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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
tip
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a useful tip
▪ Their website has some useful tips on selling your home.
be tipped as sb's successor (=be said to be a possible or likely successor)
▪ When Tizard was about to retire as chairman, Cockcroft was tipped as his successor.
filter tip
rubbish tip/dump (=a place to take rubbish)
the tip of an island (=the thin pointed end of an island)
▪ We live on the northernmost tip of the island of Barbados.
tip sheet
▪ a tip sheet for private investors
tipping point
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
handy
▪ All it takes is some imagination to think up handy tips to help other producers.
▪ This is a handy tip for setting a home-built kite bridle.
▪ On page 26 we suggest handy tips for teaching her to dress herself.
▪ Any handy tips for good, strong growth, please?
▪ The associated language analysis is useful as a reference work and set of handy tips.
hot
▪ McGrath has been advised to go ... after all, he's a hot tip to win the thing.
▪ Find something you've forgotten Don't give up if you can't remember where you saw that hot tip last week.
northern
▪ The ramshackle bus-boat back to Tekek around the northern tip of the island takes three hours, the same as the walk.
▪ But the old pier was built on top of the northern tip, and the coral below died, he said.
▪ Seven ruff, without as yet their elaborate courtship adornments, fed at the northern tip of a tyke.
▪ The northern tip of the bay lies in the Lake District National Park.
southern
▪ Nature was given its due, but only at the southern tip of the marsh.
▪ It was hazy; they reached the southern tip of Nova Scotia.
▪ Pirates in fast boats have tried to board ships off Bab el-Mandeb in the Red Sea's southern tip.
▪ The boat floated off the southern tip of Manhattan.
▪ Westwards, the road follows a tortuous route towards Capo Spartivento on the southern tip of the island.
▪ The southern tip is designated as a national nature reserve.
top
▪ Such tips were conical in shape, their height determined by the ease with which material could be moved to the top.
▪ Card Watch, the banking industry's plastic card fraud prevention campaign, issues top tips for travelling abroad.
▪ Using your thumbs alternately, stroke down the bridge of the nose from the top to the tip.
useful
▪ I discovered this to be a useful tip, but not when it came to long-distance telephone calls.
▪ Anyway, you really should have just taken the useful tips from his lecture and let the rest slide.
▪ Here is a very useful tip.
▪ Both are full of useful tips on bringing about organizational change.
▪ It also contains a record of races and also distance &038; metric conversions plus many useful tips.
▪ A useful tip is to make sure that no more than two brandy snaps are baked on each tray.
▪ The useful tips and good advice really came in handy-despite my years of experience.
■ NOUN
felt
▪ The selected area of a faced sample or hand specimen must be marked with water insoluble felt tip pen before cutting.
▪ She presses harder on the felt tip.
▪ Get the notes typewritten using a new ribbon, or copy them out in black felt tip pen in large capital letters.
▪ The shock of the new is techno-brutalism and the medium is the felt tip.
▪ At later stages a thick crayon and a large felt tip suited particular areas of marking.
▪ Is it a 50 watt bulb that a child's been scribbling on with a black felt tip pen?
▪ Mark out brick lines with a felt tip pen.
pen
▪ The selected area of a faced sample or hand specimen must be marked with water insoluble felt tip pen before cutting.
▪ Get the notes typewritten using a new ribbon, or copy them out in black felt tip pen in large capital letters.
▪ Is it a 50 watt bulb that a child's been scribbling on with a black felt tip pen?
▪ Mark out brick lines with a felt tip pen.
rubbish
▪ The device is being used at landfill rubbish tips and can tell scientists within minutes precisely what's going on underground.
▪ During those sixty seconds of biological time, Modern Man has made a rubbish tip of Paradise.
▪ Trashing lives At night on the city rubbish tip in La Paz, strange things start to happen.
▪ Municipal rubbish tips are some of the most important feeding areas for gulls, crows, vultures and kites.
▪ Jones had tried to cover his tracks by disposing of some of the apparatus on a rubbish tip.
▪ The time has come to find a solution to prevent Britain becoming one big, dangerous rubbish tip.
▪ With this rubbish tip of information she then came to me to ask how she could write it up into a dissertation.
wing
▪ After all, what's a wing tip and a Continent between friends?
Wings must include the entire wing with skin and muscle intact, but the wing tip may be removed. 4.
▪ New fibreglass wing tips and dorsal fin additions were attached.
▪ He was in white ducks, brown and white wing tips, and a yellow silk sport shirt.
▪ Remove the wing tips and reserve with the neck and gizzard for a stock.
▪ Her leg is broken, and the wing tip! but not badly.
■ VERB
follow
▪ What follows is just the tip of the legislative iceberg which has affected local government in the past few years.
▪ But you can personalize your message by following these tips.
▪ When making wraps at home, the following tips will simplify rolling or wrapping these scrumptious square meals.
▪ The following tips may help: 1.
▪ The following tips will help you make traveling with your child work.
give
▪ They might even give them a tip.
▪ Can you give me some tips on how to control myself? &038;.
▪ She understood and gave a generous tip.
▪ At her place, she gives me a good tip.
▪ If you are going to eat alfresco then I would give you two tips.
▪ But let me just give you a tip.
▪ I'd love a true professional to give me some tips, particularly on which brands are best.
▪ Q: Can you give us some beauty tips?
help
▪ All it takes is some imagination to think up handy tips to help other producers.
▪ In order of importance, these are the tips that helped me: 1.
▪ These tips are intended to help, but should not be regarded as foolproof.
▪ These tips also help prevent heat exhaustion, only several cases of which advance to potentially deadly heat stroke at the Canyon.
▪ Our expert's tips will help you to cover your roots.
▪ I hope that this tip might help anyone else who is having Panasonic v Windows problems.
▪ The following tips will help you make traveling with your child work.
offer
▪ As a way of tackling the major problem of making something essentially static into something always forward-moving, I offer this tip.
▪ He offered me the tips of his fingers.
touch
▪ He touched it - the tips of his fingers made contact with the pale face.
▪ I touched the tip of the rag through my skirt and felt it move against my skin.
▪ He neutralized the obscenity by touching the tip of one finger.
▪ I touched the needle tip of it and wished I hadn't.
▪ Yet they have only touched the tip of the iceberg, especially with respect to old people in their own homes or private care.
▪ I touch the tip of the stave to the centre of her forehead.
▪ Ronnie leaned forward and touched the pink tip with her lips, kissing it gently then moistening it with her tongue.
▪ To touch its burning tip will give love life.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
hot tip
▪ Find something you've forgotten Don't give up if you can't remember where you saw that hot tip last week.
▪ McGrath has been advised to go ... after all, he's a hot tip to win the thing.
tip/swing the balance
▪ Your letter of recommendation swung the balance in his favor.
▪ Chernobyl had further tipped the balance.
▪ His influence on deputies is significant, but it will be Mr Yeltsin's performance that will swing the balance.
▪ Perhaps remorse at having joined it had tipped the balance of Fred's mind.
▪ Teachers may try to tip the balance about this Englishness.
▪ The nature of his choice or the terms in which it is expressed may then tip the balance.
▪ The thought or feeling tipped the balance, made the difference.
▪ Vigorous efforts were made to tip the balance more in favour of those with greater needs.
▪ What tipped the balance against that was my continuing dreadful performance in the classroom.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A 15% tip is considered usual if the service was good.
▪ a 15% tip
▪ a leaflet containing some tips on how to take better photos
▪ A service charge is included on the bill, so tipping isn't necessary.
▪ Acting on a tip, police went to the motel and arrested Upton.
▪ Doctor Gordon felt my neck with the tips of his fingers.
▪ Here's a good tip: if you spill red wine on your carpet, pour salt on it to remove it.
▪ It was a very nice house until they moved in and turned it into a tip.
▪ The boy carried my suitcases up to my room and then stood waiting for a tip.
▪ The village is on the southern tip of the island.
▪ We finished our lunch and left a tip on the table for the waiter.
▪ Your room's an absolute tip!
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As I raised my tips and slid off the lift, I wondered how I was going to get down the mountain.
▪ His pale golden, ringed tail hung down and sometimes the tip of it twitched.
▪ Please keep those questions and tips coming.
▪ The very tip of the finger began to oscillate.
▪ Viewers sometimes phone in news tips.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
off
▪ Often, before the arrival of the hunters, somebody tipped off the clansmen that the authorities were on the way.
▪ The police were tipped off to his whereabouts, then locked him in the Tower of London.
▪ The person who did tip off the authorities turned it down.
▪ According to an upright government scientist, who just rnight have been tipped off by a private expert.
▪ The bomber turned informer and tipped off police.
▪ The illegal trading by Kathleen Lane and the five others she tipped off began Oct. 11, 1994.
▪ Yesterday, the police denied that drug dealers were tipped off before the operation.
▪ They were arrested after police were tipped off by local residents, who say they've since been threatened and intimidated.
over
▪ He went on to experiment with how far a branch could be extended in any one direction before the tree tipped over.
▪ The baby was sleeping in a bassinet the boys allegedly tipped over.
▪ There was the carton of juice tipped over outside the hide and the paper from the biscuits.
▪ She warns of thirst for knowledge tipping over into dangerous greed, and of youthful promise lost for one fatal flaw.
▪ Be careful not to apply too much cyclic, however, since this may still cause the model to tip over.
▪ The other children fled in terror as the hay caught fire when the candle tipped over.
▪ It tipped over, sloshing liquid across the photograph of himself astride a motorcycle.
up
▪ Her face tipped up, radiant.
▪ Then they tip up the ladle and proceed to the next mold.
▪ The task is to collect coins and to tip up the tortoises and spiders that crawl out of the pipes along the platforms.
▪ As the bed tips up and down, the body shifts as it can not in the iron lung.
▪ The table top is tipped up into the picture plane more sharply even than in a painting by Cézanne.
▪ I teetered across, on the edge of tipping up, a tightrope walk between panic and despair.
▪ It could tip up at just the wrong moment.
widely
▪ But it's now widely tipped as one labour can win.
▪ The chief architect of the document was vice chairman Makoto Tanabe, who was widely tipped to succeed Doi as leader.
■ NOUN
balance
▪ The political balance in Britain tipped quite markedly at that time, with important implications for social policy.
▪ As wheat cultivation developed and different strains of wheat became avail-able, the balance tipped away from rye.
▪ Add an engine which offers significantly better straight-line performance than the Corrado's and the balance starts to tip in favour of the Calibra.
▪ But the balance of power appears tipped in his favor.
▪ Given this choice, he reckons there's a balance to be tipped, in favour of the opportunities and against the dangers.
▪ The balance might well be tipped by forensic evidence.
▪ He almost lost his balance and tipped the chair over as he scrambled back down to floor level with it.
chair
▪ There was a crash as the big man stood up, tipping his chair over.
▪ That you tip back on your chair like that?
▪ He almost lost his balance and tipped the chair over as he scrambled back down to floor level with it.
hat
▪ Thrifty, hardworking, unemotional, they tipped their hats to no one.
▪ Stephen slid him a coin, the doorman tipped his hat with a smile.
▪ The watchman came out from his hut, tipped his hat, and opened the gate.
▪ Johnnie Walker tips his hat, smirks and hurries westward off the shelf.
head
▪ Resting his elbows on the deck behind him, he tipped his head back and closed his eyes.
▪ He stepped back and put his thumbs in his pockets and tipped his head up at me.
▪ When she laughs, my Auntie Muriel tips her head back and opens her mouth wide.
▪ Mr Mitchell had been tipped as the next head of Deutsche's investment-banking unit.
▪ She tipped her head towards the right-hand passage and lifted an interrogative eyebrow.
▪ The fingers of one hand curled around her neck, his thumb angled beneath her jaw to tip back her head.
police
▪ The bomber turned informer and tipped off police.
▪ Tug's dad is out to get him after he tipped off the police about his shady escapades.
scale
▪ Thus can a minuscule particle tip the scales one way or another.
▪ Second, the Constitution tips the scales in favor of the individual over the state in highly personal matters.
▪ Tall and stately, fairly bursting from her corset, she sometimes tipped the scales at over 200 pounds.
▪ Mr Bates thinks the disappearance of November's protest vote could tip the scales his way.
▪ This guy tips the scale at 400 pounds.
▪ For geophysicists in general, it is yet another chunk of evidence tipping the scales toward an integrated view of the earth.
wink
▪ So d'you think you could tip her the wink an' tell her I've got back early?
▪ Just tip us the wink when I come in.
▪ And they'd know if Keith was tipping the wink.
▪ And I can't tip the wink to Stephen.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
hot tip
▪ Find something you've forgotten Don't give up if you can't remember where you saw that hot tip last week.
▪ McGrath has been advised to go ... after all, he's a hot tip to win the thing.
push/tip sb over the brink
tip/swing the balance
▪ Your letter of recommendation swung the balance in his favor.
▪ Chernobyl had further tipped the balance.
▪ His influence on deputies is significant, but it will be Mr Yeltsin's performance that will swing the balance.
▪ Perhaps remorse at having joined it had tipped the balance of Fred's mind.
▪ Teachers may try to tip the balance about this Englishness.
▪ The nature of his choice or the terms in which it is expressed may then tip the balance.
▪ The thought or feeling tipped the balance, made the difference.
▪ Vigorous efforts were made to tip the balance more in favour of those with greater needs.
▪ What tipped the balance against that was my continuing dreadful performance in the classroom.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A gust of wind tipped the truck over.
▪ Don't tip the chair back so far.
▪ How much should I tip the driver?
▪ Investigators were tipped to watch for two men driving a horse van.
▪ It's usual to tip about 15% in restaurants.
▪ She tipped the taxi-driver.
▪ She weighed out the flour and tipped it into the bowl.
▪ The canoe tipped and we fell in the water.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Also tipped by Capel were Capita, up 5p at 417p, and Dorling Kindersley, 8p better at 253p.
▪ She smooths down her hair, tipping the beret back to its original angle.
▪ What he was looking for was something very small if he was prepared to tip out tiny containers.
▪ With this in mind, I would appreciate any fuel economy tips you can offer and specifically: 1.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Tip

Tip \Tip\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Tipped; p. pr. & vb. n. Tipping.] To form a point upon; to cover the tip, top, or end of; as, to tip anything with gold or silver.

With truncheon tipped with iron head.
--Hudibras.

Tipped with jet, Fair ermines spotless as the snows they press.
--Thomson.

Tip

Tip \Tip\, n. [Akin to D. & Dan. tip, LG. & Sw. tipp, G. zipfel, and probably to E. tap a plug, a pipe.]

  1. The point or extremity of anything; a pointed or somewhat sharply rounded end; the end; as, the tip of the finger; the tip of a spear.

    To the very tip of the nose.
    --Shak.

  2. An end piece or part; a piece, as a cap, nozzle, ferrule, or point, applied to the extreme end of anything; as, a tip for an umbrella, a shoe, a gas burner, etc.

  3. (Hat Manuf.) A piece of stiffened lining pasted on the inside of a hat crown.

  4. A thin, boarded brush made of camel's hair, used by gilders in lifting gold leaf.

  5. Rubbish thrown from a quarry.

Tip

Tip \Tip\, v. t. [Cf. LG. tippen to tap, Sw. tippa, and E. tap to strike gently.]

  1. To strike slightly; to tap.

    A third rogue tips me by the elbow.
    --Swift.

  2. To bestow a gift, or douceur, upon; to give a present to; as, to tip a servant. [Colloq.]
    --Thackeray.

  3. To lower one end of, or to throw upon the end; to tilt; as, to tip a cask; to tip a cart.

    To tip off, to pour out, as liquor.

    To tip over, to overturn.

    To tip the wink, to direct a wink; to give a hint or suggestion by, or as by, a wink. [Slang]
    --Pope.

    To tip up, to turn partly over by raising one end.

Tip

Tip \Tip\, v. i. To fall on, or incline to, one side.
--Bunyan.

To tip off, to fall off by tipping.

Tip

Tip \Tip\, n. [See Tip to strike slightly, and cf. Tap a slight blow.]

  1. A light touch or blow; a tap.

  2. A gift; a douceur; a fee. [Colloq.]

  3. A hint, or secret intimation, as to the chances in a horse race, or the like. [Sporting Cant]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
tip

c.1300, "to knock down, overturn, topple, knock askew" (transitive), of uncertain origin, possibly from Scandinavian (compare Swedish tippa "to tip, dump"), or from a special use of tip (n.). Intransitive sense of "to fall over, be overturned" is from mid-15c. Related: Tipped; tipping. To tip the scales at "weigh (so much" is from 1879. Tipping point attested by 1972. To tip (one's) hand "reveal one's intentions" is from 1907, an image from poker-playing.

tip

c.1400, "extreme end of something, top of something round or pointed, metal attachment to the end of something," from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch tip "utmost point, extremity, tip" (compare German zipfel, a diminutive formation); or from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse typpi).

tip

c.1200, "to strike, occur suddenly," of uncertain origin, possibly from Low German tippen "to poke, touch lightly," related to Middle Low German tip "end, point," and thus connected to tip (n.); or else related to tap (v.1). Meaning "strike sharply but lightly" is from 1560s. Sports sense is from 1816, originally in cricket. Related: Tipped; tipping.

tip

"a light, sharp blow or tap," mid-15c., from tip (v.3).

tip

"put a tip on, adorn with a tip," late 14c., from tip (n.) or Old Norse typpa. Related: Tipped; tipping.

tip

"give a small present of money to," c.1600, originally "to give, hand, pass," thieves' cant, perhaps from tip (v.3) "to tap." The meaning "give a gratuity to" is first attested 1706. The noun in this sense is from 1755; the noun meaning "piece of confidential information" is from 1845; and the verb in the sense "give private information to" is from 1883.\n

\nThe popularity of the tale of the word's supposed origin as an acronym in mid-18th century English taverns seems to be no older than Frederick W. Hackwood's 1909 book "Inns, Ales and Drinking Customs of Old England," where it was said to stand for To insure promptitude (in the form to insure promptness the anecdote is told from 1946). A reviewer of the book in the "Athenaeum" of Oct. 2, 1909, wrote, "We deprecate the careless repetition of popular etymologies such as the notion that "tip" originated from an abbreviated inscription on a box placed on the sideboard in old coaching-inns, the full meaning of which was "To Insure Promptitude." Also see here.

Wiktionary
tip

Etymology 1 n. The extreme end of something, especially when pointed; e.g. the sharp end of a pencil. (From 15th c.) vb. (context transitive English) To provide with a tip; to cover the tip of. (From 15th c.) Etymology 2

n. 1 (context skittles obsolete English) The knocking over of a skittle. (From 17th c.) 2 An act of tipping up or tilting. (From 19th c.) 3 (context UK Australia New Zealand English) An area or a place for dumping something, such as rubbish or refuse, as from a mine; a heap (''see tipple''); a dump. (From 19th c.) 4 (context UK Australia New Zealand by extension English) A recycling centre. 5 (context colloquial English) A very untidy place. (From 20th c.) 6 The act of deflecting with one's fingers, especially the fingertips vb. 1 (context transitive English) To knock over; to make fall down, to overturn. (From early 14th c.) 2 (context intransitive English) To fall over. (From earlier 16th c.) 3 (context intransitive English) To be, or come to be, in a tilted or sloping position; to become unbalanced. (From 17th c.) 4 (context transitive slang dated English) To drink. (From 18th c.) 5 (context transitive English) To dump (refuse). (From 19th c.) 6 (context US transitive English) To pour a libation, particularly from a forty of malt liquor. (From 20th c.) 7 (context transitive English) To deflect with one′s fingers, especially one′s fingertips Etymology 3

n. (context now rare English) A light blow or tap. (From later 16th c.) vb. (context now rare English) To hit quickly and lightly; to tap. (From later 15th c.) Etymology 4

n. A gratuity; a small amount of money left for a bartender, waiter, taxi driver or other servant as a token of appreciation. (From mid-18th c.) vb. To give a small gratuity to, especially to an employee of someone who provides a service. (From early 18th c.) Etymology 5

n. 1 A piece of private or secret information, especially imparted by someone with expert knowledge about sporting odds, business performance etc. (From mid-19th c.) 2 A piece of advice. vb. To give a piece of private information to; to inform (someone) of a clue, secret knowledge, etc. (From later 19th c.) Etymology 6

n. 1 (context AAVE English) A kick or phase; one's current habits or behaviour. 2 (context AAVE English) A particular arena or sphere of interest; a front.

WordNet
tip
  1. n. the extreme end of something; especially something pointed

  2. a relatively small amount of money given for services rendered (as by a waiter) [syn: gratuity, pourboire, baksheesh, bakshish, bakshis, backsheesh]

  3. an indication of potential opportunity; "he got a tip on the stock market"; "a good lead for a job" [syn: lead, steer, confidential information, wind, hint]

  4. a V shape; "the cannibal's teeth were filed to sharp points" [syn: point, peak]

  5. the top point of a mountain or hill; "the view from the peak was magnificent"; "they clambered to the summit of Monadnock" [syn: peak, crown, crest, top, summit]

  6. [also: tipping, tipped]

tip
  1. v. cause to tilt; "tip the screen upward"

  2. mark with a tip; "tip the arrow with the small stone"

  3. give a tip or gratuity to in return for a service, beyond the agreed-on compensation; "Remember to tip the waiter"; "fee the steward" [syn: fee, bung]

  4. cause to topple or tumble by pushing [syn: topple, tumble]

  5. to incline or bend from a vertical position; "She leaned over the banister" [syn: lean, tilt, slant, angle]

  6. walk on one's toes [syn: tiptoe, tippytoe]

  7. strike lightly; "He tapped me on the shoulder" [syn: tap]

  8. give insider information or advise to; "He tipped off the police about the terrorist plot" [syn: tip off]

  9. remove the tip from; "tip artichokes"

  10. [also: tipping, tipped]

Wikipedia
Tip

Tip may refer to:

Tip (album)

Tip is the debut studio album by Canadian rock band Finger Eleven, after their first, Letters from Chutney, was released under their old name of Rainbow Butt Monkeys in 1995. The band was dropped from their record label in 1997, six weeks after the album was released in Canada. They were picked up by Wind-up and the album was re-released on September 15, 1998, to the U.S. and Canada.

Following the release of the album, drummer Rob Gommerman left the band. Rich Beddoe took his place in early 1998.

On October 1, 2014, the album received gold certification in Canada, having surpassed sales of 40,000 units in that country.

Tip (Unix utility)

tip is a Unix utility for establishing a terminal connection to a remote system via a modem. It is commonly associated with BSD Unix, as well as other UNIX flavours such as Sun's Solaris. It was originally included with 4.2BSD.

Tip is referred to in the Solaris documentation as the preferred terminal emulator to connect to a Sun workstation's serial port for maintenance purposes, for example to configure the OpenPROM firmware. A reasonable freely-available equivalent is the cu utility from Taylor UUCP.

Tip (sculpture)

Tip is a public art work by American artist David Middlebrook, located in the Riverwest neighborhood north of downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The sculpture was created for Gordon Park as part of a revitalization initiative.

Tip (law enforcement)

A tip, in law enforcement, is a piece of information regarding a crime or other activity of interest to law enforcement, usually by a source outside of the law enforcement agency. A tip might provide law enforcement personnel with a direction to pursue in the investigation of a crime, and it might be made anonymously, or by a known source whom the recipient might have reason to trust or distrust. In United States law, by itself, a tip generally does not provide probable cause to make an arrest or perform a search of someone's property, but it may be a factor contributing to probable cause if corroborating evidence can be found.

Many law enforcement agencies maintain a tip line to enable citizens to report suspicious activities generally, or to provide information about a particular crime currently under investigation.

Usage examples of "tip".

The rough tips stroked, teased, and then he caught her abraded clit between two fingers.

Oswald Brunies, the strutting, candy-sucking teacher -- a monument will be erected to him -- to him with magnifying glass on elastic, with sticky bag in sticky coat pocket, to him who collected big stones and little stones, rare pebbles, preferably mica gneiss -- muscovy biotite -- quartz, feldspar, and hornblende, who picked up pebbles, examined them, rejected or kept them, to him the Big Playground of the Conradinum was not an abrasive stumbling block but a lasting invitation to scratch about with the tip of his shoe after nine rooster steps.

With the heel of his palm on the underside, he flicked a callused thumb back and forth across the pebbled tip until her breast felt heavy and ached for some fulfillment she could not understand.

Again it is the tip, as stated by Ciesielski, though denied by others, which is sensitive to the attraction of gravity, and by transmission causes the adjoining parts of the radicle to bend towards the centre of the earth.

It appears, therefore, at first sight that greasing the tips of these radicles had checked but little their bending to the adjoining damp surface.

Here it obviously is not the mere touch, but the effect produced by the caustic, which induces the tip to transmit some influence to the adjoining part, causing it to bend away.

When therefore a new tip is reformed on an oblique stump, it probably is developed sooner on one side than on the other: and this in some manner excites the adjoining part to bend to one side.

We have also seen that the destruction of the tip does not prevent the adjoining part from bending, if this part has already received some influence from the tip.

As with horizontally extended radicles, of which the tip has been cut off or destroyed, the part which ought to bend most remains motionless for many hours or days, although exposed at right angles to the full influence of geotropism, we must conclude that the tip alone is sensitive to this power, and transmits some influence or stimulus to the adjoining parts, causing them to bend.

But we now know that it is the tip alone which is acted on, and that this part transmits some influence to the adjoining parts, causing them to curve downwards.

It was ascertained in several cases that this sensitiveness resides in the tip, which transmits an influence causing the adjoining upper part to bend in opposition to geotropism towards the moist object.

Pewt he had the close and Mister Purington he nocked at the door and he asked for me and when i come to the door he made Pewt give me the close and then he told Pewt to tell me he was sorry for what he had done and Pewt he dident want to say it but Mister Purington most lifted Pewt of the ground by the ear and then Pewt he said he was sorry kind of mad like and Mister Purington lifted him up agen til Pewt he stood on his tip toes and his face was all onesided and his eyes all squinty and then he had to say it over agen polite.

The black three-cornered hat, broidered with gold, and adorned with three ostrich tips of red and a white and blue aigrette, was, however, the glory of his bravery.

Either would have given up his epidermis to make for her an Easter hat more cheerfully than the ostrich gives up his tip or the aigrette lays down its life.

He had a speck of luminous paint on the sight at the tip of the barrel to help aiming at night.