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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

lighting

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
artificial light/lighting
▪ Energy is being wasted by using artificial lighting when daylight is adequate.
lighting rig
strip lighting
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
artificial
▪ He used a solid rich surface of paint and liked the simplified shapes produced by artificial lighting.
▪ Ceilings and walls are painted white and artificial lighting is provided by suspended fluorescent lights from Spectrum.
▪ Nearby was a 400-square-yard warehouse with more plants flourishing in conditions controlled by artificial lighting and automatic watering systems.
electric
▪ The site also offers modern toilet and washing facilities for campers, and tents have electric lighting.
▪ New electric lighting was installed in the cellars, soon to become the air-raid shelters.
▪ Are there any snags regarding wall space, radiators, electric sockets, lighting, windows?
▪ It also supplied and maintained the gas street lighting. Electric street lighting was introduced in 1939.
fluorescent
▪ Most simply replace the existing rocker switch, but can not be used for controlling the fluorescent lighting.
general
▪ And, ideally, the general lighting scheme should be similar in both parts of the room.
▪ A good lighting scheme needs to be a clever combination of task and general lighting.
▪ Make it a rule to use good general lighting but to position a standard lamp or table lamp somewhere behind you.
▪ Task lighting must be combined with general lighting - on its own, it could give you eyestrain.
▪ Stick to your plan of good general lighting and a standard or table lamp behind you.
good
▪ Play materials should be used in a situation where there is good lighting directed on to the toys and objects being used.
▪ There were flowers, some handsome furniture, one or two pieces of sleek modern sculpture, good lighting.
▪ A good lighting scheme needs to be a clever combination of task and general lighting.
▪ The presence of any type of visible dirt under good lighting conditions on any surface or definable area.
▪ Make sure lettuce is available all the time and in sufficient quantity. Good lighting is also necessary.
▪ The Department acknowledges the basic need to provide workplaces with easy access, good lighting and an inviting atmosphere.
▪ Make it a rule to use good general lighting but to position a standard lamp or table lamp somewhere behind you.
▪ The tasting room needs an even temperature and good natural lighting, with silence and no distractions or interruptions.
new
▪ Curve's new lighting designer, Lawrence, is soon to join the police force.
▪ The recent development of the electronic ballast switches on a new era in lighting technology.
poor
▪ Don't strain your eyes by putting up with poor lighting.
▪ Any visual task is rendered more difficult and fatiguing if it is undertaken in poor lighting.
■ NOUN
street
▪ Roseau, the capital, had primitive street lighting, no smart shops, and nowhere to post a letter.
▪ Television broadcasting was to be reduced, as were air conditioning, street lighting and floodlit sports events.
▪ Examples include street lighting and pollution control.
▪ The most successful of all proposals in the exhibition is to leave the existing building-mounted street lighting alone.
▪ The buildings block out the street lighting.
▪ Stucco lies in drifts of powdered plaster. Street lighting is spasmodic and piped water comes in sluggish fits and starts.
▪ We residents and poll tax payers of Everton have to endure little or no street lighting at all.
▪ It also supplied and maintained the gas street lighting.
system
▪ They seemed to have their own lighting system trained on them, a glow of success and power.
▪ His hand closed on the torch he kept there as a safeguard against the house's arbitrary lighting system.
▪ All are simple to use and compatible with existing lighting systems in the home.
▪ Automatic time switches attached to your lighting system are easy to fit and a marvellous idea for those who live alone.
▪ Different parts of the lighting system can come on at different times.
▪ In spite of a complicated lighting system, only one candle flickered in an antique silver candlestick.
▪ Flexible lighting systems are also essential for conference and banqueting rooms, where practical or mood lighting must be considered.
task
▪ Requirements for lighting fall into two groups-firstly, environmental, and secondly, task lighting.
▪ You will also need some sort of task lighting for the serving area, if you have one.
▪ Taken to Task Task lighting includes bedside lights and also mirror and wardrobe lights.
■ VERB
improve
▪ They improved the lighting further and obtained a further improvement in productivity in both groups.
▪ It then makes sense to make the effort to improve the lighting.
need
▪ You need to experiment, lighting from above, or below or straight on, to see which gives the best effect.
▪ You really need a little more lighting, say two Aquastars.
▪ The units could have a counter top and there would need to be efficient lighting.
▪ This species needs strong lighting to flourish.
▪ You need to check lighting arrangements with the autocue.
provide
▪ Thorn Lighting, of Borehamwood, is one such company which specialises in providing lighting for tennis courts.
▪ They were using a nearby generator to provide lighting and music.
use
▪ Make it a rule to use good general lighting but to position a standard lamp or table lamp somewhere behind you.
▪ He was also the first person to use coal gas for lighting purposes.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The lighting isn't good for reading.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Admittedly the décor and lighting help to create the illusion of changing seasons.
▪ Classroom teachers who look at the lighting in their classroom may question whether they are able to do anything positive to help.
▪ Diminished revenue was reported on the trams, but increasing profits on the lighting side.
▪ Finally, an emergency lighting kit should always be ready in an accessible place, in case of a sudden power failure.
▪ Housed animals must have sufficient lighting to allow for their inspection at any time.
▪ Ideally lighting should be planned and installed before the walls and ceiling are decorated in case any re-wiring is necessary.
▪ She hadn't known the lighting would play such an important part.
▪ Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 old lighting units are being replaced or upgraded with more efficient types.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Lighting

Light \Light\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Lighted (l[imac]t"[e^]d) or Lit (l[i^]t); p. pr. & vb. n. Lighting.] [AS. l[=i]htan to alight orig., to relieve (a horse) of the rider's burden, to make less heavy, fr. l[=i]ht light. See Light not heavy, and cf. Alight, Lighten to make light.]

  1. To dismount; to descend, as from a horse or carriage; to alight; -- with from, off, on, upon, at, in.

    When she saw Isaac, she lighted off the camel.
    --Gen. xxiv. 64.

    Slowly rode across a withered heath, And lighted at a ruined inn.
    --Tennyson.

  2. To feel light; to be made happy. [Obs.]

    It made all their hearts to light.
    --Chaucer.

  3. To descend from flight, and rest, perch, or settle, as a bird or insect.

    [The bee] lights on that, and this, and tasteth all.
    --Sir. J. Davies.

    On the tree tops a crested peacock lit.
    --Tennyson.

  4. To come down suddenly and forcibly; to fall; -- with on or upon.

    On me, me only, as the source and spring Of all corruption, all the blame lights due.
    --Milton.

  5. To come by chance; to happen; -- with on or upon; formerly with into.

    The several degrees of vision, which the assistance of glasses (casually at first lit on) has taught us to conceive.
    --Locke.

    They shall light into atheistical company.
    --South.

    And here we lit on Aunt Elizabeth, And Lilia with the rest.
    --Tennyson.

Lighting

Light \Light\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Lighted (l[imac]t"[e^]d) or Lit (l[i^]t); p. pr. & vb. n. Lighting.] [AS. l[=y]htan, l[=i]htan, to shine. [root]122. See Light, n.]

  1. To set fire to; to cause to burn; to set burning; to ignite; to kindle; as, to light a candle or lamp; to light the gas; -- sometimes with up.

    If a thousand candles be all lighted from one.
    --Hakewill.

    And the largest lamp is lit.
    --Macaulay.

    Absence might cure it, or a second mistress Light up another flame, and put out this.
    --Addison.

  2. To give light to; to illuminate; to fill with light; to spread over with light; -- often with up.

    Ah, hopeless, lasting flames! like those that burn To light the dead.
    --Pope.

    One hundred years ago, to have lit this theater as brilliantly as it is now lighted would have cost, I suppose, fifty pounds.
    --F. Harrison.

    The sun has set, and Vesper, to supply His absent beams, has lighted up the sky.
    --Dryden.

  3. To attend or conduct with a light; to show the way to by means of a light.

    His bishops lead him forth, and light him on.
    --Landor.

    To light a fire, to kindle the material of a fire.

Lighting

Lighting \Light"ing\, n. (Metal.) A name sometimes applied to the process of annealing metals.

Wikipedia

Lighting

Lighting or illumination is the deliberate use of light to achieve a practical or aesthetic effect. Lighting includes the use of both artificial light sources like lamps and light fixtures, as well as natural illumination by capturing daylight. Daylighting (using windows, skylights, or light shelves) is sometimes used as the main source of light during daytime in buildings. This can save energy in place of using artificial lighting, which represents a major component of energy consumption in buildings. Proper lighting can enhance task performance, improve the appearance of an area, or have positive psychological effects on occupants.

Indoor lighting is usually accomplished using light fixtures, and is a key part of interior design. Lighting can also be an intrinsic component of landscape projects.

WordNet

lighting

  1. n. having abundant light or illumination; "they played as long as it was light"; "as long as the lighting was good" [syn: light] [ant: dark]

  2. apparatus for supplying artificial light effects for the stage or a film

  3. the craft of providing artificial light; "an interior decorator must understand lighting"

  4. the act of setting on fire or catching fire [syn: ignition, firing, kindling, inflammation]

Wiktionary

lighting

n. The equipment used to provide illumination; the illumination so provided.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

lighting

"shining, illumination," Old English lihting, from leoht (see light (n.)).

Usage examples of "lighting".

Paris in an infinite number of petty questions as to tenants, abutters, liabilities, taxes, repairs, sweepings, decorations for the Fete-Dieu, waste-pipes, lighting, projections over the public way, and the neighborhood of unhealthy buildings.

By that time the warhead received its signal to detonate and the fuse flashed into incandescence, lighting off an intermediate explosive set in the center of the main explosive, which erupted into a white-hot segment that detonated the high-explosive cylinder of the unit in the nose cone aft of the seeker and navigation modules forward of the central processor.

Bright emergency lights flashed on all over the estate, lighting up the area like a football field.

I confess that I am disappointed: we had planned to arrive at Potala in the twilight, while there was still alpenglow lighting the north-south ridges and the higher peaks to the north and west of the palace.

They asperged the body with water and Tibor said prayers for the memory of the dead sailor before lighting the dry reeds he had woven through the lower layers of the pyre.

I saw the Duchess in the attic, in her atelier, lighting candles to stave off the dark.

Indirect lighting, music wafting up the stairs, and a visit to the aviary should round out our ghostly evening to perfection.

The biogas rising from the pit was trapped and piped into the houses, to be used for cooking and lighting.

The wastes fell down a pipe to biogas chambers below the Wheel, which, supplemented by vegetable and animal wastes from the monastery overhead, supplied the Wheel with its methane lighting.

She hustled him out of his pile of blankets and set him to sweeping floors, helping in the laundries, and cleaning the various ingenious instruments of lighting that had accumulated in this place over the yearsbrass candlesticks and chamber-sticks, candle-snuffers, wax-jacks, bougie boxes, wick-trimmers, douters, candle-boxes, and lamps.

On my lighting the candle she seemed uneasy, and said that the light might discover us if anybody came up to the fourth floor.

As I write these words, in the very moment, I feel that the whole air, the sunshine out yonder lighting up the ploughed earth, the distant sky, the circumambient ether, and that far space, is full of soul-secrets, soul-life, things outside the experience of all the ages.

Finally, though, as the last bright sliver of the sun vanished, lighting up the sky in a glorious blaze of reds and greens and lavender, Macklin and Cissy reined up their horses.

It seems that poor Jenny, having heard of the luminations that were lighted up through the country on the ending of the Popish Bill, had, with Meg, travelled by themselves into Glasgow, where they had gathered or begged a stock of candles, and coming back under the cloud of night, had surprised and alarmed the whole clachan, by lighting up their window in the manner that I have described.

I could understand the prefect suddenly lighting a candle, but how could I realize what I saw--namely, one of my comrades sleeping soundly in my bed, with his back turned to me?