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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
fish
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fish pond
a fishing boat
▪ The fishing boats go out to sea early in the morning.
a fishing expedition
▪ We’re organizing a fishing expedition to the lake for next week.
a fishing permit
▪ To fish you’ll need a rod licence and a fishing permit.
a fishing port
▪ The town is Iceland's biggest fishing port.
a fishing village
▪ Once a fishing village, this is now a friendly, lively international resort.
a fishing/hunting licence (=a licence that allows you to fish/hunt)
▪ He renewed his hunting license.
a fish/seafood restaurant
▪ I went to a seafood restaurant by the pier for lunch.
a shopping/fishing/skiing etc trip
▪ He was knocked off his bicycle on his way home from a shopping trip.
coarse fishing
drinks like a fish (=regularly drinks a lot of alcohol)
▪ My flatmate Cherry drinks like a fish.
fish and chips
fish and chips
fish and chips
▪ Get some fish and chips on your way home.
fish farm
fish finger
fish fry
fish kettle
fish meal
fish slice
fish stick
fish/fruit and vegetable/flower etc market
▪ There’s a good antiques market here on Sundays.
fishing line
fishing line (=line for catching fish)
▪ The fishing line snapped and the fish got away.
fishing net
▪ a fishing net
fishing quotas
▪ The fishing qoutas are strictly enforced.
fishing rod
fishing tackle
fish/marine/breeding tank (=for keeping or breeding fish in)
flying fish
fresh fruit/vegetables/fish/bread etc
▪ The beans are fresh from the garden.
ice fishing
processed cheese/meat/fish etc
salted pork/meat/fish
the agricultural/fishing industry
▪ There has been a decline in Britain’s fishing industry.
the hunting/shooting/fishing season
▪ Autumn was traditionally the hunting season.
wet fish
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ Carp are no different from any other big fish.
▪ When a herring meets its end, it is usually in the mouth of a bigger fish or a in a net.
▪ With bigger fish in serious decline, mackerel, sardines and anchovies are now the main targets.
▪ On a recent afternoon, he lobbed a variety of plastic lures toward the big fish.
▪ Entire gangs have been arrested, and some very big fish have been netted.
▪ He wanted a big fish to take her bait.
▪ The bigger fish will turn up haphazardly to almost anyone.
▪ Not a good place to catch big fish.
dead
▪ I just preferred to think of dead fish rather than Syl.
▪ So I got that net out of there myself and found a lot of dead fish, but at least no mammals.
▪ The dead fish were collected for possible use as evidence should a prosecution result.
▪ They feed on crustaceans, molluscs, aquatic insects, live fish and will scavenge on dead fish.
▪ There's a smell of salt and mud and dead fish, which I find unpleasantly reminiscent of somewhere else.
▪ Thousands of dead fish were the result of toxic chemicals being dumped in this brook near Coleford.
▪ The swarming lampreys consume not only dead or sickly fish but set upon otherwise healthy ones.
fresh
▪ What advantage did Grimsby have over Hull for the distribution of fresh fish?
▪ We had not eaten fresh fish for a couple of days, and the three yellowfins would make a splendid meal.
▪ Is there a good fresh fish market near by?
▪ Loi caught a splendid dorado to provide juicy fresh fish cutlets.
▪ Specialities are fresh fish and shellfish.
▪ Included in this expansion is a fresh fish market where you can expect an impressive selection.
▪ Hotels are simple but adequate, and you can eat the freshest of fish in cheerfully informal, unlicensed restaurants.
▪ Count on fresh, high-quality fish.
freshwater
▪ Test for toxicity with a few Daphnia in the container, as they are more sensitive to toxins than most freshwater fish.
▪ The pollution of lakes and rivers has reduced the supply of freshwater fish.
▪ The bichir and other primitive freshwater fish have a pouch opening from the gut to enable them to breathe air.
▪ Perch, Salmon, Pike and Eel; regional specialities from the freshwater fish are perfect accompaniment to the wines of Anjou.
▪ A fifth of all freshwater fish are either extinct or endangered.
▪ Both marine and freshwater varieties of fish are farmed.
large
▪ How big do they grow, and will they then eat larger fish?
▪ While the gulls look on, I select a few of the larger, livelier fish and drop them into my bucket.
▪ These large fish are called ferox, a distinct species of brown trout that make their living by eating their smaller brethren.
▪ These rocks also stirred with novel species of eyeless shrimp, white crabs, translucent sea anemones and large, pink fish.
▪ Andy Parkes tells us how to get large fish at cheaper prices by growing them on.
▪ A large and quiet fish very much out of water.
▪ If so, why is it that the largest known fish is smaller than the largest whale?
▪ Then he went to a big plastic fish box, and hauled out a large red ocean fish.
little
▪ The thing up which the little fish in the river swims if you aren't careful.
▪ Picked clean by the little fish at the bottom of the sea.
▪ It was a little fish that was colorless and thoughtful-looking, one of those students who study hard and barely pass.
▪ The little bit of fish for the landlady's cat was beginning to stink.
▪ Tiny little fish that swim from the ocean into the river mouths, the same time every year.
▪ Words were rising through the blackness like little wriggling golden fish.
▪ A little fish pond, just over two feet square, and not terribly deep.
small
▪ Crane for plenty of small fish from the bottom end, and some good nets of roach from the Ashtip Field.
▪ There must have been thousands upon thousands of small fish driven upward to the surface by hordes of squid feeding from below.
▪ Runcorn opened on June 1 and has been terrific with small fish all along and bream at Astmoor and S Bends.
▪ Probably the seabirds found extra food among the small fish and marine animals which clustered near the larger items of rubbish.
▪ She thinks perhaps small fish are nibbling at her, but it is pleasant, it doesn't hurt.
▪ Little or no meat was eaten, and only small amounts of fish.
▪ They can also be dangerous to small fish and fry, which might get stuck in the tangle of filaments and suffocate.
tropical
▪ All about tropical fish by Derek McInery Favourite species?
▪ To seaward, bright tropical fish dance in the coral reefs.
▪ In tropical tanks vegetarian fish, like the larger barbs will also find it a useful supplement to their diet.
▪ Observe the reeds waving as you pass. Tropical fish ignore you.
▪ The full set builds to an invaluable reference collection of the most popular tropical fish.
▪ I know that the Plec is a tropical fish but it is tolerant to the 26-27°C temperature of my tank.
▪ In particular, mangroves are the nurseries for huge numbers of tropical fish, which as adults live in the open sea.
▪ Coral reefs and tropical fish abound for those who like to snorkel.
■ NOUN
farm
▪ The fish farm has enough work to keep two people very busy.
▪ Read in studio A judge has ordered a fish farm to compensate a group of anglers for ruining their fishing season.
▪ Seen through the lacy walls of the village pool hall the polystyrene floats of the fish farm bobbed busily.
▪ His Honour Mark Dyer said the fish farm was well aware that that particular stretch of river was reserved for brown trout.
▪ But the owners of the fish farm - Gale and Ainslie Limited - insist they weren't negligent.
▪ The group includes rare breed centres, a fish farm and even a vineyard.
pond
Pond purloined: A Scarborough school's nature garden has been scuppered by thieves who made off with their fish pond.
▪ A little fish pond, just over two feet square, and not terribly deep.
▪ He keeps her a prisoner in a fish pond where he stores the catch.
▪ He thought she looked exactly as Violet might look when sitting at the edge of a fish pond.
▪ To the north of Selborne the path goes past damp hollows which were once medieval fish ponds.
▪ On the fish pond side, be sure to look for the small Neo-Classical temple, the work of Luigi Cagnola.
tank
▪ There was a fish tank and a heap of magazines.
▪ Artificial aeration sometimes permits, unfortunately, the overcrowding of the fish tank.
▪ It is easy to see why the Angelfish makes such a popular addition to a community fish tank.
▪ He opened up the lid of what must have been a fish tank holding their live catch.
▪ Trying to escape him was about as feasible as trying to escape a very big shark in a very small fish tank.
▪ A good home for the caterpillars is a fish tank.
▪ Your best bet is to let the insurance company know that you have a fish tank before you take out a policy.
▪ The large fish tank is set into the back wall most tastefully.
■ VERB
catch
▪ And wouldn't it have been nice to catch a fish like that on the appropriate tackle for the species?
▪ The bridge on State Road 46 is another good spot to catch the fish, using minnows.
▪ I find myself pantomiming a bird with large wings, diving into the water, catching a fish in its beak.
▪ I'd gone out to catch fish ... but I let them be.
▪ After three days of total frustration trying to catch the elusive fish, Trondur did not give the dorado a chance.
▪ She had caught no fish, or perhaps she had thrown them back.
▪ When a Republican catches a fish, he mounts it.
eat
▪ How big do they grow, and will they then eat larger fish?
▪ I recently ate raw fish with a sushi virgin.
▪ It is not averse to eating any small fish it may come across during its night time forays.
▪ They eat fish from streams polluted with chlorinated hydrocarbons.
▪ I noticed her hanging around the bar, staring through its window, while I ate my fish and potatoes.
▪ Then the Kuchas sat down and ate the fish in his honor.
▪ Instead, eat more fish, particularly oily fish such as mackerel. 9.
▪ It prefers live fishes, but it can be induced to eat cut fish and shrimp.
feed
▪ Stop feeding the fish, to cut down on the waste matter being produced.
▪ Until recently Gomez had to feed the fish and invertebrates dwelling on the synthetic reef with supplemental food.
▪ Nowadays, I never ever feed tubifex to my fish.
▪ They feed on fish, grasshoppers, bird eggs, berries-almost anything. 5.
▪ They feed the fish themselves under my supervision.
▪ It was a dorado or dolphin fish, a voracious predator which feeds mostly on flying fish.
▪ Many fishkeepers feed their fish just once a day, but this is very different to the ideal situation.
▪ Lettuce trapped in an algae scraper will feed vegetarian fish.
fry
▪ Some instructions may suggest frying the fish in butter or oil.
▪ His stomach growled at the smell of frying fish.
▪ Therefore, eggs or fry of other fish are liable to be eaten.
▪ Renie never seemed to mind wearing clothes that reeked of onions, fried fish, boiled cabbage.
▪ Deep fry fish cakes and warm for 5 mins before serving with tomato sauce and lightly-boiled leeks and celery.
▪ But the floors feel spongy with moisture, and the air is saturated with the smell of mildew and fried fish.
▪ The fried fish is as good hot as it is cold.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
another/a different kettle of fish
▪ But the wilful destruction of young lives was a different kettle of fish altogether.
▪ For machines with pots of memory and using Windows, though, RAMdrive is a different kettle of fish.
▪ Harvey, with his public school accent and laid-back manner, was a different kettle of fish.
▪ Miss Braithwaite was clearly a different kettle of fish from the other Deaconess he'd met, Miss Tilley.
▪ The other envelope, however, was a different kettle of fish.
▪ The Schaubu hne is a different kettle of fish.
▪ Tonally the Atlantis is a different kettle of fish from any Rick I've ever played before.
▪ Whether or not he would ever admit it was a different kettle of fish entirely.
farmed salmon/fish/rabbits etc
▪ As a result, commercially farmed rabbits are available, both for meat and hair; the angora is an example.
▪ The documentary Warning from the Wild-the Price of Salmon looked at levels of polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in farmed salmon.
▪ The practice also raises questions about the quality of farmed fish, says Pauly.
▪ Though perfectly and classically cooked, the one I sampled had the muddy, acrid flavor of farmed fish.
fish for compliments
fish slice
fish/rice/potato etc cake
▪ Deep fry fish cakes and warm for 5 mins before serving with tomato sauce and lightly-boiled leeks and celery.
▪ From top, Smoked salmon rolls with pesto rice, Christmas jewel basmati salad, Basmati rice cake.
▪ I bet he had the fish cakes.
▪ In celebration of a new weight control year, the Quaker Oats Co. has developed yet another rice cake flavor.
▪ Lunch Rice cakes, low-fat cheese, tomatoes and onion, apple.
▪ My husband and the minister wives who come to the party do not care for the rice cake.
▪ She'd claim it was quite ordinary - fish cake s, only they went wrong - that sort of thing.
▪ Slide the potato cake from the pan on to a plate.
meat/fish/tomato etc paste
▪ A world devoid of tomato soup, tomato sauce, tomato ketchup and tomato paste is hard to visualize.
▪ Add beer, tomatoes, and tomato paste and bring to a boil.
▪ In a bowl, combine the red pepper, yoghurt, ketchup, tomato paste and Worcester sauce.
▪ Lacking fresh tomatoes and meat we tried to compensate by piling tomato paste into all our stews and soups and sauces.
▪ So, for a start, be miserly about tomato paste in meat sauces for pasta.
▪ Stir browned onions, molasses, mustard, tomato paste, cloves and cinnamon into beans.
▪ Stir in rice, tomatoes with their liquid, tomato paste, water, cumin and chiles.
▪ Stir in tomato paste and tarragon.
soup/dish/fish etc of the day
▪ A little skimmer bream is my fourth fish of the day and the first I have had to net.
▪ The fish of the day, a grilled sole, was of the same ilk.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ We're having fish for supper.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
Fishing the smaller rivers and streams gives you the chance to actually watch the fish.
▪ At once, I found myself swallowed by a huge fish.
▪ Communication Colour is more important to fish than to mammals and birds, and in fish it is often highly variable.
▪ Dredge the fish in the bread crumb mixture, pressing crumbs on a bit to stick.
▪ Even birds need toys - fish must have some plants and rocks to swim around.
▪ To ensure that the breeding of such fish is continued we will try to obtain new specimens whenever possible.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
around
▪ Mark fished around in the pile of paper for some which was suitable and gave it to him.
▪ I fished around in my handbag, coming up with some loose change.
▪ Or fish around in my handbag for a handkerchief.
▪ Ross fished around with the scope, looking frantically for his target, but nothing would stay still.
out
▪ He fished out his crumpled cigarette pack and lit up.
▪ He fished out some long canvas bags from the barn and told me the picking started at dawn.
▪ He fished out the number Major Morton had given him and dialled.
▪ The dead creatures, fished out, their fur sleek with wet, were smaller than rats.
▪ So there we are trying to fish out a bunch of keys from a three-foot pit full of human urine and excrement.
▪ You fished out those women yourself.
■ NOUN
angler
▪ Arguments started on some fisheries when match organisers and pleasure anglers tried to fish venues usually left for freelance angling.
▪ In the 1990s alone, some 2 million anglers have fished here without hooking anything even remotely resembling this record fish.
▪ Four anglers fished the night we blanked; three crowded together and one only 50 yards further along the same bank.
boat
▪ Local boats could not fish much deeper without major modifications.
▪ Pleasure boats and fishing boats had once been stored in the vast rooms below the earth.
▪ Fleetwood charter boats able to fish the edges of the bay during unsettled weather but only found dabs and whiting.
▪ Drift-net vessels, like the tuna boats fishing on dolphins, have long been stubbornly refusing to take observers on board.
fisherman
▪ All the fishermen stop fishing to join in the drive.
▪ Those waters where the missiles are landing are where us small fishermen often go to fish.
▪ The problem with the lake in the park was that local fishermen wanted to fish in it.
▪ So the fishermen fish even harder, to make up the catches they need to keep their vessels at sea.
▪ The paradox is, in short, that fishermen would catch more fish if they fished less!
lake
▪ Didn't fishermen like to go out into the middle of lakes to fish?
▪ He sought out Burkett and Sylvia and went on the lake to fish.
pocket
▪ Antonio fished in his back pocket and handed him a card.
▪ Johnny fished in his trouser pocket for a somewhat battered packet of cigarettes and a slim gold lighter.
▪ Elliott got in, arching in his seat to fish in his pocket for keys.
▪ He fished in his pocket until he found a coin.
▪ He fished hurriedly in his pocket and found a waxed box with his last few matches in it.
pond
▪ Capron had even provided the gun that had been fished from the pond on the heath.
rod
▪ One rod fished three maggots with three casters on the other.
waters
▪ Day permits are available for fishing its waters.
■ VERB
hunt
▪ Soon he and his wife were visiting Prides, and Roland was hunting and fishing with Shaw.
▪ He may hunt and fish at his cabin in Minnesota.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
another/a different kettle of fish
▪ But the wilful destruction of young lives was a different kettle of fish altogether.
▪ For machines with pots of memory and using Windows, though, RAMdrive is a different kettle of fish.
▪ Harvey, with his public school accent and laid-back manner, was a different kettle of fish.
▪ Miss Braithwaite was clearly a different kettle of fish from the other Deaconess he'd met, Miss Tilley.
▪ The other envelope, however, was a different kettle of fish.
▪ The Schaubu hne is a different kettle of fish.
▪ Tonally the Atlantis is a different kettle of fish from any Rick I've ever played before.
▪ Whether or not he would ever admit it was a different kettle of fish entirely.
be on a fishing expedition
▪ If anyone asked what they were up to, they planned to say they were on a fishing expedition.
fish for compliments
fish slice
fish/rice/potato etc cake
▪ Deep fry fish cakes and warm for 5 mins before serving with tomato sauce and lightly-boiled leeks and celery.
▪ From top, Smoked salmon rolls with pesto rice, Christmas jewel basmati salad, Basmati rice cake.
▪ I bet he had the fish cakes.
▪ In celebration of a new weight control year, the Quaker Oats Co. has developed yet another rice cake flavor.
▪ Lunch Rice cakes, low-fat cheese, tomatoes and onion, apple.
▪ My husband and the minister wives who come to the party do not care for the rice cake.
▪ She'd claim it was quite ordinary - fish cake s, only they went wrong - that sort of thing.
▪ Slide the potato cake from the pan on to a plate.
meat/fish/tomato etc paste
▪ A world devoid of tomato soup, tomato sauce, tomato ketchup and tomato paste is hard to visualize.
▪ Add beer, tomatoes, and tomato paste and bring to a boil.
▪ In a bowl, combine the red pepper, yoghurt, ketchup, tomato paste and Worcester sauce.
▪ Lacking fresh tomatoes and meat we tried to compensate by piling tomato paste into all our stews and soups and sauces.
▪ So, for a start, be miserly about tomato paste in meat sauces for pasta.
▪ Stir browned onions, molasses, mustard, tomato paste, cloves and cinnamon into beans.
▪ Stir in rice, tomatoes with their liquid, tomato paste, water, cumin and chiles.
▪ Stir in tomato paste and tarragon.
soup/dish/fish etc of the day
▪ A little skimmer bream is my fourth fish of the day and the first I have had to net.
▪ The fish of the day, a grilled sole, was of the same ilk.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He threw in a bucket of groundbait, a pint of maggots, and fished all night without a bite.
▪ Mainly he was happy to fish.
▪ Some went fishing from a small outrigger canoe they paddled out into the lagoon.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Fish

Fish \Fish\ (f[i^]sh), n. [F. fiche peg, mark, fr. fisher to fix.] A counter, used in various games.

Fish

Fish \Fish\, n.; pl. Fishes (f[i^]sh"[e^]z), or collectively, Fish. [OE. fisch, fisc, fis, AS. fisc; akin to D. visch, OS. & OHG. fisk, G. fisch, Icel. fiskr, Sw. & Dan. fisk, Goth. fisks, L. piscis, Ir. iasg. Cf. Piscatorial. In some cases, such as fish joint, fish plate, this word has prob. been confused with fish, fr. F. fichea peg.]

  1. A name loosely applied in popular usage to many animals of diverse characteristics, living in the water.

  2. (Zo["o]l.) An oviparous, vertebrate animal usually having fins and a covering scales or plates. It breathes by means of gills, and lives almost entirely in the water. See Pisces.

    Note: The true fishes include the Teleostei (bony fishes), Ganoidei, Dipnoi, and Elasmobranchii or Selachians (sharks and skates). Formerly the leptocardia and Marsipobranciata were also included, but these are now generally regarded as two distinct classes, below the fishes.

  3. pl. The twelfth sign of the zodiac; Pisces.

  4. The flesh of fish, used as food.

  5. (Naut.)

    1. A purchase used to fish the anchor.

    2. A piece of timber, somewhat in the form of a fish, used to strengthen a mast or yard. Note: Fish is used adjectively or as part of a compound word; as, fish line, fish pole, fish spear, fish-bellied. Age of Fishes. See under Age, n., 8. Fish ball, fish (usually salted codfish) shared fine, mixed with mashed potato, and made into the form of a small, round cake. [U.S.] Fish bar. Same as Fish plate (below). Fish beam (Mech.), a beam one of whose sides (commonly the under one) swells out like the belly of a fish. --Francis. Fish crow (Zo["o]l.), a species of crow ( Corvus ossifragus), found on the Atlantic coast of the United States. It feeds largely on fish. Fish culture, the artifical breeding and rearing of fish; pisciculture. Fish davit. See Davit. Fish day, a day on which fish is eaten; a fast day. Fish duck (Zo["o]l.), any species of merganser. Fish fall, the tackle depending from the fish davit, used in hauling up the anchor to the gunwale of a ship. Fish garth, a dam or weir in a river for keeping fish or taking them easily. Fish glue. See Isinglass. Fish joint, a joint formed by a plate or pair of plates fastened upon two meeting beams, plates, etc., at their junction; -- used largely in connecting the rails of railroads. Fish kettle, a long kettle for boiling fish whole. Fish ladder, a dam with a series of steps which fish can leap in order to ascend falls in a river. Fish line, or Fishing line, a line made of twisted hair, silk, etc., used in angling. Fish louse (Zo["o]l.), any crustacean parasitic on fishes, esp. the parasitic Copepoda, belonging to Caligus, Argulus, and other related genera. See Branchiura. Fish maw (Zo["o]l.), the stomach of a fish; also, the air bladder, or sound. Fish meal, fish desiccated and ground fine, for use in soups, etc. Fish oil, oil obtained from the bodies of fish and marine animals, as whales, seals, sharks, from cods' livers, etc. Fish owl (Zo["o]l.), a fish-eating owl of the Old World genera Scotopelia and Ketupa, esp. a large East Indian species ( K. Ceylonensis). Fish plate, one of the plates of a fish joint. Fish pot, a wicker basket, sunk, with a float attached, for catching crabs, lobsters, etc. Fish pound, a net attached to stakes, for entrapping and catching fish; a weir. [Local, U.S.] --Bartlett. Fish slice, a broad knife for dividing fish at table; a fish trowel. Fish slide, an inclined box set in a stream at a small fall, or ripple, to catch fish descending the current. --Knight. Fish sound, the air bladder of certain fishes, esp. those that are dried and used as food, or in the arts, as for the preparation of isinglass. Fish story, a story which taxes credulity; an extravagant or incredible narration. [Colloq. U.S.] --Bartlett. Fish strainer.

      1. A metal colander, with handles, for taking fish from a boiler.

      2. A perforated earthenware slab at the bottom of a dish, to drain the water from a boiled fish.

        Fish trowel, a fish slice.

        Fish weir or Fish wear, a weir set in a stream, for catching fish.

        Neither fish nor flesh, Neither fish nor fowl (Fig.), neither one thing nor the other.

Fish

Fish \Fish\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Fished; p. pr. & vb. n. Fishing.]

  1. To attempt to catch fish; to be employed in taking fish, by any means, as by angling or drawing a net.

  2. To seek to obtain by artifice, or indirectly to seek to draw forth; as, to fish for compliments.

    Any other fishing question.
    --Sir W. Scott.

Fish

Fish \Fish\, v. t. [OE. fischen, fisken, fissen, AS. fiscian; akin to G. fischen, OHG. fisc?n, Goth. fisk?n. See Fish the animal.]

  1. To catch; to draw out or up; as, to fish up an anchor.

  2. To search by raking or sweeping.
    --Swift.

  3. To try with a fishing rod; to catch fish in; as, to fish a stream.
    --Thackeray.

  4. To strengthen (a beam, mast, etc.), or unite end to end (two timbers, railroad rails, etc.) by bolting a plank, timber, or plate to the beam, mast, or timbers, lengthwise on one or both sides. See Fish joint, under Fish, n.

    To fish the anchor. (Naut.) See under Anchor.

Fish

Fish \Fish\, n.; pl. Fishes (f[i^]sh"[e^]z), or collectively, Fish. [OE. fisch, fisc, fis, AS. fisc; akin to D. visch, OS. & OHG. fisk, G. fisch, Icel. fiskr, Sw. & Dan. fisk, Goth. fisks, L. piscis, Ir. iasg. Cf. Piscatorial. In some cases, such as fish joint, fish plate, this word has prob. been confused with fish, fr. F. fichea peg.]

  1. A name loosely applied in popular usage to many animals of diverse characteristics, living in the water.

  2. (Zo["o]l.) An oviparous, vertebrate animal usually having fins and a covering scales or plates. It breathes by means of gills, and lives almost entirely in the water. See Pisces.

    Note: The true fishes include the Teleostei (bony fishes), Ganoidei, Dipnoi, and Elasmobranchii or Selachians (sharks and skates). Formerly the leptocardia and Marsipobranciata were also included, but these are now generally regarded as two distinct classes, below the fishes.

  3. pl. The twelfth sign of the zodiac; Pisces.

  4. The flesh of fish, used as food.

  5. (Naut.)

    1. A purchase used to fish the anchor.

    2. A piece of timber, somewhat in the form of a fish, used to strengthen a mast or yard. Note: Fish is used adjectively or as part of a compound word; as, fish line, fish pole, fish spear, fish-bellied. Age of Fishes. See under Age, n., 8. Fish ball, fish (usually salted codfish) shared fine, mixed with mashed potato, and made into the form of a small, round cake. [U.S.] Fish bar. Same as Fish plate (below). Fish beam (Mech.), a beam one of whose sides (commonly the under one) swells out like the belly of a fish. --Francis. Fish crow (Zo["o]l.), a species of crow ( Corvus ossifragus), found on the Atlantic coast of the United States. It feeds largely on fish. Fish culture, the artifical breeding and rearing of fish; pisciculture. Fish davit. See Davit. Fish day, a day on which fish is eaten; a fast day. Fish duck (Zo["o]l.), any species of merganser. Fish fall, the tackle depending from the fish davit, used in hauling up the anchor to the gunwale of a ship. Fish garth, a dam or weir in a river for keeping fish or taking them easily. Fish glue. See Isinglass. Fish joint, a joint formed by a plate or pair of plates fastened upon two meeting beams, plates, etc., at their junction; -- used largely in connecting the rails of railroads. Fish kettle, a long kettle for boiling fish whole. Fish ladder, a dam with a series of steps which fish can leap in order to ascend falls in a river. Fish line, or Fishing line, a line made of twisted hair, silk, etc., used in angling. Fish louse (Zo["o]l.), any crustacean parasitic on fishes, esp. the parasitic Copepoda, belonging to Caligus, Argulus, and other related genera. See Branchiura. Fish maw (Zo["o]l.), the stomach of a fish; also, the air bladder, or sound. Fish meal, fish desiccated and ground fine, for use in soups, etc. Fish oil, oil obtained from the bodies of fish and marine animals, as whales, seals, sharks, from cods' livers, etc. Fish owl (Zo["o]l.), a fish-eating owl of the Old World genera Scotopelia and Ketupa, esp. a large East Indian species ( K. Ceylonensis). Fish plate, one of the plates of a fish joint. Fish pot, a wicker basket, sunk, with a float attached, for catching crabs, lobsters, etc. Fish pound, a net attached to stakes, for entrapping and catching fish; a weir. [Local, U.S.] --Bartlett. Fish slice, a broad knife for dividing fish at table; a fish trowel. Fish slide, an inclined box set in a stream at a small fall, or ripple, to catch fish descending the current. --Knight. Fish sound, the air bladder of certain fishes, esp. those that are dried and used as food, or in the arts, as for the preparation of isinglass. Fish story, a story which taxes credulity; an extravagant or incredible narration. [Colloq. U.S.] --Bartlett. Fish strainer.

      1. A metal colander, with handles, for taking fish from a boiler.

      2. A perforated earthenware slab at the bottom of a dish, to drain the water from a boiled fish.

        Fish trowel, a fish slice.

        Fish weir or Fish wear, a weir set in a stream, for catching fish.

        Neither fish nor flesh, Neither fish nor fowl (Fig.), neither one thing nor the other.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
fish

Old English fiscian "to fish, to catch or try to catch fish" (cognates: Old Norse fiska, Old High German fiscon, German fischen, Gothic fiskon), from the root of fish (n.). Related: Fished; fishing.

fish

Old English fisc "fish," from Proto-Germanic *fiskaz (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Old High German fisc, Old Norse fiskr, Middle Dutch visc, Dutch vis, German Fisch, Gothic fisks), from PIE *peisk- "fish" (cognates: Latin piscis, Irish iasc, and, via Latin, Italian pesce, French poisson, Spanish pez, Welsh pysgodyn, Breton pesk).\n

\nPopularly, since Old English, "any animal that lives entirely in the water," hence shellfish, starfish (an early 15c. manuscript has fishes bestiales for "water animals other than fishes"). The plural is fishes, but in a collective sense, or in reference to fish meat as food, the singular fish generally serves for a plural. In reference to the constellation Pisces from late 14c. Fish (n.) for "person" is from 1750 in the faintly dismissive sense; earlier it was used in reference to a person considered desirable to 'catch' (1722). Figurative sense of fish out of water first recorded 1610s. To drink like a fish is from 1744. To have other fish to fry "other objects which invite or require attention" is from 1650s.\n

\nFish-story attested from 1819, from the tendency to exaggerate the size of the catch (or the one that got away). Fish-eye as a type of lens is from 196

  1. Fish-and-chips is from 1876; fish-fingers from 196

  2. Fish-food is from 1936 as "food for (pet or hobby) fish."

Wiktionary
fish

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context countable English) A cold-blooded vertebrate animal that lives in water, moving with the help of fins and breathing with gills. 2 (context possibly archaic English) Any animal that lives exclusively in water. 3 (context uncountable English) The flesh of the fish used as food. 4 (context countable English) A period of time spent fishing. 5 (context countable English) An instance of seeking something. 6 (context uncountable English) A card game in which the object is to obtain cards in pairs or sets of four (depending on the variation), by asking the other players for cards of a particular rank. 7 (context uncountable derogatory slang English) A woman. 8 (context countable slang English) An easy victim for swindle. 9 (context countable poker slang English) A bad poker player. 10 (context countable nautical English) A makeshift overlapping longitudinal brace, originally shaped roughly like a fish, used to temporarily repair or extend a spar or mast of a ship. 11 (context nautical English) A purchase used to fish the anchor. 12 (context countable nautical English) A torpedo. 13 (context zoology English) A polyphyletic grouping of the following extant taxonomic groups: 14 # Class Myxini, the hagfish (no vertebra) 15 # Class Petromyzontida, the lampreys (no jaw) 16 # Within infraphylum Gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates (also including Tetrapoda) 17 ## Class Chondrichthyes, cartilaginous fish such as sharks and rays 18 ## Superclass Osteichthyes, bony fish. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To try to catch fish, whether successfully or not. 2 (context transitive English) To try to find something other than fish in (a body of water). 3 (context intransitive English) To attempt to find or get hold of an object by searching among other objects. 4 (context intransitive followed by "around" English) To attempt to obtain information by talking to people. 5 (context intransitive cricket English) Of a batsman, to attempt to hit a ball outside off stump and miss it. 6 (context transitive figuratively followed by "for" English) To attempt to gain. 7 (context nautical English) To repair a spar or mast using a brace often called a fish (see NOUN above). Etymology 3

n. (context obsolete English) A counter, used in various games.

WordNet
fish
  1. n. any of various mostly cold-blooded aquatic vertebrates usually having scales and breathing through gills; "the shark is a large fish"; "in the livingroom there was a tank of colorful fish"

  2. the flesh of fish used as food; "in Japan most fish is eaten raw"; "after the scare about foot-and-mouth disease a lot of people started eating fish instead of meat"; "they have a chef who specializes in fish"

  3. (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Pisces [syn: Pisces]

  4. the twelfth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about February 19 to March 20 [syn: Pisces, Pisces the Fishes]

  5. [also: fishes (pl)]

fish
  1. v. seek indirectly; "fish for compliments" [syn: angle]

  2. catch or try to catch fish or shellfish; "I like to go fishing on weekends"

  3. [also: fishes (pl)]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Fish (cryptography)

Fish (sometimes FISH) was the UK's GC&CS Bletchley Park codename for any of several German teleprinter stream ciphers used during World War II. Enciphered teleprinter traffic was used between German High Command and Army Group commanders in the field, so its intelligence value ( Ultra) was of the highest strategic value to the Allies. This traffic normally passed over landlines, but as German forces extended their geographic reach beyond western Europe, they had to resort to wireless transmission.

Fish (U.S. TV series)

'Fish ' is an American sitcom that aired on ABC from February 5, 1977, to May 18, 1978. It was a spin-off of Barney Miller starring Abe Vigoda as New York City Police Department Detective Phil Fish and Florence Stanley as his wife Bernice. Lenny Bari as Mike, Todd Bridges as Loomis, John Cassisi as Victor Kreutzer, Denise Miller as Jilly Papalardo, Sarah Natoli as Diane Pulaski, and Barry Gordon as Charlie Harrison.

FISH (cipher)

The FISH (FIbonacci SHrinking) stream cipher is a fast software based stream cipher using Lagged Fibonacci generators, plus a concept from the shrinking generator cipher. It was published by Siemens in 1993. FISH is quite fast in software and has a huge key length. However, in the same paper where he proposed Pike, Ross Anderson showed that FISH can be broken with just a few thousand bits of known plaintext.

Fish (singer)

Derek William Dick, better known as Fish (born 25 April 1958, Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland), is a Scottish singer-songwriter and occasional actor. He achieved prominence as the lead singer and lyricist of the neo-progressive rock band Marillion from 1981 until 1988. In his solo career he has explored contemporary pop and traditional folk.

Music critics have acknowledged Fish for his voice, which has been described as both "distinct" and a "conflation of Roger Daltrey and Peter Gabriel", while his lyrics have been praised as " poetic prose". Fish was voted number 37 in the greatest voices in rock by Planet Rock listeners in 2009.

FISH (cipher)

The FISH (FIbonacci SHrinking) stream cipher is a fast software based stream cipher using Lagged Fibonacci generators, plus a concept from the shrinking generator cipher. It was published by Siemens in 1993. FISH is quite fast in software and has a huge key length. However, in the same paper where he proposed Pike, Ross Anderson showed that FISH can be broken with just a few thousand bits of known plaintext.

Fish (disambiguation)
  • Fish are vertebrates with gills that live in water.

Fish or FISH may also refer to:

  • Fish as food, an important source of protein
  • Fishing, the activity of catching fish
Fish (UK TV series)

Fish is a British television drama series first broadcast on BBC One in 2000. It features Paul McGann as the title character, alongside Jemma Redgrave and Mick Ford. It was created by Stephen Tredre, written by Tredre and Matthew Bardsley, and co-produced by the BBC and Principle Pictures.

Fish (Craig Campbell song)

"Fish" is a song co-written and recorded by American country music singer Craig Campbell. It was released in June 2011 as the second single from his self-titled debut album. Campbell wrote this song with Arlos Smith and Ashe Underwood.

Fish

A fish is any member of a paraphyletic group of organisms that consist of all gill-bearing aquatic craniate animals that lack limbs with digits. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish, as well as various extinct related groups. Most fish are ectothermic ("cold-blooded"), allowing their body temperatures to vary as ambient temperatures change, though some of the large active swimmers like white shark and tuna can hold a higher core temperature. Fish are abundant in most bodies of water. They can be found in nearly all aquatic environments, from high mountain streams (e.g., char and gudgeon) to the abyssal and even hadal depths of the deepest oceans (e.g., gulpers and anglerfish). With 33,100 described species, fish exhibit greater species diversity than any other group of vertebrates.

Fish are an important resource for humans worldwide, especially as food. Commercial and subsistence fishers hunt fish in wild fisheries (see fishing) or farm them in ponds or in cages in the ocean (see aquaculture). They are also caught by recreational fishers, kept as pets, raised by fishkeepers, and exhibited in public aquaria. Fish have had a role in culture through the ages, serving as deities, religious symbols, and as the subjects of art, books and movies.

Because the term "fish" is defined negatively, and excludes the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals) which descend from within the same ancestry, it is paraphyletic, and is not considered a proper grouping in systematic biology. The traditional term pisces (also ichthyes) is considered a typological, but not a phylogenetic classification.

The earliest organisms that can be classified as fish were soft-bodied chordates that first appeared during the Cambrian period. Although they lacked a true spine, they possessed notochords which allowed them to be more agile than their invertebrate counterparts. Fish would continue to evolve through the Paleozoic era, diversifying into a wide variety of forms. Many fish of the Paleozoic developed external armor that protected them from predators. The first fish with jaws appeared in the Silurian period, after which many (such as sharks) became formidable marine predators rather than just the prey of arthropods.

Fish (surname)

Fish is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Albert Fish (1870–1936), American serial killer and cannibal
  • Albert Fish (politician) (1922–2006), Canadian politician
  • Bert Fish (1875–1943), American judge and ambassador
  • Bobby Fish (born 1976), American professional wrestler
  • Christopher Fish (born 1993), Swedish professional ice hockey player
  • Eric Fish (born 1969), singer in Subway To Sally and solo artist
  • Farnum Fish (1896-1978), early American aviator
  • Fred Fish (1952–2007), American computer programmer
  • Frederick Perry Fish (1855-1930), president of American Telephone & Telegraph Corporation and founder of Fish & Richardson P.C.
  • Ginger Fish (born 1965), drummer for the band Marilyn Manson
  • Hamilton Fish (disambiguation), any of several American politicians
  • Henry Fish (1838–1897), New Zealand politician from Dunedin
  • Jack Fish (American football), American football and college baseball coach
  • Jacob Fish (born 1956), Israeli-American researcher and professor in computational mechanics.
  • Jasper Fish (buried 1791), professional cricketer chiefly associated with Kent in the 1760s and 1770s
  • Leslie Fish, singer and anarchist
  • Mardy Fish (born 1981), American professional tennis player
  • Matt Fish (born 1969), American basketball player
  • Michael Fish (fashion designer), UK fashion designer
  • Michael Fish (born 1944), BBC weather presenter
  • Morris Fish (born 1938), Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada
  • Nicky Fish (born 1984), Welsh footballer
  • Oliver Fish (Born 1986), Cameraman - Bear Ghylls Born Survivor.
  • Phil Fish (born 1984), video game designer
  • Preserved Fish (1766–1846), New York shipping merchant
  • Rhiannon Fish a Canadian-born Australian actress
  • Ron Fish, American musician and recording artist
  • Simon Fish (died 1531), 16th-century Protestant reformer
  • Stanley Fish (born 1938), literary theorist
  • Stuyvesant Fish (1851–1923), president of Illinois Central Railroad

Fictional characters:

  • Oliver Fish, fictional character on the ABC daytime drama One Life to Live
  • Detective Phil Fish, character played by Abe Vigoda on the television series Barney Miller and spinoff Fish
Fish (nickname)

Fish or The Fish is a nickname of:

  • James Averis (born 1974), English retired cricketer
  • Lord William Cecil (bishop) (1863-1936), English Anglican bishop and eccentric
  • Ben Fisher (born 1981), Australian rugby league footballer and coach
  • Philip Fisher, former drummer and original member of Fishbone (formed 1979), an American alternative rock band
  • Steve Fisher (snowboarder) (born 1982), American snowboarder nicknamed "The Fish"
  • Tyler Fisher (born 1993), South African rugby union player
  • Jon Fishman (born 1965), drummer in the American jam band Phish
  • Felicia Hano (born 1998), American artistic gymnast and former trampolinist
  • Robert "Fish" Jones (died 1930), American businessman and showman
  • Barry Melton (born 1947), guitarist and co-founder of the band Country Joe and The Fish, nicknamed "The Fish"
  • Herman Salmon (1913-1980), American barnstormer, air racer and test pilot
  • Chris Squire (born 1948), bassist in the British progressive rock band Yes
  • Richard Stannard (triathlete) (born 1974), British triathlete nicknamed "The Fish"

Usage examples of "fish".

But thus far there had been no other craft sighted on the waters, although smokes were visible from the many Aliansa village sites and a small group of aborigines was spied netting fish in the shallows.

Neighbors described Abies as proud and self-sufficient, someone who before the standoff would take a group of local children fishing.

Boil the fish in acidulated water according to directions previously given.

Cook the roes for five minutes in salted and acidulated water, drain, cut in two, and arrange around the fish.

Sew up the fish in a cloth dredged with flour, and boil in salted and acidulated water.

Boil the fish in salted and acidulated water, with a bunch of parsley to season.

Prepare and clean the fish and simmer until done in salted and acidulated water.

Boil the fish with a bunch of parsley in salted and acidulated water to cover.

Boil a large fish in salted and acidulated water with a bunch of parsley.

Clean and draw the fish and boil slowly in salted and acidulated water to cover.

I was ready to call it quits and give up on the reward and just spend the next few years enjoying a little pre-connubial bliss, she told me that I was all through going to Acme Fertilizer Company and would now be making my pick-ups at the Prime Fish Hatcheries.

Cawcaw went fishing agen today in the bote ferst i padled and he skiped and then he padeled and i skiped.

He further donated to the monks of Nogent for their sole use the rights to the fish in the river Ailette over a given distance from the Rue de Brasse to the Pont St.

On the opposite side of the float the crew of the Flying Fish, the Snark, the Bonita and the Albacore were equally busy over their craft.

A word, a heave in unison, and the albacore lay gasping in the bilges -- a magnificent fish of a hundred pounds or more.