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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

stream

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a flood/stream of inquiries
▪ The special offer has produced a flood of inquiries from interested customers.
a mountain stream
▪ The water was as clear and cold as a mountain stream.
a rush/blast/stream of air
▪ There was a cold rush of air as she wound down her window.
a steady stream/flow/trickle
▪ All day long a steady stream of customers came and went.
a stream of traffic (=a long continuous series of cars, trucks etc)
▪ There was a constant stream of traffic.
a streaming coldBritish English (= in which a lot of liquid comes from your nose)
▪ You shouldn’t go to work if you’ve got a streaming cold.
a torrent/stream of abuse (=a series of rude or angry words)
blood gushes/streams (=moves fast)
▪ A man was lying in the street with blood gushing from his head.
constant stream of
▪ There was a constant stream of visitors to the house.
endless stream of
▪ an endless stream of visitors
Gulf Stream
jet stream
light streams/floods in (=a large amount of light comes in)
▪ Light streamed in through the window.
on stream
▪ Costs should fall as new technology comes on-stream.
stream of consciousness
streaming media
sunlight streams/pours somewhere (=a lot comes in)
▪ Mabel pulled back the curtains, and sunlight streamed in.
tears run/roll/stream down sb’s face
▪ Oliver laughed until tears ran down his face.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
constant
▪ Her clinic at the John Radcliffe hospital has a constant stream of parents wanting help.
▪ A constant stream of spoken advice and directions that this child is less able to comprehend will thereby exaggerate her difficulty.
▪ From it, during her life-time, she ejects eggs in an almost constant stream.
▪ The constant stream of praise burbling in the background of the class swelled into shouts of rapture.
▪ I always wondered where her constant stream of men came from.
▪ A constant stream of strangers roamed the neighborhoods.
▪ Cook drove clumsily, keeping up a constant stream of chatter.
▪ Did he want to work with the same people over a period of time or have a constant stream of new ones?
continuous
▪ This behaviour is really a continuous stream of behaviours.
▪ And it organises a continuous stream of philosophical conferences.
▪ Don't just write a continuous stream of unorganised information.
▪ Mr Daubney had been busy with a continuous stream of traffic.
▪ The sisters had no money for food and medicines, but they received a continuous stream of charitable donations.
▪ The frequency of occurrence of each n-gram in a continuous stream of data constitutes the n-gram statistics of the data set.
endless
▪ She had an endless stream of admirers, and I was jealous of all of them.
▪ The endless incomprehensible stream of language was sending Alan to sleep on his feet.
▪ An endless stream of self-powered ants can be sent up to the end of the cable with no further power input whatsoever!
▪ He takes great trouble over a seemingly endless stream of difficulties.
▪ His life is an endless stream of interviews and news conferences, often back to back.
▪ An endless stream of proposals had poured in for the £20 million a year it had to dispense.
▪ The endless stream of parties, dinners and galas all seemed to draw from the same guest list.
little
▪ And there are marsh plants in the bossy bits and beside the little streams.
▪ The little stream is delightfully clear and bright.
▪ Immediately after the stile is a lovely little mountain stream crossed by stepping stones.
▪ He was out hunting and hot and thirsty entered a grotto where a little stream widened into a pool.
▪ Unfortunately, as more and more of our little rivers and streams are converted into drains our fishing opportunities dwindle.
▪ Even the ponds looked healthy, the little streams we crossed in the middle of nowhere.
▪ Right: The little stream which flows under Puente Chinoluiz where we found an abundance of fish.
▪ The recent rain made the little stream passable and the water was very swift, shallow and rocky.
small
▪ Fishing the smaller rivers and streams gives you the chance to actually watch the fish.
▪ But scores of state policemen met two truckloads of the farmers at a spot where a small stream crosses the mountain road.
▪ They might make their own bridge over a very small stream or ditch and find out what will float underneath.
▪ Soon however, she found a small stream carrying runoff from the previous rain.
▪ The small streams are called 1st Order.
▪ He remembered that in his university days he had been impressed by a bridge suspended by chains over a small stream.
▪ Others nestle more gently around small meandering streams.
▪ A small stream of water called Willoughby Run winds between the next two ridges.
steady
▪ The docks were experiencing a boom in trade and all day long a steady stream of customers came and went.
▪ The bill also would provide a steady stream of money for the emissions test.
▪ A steady income stream is required to meet the costs of the syndicated lending department.
▪ But until the weather here turns cool again and the race heats up, look for a steady stream of empty feints.
▪ This, of course, is a recipe for disaster, her attempts to please meeting with a steady stream of rebuffs.
▪ And out of that mouth came a steady stream of bottom-line analysis and profanity.
▪ I4e was having a hard time still and his day was a steady stream of disappointments.
underground
▪ The water is some 20 feet down: a pool fed by a diverted underground stream.
▪ And I read that many cathedrals were built on ancient pagan sites, which in turn were built over underground streams.
▪ The Forest of Dean is riddled with underground streams and springs.
▪ Is the Black Virgin a symbol of the hidden Church and of the underground stream?
▪ Erosion was caused by solution of the rocks and by the mud and pebbles moving in the underground stream.
▪ We have seen how many of the Neolithic monuments, such as Silbury Hill, were built over underground streams.
▪ Bless the underground stream that gave the town its water, and pray that it flows for ever and ever.
■ NOUN
bed
▪ The stream bed below is normally dry as the water percolates through at a lower level.
▪ Restoring the old stream beds would create miles and miles of wetlands and streamside habitat in a and endangered.
▪ They ram sticks upright into the stream bed.
▪ We turned left and followed the gravel stream bed.
▪ A formal tank would perhaps owe as much to landscape gardening as to an idealised stream bed.
income
▪ A steady income stream is required to meet the costs of the syndicated lending department.
▪ However, if there would be a significant decline in her income stream, you would want to make much greater adjustments.
▪ When income stream is not coming through and capital values are falling then you are going to get problems.
▪ You could expect dividends of about 7 percent, producing a $ 12, 537 annual income stream.
▪ Consequently, unlike equities, the income stream from debt is usually known.
▪ Against this income stream, Flynn faced mounting tuition bills, which averaged $ 29, 328 annually over 11 years.
▪ They analyse managements, investments and future income streams.
▪ We want a predictable income stream.
mountain
▪ Immediately after the stile is a lovely little mountain stream crossed by stepping stones.
▪ Or would he perhaps look upon a clear mountain stream and complain about the absence of raw sewage or Industrial effluents?
▪ Spring streams are generally shorter, typically forming the tributaries of mountain streams.
▪ A racing mountain stream ran through the centre of the village.
▪ It creeps over the boulders on the beds of the mountain streams, grazing on algae.
▪ It survived a dunking in a mountain stream, and brought back a picture of a retrieving hand to prove it.
▪ We paddle on seas the green of cat's eyes, and seas as clear as mountain streams.
▪ Its newly tamed garden has fine views and a fast-running mountain stream.
revenue
▪ By increasing the Group's focus on the digital environment, Emap expects to generate significant new revenue streams.
▪ A revenue bond, on the other hand, is paid by a defined revenue stream, specified by the county.
▪ That capital is dead money until the revenue stream comes on line.
▪ In 1996, Massachusetts passed a law to provide an ongoing state revenue stream for connecting activities related to school-to-work.
▪ It's already got a revenue stream from its education courses.
▪ In time, as the portfolio of products develops, additional revenue streams are expected from e-commerce activities.
▪ However, in time, other revenue streams are expected from e-commerce opportunities.
■ VERB
bring
▪ Cash flow from operations will increase as production from these new fields is brought on stream.
▪ Fluka's product line is continually increasing as its own research and development bring new products on stream.
▪ Malacca Strait: Two discoveries in the Selatan field were brought on stream in the second half of 1991.
▪ Some new lines have been brought on stream.
come
▪ They will be concentrated in the same industries and come on stream as the economy is beginning its recovery from the depression.
▪ And out of that mouth came a steady stream of bottom-line analysis and profanity.
▪ Norton believes privatisation of electricity and water companies means more funds will come on stream.
▪ Similar initiatives flowed thereafter as the team members came up with a stream of ideas.
▪ The Lomond platform is due to come on stream in April.
▪ We came to a stream and crossed it on a tree trunk some one had flattened with an adze.
▪ With more and more reactors coming on stream every year, it was inevitable that problems would begin to occur.
▪ A seventy million pounds engine plant came on stream three years ago producing engines for Rover.
cross
▪ A little way along the lane is a humpback bridge that crosses a stream.
▪ When the Gingerbread Man wanted to cross a stream, he accepted help from a fox, who ate him.
▪ Soon he crossed a stream which he did not recognize.
▪ Still holding the mangled trophy above his head, he started to cross the stream.
▪ A tumbling weir creates the localized conditions of an upland brook wherever it crosses a silty lowland stream.
▪ He offered to help the Gingerbread Man cross a stream and told the cookie to jump on his tail.
▪ The jeep was fitted with a snorkel so that it could cross the streams and rivers encountered on the way.
▪ After crossing the stream turn right along the track which passes close to Trepewet Farm.
flow
▪ You cut openings for springs and torrents; you dried up ever-#flowing streams.
▪ These reactions are carried out in flowing low-pressure gas streams.
follow
▪ We turned left and followed the gravel stream bed.
▪ Once on the other side turn left to follow the stream to the stepping stones across the East Dart.
▪ They crossed an old footbridge and followed a stream that bubbled along off to their left.
▪ The Roberts were soon following the stream of passengers heading in the direction of passport control.
▪ We followed a stream up Salubrious Passage before squeezing ourselves through a small twisting passage to bring us back above ground.
▪ One loosened, the rest follow in a steady stream, wrestling bitterly for freedom.
▪ They followed the stream, their feet quiet on the soft mud, the boot soles leaving patterns in damp places.
produce
▪ The second strategy is to produce a stream of new products.
▪ Swinging through the trees produces a visual stream rushing past on both sides of your head.
▪ A succession of published polls typically produces a stream of more or less contradictory results.
▪ It was a Series that produced a stream of new faces to help pull the game toward the new millennium.
▪ Finally, the increase in projects has produced a constant stream of highly-paid expatriate consultants.
▪ The nuclear industry produces waste streams which contain a variety of radioactive metal ions, the extraction of which minimises radioactive discharges.
receive
▪ The councillor had already survived one attempt on his life, and had received a stream of death threats.
▪ The Customs Service will receive a stream of tips from child labor groups and will have to check on relatively few sites.
▪ So it's equally unsurprising that he receives a steady stream of unsolicited portfolios from eager aspirants searching for their break.
▪ In early 1958 he received a stream of well-placed visitors during his fortnightly trips to the capital.
▪ To their alarm, civil servants began to receive a growing stream of horrifying reports.
▪ The sisters had no money for food and medicines, but they received a continuous stream of charitable donations.
▪ Despite the current depressed state of the advertising industry, Ashton receives a regular stream of calls from headhunters.
run
▪ On one side of the street ran a sluggish stream in a deep channel cut through the earth.
▪ In addition Drake set up artificial ecologies in aquaria and in running water for artificial stream ecologies.
▪ Viewed from the hill above, the wooden houses and flagstoned alleys divided by running streams still present an attractive sight.
▪ They grow in running streams as well as in stagnant water of ponds, backwaters, and wells.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
come/be on stream
▪ A seventy million pounds engine plant came on stream three years ago producing engines for Rover.
▪ Norton believes privatisation of electricity and water companies means more funds will come on stream.
▪ The Lomond platform is due to come on stream in April.
▪ The plant is scheduled to come on stream in the spring of 1992.
▪ They will be concentrated in the same industries and come on stream as the economy is beginning its recovery from the depression.
▪ Those two plants came on stream at a time when we needed all the capacity they could provide.
▪ Two years later, the new developments are on stream, bringing the target of 400 job opportunities even closer.
▪ With more and more reactors coming on stream every year, it was inevitable that problems would begin to occur.
the Gulf Stream
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A stream of air swirled the dust into clouds.
▪ a mountain stream
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Below meandered a little stream; the stream believed to be the source of Charles Kingsley's inspiration.
▪ Between there and Drumbreck House they came across a number of swollen burns and encountered streams where no streams had existed before.
▪ It is raining, and I am watching the streams of water form patterns on the windows.
▪ Many course combinations are possible during the first three years, facilitating transfer between these three streams.
▪ Still holding the mangled trophy above his head, he started to cross the stream.
▪ The constant stream of praise burbling in the background of the class swelled into shouts of rapture.
▪ The upper path was deep in mud: the lower one was now a stream.
▪ This free software uses the Internet to deliver a stream of news, stock quotes and other information right to your desktop.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
blood
▪ I looked round and there was blood streaming from this guy's head.
▪ His legs felt wobbly, blood streaming into his face from the cut on his forehead.
▪ There was blood streaming down her white nightdress and also soaking the bedcovers.
▪ So had the warm gushing blood that streamed out of her body, taking her life with it.
▪ Its blood, streaming upon the glass, was slowly set aside by the windscreen wipers.
▪ Men with blood streaming from their head wounds stood defiantly hurling stones.
▪ Bellot retired, blood streaming from a head wound.
cheek
▪ Tears were streaming down his black cheeks.
▪ She held it in her palm and gazed at it, as if stricken, tears streaming down her cheeks.
face
▪ However most walkers were enjoying the view of me with a glove covered in steaming soup and a face streaming with tears.
▪ An black man, his face streaming with blood, shouts at a group of white men.
hair
▪ The black cloak of hair streamed now over her hips and legs.
▪ She wore a nightgown, and her silvery hair streamed free over her shoulders.
▪ On windy days he finds himself flying over Doncaster, flares a-flap, hair streaming behind him like a curtain.
▪ The observer lay sprawled across his gun, his blond hair streaming romantically in the wind.
▪ It was Britta, her blond hair streaming in an unfelt wind.
▪ She turned automatically belly down, hair streaming behind her, and floated in the rushing wind.
sun
▪ Michael and Hope lay on the floor of the nursery with warm sun streaming in over their lovely bodies.
▪ It is my favorite, especially on a sunny morning when the sun streams through the stained glass front door.
▪ When she woke, the sun was streaming through the window.
▪ The setting sun streams over the peaks of the Sierra that fill the background.
▪ The sun was streaming in at the windows of her room.
▪ The sun was streaming in through the window, yet it did nothing to lighten his mood.
▪ When Caroline awakened, the sun was streaming in through the windows.
sunlight
▪ A beam of sunlight streaming through the crack in the door hit her closed eyes.
▪ I looked at her face in the colorless sunlight that streamed through the windows.
▪ Jack instinctively moved to the window and pulled apart the curtains. Sunlight streamed in.
▪ Mabel pulled back the curtains, and sunlight streamed in.
tear
▪ This time was no different and my master left Syon with the tears streaming down his face.
▪ When I pull on my coat, the tears are streaming down my face.
▪ Ivan had gathered Viktor and the baby Valeria in his arms; tears were streaming down his face.
▪ She got up, tears streaming from her eyes as he grabbed her trembling wrist and put the bracelet on her.
▪ Redmond, with tears streaming down his face, tried to carry on.
▪ Elsie, who lived with us at that time, just sat with tears streaming down her face.
▪ I crawled off his body and sat down in the road, tears streaming down my face.
water
▪ Faces appeared, water streaming from their eye-sockets.
▪ Instead it has numerous beehive-shaped patches of shingled sulfides where high-temperature water streams upward.
window
▪ Sunlight streamed in from the windows above the gallery, bathing the polished panels of the walls in a warm glow.
▪ I looked at her face in the colorless sunlight that streamed through the windows.
▪ When she woke, the sun was streaming through the window.
▪ The sun was streaming in at the windows of her room.
▪ The sun was streaming in through the window, yet it did nothing to lighten his mood.
▪ Daylight streamed through the aircraft windows.
▪ When Caroline awakened, the sun was streaming in through the windows.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And they streamed in as the game wound down.
▪ At the appointed hour for the concert to begin, crowds began streaming off the parade route and into the park.
▪ His eyes were streaming with tears from the coughing.
▪ People streamed past us on all sides.
▪ There was a beach of pebbles, grey too, and streaming with rain.
▪ There were no more creatures streaming from the rear of the shuttle.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Stream

Stream \Stream\ (str[=e]m), n. [AS. stre['a]m; akin to OFries. str[=a]m, OS. str[=o]m, D. stroom, G. strom, OHG. stroum, str[=u]m, Dan. & Sw. str["o]m, Icel. straumr, Ir. sroth, Lith. srove, Russ. struia, Gr. "ry`sis a flowing, "rei^n to flow, Skr. sru. [root]174. Cf. Catarrh, Diarrhea, Rheum, Rhythm.]

  1. A current of water or other fluid; a liquid flowing continuously in a line or course, either on the earth, as a river, brook, etc., or from a vessel, reservoir, or fountain; specifically, any course of running water; as, many streams are blended in the Mississippi; gas and steam came from the earth in streams; a stream of molten lead from a furnace; a stream of lava from a volcano.

  2. A beam or ray of light. ``Sun streams.''
    --Chaucer.

  3. Anything issuing or moving with continued succession of parts; as, a stream of words; a stream of sand. ``The stream of beneficence.''
    --Atterbury. ``The stream of emigration.''
    --Macaulay.

  4. A continued current or course; as, a stream of weather. ``The very stream of his life.''
    --Shak.

  5. Current; drift; tendency; series of tending or moving causes; as, the stream of opinions or manners.

    Gulf stream. See under Gulf.

    Stream anchor, Stream cable. (Naut.) See under Anchor, and Cable.

    Stream ice, blocks of ice floating in a mass together in some definite direction.

    Stream tin, particles or masses of tin ore found in alluvial ground; -- so called because a stream of water is the principal agent used in separating the ore from the sand and gravel.

    Stream works (Cornish Mining), a place where an alluvial deposit of tin ore is worked.
    --Ure.

    To float with the stream, figuratively, to drift with the current of opinion, custom, etc., so as not to oppose or check it.

    Syn: Current; flow; rush; tide; course.

    Usage: Stream, Current. These words are often properly interchangeable; but stream is the broader word, denoting a prevailing onward course. The stream of the Mississippi rolls steadily on to the Gulf of Mexico, but there are reflex currents in it which run for a while in a contrary direction.

Stream

Stream \Stream\, v. t. To send forth in a current or stream; to cause to flow; to pour; as, his eyes streamed tears.

It may so please that she at length will stream Some dew of grace into my withered heart.
--Spenser.

2. To mark with colors or embroidery in long tracts.

The herald's mantle is streamed with gold.
--Bacon.

3. To unfurl.
--Shak.

To stream the buoy. (Naut.) See under Buoy.

Stream

Stream \Stream\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Streamed; p. pr. & vb. n. Streaming.]

  1. To issue or flow in a stream; to flow freely or in a current, as a fluid or whatever is likened to fluids; as, tears streamed from her eyes.

    Beneath those banks where rivers stream.
    --Milton.

  2. To pour out, or emit, a stream or streams.

    A thousand suns will stream on thee.
    --Tennyson.

  3. To issue in a stream of light; to radiate.

  4. To extend; to stretch out with a wavy motion; to float in the wind; as, a flag streams in the wind.

Wikipedia

Stream (disambiguation)

A stream is a body of moving water.

Stream or streaming may also refer to:

Stream (album)

Stream is the eighth album by Fischer-Z. The album contains the single "Protection", which explored the dark area of child exploitation. Following the album, John Watts concentrated on his solo career again, making this the last album by Fischer-Z, before its slight revival again in 2002.

Stream (computer science)

In type theory and functional programming, a stream is a potentially infinite analog of a list, given by the coinductive definition:

data Stream α = Cons α (Stream α)

Generating and computing with streams requires lazy evaluation, either implicitly in a lazily evaluated language or by creating and forcing thunks in an eager language. In total languages they must be defined as codata and can be iterated over using (guarded) corecursion.

Stream (computing)

In computer science, a stream is a sequence of data elements made available over time. A stream can be thought of as items on a conveyor belt being processed one at a time rather than in large batches

Streams are processed differently from batch data – normal functions cannot operate on streams as a whole, as they have potentially unlimited data, and formally, streams are codata (potentially unlimited), not data (which is finite). Functions that operate on a stream, producing another stream, are known as filters, and can be connected in pipelines, analogously to function composition. Filters may operate on one item of a stream at a time, or may base an item of output on multiple items of input, such as a moving average.

Stream

A stream is a body of water with a current, confined within a bed and banks. Depending on its location or certain characteristics, a stream may be referred to as a branch, brook, beck, burn, creek, crick, ghyll, gill, kill, lick, mill race, race, rill, river, syke, bayou, rivulet, streamage, wash, run, or runnel.

Streams are important as conduits in the water cycle, instruments in groundwater recharge, and corridors for fish and wildlife migration. The biological habitat in the immediate vicinity of a stream is called a riparian zone. Given the status of the ongoing Holocene extinction, streams play an important corridor role in connecting fragmented habitats and thus in conserving biodiversity. The study of streams and waterways in general is known as surface hydrology and is a core element of environmental geography.

WordNet

stream

  1. v. to extend, wave or float outward, as if in the wind; "their manes streamed like stiff black pennants in the wind"

  2. exude profusely; "She was streaming with sweat"; "His nose streamed blood"

  3. move in large numbers; "people were pouring out of the theater"; "beggars pullulated in the plaza" [syn: pour, swarm, teem, pullulate]

  4. rain heavily; "Put on your rain coat-- it's pouring outside!" [syn: pour, pelt, rain cats and dogs, rain buckets]

  5. flow freely and abundantly; "Tears streamed down her face" [syn: well out]

stream

  1. n. a natural body of running water flowing on or under the earth [syn: watercourse]

  2. dominant course (suggestive of running water) of successive events or ideas; "two streams of development run through American history"; "stream of consciousness"; "the flow of thought"; "the current of history" [syn: flow, current]

  3. a steady flow (usually from natural causes); "the raft floated downstream on the current"; "he felt a stream of air" [syn: current]

  4. the act of flowing or streaming; continuous progression [syn: flow]

  5. something that resembles a flowing stream in moving continuously; "a stream of people emptied from the terminal"; "the museum had planned carefully for the flow of visitors" [syn: flow]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

stream

early 13c., "to flow copiously," from stream (n.). Transitive sense "discharge in a stream" is from late 14c. Related: Streamed; streaming. Compare German strömen, Dutch stroomen, Danish strömme, all verbs from nouns.

stream

Old English stream "a course of water," from Proto-Germanic *straumaz (cognates: Old Saxon strom, Old Norse straumr, Danish strøm, Swedish ström, Norwegian straum, Old Frisian stram, Dutch stroom, Old High German stroum, German Strom "current, river"), from PIE root *sreu- "to flow" (see rheum).\n

\nFrom early 12c. as "anything issuing from a source and flowing continuously." Meaning "current in the sea" (as in Gulf Stream) is recorded from late 14c., as is the sense of "steady current in a river." Stream of consciousness in lit crit first recorded 1930, originally in psychology (1855). Stream of thought is from 1890.

Wiktionary

stream

n. A small river; a large creek; a body of moving water confined by banks. vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To flow in a continuous or steady manner, like a liquid. 2 To extend; to stretch out with a wavy motion; to float in the wind. 3 (context Internet English) To push continuous data (e.g. music) from a server to a client computer while it is being used (played) on the client.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "stream".

Her thoughts are like the lotus Abloom by sacred streams Beneath the temple arches Where Quiet sits and dreams.

In the cold stream Deacon Rose bathed and performed his ablutions and meditations, while a much subdued Pryor saw to the horses.

Not only was it exceptionally lofty, and on one flank of that series of bluffs which has before been mentioned as constituting the line upon which the Confederate grip of the stream was based, but the tortuous character of the channel gave particular facilities for an enfilading fire on vessels both before and after they came abreast the works.

Their skilful guide, changing his plan of operations, then conducted the army by a longer circuit, but through a fertile territory, towards the head of the Euphrates, where the infant river is reduced to a shallow and accessible stream.

The latter of those mighty streams, which rises at the distance of only thirty miles from the former, flows above thirteen hundred miles, for the most part to the south-east, collects the tribute of sixty navigable rivers, and is, at length, through six mouths, received into the Euxine, which appears scarcely equal to such an accession of waters.

V With shudders chill as aconite, The couchant chewer of the cud Will start at times in pussy fright Before the dogs, when reads her sprite The streaks predicting streams of blood.

Her reaction had been stupid, she admitted as Acorn picked his way across a stream.

Each of the different cultural groups such as coho, steelhead and sockeye have different times and styles in which they run to spawn in the upland streams, but each of their cultures show a similarity of adaptation to the earth.

In the hard red light of dawn the leaves and vines dandled in the current seemed to deliquesce, to be runoff streams of dye, matter adrip into meltwater.

But the spell breaks, the cut is plunged into the aerated stream of her Puraflo faucet, the finger wrapped in a floral blue paper towel.

I must confess she did not seem at all sorry to have me taken off her hands, for after cautioning me to beware of a number of things I did not so much as know by name, she shot off like a respectable old aerolite with a black trail streaming out behind.

There was light everywhere, coming not from candles set afire, but streaming in through the windows in lovely parallel lines of emerald and blue.

And saw a stream of animals, hoofed, padded, clawed and dashing, splashing through the ponds for Various Aquatic Birds, setting the night aflight - all of them making for the rear gate that opened to the Tiroler Garten.

Out front on the green cement lawn a tiptoed Cupid, wings aflutter, squirted from pouty lips an eternal stream of blue-colored water into a marble pool deep in good-luck coins and casino chips.

Reuben sat his horse beside me, with his spare shirt streaming in the wind and his great pikemen all agrin behind him, though his thoughts and his eyes were too far away to note them.