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Crossword clues for lead

lead
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
lead
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a door leads somewhere (=used to say what place is on the other side of a door)
▪ This door leads into the garden.
a leading brand
▪ a leading brand such as Toshiba
a leading expert (=one of the best and most respected)
▪ He is one of the country’s leading experts on Islam.
a leading member (=an important member)
▪ a discussion between leading members of the profession
a leading opponent (=one of the main opponents, often influencing other people)
▪ She was a leading opponent of gun control in the Senate.
a leading opponent (=one of the main opponents)
▪ In July the authorities arrested two leading opponents of the government.
a leading role (=the most important role)
▪ They take a leading role in discussions.
a leading supporter
▪ Many of his leading supporters had by now either escaped abroad or been captured.
a leading/prominent businessman
▪ In many cities prominent businessmen encouraged and financed city centre improvements.
a leading/prominent citizen (=an important one)
▪ The protests were led by leading citizens in the community.
a leading/prominent politician
▪ The scandal ruined the careers of several leading politicians.
a major/leading cause of sth
▪ In this country, debt is a major cause of homelessness.
▪ Drug abuse is the leading cause of crime and violence.
a path leads somewhere
▪ There are many paths leading to the top of the mountain.
a road leads/goes/runs somewhere
▪ We turned into the road leading to the village.
a tunnel leads somewhere
▪ The Greenwich Foot Tunnel leads under the RiverThames.
alcohol/lead/radiation etc poisoning (=caused by a particular substance)
▪ a case of alcohol poisoning
be ahead/leading in the polls
▪ The good news is that we are ahead in the polls.
cast sb in a role/a part/the lead
▪ The producer finally cast Finsh in the male lead.
cause/create/lead to anxiety
▪ Their nuclear programme is causing mounting anxiety among other nations, especially Israel.
cause/lead to a boom
▪ Tax cuts sometimes lead to an economic boom.
cause/lead to a breakdown
▪ Money problems often cause marriage breakdown.
cause/lead to a decline
▪ The use of agricultural chemicals has led to a decline in water quality.
cause/lead to a delay
▪ The bad weather caused a three-hour delay in sending out rescue helicopters.
cause/lead to a misunderstanding
▪ Hearing loss can cause misunderstandings, when what you say is not correctly heard.
▪ Don’t just assume that you know what he means; that can lead to misunderstandings.
cause/lead to difficulties
▪ Stress and worry both cause sleep difficulties.
cause/lead to disagreement
▪ This is a policy that has caused an enormous amount of disagreement.
cause/lead to extinction (=make an animal, plant etc stop existing)
▪ Exactly what caused the extinction of the dinosaurs?
cause/lead to illness
▪ Inadequate hygiene can lead to illness.
cause/lead to inflation
▪ Too much government borrowing can lead to inflation.
cause/lead to/bring about destruction
▪ It's clear that the bomb was intended to cause death and destruction.
commanding lead
▪ a commanding lead
events lead (up) to sth (=cause something)
▪ His assassination was one of the events that led to the First World War.
extended...lead
▪ Manchester United extended their lead at the top of the table to 10 points.
extension lead
follow the lead
▪ Environmentalists are urging the government to follow the lead of Scandinavian countries in this matter.
forged into the lead
▪ He forged into the lead in the fourth set.
jump leads
lead a band (=either as lead singer or as a conductor)
▪ He led his own band in Florida and played in clubs.
lead a campaign
▪ The government is leading a 'walk to school' campaign.
lead a healthy/simple etc lifestyle (=live in a particular way)
▪ You can change your eating habits and lead a healthier lifestyle.
lead a nation
▪ He led the nation out of a depression and into a period of growth and prosperity.
lead a rebellion
▪ He led a peasant rebellion against Catherine the Great.
lead a revolt
▪ He led a revolt against Constantine and acclaimed Maximus as emperor.
lead a team
▪ She was the doctor who led the surgical team.
lead by example (=show people what they should do by doing it yourself)
▪ The captain of the team should lead by example.
lead sb to victory
▪ She led her team to victory in the finals.
lead singer (=main singer)
▪ the lead singer of Slade
lead story
lead the country
▪ She became the first woman to lead the country.
lead the race (=be ahead of everyone else)
▪ He led the race from start to finish.
lead the world (=be the most successful in the world)
▪ Britain leads the world in defence electronics.
lead time
lead to a clash
▪ The anti-war protests led to violent clashes between police and demonstrators.
lead to a compromise
▪ Negotiations between the residents and the council led to a compromise.
lead to a conviction
▪ They offered a reward for information leading to the conviction of the killer.
lead to a discovery
▪ It was pure chance that led to the discovery.
lead to an increase
▪ They argue that the abolition of the death penalty has led to an increase in the number of murders.
lead to ruin
▪ This policy could lead to utter ruin.
lead to unrest
▪ Food shortages led to widespread social unrest.
lead to/point to a conclusion (=make you decide that something is true)
▪ All the data led to only one conclusion.
lead to/prompt/give rise to speculation (=result in it)
▪ This development led to speculation that she was about to resign.
lead to/result in a shortage
▪ The strike led to serious shortages of fuel in some areas.
lead to/result in confusion
▪ The differing instructions led to confusion.
lead to/result in death
▪ Any delay in calling an ambulance may have resulted in her death.
lead to/result in erosion
▪ Poor farming practices have led to erosion of the soil.
lead to/spark (off) protests (=cause them)
▪ The arrests sparked off violent street protests.
lead/guide sb through the minefield of sth (=help someone avoid problems)
▪ Talk to a financial advisor, who can guide you through the minefield of stocks and shares.
lead/head a coalition
▪ The coalition was led by the Christian Democrats and the Socialists.
leading article
leading exponent
▪ a leading exponent of desktop publishing
leading/main/major proponent
▪ Dr George is one of the leading proponents of this view.
lead/live a double life
▪ Marje had no idea that her husband was leading a double life with another woman.
lead/live a solitary/frugal etc existence
▪ The women lead a miserable existence.
lead/mount an attack
▪ The King now prepared to mount an attack on Granada.
led to...downfall
▪ the scandal that led to the president’s downfall
major/leading exporter
▪ Japan is a leading exporter of textiles.
regain the lead
▪ Hamilton regained the lead in the drivers' championship.
sb’s lead in the polls
▪ Labour soon regained its lead in the polls.
serious/strong/leading etc contender
▪ Her album is a strong contender for the Album of the Year award.
take the lead (=in a race, competition etc)
the lead character (=in a play, film, or television series)
▪ DiCaprio played the lead character in Titanic.
the leading/lead article (=the main article)
▪ Look at this leading article from Newsweek’s business section.
the leading/lead article (=the main article)
▪ Look at this leading article from Newsweek’s business section.
the leading/principal actor (=acting the most important part)
▪ Schwarzeneeger was one of Hollywood’s leading actors.
the lead/leading part (=the most important part)
▪ Taking the lead part of Annie will be 11-year-old Zoe Jones.
the lead/leading part (=the most important part)
▪ Taking the lead part of Annie will be 11-year-old Zoe Jones.
the lead/leading role (=the most important role)
▪ He had already cast Tom Hanks in the lead role.
the lead/leading role (=the most important role)
▪ He had already cast Tom Hanks in the lead role.
the lead/top story (=the most important story in a newspaper or news programme)
▪ The floods were the lead story on the news that evening.
the main/central/leading character
▪ Alec is the central character in the play.
top/leading/highest scorer
▪ He was Palace’s top scorer.
unassailable lead
▪ The result gave the team an unassailable lead.
went down like a lead balloon (=was not popular or successful)
▪ The idea went down like a lead balloon.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
to
▪ All would lead to more computing capacity and larger brains.
▪ Of course, this can lead to rather over-obvious themes, but this psychological necessity is a factor we can not ignore.
▪ There might then be a further danger that the instructions will be ignored, leading to even greater disorder.
▪ The Bill could lead to exactly the same kind of problem.
▪ She always seemed to loathe it so ... what flirtation leads to.
▪ Indeed, almost any investigation is likely to lead to results conditional on a range of alternative assumptions.
▪ Whom should we therefore ban from public places for causing all the depression leading to so many suicides?
▪ Small achievable tasks increase confidence, leading to more difficult tasks.
■ NOUN
attack
▪ In Raynaud's disease, the blood supply to the fingers is faulty, leading to attacks of numbness and discomfort.
▪ Khalid Ibn al-Walid, one of the most valiant of the great men, led the attack.
▪ Residents fear a relocation at Hydebank could lead to another attack with massive blast damage being caused to nearby homes.
▪ When the others had satisfied their hunger he led the attack.
▪ He confirmed that Derby's Dean Saunders will lead the attack.
▪ Andrei Krestyaninov, a commander of an elite rapid reaction force leading the attack, the Itar-Tass news agency reported.
▪ Such blockages cause pains known as angina, and in severe cases can lead to a heart attack.
▪ Mayhew led the ministerial attack with veiled sniper fire at Episcopalians for sending invaders to Congregational territory.
campaign
▪ Actress and animal lover, Damaris Hayman is leading a campaign to keep the animal collection in the Park.
▪ They invited proponents and opponents and key people who were leading both campaigns....
▪ Local councillor Peter Shephard, who led the campaign, has welcomed the positive moves to solve the problem.
▪ Brown led the opposition campaign, and later criticized the media for creating a negative image of the Legislature.
▪ Meanwhile, however, the lack of adequate community care facilities has led to a campaign to save the old mental hospitals.
▪ Andy Nichols, who led the campaign for Prop 204, says the state is working out details on implementation.
▪ In 1987 he had led a campaign for the extradition of drug traffickers.
▪ Britain and the United States have been leading a global campaign against the junta's oppression of the country's 46m people.
field
▪ The commentator even remarked on the fact that the two loose horses leading the field had caused no hindrance.
▪ He led the nation in field goal percentage for several weeks.
▪ The Doctor and his companion were led across a field to an archaeological dig.
▪ And so saying, he led me over the fields to his childhood home.
▪ Only track I found led to a field where some men were dipping sheep.
▪ M &038; S leads the field with an ankle-length wool coat at £99, while Top Shop's fitted version is £79.
▪ Swanson and Percival continued to show excellent form, leading home their respective fields.
group
▪ This may lead to the whole group moving, tugged along by a complex web of bonds.
▪ It is working well, one person leading the group, another checking the time, another taking notes.
▪ It's hard driven, but Tommy is unmistakeably a jazz drummer, very crisp and energetic and clearly leading the group.
▪ Who succeeds in forming and leading a Great Group?
▪ In the 1980s he began leading his own group, District 6.
▪ He also lacked experience leading a large group, and he was sometimes abrasive and patronizing.
▪ He then led his own groups, and played and arranged for Hot Lips Page in 1941.
▪ Currently, he leads an investment group that has reacquired Canary Wharf from a bank consortium.
life
▪ Sometimes I imagined that he'd sneaked back into the country and was leading another life.
▪ Third world towns and cities contain large numbers of women who may lead lives very different from those of their rural counterparts.
▪ His argument was simple: if we all led pure lives, there would be no need for this bloodshed.
▪ So long as the proper dose of insulin is administered on a regular basis, diabetics can generally lead normal lives.
▪ Jenny Wilson was an ordinary woman, leading an ordinary life, had an ordinary job in an ordinary town.
▪ Having led sheltered lives in the North, they had never had to scrape to get ahead.
▪ But all teachers are concerned about their own level of stress, and how to lead a satisfying working life.
▪ These women ask for little and lead very simple lives.
team
▪ As a junior, she led her team to the state championships.
▪ I lead a team of ten, dispersed around the region.
▪ The production manager attends a two-week training course in Atlanta on leading work-unit teams.
▪ The underwriter led the team and was charged with full authority to approve or disapprove applications.
▪ Kerr scored 21 points to lead the team in scoring for only the seventh time in his five Chicago seasons.
way
▪ She led the way, hobbling on arthritic knees and ankles, into her sitting-room whose windows looked down on the street.
▪ Even the man credited with emancipating the slaves thanked this social entrepreneur for leading the way.
▪ A goatherd leads the way, followed by his unique white Appenzell goats.
▪ They had led the way to California in the new West, the fastest-growing center of political power and money.
▪ Silver and Bigwig led the way, with Hazel and Buckthorn a short distance behind.
▪ After all Bilbo is right about the road outside Bag End leading all the way to Mordor.
▪ Cram Liverpool drivers will lead the way to a weekend festival celebrating the Mini in the Lake District next week.
▪ Northampton General and the Princess Margaret lead the way with 16 percent.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a leading light in/of sth
▪ Mrs. Shaewitz is a leading light in the local drama society.
▪ By 1991, it was a leading light in outlandish front suspension concepts.
▪ On renouncing alcohol he was pardoned and he set sail for Darlington where he became a leading light in the Society.
▪ She loves gym workouts, swimming and playing netball - she is a leading light in a local women's team.
be leading the pack/be ahead of the pack
have/lead a charmed life
▪ But since its premier issue in January 1993, Wired has led a charmed life.
▪ By his own admission he has led a charmed life.
▪ It's been too easy for us; we've led charmed lives till now.
▪ No wonder that she and Charles felt that they led a charmed life, that the times were on their side.
lead on, Macduff
lead sb astray
▪ Claudio is the false friend who leads Leonardo astray into drinking and gambling.
▪ Gardeners shouldn't be led astray by these ideas.
▪ Parents complained that teachers were leading students astray by discussing contraception and abortion in the classroom.
▪ Pfeiffer plays a virtuous woman who is led astray.
▪ They're afraid their son will be led astray by the older boys.
lead the charge
▪ Allen led the charge, but could they get a goal back?
▪ But Dole has, in his long Senate career, led the charge for the second -, third-and fourth-largest.
▪ But it is unrealistic to expect businesses to lead the charge alone.
▪ But it was Lieutenant Harvey who was still leading the charge as he hurdled elegantly over the wire and into no-man's-land.
▪ C., to lead the charge against the Bay Guardian.
▪ Its guitar-twanging shock troops led the charge away from what Ulan Bator had been, and toward what it was becoming.
▪ Popper led the charge against, describing Wittgenstein s picture theory of language as hopelessly and indeed outrageously mistaken.
leading edge
▪ the leading edge of a plane's wing
▪ To survive, companies must stay on the leading edge of technology.
▪ By having an aerodynamic, efficient leading edge.
▪ One that balances leading edge technological capability with a thorough understanding of your business.
▪ Part of it went upwards perforating the leading edge of the fin in several places.
▪ Somehow, he accomplishes it and keeps doing work at the leading edge.
▪ That so weakened the plane that the fuselage broke in two, just forward of the leading edge of the wings.
▪ The weaving yarn should always be on the leading edge of the carriage.
▪ When curtains are to butt together, plan to have a half space at each leading edge.
▪ When glass fibre tubular spars were standard practice, leading edge distortion would form an otherwise straight line into a swan-neck shape!
leading lady/man
▪ But being in a wheelchair doesn't stop them having fun - or falling for the leading man.
▪ Corbin Timbrook, a handsome leading man-type, has been tending Downtown's best bar for three years now.
▪ Davis became a genius by turning bit actors into leading men.
▪ Oh, some one always asks who my favorite leading lady was or who was the best kisser.
▪ Questioner2 Is your decision to take a year off anything to do with the rumours about Jeff and his present leading lady?
▪ The initial structure of the show had kind of a leading man figure: John Kelly.
▪ They came at full speed, the leading man aiming to Sharpe's left, the other pulling to his right.
▪ Tuesday night's opening had to be cancelled and on Wednesday night the leading lady was ill.
leading light
▪ Another was a leading light opera singer in the local community.
▪ By now, Braudel had become one of its leading lights, and from 1956 to 1968 he was virtually its editor.
▪ Harrison, a man of simple birth and high intelligence, crossed swords with the leading lights of his day.
▪ On renouncing alcohol he was pardoned and he set sail for Darlington where he became a leading light in the Society.
▪ She loves gym workouts, swimming and playing netball - she is a leading light in a local women's team.
▪ The merchants were the leading lights of the popolo grasso or rich bourgeoisie.
▪ This victory may set Stretch up with a world-title elimination fight with Britain's other leading light middleweight, Chris Pyatt.
leading question
▪ All right, I won't ask leading questions.
▪ For example, a leading question may take the respondent outside the bounds of the context of everyday life.
▪ In answer to a leading question about the temperature Of the room, he reflected that it had been cold and draughty.
▪ It makes me worry, all those leading questions with hidden assumptions that detectives like to ask suspects.
▪ Never did she ask leading questions or provide suggestions.
▪ To arrive there the counsellor has to stop talking, and in order to stop talking, answerable and leading questions are required.
live/lead/have the life of Riley
▪ I hear that all the older boys are driving big expensive cars and living the life of Riley.
one thing leads to another
▪ But one thing leads to another, and Sister Helen finds herself challenged to put her beliefs on the line.
▪ I know that and I do understand why, but one thing leads to another, you know how it is.
▪ You can be sure one thing leads to another.
the blind leading the blind
▪ It has become a case of the blind leading the blind.
▪ This is called the blind leading the blind.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ 67% of voters said they would not trust him to lead the country.
▪ A group of 80 planes, led by Lieutenant Commander Egusha, was on its way to attack.
▪ Debbie always leads the conversation back around to herself.
▪ Dr Jenkins leads a team of researchers at the Plant Institute.
▪ For many years, India's Congress Party was led by Mrs Indira Gandhi.
▪ He led Julia through the house to his study.
▪ In silence, Roland led the way back to the car.
▪ Jaruzelski led the country's Communist regime for nine years.
▪ Juan led her slowly around the dance floor.
▪ Our guide seemed to be leading us towards a wooded area in the distance.
▪ The drug raid was led by top officers.
▪ The government, led by conservatives, has been unwilling to join the talks.
▪ The high school band is leading the parade.
▪ The police officer took her arm and led her gently away.
▪ UN-led hostage negotiations
▪ Who is leading the investigation?
▪ With two minutes to play, the Lakers are still leading.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He led the way, his slim hips in the tight fitting pants snaking gracefully between the tables.
▪ He was killed in the assault soon after, but the information he had gained as a scout led to victory.
▪ Kato leads Cal in interceptions with three.
▪ One unexcused absence can lead to a ninety-day suspension of benefits; four unexcused absences can cause expulsion from welfare entirely.
▪ She opened the door, thinking it led to a bedroom.
▪ This led to the second major set of issues, operation and maintenance at the local level.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ The bigger the lead of one superpower, the harder the other tries to catch up.
▪ On 23 June the Gaullists took a big lead in the first round of the elections.
▪ She is always silent during halftime, even when the Ducks have a big lead and the others are loose and joking.
▪ They lost concentration at times with a big lead behind them.
▪ On this night, the Orangemen built a big early lead and the Panthers couldn't recover.
▪ Long Beach went on an 18-6 run to open its biggest lead, 77-49, in the fourth quarter.
▪ This is a big lead for Bush, and it could get bigger before it gets smaller.
comfortable
▪ After two rounds, Duvergel had a comfortable lead on points with the gold medal plainly in sight.
▪ Barnes added a further penalty to give Portadown a comfortable 10-0 lead at half-time.
▪ Another penalty from Roberts gave Gloucester a comfortable half-time lead.
▪ With his comfortable lead, Dole has pulled back on some of his campaign plans for the state.
▪ While Clinton has a comfortable lead over Dole in recent national surveys, the Kansas senator is expected to win Texas.
early
▪ On this night, the Orangemen built a big early lead and the Panthers couldn't recover.
▪ Two-goal Dave Mitchell fired Swindon into an early lead.
▪ It left her six shots off an early lead held by Colleen Walker.
▪ This is just what Jody likes, aggressive first-half play, a big early lead.
▪ Netscape held the early lead in the category, but Microsoft has made considerable gains more recently.
female
▪ Sam, 26, played the female lead in a version of the movie hit Grease.
▪ The trio of female leads are all outstanding.
▪ So far no progress with the female lead.
▪ She was the female lead and therefore a rival.
▪ Glenda Jackson had already been approached for the female lead.
male
▪ But Mr Frobisher, who had been having trouble with his male leads, assured us he was just what was needed.
romantic
▪ In those days I don't think there was an average looking or homely looking person playing romantic leads.
▪ Woody Allen has been a romantic lead.
▪ He still looked like a romantic lead.
▪ But he's singing like a romantic lead.
■ NOUN
goal
▪ Peschisllibo ravaged Derby's defence in an exhilarating first half when Birmingham rocketed into a three goal lead.
guitarist
▪ To enter, simply answer this question: What is the name of Extreme's heart-throb lead guitarist?
▪ The band includes lead guitarist Chris Floyd, a former Leesburg city commissioner.
▪ Then, as Mike became more and more the lead guitarist, I played more and more bass.
manager
▪ That is why so small a group of internationally powerful banks are repeatedly chosen as lead managers.
▪ The lead manager for the issue was Lehman Brothers.
▪ The note issue was handled by Lehman Brothers as lead manager.
▪ The roles were not necessarily distinct; the lead manager may also be an underwriter and a seller.
point
▪ But they just about deserved their 10-#point lead at the interval.
▪ Some one apparently did get to the Raiders, who soared out to a 10-#point lead in the third quarter.
▪ In the latest round of polls, Peres holds a 5 percentage point lead over Netanyahu.
▪ Aintree and Fazakerley have opened up a six point lead in the second division with 35 from six matches.
▪ A crucial conversion from Nick Marment gave Gloucester a flimsy one point lead.
▪ The subs have allowed the twenty-two-#point lead to dwindle to sixteen.
role
▪ She was approached for the lead role in a Hollywood production to be directed by Steven Spielberg.
▪ Many local chambers of commerce are already taking a lead role in this process.
▪ Four actors were initially tested for the lead role of Joe Buck, among whom Michael Sarrazin was first choice.
▪ Salomon Brothers will take a lead role in the international share offer, the statement said.
▪ In mainland Britain MI5 now has the lead role in intelligence gathering.
singer
▪ She was lead singer in the Black and White Minstrel Show during the 70s.
▪ But it is difficult to take him seriously because he looks like he should be the lead singer for Oasis.
▪ He's our lead singer, or rather I should say he was.
▪ The lead singer, have you seen his hair?
▪ The floppy fringes and pouting lips of the respective lead singers are another story entirely.
▪ To enter our super competition simply answer this question: What is the name of Marillion's lead singer?
story
▪ The big lead story was fascinating.
▪ The anchor reads the lead story.
▪ It was the main lead story and was written by one of the paper's most respected journalists.
▪ The proposals were the main lead story on Independent Television's news on the night of 16 December 1968!
▪ Understandably, her death was the lead story on the nightly news that evening.
▪ The candidates had been asked to supply a dummy paper with a lead story and some idea of content.
▪ Riley had won his argument: the lead story was the recapture of Sniffy Wilson.
■ VERB
cut
▪ The poll also shows the Tories have cut Labour's lead from nine to six points over the past month.
▪ The Raptors cut the lead to 5, but could get no closer.
▪ Once Smith's penalty goal had cut the Cambridge lead to two points Oxford appeared to be in the driving seat.
▪ New York cut the Dolphin lead to 24-17 with a 43-yard touchdown run by Adrian Murrell with 7: 37 left.
▪ It has also cut manufacturing lead times from 17 weeks to two and trebled output per operator.
▪ We have cut airborne lead by 50 percent.
▪ The benefit of the first method is that it cuts total lead time while leaving each individual stage length unchanged.
extend
▪ Firebrands beat Swindon 3-0 to extend a seven-point lead at the West League's winter break.
▪ In the second half, the Mustangs were able to extend their lead to 30 with a more up-tempo offense.
▪ Birkenhead St Mary's extended their lead at the top as the nearest challengers Sutton and Aigburth lost.
▪ Ball then kicked a penalty before Neath extended their lead with a try from John Davies.
▪ Ball kicked another penalty shortly before half-time to extend the lead to 14-6.
follow
▪ Without external evidence of a transformation, other states had little or no reason to follow de Gaulle's lead.
▪ The 64-page report recommended that all military education programs follow the lead of the service academies and provide intensified ethics training.
▪ He hesitated, but followed my lead.
▪ His characters tend to follow his lead.
▪ I award Bridgemere my Gold Medal for environmental responsibility and I just hope other growers and private gardeners follow its lead.
▪ The community appears to have followed his lead, even as a nation longs for answers.
▪ His eyes narrowed slightly but he started the second verse in the minor key she was using, following her lead.
▪ Theoretically they should follow the lead of the Warbutt if he commands them; they are his vassals.
give
▪ He did no more than chip that one in as well, and it gave us the lead.
▪ It too would have to refuel in Newfoundland, giving them a twelve-hour lead.
▪ It started well enough, with Dave Mitchell giving Town the lead midway through the first half.
▪ John Liley converted to give Leicester a 12-10 lead which they stretched to 18-10 before Bowling and Llanelli hit back.
▪ Steve Winn gave Marske the lead early in the game, with Archie Stephens equalising midway through the second half.
▪ Fealy's try gave Newbridge the lead after Hayward had missed with two earlier attempts.
▪ Mori in the Times gave Labour a one-point lead.
hold
▪ She held the lead and quietly plodded upward through the crisp snow that covered the long Baskan Glacier.
▪ Flowing Wells held a one-point lead with a minute to go in the game, but Pueblo came back for the win.
▪ In race one, Hodgson was able to get a better run through the backmarkers and hold the lead to the line.
▪ In the World Wide Web arena, it is Netscape that holds the commanding lead thus far.
▪ Somailai then edged back in front and held on to their lead and eventually ran out 5-2 winners.
▪ Dole also held sizable leads in Florida and Mississippi, according to Mason-Dixon.
▪ The measure of his performance was that at lunch he held a nine-stroke lead over the other morning starters.
▪ The Stings got the best of it, though, holding on to the lead for the victory.
increase
▪ Tracy Edwards and the all-girl crew of Maiden have increased their lead over their Division D rivals.
▪ Despite Eddie and Jess, Oregon effortlessly increases its lead to thirty points and holds it there.
▪ David Straney increased Glenavon's lead when the Larne defence allowed him time and space to score.
▪ Henderson then increased the lead to 14 with a three-point play, and the margin eventually grew to 17.
▪ Villa had their tails up in the second half and Atkinson and Staunton both had chances to increase their lead.
▪ Alton had further chances to increase their lead.
▪ Dungannon nearly increased their lead when Jonathon Hastings charged down a Highfield kick in midfield.
▪ Wilkinson increased the lead with a brilliant header into the roof of the net from an inch-perfect left-wing cross by Ripley.
lose
▪ Carelli, winless since mid-June of last year, lost a five-second lead with the checkered flag in sight.
▪ Morgan had his chances, even after losing the lead outright when Player had a second straight birdie on No. 15.
▪ Schumacher dominated the 58-lap race, only losing the lead briefly during his single scheduled pit stop on lap 37.
▪ They're going for promotion and there was no way they were going to lose a 2-goal lead.
▪ Harris foiled him with a cross-court volley into the nick and Martin lost his lead by misdirecting an audacious winner.
▪ The party has lost its lead in the polls.
open
▪ They opened up a lead of more than two minutes by Huddersfield, but were caught with just under 30 miles left.
▪ By the end of the half, Oregon has opened a ten-point lead.
▪ Coming round the final bend he had opened up a substantial lead and seemed to be coasting home.
▪ Jason Collins had eight points in the last seven minutes of the first half as the Cardinal opened their seven-point lead.
▪ Cumbria's Dave Swanson opened up a lead over Paul Dugdale after 5K, and stretched it into a 16-second victory.
▪ Three times during the second half, Stanford opens the lead to fifteen.
▪ Barnsley opened a 9-0 lead before Acklam's number eight Stuart Dredge touched down a push-over try.
▪ The Ducks open up a twenty-point lead with two minutes left in the half.
play
▪ In those days I don't think there was an average looking or homely looking person playing romantic leads.
▪ Sister Aimee herself-in fetching costume-always played the lead character.
▪ But although I played lead for a long time in the group I never cite lead players like Clapton or Beck.
▪ Sanger directed and Winston played the lead.
▪ Ben has adapted his zany thriller about ecological disaster and will play the lead.
▪ Scott's going to be playing the lead in Glen's movie.
▪ Audiences are packing in to see Paul Nicholas play the lead role in Barnum.
▪ Who plays the lead in Carry On Columbus? 10.
take
▪ The 18-year-old from North Shields beat off eight opponents and a tendon injury to take the lead after the opening compulsory figures.
▪ Meanwhile, in the brothers' partnership, Joe took the lead.
▪ On 23 June the Gaullists took a big lead in the first round of the elections.
▪ The game came alive just 24 seconds after the break when Scarborough took the lead through a well-worked goal.
▪ If there is no Compact established yet you might take the lead in local Compact development!
▪ He hit the crossbar with an audacious lob a minute before Chelsea took the lead.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be leading the pack/be ahead of the pack
have/lead a charmed life
▪ But since its premier issue in January 1993, Wired has led a charmed life.
▪ By his own admission he has led a charmed life.
▪ It's been too easy for us; we've led charmed lives till now.
▪ No wonder that she and Charles felt that they led a charmed life, that the times were on their side.
hold the lead/advantage
▪ But this time Carlos Sainz, who had held the lead since Tuesday, came third in a Toyota.
▪ In race one, Hodgson was able to get a better run through the backmarkers and hold the lead to the line.
▪ New Zealand held the lead for long periods and their frequent advantages depended on the only try of the match.
▪ She held the lead and quietly plodded upward through the crisp snow that covered the long Baskan Glacier.
▪ She held the lead in her gloved hands; behind her was Selene, with hers protected by a muff.
lead on, Macduff
lead sb astray
▪ Claudio is the false friend who leads Leonardo astray into drinking and gambling.
▪ Gardeners shouldn't be led astray by these ideas.
▪ Parents complained that teachers were leading students astray by discussing contraception and abortion in the classroom.
▪ Pfeiffer plays a virtuous woman who is led astray.
▪ They're afraid their son will be led astray by the older boys.
leading edge
▪ the leading edge of a plane's wing
▪ To survive, companies must stay on the leading edge of technology.
▪ By having an aerodynamic, efficient leading edge.
▪ One that balances leading edge technological capability with a thorough understanding of your business.
▪ Part of it went upwards perforating the leading edge of the fin in several places.
▪ Somehow, he accomplishes it and keeps doing work at the leading edge.
▪ That so weakened the plane that the fuselage broke in two, just forward of the leading edge of the wings.
▪ The weaving yarn should always be on the leading edge of the carriage.
▪ When curtains are to butt together, plan to have a half space at each leading edge.
▪ When glass fibre tubular spars were standard practice, leading edge distortion would form an otherwise straight line into a swan-neck shape!
leading lady/man
▪ But being in a wheelchair doesn't stop them having fun - or falling for the leading man.
▪ Corbin Timbrook, a handsome leading man-type, has been tending Downtown's best bar for three years now.
▪ Davis became a genius by turning bit actors into leading men.
▪ Oh, some one always asks who my favorite leading lady was or who was the best kisser.
▪ Questioner2 Is your decision to take a year off anything to do with the rumours about Jeff and his present leading lady?
▪ The initial structure of the show had kind of a leading man figure: John Kelly.
▪ They came at full speed, the leading man aiming to Sharpe's left, the other pulling to his right.
▪ Tuesday night's opening had to be cancelled and on Wednesday night the leading lady was ill.
leading light
▪ Another was a leading light opera singer in the local community.
▪ By now, Braudel had become one of its leading lights, and from 1956 to 1968 he was virtually its editor.
▪ Harrison, a man of simple birth and high intelligence, crossed swords with the leading lights of his day.
▪ On renouncing alcohol he was pardoned and he set sail for Darlington where he became a leading light in the Society.
▪ She loves gym workouts, swimming and playing netball - she is a leading light in a local women's team.
▪ The merchants were the leading lights of the popolo grasso or rich bourgeoisie.
▪ This victory may set Stretch up with a world-title elimination fight with Britain's other leading light middleweight, Chris Pyatt.
leading question
▪ All right, I won't ask leading questions.
▪ For example, a leading question may take the respondent outside the bounds of the context of everyday life.
▪ In answer to a leading question about the temperature Of the room, he reflected that it had been cold and draughty.
▪ It makes me worry, all those leading questions with hidden assumptions that detectives like to ask suspects.
▪ Never did she ask leading questions or provide suggestions.
▪ To arrive there the counsellor has to stop talking, and in order to stop talking, answerable and leading questions are required.
live/lead/have the life of Riley
▪ I hear that all the older boys are driving big expensive cars and living the life of Riley.
one thing leads to another
▪ But one thing leads to another, and Sister Helen finds herself challenged to put her beliefs on the line.
▪ I know that and I do understand why, but one thing leads to another, you know how it is.
▪ You can be sure one thing leads to another.
swing the lead
▪ Your mam, you now, she wouldn't believe but that I was swinging the lead all those years.
the blind leading the blind
▪ It has become a case of the blind leading the blind.
▪ This is called the blind leading the blind.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ High levels of lead were discovered in the soil in Skagway.
▪ The police have no leads in the murder investigation.
▪ Tucker got a belly full of lead.
▪ Who's playing the lead in the school play?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ The wall was covered with scrawls done with a bit of pencil lead.
▪ There were no clues, no leads, no moves to be made.
▪ Two-goal Dave Mitchell fired Swindon into an early lead.
▪ We got our cherry popped that day, and my platoon was in the lead.
III.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ The bigger the lead of one superpower, the harder the other tries to catch up.
▪ On 23 June the Gaullists took a big lead in the first round of the elections.
▪ She is always silent during halftime, even when the Ducks have a big lead and the others are loose and joking.
▪ They lost concentration at times with a big lead behind them.
▪ On this night, the Orangemen built a big early lead and the Panthers couldn't recover.
▪ Long Beach went on an 18-6 run to open its biggest lead, 77-49, in the fourth quarter.
▪ This is a big lead for Bush, and it could get bigger before it gets smaller.
comfortable
▪ After two rounds, Duvergel had a comfortable lead on points with the gold medal plainly in sight.
▪ Barnes added a further penalty to give Portadown a comfortable 10-0 lead at half-time.
▪ Another penalty from Roberts gave Gloucester a comfortable half-time lead.
▪ With his comfortable lead, Dole has pulled back on some of his campaign plans for the state.
▪ While Clinton has a comfortable lead over Dole in recent national surveys, the Kansas senator is expected to win Texas.
early
▪ Two-goal Dave Mitchell fired Swindon into an early lead.
▪ Netscape jumped to an early lead with its Navigator software for browsing the Internet.
▪ On this night, the Orangemen built a big early lead and the Panthers couldn't recover.
▪ It left her six shots off an early lead held by Colleen Walker.
▪ Hull fell apart after Gay and Nolan had given them an early 10-0 lead.
▪ This is just what Jody likes, aggressive first-half play, a big early lead.
female
▪ Sam, 26, played the female lead in a version of the movie hit Grease.
▪ The trio of female leads are all outstanding.
▪ So far no progress with the female lead.
▪ She was the female lead and therefore a rival.
▪ Glenda Jackson had already been approached for the female lead.
male
▪ But which male leads could get away with it?
▪ But Mr Frobisher, who had been having trouble with his male leads, assured us he was just what was needed.
romantic
▪ In those days I don't think there was an average looking or homely looking person playing romantic leads.
▪ Woody Allen has been a romantic lead.
▪ He still looked like a romantic lead.
▪ But he's singing like a romantic lead.
■ NOUN
goal
▪ Peschisllibo ravaged Derby's defence in an exhilarating first half when Birmingham rocketed into a three goal lead.
guitarist
▪ To enter, simply answer this question: What is the name of Extreme's heart-throb lead guitarist?
▪ The band includes lead guitarist Chris Floyd, a former Leesburg city commissioner.
▪ Then, as Mike became more and more the lead guitarist, I played more and more bass.
manager
▪ Morgan Stanley &038; Co Inc was lead manager.
▪ That is why so small a group of internationally powerful banks are repeatedly chosen as lead managers.
▪ The lead manager for the issue was Lehman Brothers.
▪ The note issue was handled by Lehman Brothers as lead manager.
▪ The roles were not necessarily distinct; the lead manager may also be an underwriter and a seller.
point
▪ But they just about deserved their 10-#point lead at the interval.
▪ Some one apparently did get to the Raiders, who soared out to a 10-#point lead in the third quarter.
▪ In the latest round of polls, Peres holds a 5 percentage point lead over Netanyahu.
▪ Aintree and Fazakerley have opened up a six point lead in the second division with 35 from six matches.
▪ A crucial conversion from Nick Marment gave Gloucester a flimsy one point lead.
▪ The subs have allowed the twenty-two-#point lead to dwindle to sixteen.
role
▪ He cast Nicholson in the lead role and all he needed was a female.
▪ Many local chambers of commerce are already taking a lead role in this process.
▪ She was approached for the lead role in a Hollywood production to be directed by Steven Spielberg.
▪ Salomon Brothers will take a lead role in the international share offer, the statement said.
▪ Hardly anyone noted her arrival in the corps de ballet until she suddenly appeared in the lead role of Symphonic Variations.
singer
▪ She was lead singer in the Black and White Minstrel Show during the 70s.
▪ The lead singer, have you seen his hair?
▪ He's our lead singer, or rather I should say he was.
▪ But it is difficult to take him seriously because he looks like he should be the lead singer for Oasis.
▪ The lead singer had a Mohican haircut and lots of chains and zips.
▪ To enter our super competition simply answer this question: What is the name of Marillion's lead singer?
▪ They sing in groups, and there is a lead singer.
times
▪ As a result time-to-market and lead times remain excessive in most manufacturing sectors.
▪ The head of computer services could dictate lead times and turnaround times for all projects.
▪ Can embargo be a useful instrument to protect lead times or influence Soviet policy?
▪ The first modification requires that a reorder point be established that allows for delivery lead times.
▪ The lead times are useful in planning other activities dependent on this stage being completed.
▪ It has also cut manufacturing lead times from 17 weeks to two and trebled output per operator.
▪ A highly skilled workforce trained in designing and manufacturing high-quality, high value-added products at low cost, with shorter lead times.
▪ Product lead times have been cut in half from 30 days to under 13 days.
■ VERB
cut
▪ The poll also shows the Tories have cut Labour's lead from nine to six points over the past month.
▪ The Raptors cut the lead to 5, but could get no closer.
▪ Once Smith's penalty goal had cut the Cambridge lead to two points Oxford appeared to be in the driving seat.
▪ New York cut the Dolphin lead to 24-17 with a 43-yard touchdown run by Adrian Murrell with 7: 37 left.
▪ It has also cut manufacturing lead times from 17 weeks to two and trebled output per operator.
extend
▪ Firebrands beat Swindon 3-0 to extend a seven-point lead at the West League's winter break.
▪ In the second half, the Mustangs were able to extend their lead to 30 with a more up-tempo offense.
▪ Birkenhead St Mary's extended their lead at the top as the nearest challengers Sutton and Aigburth lost.
▪ Ball then kicked a penalty before Neath extended their lead with a try from John Davies.
▪ Ball kicked another penalty shortly before half-time to extend the lead to 14-6.
follow
▪ It is likely that they will follow London's lead and also exempt motorcycles from any charges.
▪ But he is not the leader of any faction or group of lawmakers who would naturally follow his lead, lawmakers said.
▪ His eyes narrowed slightly but he started the second verse in the minor key she was using, following her lead.
▪ Only you can give all the people the opportunity to follow your lead.
▪ It will be given a sleeker, more modern look-again following the lead set by the latest R1150R.
▪ His characters tend to follow his lead.
▪ Theoretically they should follow the lead of the Warbutt if he commands them; they are his vassals.
▪ Other mannequins are following her lead, cropping and coloring at a pretty pace.
give
▪ Luke Nightingale gave Pompey the lead after 56 minutes and Mike Panopoulos netted from the spot for the second.
▪ It started well enough, with Dave Mitchell giving Town the lead midway through the first half.
▪ Julian Darby had given Bolton a 2-1 lead after 89 minutes.
▪ Fealy's try gave Newbridge the lead after Hayward had missed with two earlier attempts.
▪ Mori in the Times gave Labour a one-point lead.
▪ But Rochdale took command from then on, Morgan gave them the lead and then a Flounders penalty making it 3-1.
▪ Two minutes later, Mark Knapper gave Rovers the lead.
▪ Student protests, sweeping through the nation's campuses, gave a lead to the opponents of the war.
hold
▪ She held the lead and quietly plodded upward through the crisp snow that covered the long Baskan Glacier.
▪ Flowing Wells held a one-point lead with a minute to go in the game, but Pueblo came back for the win.
▪ In race one, Hodgson was able to get a better run through the backmarkers and hold the lead to the line.
▪ In the World Wide Web arena, it is Netscape that holds the commanding lead thus far.
▪ Somailai then edged back in front and held on to their lead and eventually ran out 5-2 winners.
▪ Dole also held sizable leads in Florida and Mississippi, according to Mason-Dixon.
▪ The measure of his performance was that at lunch he held a nine-stroke lead over the other morning starters.
▪ The Stings got the best of it, though, holding on to the lead for the victory.
increase
▪ Tracy Edwards and the all-girl crew of Maiden have increased their lead over their Division D rivals.
▪ Despite Eddie and Jess, Oregon effortlessly increases its lead to thirty points and holds it there.
▪ David Straney increased Glenavon's lead when the Larne defence allowed him time and space to score.
▪ Henderson then increased the lead to 14 with a three-point play, and the margin eventually grew to 17.
▪ Villa had their tails up in the second half and Atkinson and Staunton both had chances to increase their lead.
▪ Alton had further chances to increase their lead.
▪ Dungannon nearly increased their lead when Jonathon Hastings charged down a Highfield kick in midfield.
▪ Wilkinson increased the lead with a brilliant header into the roof of the net from an inch-perfect left-wing cross by Ripley.
lose
▪ Carelli, winless since mid-June of last year, lost a five-second lead with the checkered flag in sight.
▪ Morgan had his chances, even after losing the lead outright when Player had a second straight birdie on No. 15.
▪ Schumacher dominated the 58-lap race, only losing the lead briefly during his single scheduled pit stop on lap 37.
▪ They're going for promotion and there was no way they were going to lose a 2-goal lead.
▪ Harris foiled him with a cross-court volley into the nick and Martin lost his lead by misdirecting an audacious winner.
▪ The party has lost its lead in the polls.
open
▪ They opened up a lead of more than two minutes by Huddersfield, but were caught with just under 30 miles left.
▪ By the end of the half, Oregon has opened a ten-point lead.
▪ Coming round the final bend he had opened up a substantial lead and seemed to be coasting home.
▪ Jason Collins had eight points in the last seven minutes of the first half as the Cardinal opened their seven-point lead.
▪ Cumbria's Dave Swanson opened up a lead over Paul Dugdale after 5K, and stretched it into a 16-second victory.
▪ Three times during the second half, Stanford opens the lead to fifteen.
▪ Barnsley opened a 9-0 lead before Acklam's number eight Stuart Dredge touched down a push-over try.
▪ The Ducks open up a twenty-point lead with two minutes left in the half.
play
▪ In those days I don't think there was an average looking or homely looking person playing romantic leads.
▪ Sister Aimee herself-in fetching costume-always played the lead character.
▪ But although I played lead for a long time in the group I never cite lead players like Clapton or Beck.
▪ Sanger directed and Winston played the lead.
▪ Ben has adapted his zany thriller about ecological disaster and will play the lead.
▪ Scott's going to be playing the lead in Glen's movie.
▪ Audiences are packing in to see Paul Nicholas play the lead role in Barnum.
take
▪ City who are chasing promotion, took the lead with a penalty.
▪ They had three chances to take the lead but failed each time and eventually missed eight straight shots.
▪ Where London has perhaps taken a lead, it has been followed.
▪ Many local chambers of commerce are already taking a lead role in this process.
▪ Senior management failed to take a lead in clarifying the role of the Beacon in the department's services to under fives.
▪ Meanwhile, in the brothers' partnership, Joe took the lead.
▪ It was no great surprise when Middlesbrough took the lead.
▪ He also has taken the lead in documenting the horrific toll taken by mines.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All these increase costs and lead to economic inefficiency.
▪ One of the lead negotiators in the Liggett talks said a possible deal was still moving forward.
▪ There were no clues, no leads, no moves to be made.
▪ Two-goal Dave Mitchell fired Swindon into an early lead.
▪ We got our cherry popped that day, and my platoon was in the lead.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Lead

Lead \Lead\ (l[e^]d), n. [OE. led, leed, lead, AS. le['a]d; akin to D. lood, MHG. l[=o]t, G. loth plummet, sounding lead, small weight, Sw. & Dan. lod. [root]123.]

  1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a heavy, pliable, inelastic metal, having a bright, bluish color, but easily tarnished. It is both malleable and ductile, though with little tenacity, and is used for tubes, sheets, bullets, etc. Its specific gravity is 11.37. It is easily fusible (melting point 327.5[deg] C), forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of solder and type metal. Atomic number 8

  2. Atomic weight, 207.2. Symbol Pb (L. Plumbum). It is chiefly obtained from the mineral galena, lead sulphide. 2. An article made of lead or an alloy of lead; as:

    1. A plummet or mass of lead, used in sounding at sea.

    2. (Print.) A thin strip of type metal, used to separate lines of type in printing.

    3. Sheets or plates of lead used as a covering for roofs; hence, pl., a roof covered with lead sheets or terne plates.

      I would have the tower two stories, and goodly leads upon the top.
      --Bacon

  3. A small cylinder of black lead or graphite, used in pencils. Black lead, graphite or plumbago; -- so called from its leadlike appearance and streak. [Colloq.] Coasting lead, a sounding lead intermediate in weight between a hand lead and deep-sea lead. Deep-sea lead, the heaviest of sounding leads, used in water exceeding a hundred fathoms in depth. --Ham. Nav. Encyc. Hand lead, a small lead use for sounding in shallow water. Krems lead, Kremnitz lead [so called from Krems or Kremnitz, in Austria], a pure variety of white lead, formed into tablets, and called also Krems white, or Kremnitz white, and Vienna white. Lead arming, tallow put in the hollow of a sounding lead. See To arm the lead (below). Lead colic. See under Colic. Lead color, a deep bluish gray color, like tarnished lead. Lead glance. (Min.) Same as Galena. Lead line

    1. (Med.) A dark line along the gums produced by a deposit of metallic lead, due to lead poisoning.

    2. (Naut.) A sounding line. Lead mill, a leaden polishing wheel, used by lapidaries. Lead ocher (Min.), a massive sulphur-yellow oxide of lead. Same as Massicot. Lead pencil, a pencil of which the marking material is graphite (black lead). Lead plant (Bot.), a low leguminous plant, genus Amorpha ( Amorpha canescens), found in the Northwestern United States, where its presence is supposed to indicate lead ore. --Gray. Lead tree.

      1. (Bot.) A West Indian name for the tropical, leguminous tree, Leuc[ae]na glauca; -- probably so called from the glaucous color of the foliage.

      2. (Chem.) Lead crystallized in arborescent forms from a solution of some lead salt, as by suspending a strip of zinc in lead acetate.

        Mock lead, a miner's term for blende.

        Red lead, a scarlet, crystalline, granular powder, consisting of minium when pure, but commonly containing several of the oxides of lead. It is used as a paint or cement and also as an ingredient of flint glass.

        Red lead ore (Min.), crocoite.

        Sugar of lead, acetate of lead.

        To arm the lead, to fill the hollow in the bottom of a sounding lead with tallow in order to discover the nature of the bottom by the substances adhering.
        --Ham. Nav. Encyc.

        To cast the lead, or To heave the lead, to cast the sounding lead for ascertaining the depth of water.

        White lead, hydrated carbonate of lead, obtained as a white, amorphous powder, and much used as an ingredient of white paint.

Lead

Lead \Lead\ (l[e^]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Leaded; p. pr. & vb. n. Leading.]

  1. To cover, fill, or affect with lead; as, continuous firing leads the grooves of a rifle.

  2. (Print.) To place leads between the lines of; as, to lead a page; leaded matter.

Lead

Lead \Lead\, v. i.

  1. To guide or conduct, as by accompanying, going before, showing, influencing, directing with authority, etc.; to have precedence or pre["e]minence; to be first or chief; -- used in most of the senses of lead, v. t.

  2. To tend or reach in a certain direction, or to a certain place; as, the path leads to the mill; gambling leads to other vices.

    The mountain foot that leads towards Mantua.
    --Shak.

    To lead off or To lead out, to go first; to begin; as, Mickey Mantle led off in the fifth inning of the game.

Lead

Lead \Lead\ (l[=e]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Led (l[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Leading.] [OE. leden, AS. l[=ae]dan (akin to OS. l[=e]dian, D. leiden, G. leiten, Icel. le[imac][eth]a, Sw. leda, Dan. lede), properly a causative fr. AS. li[eth]an to go; akin to OHG. l[imac]dan, Icel. l[imac][eth]a, Goth. lei[thorn]an (in comp.). Cf. Lode, Loath.]

  1. To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some physical contact or connection; as, a father leads a child; a jockey leads a horse with a halter; a dog leads a blind man.

    If a blind man lead a blind man, both fall down in the ditch.
    --Wyclif (Matt. xv. 14.)

    They thrust him out of the city, and led him unto the brow of the hill.
    --Luke iv. 29.

    In thy right hand lead with thee The mountain nymph, sweet Liberty.
    --Milton.

  2. To guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain place or end, by making the way known; to show the way, esp. by going with or going in advance of. Hence, figuratively: To direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to lead a traveler; to lead a pupil. The Lord went before them by day in a pillar of a cloud, to lead them the way. --Ex. xiii. 2

    1. He leadeth me beside the still waters.
      --Ps. xxiii.

    2. This thought might lead me through the world's vain mask. Content, though blind, had I no better guide.
      --Milton.

  3. To conduct or direct with authority; to have direction or charge of; as, to lead an army, an exploring party, or a search; to lead a political party.

    Christ took not upon him flesh and blood that he might conquer and rule nations, lead armies, or possess places.
    --South.

  4. To go or to be in advance of; to precede; hence, to be foremost or chief among; as, the big sloop led the fleet of yachts; the Guards led the attack; Demosthenes leads the orators of all ages.

    As Hesperus, that leads the sun his way.
    --Fairfax.

    And lo ! Ben Adhem's name led all the rest.
    --Leigh Hunt.

  5. To draw or direct by influence, whether good or bad; to prevail on; to induce; to entice; to allure; as, to lead one to espouse a righteous cause.

    He was driven by the necessities of the times, more than led by his own disposition, to any rigor of actions.
    --Eikon Basilike.

    Silly women, laden with sins, led away by divers lusts.
    --2 Tim. iii. 6 (Rev. Ver.).

  6. To guide or conduct one's self in, through, or along (a certain course); hence, to proceed in the way of; to follow the path or course of; to pass; to spend. Also, to cause (one) to proceed or follow in (a certain course).

    That we may lead a quiet and peaceable life.
    --1 Tim. ii. 2.

    Nor thou with shadowed hint confuse A life that leads melodious days.
    --Tennyson.

    You remember . . . the life he used to lead his wife and daughter.
    --Dickens.

  7. (Cards & Dominoes) To begin a game, round, or trick, with; as, to lead trumps; the double five was led.

    To lead astray, to guide in a wrong way, or into error; to seduce from truth or rectitude.

    To lead captive, to carry or bring into captivity.

    To lead the way, to show the way by going in front; to act as guide.
    --Goldsmith.

Lead

Lead \Lead\, n.

  1. The act of leading or conducting; guidance; direction; as, to take the lead; to be under the lead of another.

    At the time I speak of, and having a momentary lead, . . . I am sure I did my country important service.
    --Burke.

  2. Precedence; advance position; also, the measure of precedence; as, the white horse had the lead; a lead of a boat's length, or of half a second.

  3. (Cards & Dominoes) The act or right of playing first in a game or round; the card suit, or piece, so played; as, your partner has the lead.

  4. An open way in an ice field.
    --Kane.

  5. (Mining) A lode.

  6. (Naut.) The course of a rope from end to end.

  7. (Steam Engine) The width of port opening which is uncovered by the valve, for the admission or release of steam, at the instant when the piston is at end of its stroke.

    Note: When used alone it means outside lead, or lead for the admission of steam. Inside lead refers to the release or exhaust.

  8. (Civil Engineering) the distance of haul, as from a cutting to an embankment.

  9. (Horology) The action of a tooth, as a tooth of a wheel, in impelling another tooth or a pallet.
    --Saunier.

  10. (Music.)

    1. The announcement by one voice part of a theme to be repeated by the other parts.

    2. A mark or a short passage in one voice part, as of a canon, serving as a cue for the entrance of others.

  11. In an internal-combustion engine, the distance, measured in actual length of piston stroke or the corresponding angular displacement of the crank, of the piston from the end of the compression stroke when ignition takes place; -- called in full

    lead of the ignition. When ignition takes place during the working stroke the corresponding distance from the commencement of the stroke is called

    negative lead.

  12. (Mach.) The excess above a right angle in the angle between two consecutive cranks, as of a compound engine, on the same shaft.

  13. (Mach.) In spiral screw threads, worm wheels, or the like, the amount of advance of any point in the spiral for a complete turn.

  14. (Elec.)

    1. The angle between the line joining the brushes of a continuous-current dynamo and the diameter symmetrical between the poles.

    2. The advance of the current phase in an alternating circuit beyond that of the electromotive force producing it.

  15. (Theat.) A role for a leading man or leading woman; also, one who plays such a role.

  16. The first story in a newspaper or broadcast news program.

  17. an electrical conductor, typically as an insulated wire or cable, connecting an electrical device to another device or to a power source, such as a conductor conveying electricity from a dynamo.

  18. (Baseball) the distance a runner on base advances from one base toward the next before the pitch; as, the long lead he usually takes tends to distract the pitchers.

    Lead angle (Steam Engine), the angle which the crank maker with the line of centers, in approaching it, at the instant when the valve opens to admit steam.

    Lead screw (Mach.), the main longitudinal screw of a lathe, which gives the feed motion to the carriage.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
lead

"to guide," Old English lædan "cause to go with one, lead, guide, conduct, carry; sprout forth; bring forth, pass (one's life)," causative of liðan "to travel," from Proto-Germanic *laidjan (cognates: Old Saxon lithan, Old Norse liða "to go," Old High German ga-lidan "to travel," Gothic ga-leiþan "to go"), from PIE *leit- "to go forth."\n

\nMeaning "to be in first place" is from late 14c. Sense in card playing is from 1670s. Related: Led; leading. Lead-off "commencement, beginning" attested from 1879; lead-in "introduction, opening" is from 1928.

lead

c.1300, "action of leading," from lead (v.1). Meaning "the front or leading place" is from 1560s. Johnson stigmatized it as "a low, despicable word." Sense in card-playing is from 1742; in theater, from 1831; in journalism, from 1912; in jazz bands, from 1934.

lead

early 15c., "to make of lead," from lead (n.1). Meaning "to cover with lead" is from mid-15c. Related: Leaded (early 13c.); leading.

lead

heavy metal, Old English lead, from West Germanic *loudhom (cognates: Old Frisian lad, Middle Dutch loot, Dutch lood "lead," German Lot "weight, plummet"). The name and the skill in using the metal seem to have been borrowed from the Celts (compare Old Irish luaide), probably from PIE root *plou(d)- "to flow."\n

\nFigurative of heaviness since at least early 14c. Black lead was an old name for "graphite," hence lead pencil (1680s) and the colloquial figurative phrase to have lead in one's pencil "be possessed of (especially male sexual) vigor," attested by 1902. Lead balloon "a failure," American English slang, attested by 1957 (as a type of something heavy that can be kept up only with effort, from 1904). Lead-footed "slow" is from 1896; opposite sense of "fast" emerged 1940s in trucker's jargon, from notion of a foot heavy on the gas pedal.

Wiktionary
lead

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context uncountable English) A heavy, pliable, inelastic metal element, having a bright, bluish color, but easily tarnished; both malleable and ductile, though with little tenacity. It is easily fusible, forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of solder and type metal. Atomic number 82, symbol Pb (from Latin ''plumbum''). 2 (context countable English) A plummet or mass of lead attached to a line, used in sounding depth at sea or (context dated English) to estimate velocity in knots. 3 A thin strip of type metal, used to separate lines of type in printing. 4 (context uncountable typography English) Vertical space in advance of a row or between rows of text. Also known as ''leading''. 5 Sheets or plates of lead used as a covering for roofs. 6 (context plural '''leads''' English) A roof covered with lead sheets or terne plates. 7 (context countable English) A thin cylinder of black lead or plumbago (graphite) used in pencils. 8 (context slang English) bullet; ammunition. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To cover, fill, or affect with lead; as, continuous firing leads the grooves of a rifle. 2 (context transitive printing historical English) To place leads between the lines of. 3 (context transitive climbing English) lead climb. Etymology 2

  1. (context not comparable English) foremost. n. 1 (context uncountable English) The act of leading or conducting; guidance; direction, course; as, to take the lead; to be under the lead of another. 2 (context uncountable English) Precedence; advance position; also, the measure of precedence; as, the white horse had the lead; a lead of a boat’s length, or of half a second; the state of being ahead in a race; the highest score in a game in an incomplete game. v

  2. 1 (label en heading transitive) ''To guide#Verb or conduct#Verb.'' 2 # To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some physical contact connection. 3 # To guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain place or end, by making the way known; to show the way, especially by going with or going in advance of, to lead a pupil; to guide somebody somewhere or to bring somebody somewhere by means of.instructions. Hence, figuratively: To direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to lead a traveler. Etymology 3

    vb. (misspelling of led English)

WordNet
lead
  1. n. a soft heavy toxic malleable metallic element; bluish white when freshly cut but tarnishes readily to dull gray; "the children were playing with lead soldiers" [syn: Pb, atomic number 82]

  2. an advantage held by a competitor in a race; "he took the lead at the last turn"

  3. evidence pointing to a possible solution; "the police are following a promising lead"; "the trail led straight to the perpetrator" [syn: track, trail]

  4. a position of leadership (especially in the phrase `take the lead'); "he takes the lead in any group"; "we were just waiting for someone to take the lead"; "they didn't follow our lead"

  5. the angle between the direction a gun is aimed and the position of a moving target (correcting for the flight time of the missile)

  6. the introductory section of a story; "it was an amusing lead-in to a very serious matter" [syn: lead-in]

  7. an actor who plays a principal role [syn: star, principal]

  8. (baseball) the position taken by a base runner preparing to advance to the next base; "he took a long lead off first"

  9. an indication of potential opportunity; "he got a tip on the stock market"; "a good lead for a job" [syn: tip, steer, confidential information, wind, hint]

  10. a news story of major importance [syn: lead story]

  11. the timing of ignition relative to the position of the piston in an internal-combustion engine [syn: spark advance]

  12. restraint consisting of a rope (or light chain) used to restrain an animal [syn: leash, tether]

  13. thin strip of metal used to separate lines of type in printing [syn: leading]

  14. mixture of graphite with clay in different degrees of hardness; the marking substance in a pencil [syn: pencil lead]

  15. a jumper that consists of a short piece of wire; "it was a tangle of jumper cables and clip leads" [syn: jumper cable, jumper lead]

  16. the playing of a card to start a trick in bridge; "the lead was in the dummy"

  17. [also: led]

lead
  1. v. take somebody somewhere; "We lead him to our chief"; "can you take me to the main entrance?"; "He conducted us to the palace" [syn: take, direct, conduct, guide]

  2. result in; "The water left a mark on the silk dress"; "Her blood left a stain on the napkin" [syn: leave, result]

  3. tend to or result in; "This remark lead to further arguments among the guests"

  4. travel in front of; go in advance of others; "The procession was headed by John" [syn: head]

  5. cause to undertake a certain action; "Her greed led her to forge the checks"

  6. stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point; "Service runs all the way to Cranbury"; "His knowledge doesn't go very far"; "My memory extends back to my fourth year of life"; "The facts extend beyond a consideration of her personal assets" [syn: run, go, pass, extend]

  7. be in charge of; "Who is heading this project?" [syn: head]

  8. be ahead of others; be the first; "she topped her class every year" [syn: top]

  9. be conducive to; "The use of computers in the classroom lead to better writing" [syn: contribute, conduce]

  10. lead, as in the performance of a composition; "conduct an orchestra; Bairenboim conducted the Chicago symphony for years" [syn: conduct, direct]

  11. pass or spend; "lead a good life"

  12. lead, extend, or afford access; "This door goes to the basement"; "The road runs South" [syn: go]

  13. move ahead (of others) in time or space [syn: precede] [ant: follow]

  14. cause something to pass or lead somewhere; "Run the wire behind the cabinet" [syn: run]

  15. preside over; "John moderated the discussion" [syn: moderate, chair]

  16. [also: led]

Gazetteer
Lead, SD -- U.S. city in South Dakota
Population (2000): 3027
Housing Units (2000): 1617
Land area (2000): 1.989438 sq. miles (5.152620 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 1.989438 sq. miles (5.152620 sq. km)
FIPS code: 36220
Located within: South Dakota (SD), FIPS 46
Location: 44.350967 N, 103.765784 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Lead, SD
Lead
Wikipedia
Lead (disambiguation)

Lead has two different pronunciations and several different meanings, usually related to either the chemical element lead (a heavy metal) or the verb to lead.

Lead (geology)

A lead in hydrocarbon exploration, is a subsurface structural or stratigraphic feature with the potential to have entrapped oil or natural gas. When exploring a new area, or when new data becomes available in existing acreage, an explorer will carry out an initial screening to identify possible leads. Further work is then concentrated on the leads with the intention to mature at least some of them into drillable prospects.

Lead (band)

Lead is a Japanese hip-hop group, under the Record of Pony Canyon/ Flight Master. Their debut was on July 31, 2002 with their single Manatsu no Magic (Mid-Summer Magic).

Lead

Lead is a chemical element in the carbon group with symbol Pb (from ) and atomic number 82. It is a soft, malleable and heavy post-transition metal. Freshly cut, solid lead has a bluish-white color that soon tarnishes to a dull grayish color when exposed to air; the liquid metal has shiny chrome-silver luster. Lead has the highest atomic number of any non- radioactive element (two radioactive elements, namely technetium and promethium, are lighter), although the next higher element, bismuth, has one isotope with a half-life that is long enough (over one billion times the estimated age of the universe) to be considered stable. Lead's four stable isotopes each have 82 protons, a magic number in the nuclear shell model of atomic nuclei. The isotope lead-208 also has 126 neutrons, another magic number, and is hence double magic, a property that grants it enhanced stability: lead-208 is the heaviest known stable nuclide.

Lead is used in building construction, lead-acid batteries, bullets and shot, weights, as part of solders, pewters, fusible alloys, and as a radiation shield.

If ingested or inhaled, lead and its compounds are poisonous to animals and humans. Lead is a neurotoxin that accumulates both in soft tissues and the bones, damaging the nervous system and causing brain disorders. Excessive lead also causes blood disorders in mammals. Lead poisoning has been documented since ancient Rome, ancient Greece, and ancient China.

Lead (electronics)

In electronics, a lead is an electrical connection consisting of a length of wire or metal pad ( SMD) that comes from a device. Leads are used for physical support, to transfer power, to probe circuits (see multimeter), to transmit information, and sometimes as a heatsink. The tiny leads coming off through-hole components are also often called pins.

Many electrical components such as capacitors, resistors, and inductors have only two leads where some integrated circuits (ICs) can have several hundred leads to more than a thousand for the largest BGA devices. IC pins often either bend under the package body like a letter "J" (J-lead) or come out, down, and form a flat foot for securing to the board (S-lead or gull-lead).

Most kinds of integrated circuit packaging are made by placing the silicon chip on a lead frame, wire bonding the chip to the metal leads of that lead frame, and covering the chip with plastic. The metal leads protruding from the plastic are then either "cut long" and bent to form through-hole pins, or "cut short" and bent to form surface-mount leads. Such lead frames are used for surface mount packages with leads—such as small-outline integrated circuit (SOIC), Quad Flat Package (QFP), etc. -- and for through-hole packages such as dual in-line package (DIP) etc. -- and even for so-called "leadless" or "no-lead" packages—such as quad-flat no-leads package (QFN), etc.

The lead frame (and therefore the pins, if any, formed from that lead frame) are occasionally made from FeNi42, a kind of Invar.

Lead (tack)

A lead, lead line, lead rope (USA) or head collar rope (UK), is used to lead an animal such as a horse. Usually, it is attached to a halter. The lead may be integral to the halter or, more often, separate. When separate, it is attached to the halter with a heavy clip or snap so that it can be added or removed as needed. A related term, lead shank or lead chain refers to a lead line with a chain attached that is used in a variety of ways to safely control possibly difficult or dangerous horses if they will not respond to a regular lead.

Lead (engineering)

Lead is the axial advance of a helix or screw during one complete turn (360°) The lead for a screw thread is the axial travel for a single revolution.

Pitch is defined as the axial distance between adjacent threads on a helix or screw. In most screws, called "single start" screws, which have a single helical thread along their length, the lead and pitch are equal. They only differ in "multiple start" screws, which have several intertwined threads. In these screws, the lead is equal to the pitch multiplied by the number of "starts".

Lead angle is the angle between the helix and a plane of rotation. It is the complement of the helix angle, and is used for convenience in worms and hobs. It is understood to be at the standard pitch diameter unless otherwise specified.

The lead angle can be expressed as:


$$\mbox{Lead angle} = \arctan \left( \frac {l} {\pi d_m} \right)$$

where

l is lead of the helix d is mean diameter of the helix

In American literature λ is used to notate the Lead Angle. In European literature, Υ (Greek letter gamma) may be used.

Lead (leg)

Lead refers to which set of legs, left or right, leads or advances forward to a greater extent when a quadruped animal is cantering, galloping, or leaping. The feet on the leading side touch the ground forward of its partner. On the "left lead", the animal's left legs lead. The choice of lead is of special interest in horse riding.

A lead change refers to an animal, usually a horse, moving in a canter or gallop, changing from one lead to the other. There are two basic forms of lead change: simple and flying. It is very easy to define the correct lead from the incorrect lead. When a horse is executing the correct lead, the inside front and hind legs reach farther forwards than the outside legs.

In a transverse or lateral or united canter and gallop, the hind leg on the same side as the leading foreleg (the lateral hindleg) advances more. In horses this is the norm.

In a rotatory or diagonal or disunited canter and gallop, the hind leg on the opposite side (the diagonal hindleg) advances more. In horses, it is more often than not an undesirable gait form, also known as rotary and round galloping, and as moving disunited, cross-firing, and cross-cantering. In animals such as dogs, deer, and elk, however, this form of the gait is the norm.

Some authorities define the leading leg in the singular form as the last to leave the ground before the one or two periods of suspension within each stride. In these cases, because the canter has only one moment of suspension, the leading leg is considered to be the foreleg. Because in some animals the gallop has two moments of suspension, some authorities recognize a lead in each pair of legs, fore and hind. So when an animal is in a rotatory gait, it is called disunited, due to different leading legs in the front and hind.

Lead (sea ice)

A lead is a large fracture within an expanse of sea ice, defining a linear area of open water that can be used for navigation purposes. Leads vary in width from meters to hundreds of meters. As is the case for polynyas (another sea ice feature involving open water), leads allow the direct interaction between the atmosphere and the ocean, and are important for Arctic sea ice ecology. Additionally it has been lately found that ice leads contribute significantly to the amount of mercury deposited onto surface and leaked into the ocean. If the air is cold enough (typically in the winter), the water within a lead quickly refreezes, such that in many cases, leads are partly or entirely covered by a thin layer of new ice.

Lead (curling)

In curling, the lead is the person who delivers the first two stones of the end for their team. On most teams, where the lead does not act as skip or vice, the lead will sweep for each of his teammates. Because of the free-guard rule, which prevents leads from removing most of an opponents stones, leads are usually proficient at throwing guards and other draws, and throw few takeouts or other power shots. In some regions, such as Eastern Ontario and the Eastern United States, the lead is responsible for determining who has hammer, using random selection, such as flipping a coin. However, in most regions, this is the responsibility of the third.

Usage examples of "lead".

Q Factor Aberrants has not previously been observed to lead to aberrancy in the offspring of such alliances, since the aberrant factors do not appear to be inherited to any significant extent.

But the fateful decisions secretly made, the intrigues, the treachery, the motives and the aberrations which led up to them, the parts played by the principal actors behind the scenes, the extent of the terror they exercised and their technique of organizing it - all this and much more remained largely hidden from us until the secret German papers turned up.

But I have bethought me, that, since I am growing old and past the age of getting children, one of you, my sons, must abide at home to cherish me and your mother, and to lead our carles in war if trouble falleth upon us.

Then grew Ralph shamefaced and turned away from her, and miscalled himself for a fool and a dastard that could not abide the pleasure of his lady at the very place whereto she had let lead him.

End, I will lead you over this green plain, and then go back home to mine hermitage, and abide there till ye come to me, or I die.

The wise merchant who led thee unto me is abiding thine homecoming that he may have of thee that which thou promisedst to him.

Excessive marital indulgence produces abnormal conditions of the generative organs and not unfrequently leads to incurable disease.

Now this cheaping irked Ralph sorely, as was like to be, whereas, as hath been told, he came from a land where were no thralls, none but vavassors and good yeomen: yet he abode till all was done, hansel paid, and the thralls led off by their new masters.

So they abode there but two days, and on the third day were led away by a half score of men gaily apparelled after their manner, and having with them many sumpter-beasts with provision for the road.

Thus then they abode a-feasting till the sun was westering and the shadows waxed about them, and then at last Ralph rose up and called to horse, and the other wayfarers arose also, and the horses were led up to them.

Not knowing exactly what excuse to make, but hoping for something to turn up, the mullah took a lantern and followed him out, taking the lead as they passed through the gap in the fence and drew abreast of the mosque portico.

I They secured the end of the rope to one of the poles wedged like an anchor in the opening of the tunnel that led to the crystal cavern, and Craig abseiled down the rope to the water at the bottom of the shaft once more.

Lead truck following Aby, rolling down to the fatal turn, where the woods came near the road.

Mellis false-flags Banish with his bullshit mine story if there was a claymore mine on this mountain, it would be command-detonated and Abies would have lit it off with the rest of his fireworks then leads him up to the gun site and fucking drops him cold.

A woman raised in an environment so full of honor and respect, and someone who, according to the academician, led her whole family around by their noses, had thought it worthwhile to talk to him, and in a way that came rather close to friendliness.