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Crossword clues for rule

rule
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
rule
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a court rules/orders/holds sth
▪ The court ruled that the penalty was not excessive.
a court ruling (=an official decision)
▪ The company appealed against the court ruling.
a king rules/reigns (=is in charge of a country)
▪ How could a Christian king rule if he was banned from the Church?
a queen rules/reigns (=is in charge of a country)
▪ Queen Victoria reigned for over 60 years.
adhered...to...rules
▪ I have adhered strictly to the rules.
as a general rule
▪ I hate paperwork as a general rule.
Australian Rules football
basic rules
▪ Most people nowadays are aware of some of the basic rules of healthy living.
be the exception, not the rule (=used to emphasize that something is unusual)
▪ Staying married for life seems to be the exception, not the rule these days.
be the exception to the rule (also be the exception that proves the rule) (= be different to most other people or things)
▪ Most of the boys were quite shy, but Larry was the exception to the rule.
cardinal rules
▪ Having clean hands is one of the cardinal rules when preparing food.
colonial rule
▪ the struggle against colonial rule
common-law rules/courts/rights etc
enforce a rule/regulation
▪ The rules are strictly enforced.
gag rule
golden rule
▪ The golden rule of cooking is to use fresh ingredients.
ground rules
▪ Our book lays down the ground rules for building a patio successfully.
hard-and-fast rules
▪ It is impossible to give hard-and-fast rules, but here are some points to consider.
home rule
laws/rules dictate sth
▪ Federal laws dictate how land can be used.
lay down/establish ground rules for sth
▪ Our book lays down the ground rules for building a patio successfully.
majority rule
▪ It took many years of struggle to establish majority rule in South Africa.
maze of rules/regulations etc
▪ a maze of new laws
mob rule (=when a mob controls the situation rather than the government or the law)
▪ The leadership had been criticized for giving in to mob rule .
obey the law/rules
▪ She’s the sort of person who always obeys the rules.
relax rules/regulations/controls
▪ Hughes believes that immigration controls should not be relaxed.
reverse a decision/ruling
▪ The Supreme Court reversed the decision.
rule a country (=have complete control of a country)
▪ For a long time the country was ruled by military dictators.
rule out/exclude a possibility (=say that something will definitely not happen or is definitely not true)
▪ We can't rule out the possibility that there will be more redundancies.
ruled out foul play
▪ Detectives have not ruled out foul play.
rules and conventions
▪ Rules and conventions permeate the whole of social life.
rules and regulations
▪ We must reduce the number of rules and regulations.
rules/standards of conduct
▪ In war, there are established rules of conduct.
ruling elite
▪ a struggle for power within the ruling elite
sb’s heart rules their head (=someone makes decisions based on emotions rather than careful thought)
▪ He has never been one to let his heart rule his head.
slide rule
stretch the rules
▪ This once, I’ll stretch the rules and let you leave work early.
strict rules/regulations/guidelines
▪ There are strict rules and regulations regarding conduct.
the rules of a competition
▪ Make sure you understand the rules of the competition.
the rules of the game
▪ It's against the rules of the game to pick up the ball.
the ruling class (=the people in power)
▪ For a long time, French was the language of the ruling class.
the ruling party (=the party in power)
▪ The ruling party’s level of support grew throughout the year.
the ruling/governing coalition
▪ The March elections may weaken the ruling coalition.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
basic
▪ The basic rules of self-defence are quite simple: keep your eyes open and you can usually avoid trouble.
▪ Shelter from the storm was a basic rule of humanity and yet not to be misunderstood as an invitation.
▪ The basic branching rule is very simple.
▪ The basic rules are First-in-First-Out and When-in-Doubt-Throw-It-Out.
▪ Society lays down the basic rules of the marriage contract.
▪ I know there are exceptions to this basic rule.
▪ Returning to Community legislation, the founding treaties lay down certain basic rules on the publication and commencement of such texts.
▪ These few basic rules can make your group maximally helpful:-Meet regularly at a mutually acceptable time and place.
colonial
▪ Critics say that Cable &038; Wireless never adjusted to the loss of its traditional dominance in Hong Kong under colonial rule.
▪ His Mirror Group papers were non-partisan, but they were, equally, not identified with colonial rule.
▪ The act of representing peoples under direct colonial rule or as disadvantaged economic partners of the west is therefore also political.
▪ During seventy years of colonial rule, no university had been established.
▪ What were the social and economic consequences of the imposition of colonial rule?
▪ During colonial rule the people and the leaders had struggled together as one.
communist
▪ In his broadcast on Saturday Mr Yeltsin said he had been forced to act to prevent the restoration of Communist rule.
▪ Even though Communist rule is 11 months away, Zunzi is paying the price for his brashness.
▪ Their country suffered years of economic stagnation and mismanagement under Communist rule.
▪ But they also engaged in blood feuds, which were outlawed under Communist rule.
▪ From its balcony, in 1948, Gottwald declared the introduction of Communist rule.
direct
▪ The decision to impose direct rule followed the expiry of Governor's rule at midnight on July 18.
▪ By midnight, there was no indication that Milosevic had imposed direct rule in the capital.
▪ The act of representing peoples under direct colonial rule or as disadvantaged economic partners of the west is therefore also political.
▪ Basically their socioeconomic structure thus remains as it was under direct imperialist rule.
▪ For example this happened in 1972 when the Westminster Parliament reimposed direct rule in Northern Ireland.
▪ In March 1972, the Stormont parliament and executive were abolished and direct rule was applied.
▪ The path least likely to cause trouble appears to be the continuation of direct rule from Westminster.
▪ Introducing direct rule had been easy enough; ending it was a problem.
fast
▪ As long as you are comfortable, there are no hard and fast rules about clothing.
▪ However, this is not a hard and fast rule and there are numerous exceptions.
▪ The official departmental view is that no case is exactly like another, and hard and fast rules can not be applied.
▪ There are no hard and fast rules.
▪ There is no hard and fast rule: once again, the test is that of ordinary readers.
▪ But there are no hard and fast rules about the physique of a racing cyclist.
▪ It's difficult to give a hard and fast rule.
general
▪ Pay first and object later is the general rule.
▪ Exacerbations and remissions of the pain are the general rule.
▪ But as a general rule it can happen at any age and time.
▪ As a general rule, algae are considered weeds in the aquarium as their growth can not be easily regulated.
▪ The double bassoon should only be used, as a general rule, in fully scored passages.
▪ As a general rule, though, the good ones end up in law school.
▪ There are exceptions to this general rule, however.
▪ This general rule should solve most of the problems raised by this subject-matter.
golden
▪ So here are a few golden rules to follow ... just in case the sun keeps shining.
▪ They discovered and applied the golden rule of leading change: Do unto yourself what you would have others do unto themselves.
▪ The first, golden rule is that children do not learn at an even pace.
▪ In terms of the golden rule of change, it caused them to do unto themselves what they wanted others to do.
▪ Aspiring rock artists should remember one golden rule when dealing with the press: there are no rules.
▪ So, the two golden rules when buying are to go for quality and buy the largest you can afford.
▪ Remember the golden rule of legal PR-keep the client in the picture.
▪ There are two golden rules about school fees planning.
hard
▪ The official departmental view is that no case is exactly like another, and hard and fast rules can not be applied.
▪ However, this is not a hard and fast rule and there are numerous exceptions.
▪ There is no hard and fast rule: once again, the test is that of ordinary readers.
▪ There are no hard and fast rules.
▪ But there are no hard and fast rules about the physique of a racing cyclist.
▪ It's difficult to give a hard and fast rule.
legal
▪ Equally, any proposed remedies must be addressed more to administrative and procedural practice than to changing formal legal rules.
▪ Its importance in enabling people to use lawyers to guide them through the baffling maze of legal rules is self-evident.
▪ Everywhere else it is used in the sense of legal rules embodied in one document.
▪ His decision to aid the individual is determined by a set of social or legal rules.
▪ Do you therefore automatically break this legal rule?
▪ Nevertheless, the topic is undeniably an important one and it is worth sketching in the legal rules.
▪ There is not one particular legal rule for each situation which arises or may arise.
military
▪ The exiled monarch had also called for an immediate end to military rule.
▪ There was to be no pause for reflection, nor - much less - for a changeover from military to civilian rule.
▪ It also removed many of the restrictions imposed during the period of military rule between 1964 and 1985.
▪ Existing political parties were banned, and a period of military rule followed.
▪ The end of military rule in 1999 was cause for fresh optimism.
▪ They advocated an immediate end to military rule and the holding of a national conference of all political forces.
▪ After a period of military rule from March 1967 to April 1968 a republican Constitution was adopted in April 1971.
▪ Weekend celebrations to mark the end of military rule had led to violent clashes between police and demonstrators.
new
▪ She was not able to say whether anyone with past convictions had passed the selection process under the new rules.
▪ Once the dinner behavior is under control, it is time to carry the new rules to new situations.
▪ He tried to escape the cross-fire by getting the two offices separated but could not get the new rules approved.
▪ A new rule was adopted by commissioners that would allow them to set a shotgun-only turkey season.
▪ That triggered a rush of new rules -- more than 1, 100 in two weeks -- to beat the 1995 deadline.
▪ This would be a system of adhoc law which would suggest that each novel situation warrants the creation of a new rule.
▪ Bankinter has chosen not to take advantage of the new rules and continues to mark its bond portfolio to market prices.
simple
▪ Business development professionals often rely on simple rules of thumb to sort potential relationships and weed out unlikely partners.
▪ Practice these simple rules: Keep cold food cold.
▪ It is a set of simple rules - a program or algorithm - that tells the developing organism what to do next.
▪ And can not follow simple rules.
▪ Here are some simple rules for managing paper: 1.
▪ Martha discovered that a few simple rules about her home office are helping to maintain this porous and transparent border.
▪ Mendel started a science that still rests upon his simple rules.
▪ To create absorbing questions, remember to follow these three simple rules: a. Answer the question immediately.
strict
▪ But one strict rule they had; oh yes, the strictest.
▪ Back then, he said, most Orthodox Christians still adhered to strict fasting rules during the 40 days before Pasak.
▪ At the same time, the protectorate's authorities want to maintain high standards of financial propriety with strict rules.
▪ Children were routinely beaten for insignificant violations of strict company rules.
▪ He says we have strict rules and regulations and the flying safety committee make sure they're administered.
▪ They cling to their religion, its strict kosher rules and ancient rites of worship.
▪ Within the society that Jane Austen features there are many strict rules.
▪ The librarians have very strict rules.
unwritten
▪ Certain unwritten rules may apply with regard to hospitality.
▪ Although people management is not a science, it has a system of unwritten rules and logic.
▪ Norms can be thought of as unwritten rules.
▪ By an unwritten rule, they avoided controversy for the sake of good fellowship.
▪ Without unwritten rules civilised life would be impossible.
▪ But managers know the unwritten rules when they enter the business.
▪ There are a number of unwritten rules or axioms which perhaps need to be questioned.
▪ There is an unwritten rule in their crowd.
■ NOUN
ground
▪ Once you realize this you can start treating it like any other interview, and apply the same ground rules.
▪ The strategic support group ground rules were all they needed to get started.
▪ There are no ground rules for knowing how to handle these semi-permanent relationships in the context of the larger family circle.
▪ As long as the ground rules were properly observed, Gutfreund gave it right back.
▪ Certain commonsense ground rules should be mentioned - discussing marital and financial problems with children, for example, is not advisable.
▪ Some ground rules for the Cold War, of spirit if not of substance, were needed.
▪ They are largely caused by a lack of knowledge or understanding in chambers where no ground rules are laid down.
▪ The owners set the ground rules, then they find all the loopholes to enable them to move players anyway.
home
▪ Politically he was a radical, keenly interested in free trade and home rule.
▪ In 1878, Congress abolished what remained of home rule and took over the District.
▪ In Parliament he was a determined opponent of home rule.
▪ During the home rule crisis in 1885, Harland made secret preparations to withdraw to mainland Britain if the situation became intolerable.
▪ If the former, then they have to accept that different unions are possible, devolved, home rule, federal.
▪ He was mayor of Belfast in 1885-7 and helped co-ordinate the campaign against the home rule bill.
majority
▪ Is majority rule under a system of parliamentary democracy a sufficient guarantee of legitimacy?
▪ In the case of spending and tax legislation, majority rule is thus further weakened.
▪ Many reject democracy in terms of party competition, majority rule and the rule of law.
▪ Those who peopled them have either been driven out in a bloody liberation war or yielded their political supremacy to majority rule.
▪ In these weeks, I have had the chance to listen to Joshua Nkomo calling for majority rule now.
▪ Two working conclusions follow from this, namely, toleration and the qualification of majority rule.
▪ The majority leadership's specialty became mounting filibusters or using other delaying tactics to prevent majority rule.
■ VERB
apply
▪ I must apply the same rules to those on the Front Benches as to those on the Back Benches.
▪ They discovered and applied the golden rule of leading change: Do unto yourself what you would have others do unto themselves.
▪ Alternatively, an independent trustee may be appointed to apply the trust rules negotiated by the parties.
▪ Those who apply the rule to particular cases, must of necessity expound and interpret that rule.
▪ And for the pleasure of it I apply my rule to the urban world of glut.
▪ Chapter 8 analyses the essential elements of an expert clause, applying the rules of contract law.
▪ In applying these general rules, the courts look at each individual case in light of whatever state statute may apply.
bend
▪ Only a zombie would risk a child's health by refusing to bend a rule.
▪ The state government was willing to bend the rules where necessary to stop penalizing employers for creating jobs.
▪ The willingness to bend the rules to authorize a major invasion of civil liberties contrasts sharply with the Spycatcher case.
▪ These are urgent issues because the few charities that bend or break the rules put the law-abiding majority at a disadvantage.
▪ However, it may yet be tempted to bend the rules to admit the two newcomers.
▪ This bending of the rules was typical of Rabari thrift and good sense.
▪ The advice on bending the rules came from the then Defence Minister, Alan Clark.
▪ It can be done, if you, or your travel agent, are willing to bend airline rules.
break
▪ Minton, meanwhile, became more and more extrovert and seemed determined to break all the rules.
▪ Bill Clinton has broken the rule against electing the weepy.
▪ It claims that Milosevic is poised to break the rules that he has himself defined.
▪ These are urgent issues because the few charities that bend or break the rules put the law-abiding majority at a disadvantage.
▪ Sure he breaks rules but he gets results.
▪ I did break the rules and go over and cuddle her in her cot, but not pick her up out of it.
▪ We are forbidden to ride the Cyclone, though I break the rule, and ride it, but rarely.
change
▪ Equally, any proposed remedies must be addressed more to administrative and procedural practice than to changing formal legal rules.
▪ All of these actions say clearly that the rules have changed.
▪ Will the Department change that rule?
▪ A simple act, maybe, but it changed the rules of engagement for ever.
▪ Lord Justice Ralph Gibson said arguments put forward had spelled out a powerful case for changing the rule.
▪ Get a free hand to change work rules.
▪ They wished to change the rules and require the politically committed members to contract in.
▪ Every new card can change the rules for the whole game.
comply
▪ Students failing to comply with the rules will be subject to the provisions of Ordinance 1985/7, Students Discipline.
▪ Several other major oil companies have already taken large write-downs to comply with the new rule.
▪ Parents must comply with the stringent rules for vehicular access, which are explained in a Headmaster's letter.
▪ Louis Post-Dispatch have concluded that the transaction largely complied with House rules and was within tax law.
▪ We have a certificate to run the race and we do comply with all the rules and regulations.
▪ He is held personally responsible for complying with the many rules and regulations that govern its use.
▪ In particular, the transaction seemed to comply with strict rules dictating the type of assets that banks could hold.
▪ At the moment the offer is being considered by the Office of Fair Trading to see whether it complies with competition rules.
establish
▪ Many families experience the problems of squabbles between siblings and learn to establish rules for mediating a problem.
▪ It has failed to establish the rule of law, allowing gangsters and militants to intimidate at will.
▪ This was supposed to be her final victory over him, supposed to establish her rule once and for all.
▪ Ground rules Always establish good ground rules at the beginning of each session.
▪ The 18-year-old king moved quickly to establish rule under his personal control.
▪ The World Trade Organisation establishes rules governing trade, why can't we have something similar for finance?
▪ Government is important because it can and should establish and enforce rules of conduct and protect property rights.
follow
▪ And hence we can not check on whether we are following the rule by recalling the original sensation.
▪ Menendez surrounded the Huguenots and carried on a charade following Old World rules.
▪ Although those great animals have gone, they followed the same rules of instinct and habit as did their descendants.
▪ Generally, follow these rules: Letters and memos: List the main points for the entire document.
▪ Committees are formal and follow rules of procedure.
▪ To find your soft spots, read the following rules and determine which ones you consistently break.
▪ So they're asking musicians to follow a few simple rules, as Ken Goodwin has been finding out.
▪ Do remember to praise him, however, when he follows the rule.
lay
▪ He could order her about and lay down any rule he thought of.
▪ It is hard to lay down rules about this ahead of time.
▪ Society lays down the basic rules of the marriage contract.
▪ It lays out constitutional rules on secrecy that any White House could claim.
▪ He seemed to lay down rules and regulations.
▪ This means organizations must continue to set norms and create a corporate culture but not lay down rigid rules.
▪ Returning to Community legislation, the founding treaties lay down certain basic rules on the publication and commencement of such texts.
obey
▪ The first is to create a new bureaucracy to make sure that insurers obey the rules.
▪ The vast majority of Macintosh programs obey the rules and, therefore, allow information to be passed between them.
▪ Perdita thought that not obeying rules was somehow cool.
▪ Maxims, proverbs, and other forms of folk wisdom give a person reasons for obeying rules.
▪ If the message Not a valid filename appears, your filename does not obey the rules.
▪ But this time it would be different, this time she was not going to obey any silly rules.
▪ It is not to be expected that each sentence written will obey grammar rules.
▪ This filename should obey the following rules.
observe
▪ You should still observe the general rules for stairs.
▪ We observe the international rules of warfare in this head.
▪ She wanted to touch him, but continued to observe the rules that kept them apart during office hours.
▪ I sat down and talked with him a couple of times, obviously being very careful to observe all the rules.
▪ Similarly, a requirement that the expert observe the rules of natural justice could be made a contractual obligation.
▪ I myself always observed this rule.
▪ Guests reclined on couches, observing strict rules as to their positions.
▪ Members of the Commission qua members of the Commission had to observe the rules in performance of the treaty.
play
▪ They were all playing by the same rules.
▪ No significant playing rules changes are in the works.
▪ The politicians had trapped him into a game played by their rules.
▪ Most of us are still playing under the old rules.
▪ Bernie said my sciatica would play me up and rule me out.
▪ All games to be played according to pre-arranged rules.
▪ Economies of organizational structure is a new game, though, played by new rules.
prove
▪ But he was the exception that proved the rule.
▪ The two exceptions prove the rule.
▪ Or could you prove the rules of logic without using the rules to do so?
▪ But such successes were rare: they are the exceptions that prove the rule.
▪ This is the exception to prove the rule.
▪ So much for the exceptions; now to prove the rule.
▪ Mikhail Gorbachev's Soviet Union had once seemed the enlightened exception, but now only proves the bloody rule.
▪ That way they could be exceptions that prove the rule rather than embarrass it.
relax
▪ However, the board will not relax the rule requiring any product called tequila to contain 51 % agave.
▪ Postponement, says Kohl, is unacceptable, but so is relaxing the rules of entry.
▪ Last September the Government relaxed rules on foreign workers coming to Britain to combat skills shortages.
▪ The judicial antipathy to relaxing the rule has been far from uniform.
▪ The following month the government relaxed its rules on censorship.
▪ Mr. Lester submitted that the time has come to relax the rule to the extent which I have mentioned.
set
▪ Only in one major area, capital, has Parliament or central government set detailed rules reducing this freedom.
▪ By setting the rules, governments can structure the marketplace so it meets public needs.
▪ If marriage is to do all the things that society demands of it, then the state must set some rules.
▪ The owners set the ground rules, then they find all the loopholes to enable them to move players anyway.
▪ It requires member states to set rules on mandatory bids, providing information to shareholders and treating them equally.
▪ After six years in power, Park was becoming more repressive and had his sights set on long-term rule.
▪ This is because his opponents in Congress set the rules and can change them whenever they want.
▪ He was constantly setting out rules for Kyle, only to see Kyle ignore or defy them.
violate
▪ They say they simply believe that Aldrich violated the rules by not obtaining full clearance for his manuscript.
▪ The ordinance, passed unanimously Tuesday, makes it either a misdemeanor or infraction to violate a park safety rule.
▪ A student-run committee decides if fellow mids are guilty of lying or of violating other honor rules.
▪ So I guess the very nature of Magoo violates that rule.
▪ Doctors and insurance companies faced federal fines and prison time for violating the rules.
▪ The consequences of violating this rule had always been unhappy in the long run and not infrequently in the short.
▪ The rule she violated is a dumb rule.
▪ Wirk and her husband once paid $ 1, 500 each for violating the no-smoking rule.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be a stickler for detail/rules/accuracy etc
▪ With his personal guests who were important to him or his state, Kim was a stickler for detail.
be subject to a rule/law/penalty/tax etc
blanket statement/rule/ban etc
▪ Cine Blitz International publisher Rajesh Mehra attacked the blanket ban.
▪ His support for a 15-month blanket ban on strikes suggests that he is still not wholly aware of this fact.
▪ One of the most urgent measures is a blanket ban on all animal and bone meal in animal feed.
▪ The ban is a blanket ban covering all marches or all marches of a particular class such as political marches.
▪ The existing blacklist of substances not to be dumped at sea would be superseded by the blanket ban.
▪ The idea behind this imposition of blanket bans was to prevent the temptation to discriminate against particular marches.
▪ The state bar would prefer to set a blanket rule governing all types of lawyers.
▪ They already had been instructed to avoid Simpson coverage, but Fujisaki expanded his order to a blanket ban on all news.
divide and rule/conquer
▪ Britain did not divide and rule.
▪ He preferred to divide and rule.
▪ Here too the Party could fend off opposition by a policy of divide and rule.
▪ Power to appoint is power to divide and rule.
▪ That if you play the game of divide and rule long enough then you end up with Sister Souljah?
▪ The well-tried Roman policy of divide and rule had been the basis of Augustan diplomacy and continued during the conquest.
▪ They haven't shown the political will to sort out the problem - there has been an element of divide and rule.
hand down a decision/ruling/sentence etc
▪ Just a few months earlier, the Supreme Court had handed down a decision inviting states to pass abortion restrictions.
▪ She is expected soon to hand down a ruling.
▪ The commission will seek to arbitrate a resolution before handing down a decision in late summer.
sb/sth is the exception that proves the rule
▪ Most people our age have finished school, and Mike is the exception that proves the rule.
stay an order/ruling/execution etc
▪ Rivals got a stay order from the courts, though after a backroom deal in mid-March the government got its way.
stick to the rules
▪ Everyone in the party has a responsibility to stick to the rules agreed by the party conference.
▪ Failure to stick to the safety rules could result in disaster.
▪ I'd stuck to the rules arid nothing had happened.
▪ It was all right if she was hours late, but Henry had to stick to the rules.
▪ That government said at the summit it was sticking to the rules, and then suggested afterward it would not not.
work to rule
▪ Plants work to rules rather different from those of animals.
▪ Video-Tape, no voice over ARNCOTT/Oxfordshire Prison officers at Bullingdon prison near Bicester began their work to rule last night.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ British rule in India came to an end in 1947.
▪ For many years Algeria was under French rule.
▪ I have no sympathy for Jonson. He broke the rules and got caught, that's all.
▪ It is strictly against the rules for athletes to take drugs.
▪ It says in the rules that every child has to wear school uniform.
▪ Late in 1991, Communist rule ended in Russia.
▪ No one's allowed to ride with the driver. That's a company rule.
▪ the rules of etiquette
▪ The rules of grammar in French are very complex.
▪ There have been some changes in the rules governing the use of safety equipment.
▪ These are just guidelines, not hard and fast rules.
▪ What are the rules of the game?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Clear rules, fairly and consistently applied, are fundamental to all forms of punishment.
▪ In general, two kinds of rule will be considered - first, rules of interpretation and second, prescriptive rules.
▪ In the next section we will also discuss the loss of a morphological rule that created causative verbs from adjectives.
▪ Legal advice must be taken to ascertain the exact rules and how they are applied.
▪ So break any rules you please.
▪ Sparky is a manufacturer within the rule and Pyro and Nancy are consumers.
▪ The resultant grammar contained 3527 basic rules which were converted and extended to a set of 200,000 rules.
▪ We can, however, instantly recognize the actual instances where rules are broken.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
out
▪ Dole demanded that Clinton rule out pardons for his business partners in the failed Whitewater land scheme.
▪ Ford dismissed an immediate meeting with the unions but did not rule out talks after Christmas.
▪ Although he said the tire does not appear to have been shot, police have not ruled out that possibility.
▪ However, one can not rule out the possibility that certain other new parties may appear.
▪ No one has been able to create purified prions in a system that would rule out the presence of viruses.
▪ The variety is enormous but many can be ruled out in not satisfying all the requirements.
▪ The things that were ruled out were things that would put him in danger.
■ NOUN
country
▪ Charles de Gaulle once lamented that he simply could not rule over a country that had 385 different kinds of cheese!
▪ But because he is a child, the Earl of Moray, my half-brother, can rule the country for him.
▪ They were now ruling the country and of course were rejoiced to welcome Aeneas and his men.
▪ Frankly, we could hardly hope to rule a country if we went around killing everyone all the time, could we?
▪ Parties seeking to rule a country should be accountable to all the people of the country.
court
▪ Finally, the courts have ruled that school boards can impose economic sanctions on teachers who go on strike.
▪ In Goodfellow the Court of Appeal ruled that there should be no reference to the risk of damage to property.
decree
▪ The powers allow it to rule by decree and declare a state of war.
▪ Article 38 permits the government to rule by decree.
▪ Mr Gorbachev may well use his powers to rule by decree to push the reform through.
favor
▪ Carter-appointed judges ruled in favor of the defendant in 40 percent of the cases, the study found.
▪ He ruled in favor of the party for a large amount of damages.
▪ In the last five years, some federal judges have ruled in their favor.
▪ A Montgomery County jury ruled in their favor, and Aron was ordered to pay $ 175, 000.
▪ He could rule entirely in favor of the government, and let all the rules stand.
▪ The Pikes appealed to a juvenile court judge, who ruled in their favor.
judge
▪ But they walked free from Bristol Crown Court after the judge ruled that there was no case to answer.
▪ In 1994 a judge ruled that prisoners who were mentally competent were free to starve themselves to death.
▪ In December 1978, federal district judge Marion Callister ruled that the extension was unconstitutional.
▪ The police claimed the records weren't relevant to the case, but the judge ruled they should be disclosed.
▪ Although there was conflicting testimony on whether or not the course was religious, the judge ruled that it was.
possibility
▪ Detectives still haven't ruled out the possibility that she was abducted.
▪ However, Bantle would not rule out the possibility that the mission could be cut short if the system is not repaired.
▪ Abreu's strategies appear to rule out such renegotiation possibilities - an agreement is made once and for all and can never be reopened.
▪ Expenses will be kept in line, he said, not ruling out the possibility of minor layoffs.
▪ The government's overriding concern to ensure domestic stability ruled out the possibility of landless Emancipation.
▪ Moreover, experiments on pigeons have been thought to rule out that possibility.
▪ But, in a television interview, she appeared to rule out the possibility of a reconciliation.
▪ They have also ruled out any possibility of supporting a rights issue.
roost
▪ The mid-fielders ruled the roost up to the interval, but after a scoreless first half the Antrim team showed great dominance.
▪ Alongside the State, they continued to rule the roost.
▪ But it was those two who ruled the roost.
▪ In the meantime, it was Amelia who ruled the family roost.
▪ The late 1960s and early 1970s saw Lee Trevino ruling the roost on both sides of the Pond.
▪ Effective discipline is neither harsh nor does it allow the child to rule the roost.
▪ I kind of ruled the roost a bit, but we got on well.
■ VERB
refuse
▪ But Suffolk governors, who share hiring and firing responsibilities with their school heads, have refused to rule out disciplinary action.
▪ Haley Barbour, chairman of the Republican National Committee, pointedly refused last week to rule out using the tape in commercials.
▪ The speculation was fuelled by Premier John Major who refused to rule them out.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be a stickler for detail/rules/accuracy etc
▪ With his personal guests who were important to him or his state, Kim was a stickler for detail.
be subject to a rule/law/penalty/tax etc
blanket statement/rule/ban etc
▪ Cine Blitz International publisher Rajesh Mehra attacked the blanket ban.
▪ His support for a 15-month blanket ban on strikes suggests that he is still not wholly aware of this fact.
▪ One of the most urgent measures is a blanket ban on all animal and bone meal in animal feed.
▪ The ban is a blanket ban covering all marches or all marches of a particular class such as political marches.
▪ The existing blacklist of substances not to be dumped at sea would be superseded by the blanket ban.
▪ The idea behind this imposition of blanket bans was to prevent the temptation to discriminate against particular marches.
▪ The state bar would prefer to set a blanket rule governing all types of lawyers.
▪ They already had been instructed to avoid Simpson coverage, but Fujisaki expanded his order to a blanket ban on all news.
sb/sth is the exception that proves the rule
▪ Most people our age have finished school, and Mike is the exception that proves the rule.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Ashley's life was ruled by her addiction to drugs.
▪ At that time, Persia was divided into several provinces, ruled by local khans.
▪ He ruled three lines under the title of his essay.
▪ Henry VIII ruled England from 1509 to 1547.
▪ In 1860, Italy was a collection of small states ruled by princes and dukes.
▪ India was ruled by the British for a very long time.
▪ Marcos ruled the Philippines for 20 years.
▪ Mary, Queen of Scots, only ruled for six years.
▪ Motamid had died, leaving his son Mostain to rule over Saragossa.
▪ Paper ruled into one-inch squares is used to practice writing Chinese characters.
▪ She divided the page into four by ruling two diagonal lines across it.
▪ Spain ruled over Portugal from 1580 to 1640.
▪ The Medical Examiner's office ruled the death a murder.
▪ The Pol Pot regime ruled Cambodia from 1974 to 1978.
▪ While they ruled, the country remained isolated from the rest of the world.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Anybody who could sew had a collection on show and fashion ruled.
▪ Golding said that, before she reaches any conclusions, she wants a full briefing on the court ruling from Gwinn.
▪ Speculation that the Dolphin Centre could be used has been ruled out by Mr Boyle who says it would be too expensive.
▪ They were ruled by powerful clans.
▪ This does not rule out evolution by mutation and selection.
▪ Voting six to three, the court ruled that this ultimate threat violated states' rights.
▪ Why weren't they ruled out of order before they transgressed?
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Rule

Rule \Rule\, v. i.

  1. To have power or command; to exercise supreme authority; -- often followed by over.

    By me princes rule, and nobles.
    --Prov. viii. 16.

    We subdue and rule over all other creatures.
    --Ray.

  2. (Law) To lay down and settle a rule or order of court; to decide an incidental point; to enter a rule.
    --Burril. Bouvier.

  3. (Com.) To keep within a (certain) range for a time; to be in general, or as a rule; as, prices ruled lower yesterday than the day before.

Rule

Rule \Rule\, n. Syn: regulation; law; precept; maxim; guide; canon; order; method; direction; control; government; sway; empire. [1913 Webster] Rule \Rule\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Ruled; p. pr. & vb. n. Ruling.] [Cf. OF. riuler, ruiler, L. regulare. See Rule, n., and cf. Regulate.]

  1. To control the will and actions of; to exercise authority or dominion over; to govern; to manage.
    --Chaucer.

    A bishop then must be blameless; . . . one that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection.
    --1 Tim. iii. 2, 4.

  2. To control or direct by influence, counsel, or persuasion; to guide; -- used chiefly in the passive.

    I think she will be ruled In all respects by me.
    --Shak.

  3. To establish or settle by, or as by, a rule; to fix by universal or general consent, or by common practice.

    That's are ruled case with the schoolmen.
    --Atterbury.

  4. (Law) To require or command by rule; to give as a direction or order of court.

  5. To mark with lines made with a pen, pencil, etc., guided by a rule or ruler; to print or mark with lines by means of a rule or other contrivance effecting a similar result; as, to rule a sheet of paper of a blank book.

    Ruled surface (Geom.), any surface that may be described by a straight line moving according to a given law; -- called also a scroll.

Rule

Rule \Rule\, n. Syn: regulation; law; precept; maxim; guide; canon; order; method; direction; control; government; sway; empire. [1913 Webster] Rule \Rule\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Ruled; p. pr. & vb. n. Ruling.] [Cf. OF. riuler, ruiler, L. regulare. See Rule, n., and cf. Regulate.]

  1. To control the will and actions of; to exercise authority or dominion over; to govern; to manage.
    --Chaucer.

    A bishop then must be blameless; . . . one that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection.
    --1 Tim. iii. 2, 4.

  2. To control or direct by influence, counsel, or persuasion; to guide; -- used chiefly in the passive.

    I think she will be ruled In all respects by me.
    --Shak.

  3. To establish or settle by, or as by, a rule; to fix by universal or general consent, or by common practice.

    That's are ruled case with the schoolmen.
    --Atterbury.

  4. (Law) To require or command by rule; to give as a direction or order of court.

  5. To mark with lines made with a pen, pencil, etc., guided by a rule or ruler; to print or mark with lines by means of a rule or other contrivance effecting a similar result; as, to rule a sheet of paper of a blank book.

    Ruled surface (Geom.), any surface that may be described by a straight line moving according to a given law; -- called also a scroll.

Rule

Rule \Rule\, n. [OE. reule, riule, OF. riule, reule, F. r['e]gle, fr. L. regula a ruler, rule, model, fr. regere, rectum, to lead straight, to direct. See Right, a., and cf. Regular.]

  1. That which is prescribed or laid down as a guide for conduct or action; a governing direction for a specific purpose; an authoritative enactment; a regulation; a prescription; a precept; as, the rules of various societies; the rules governing a school; a rule of etiquette or propriety; the rules of cricket.

    We profess to have embraced a religion which contains the most exact rules for the government of our lives.
    --Tillotson.

  2. Hence:

    1. Uniform or established course of things.

      'T is against the rule of nature.
      --Shak.

    2. Systematic method or practice; as, my ule is to rise at six o'clock.

    3. Ordibary course of procedure; usual way; comon state or condition of things; as, it is a rule to which there are many exeptions.

    4. Conduct in general; behavior. [Obs.]

      This uncivil rule; she shall know of it.
      --Shak.

  3. The act of ruling; administration of law; government; empire; authority; control.

    Obey them that have the rule over you.
    --Heb. xiii. 17.

    His stern rule the groaning land obeyed.
    --Pope.

  4. (Law) An order regulating the practice of the courts, or an order made between parties to an action or a suit.
    --Wharton.

  5. (Math.) A determinate method prescribed for performing any operation and producing a certain result; as, a rule for extracting the cube root.

  6. (Gram.) A general principle concerning the formation or use of words, or a concise statement thereof; thus, it is a rule in England, that s or es, added to a noun in the singular number, forms the that noun; but ``man'' forms its plural ``men'', and is an exception to the rule.

    1. A straight strip of wood, metal, or the like, which serves as a guide in drawing a straight line; a ruler.

    2. A measuring instrument consisting of a graduated bar of wood, ivory, metal, or the like, which is usually marked so as to show inches and fractions of an inch, and jointed so that it may be folded compactly.

      A judicious artist will use his eye, but he will trust only to his rule.
      --South.

  7. (Print.)

    1. A thin plate of metal (usually brass) of the same height as the type, and used for printing lines, as between columns on the same page, or in tabular work.

    2. A composing rule. See under Conposing.

      As a rule, as a general thing; in the main; usually; as, he behaves well, as a rule.

      Board rule, Caliber rule, etc. See under Board, Caliber, etc.

      Rule joint, a knuckle joint having shoulders that abut when the connected pieces come in line with each other, and thus permit folding in one direction only.

      Rule of the road (Law), any of the various regulations imposed upon travelers by land or water for their mutual convenience or safety. In the United States it is a rule of the road that land travelers passing in opposite directions shall turn out each to his own right, and generally that overtaking persons or vehicles shall turn out to the left; in England the rule for vehicles (but not for pedestrians) is the opposite of this.

      Rule of three (Arith.), that rule which directs, when three terms are given, how to find a fourth, which shall have the same ratio to the third term as the second has to the first; proportion. See Proportion, 5 (b) .

      Rule of thumb, any rude process or operation, like that of using the thumb as a rule in measuring; hence, judgment and practical experience as distinguished from scientific knowledge.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
rule

c.1200, "principle or maxim governing conduct, formula to which conduct must be conformed" from Old French riule, Norman reule "rule, custom, (religious) order" (in Modern French partially re-Latinized as règle), from Vulgar Latin *regula, from Latin regula "straight stick, bar, ruler;" figuratively "a pattern, a model," related to regere "to rule, straighten, guide" (see regal). Replaced Old English wealdan.\n

\nMeaning "regulation governing play of a game, etc." is from 1690s. Phrase rule of thumb first attested 1690s. Rule of law "supremacy of impartial and well-defined laws to any individual's power" is from 1883. Meaning "strip used for making straight lines or measuring" is recorded from mid-14c. Typography sense is attested from 1680s.

rule

c.1200, "to control, guide, direct," from Old French riuler "impose rule," from Latin regulare (see regulate). Legal sense "establish by decision" is recorded from early 15c. Meaning "mark with lines" is from 1590s. Meaning "to dominate, prevail" is from 1874. "Rule Brittania," patriotic song, is from 1740. Related: Ruled; ruling.

Wiktionary
rule

n. A regulation, law, guideline. vb. (context transitive English) To regulate, be in charge of, make decisions for, reign over.

WordNet
rule
  1. n. a principle or condition that customarily governs behavior; "it was his rule to take a walk before breakfast"; "short haircuts were the regulation" [syn: regulation]

  2. something regarded as a normative example; "the convention of not naming the main character"; "violence is the rule not the exception"; "his formula for impressing visitors" [syn: convention, normal, pattern, formula]

  3. prescribed guide for conduct or action [syn: prescript]

  4. (linguistics) a rule describing (or prescribing) a linguistic practice [syn: linguistic rule]

  5. a basic generalization that is accepted as true and that can be used as a basis for reasoning or conduct; "their principles of composition characterized all their works" [syn: principle]

  6. a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system; "the principle of the conservation of mass"; "the principle of jet propulsion"; "the right-hand rule for inductive fields" [syn: principle]

  7. the duration of a monarch's or government's power; "during the rule of Elizabeth"

  8. dominance or power through legal authority; "France held undisputed dominion over vast areas of Africa"; "the rule of Caesar" [syn: dominion]

  9. directions that define the way a game or sport is to be conducted; "he knew the rules of chess"

  10. any one of a systematic body of regulations defining the way of life of members of a religious order; "the rule of St. Dominic"

  11. (mathematics) a standard procedure for solving a class of mathematical problems; "he determined the upper bound with Descartes' rule of signs"; "he gave us a general formula for attacking polynomials" [syn: formula]

  12. measuring stick consisting of a strip of wood or metal or plastic with a straight edge that is used for drawing straight lines and measuring lengths [syn: ruler]

rule
  1. v. exercise authority over; as of nations; "Who is governing the country now?" [syn: govern]

  2. decide with authority; "The King decreed that all first-born males should be killed" [syn: decree]

  3. be larger in number, quantity, power, status or importance; "Money reigns supreme here"; "Hispanics predominate in this neighborhood" [syn: predominate, dominate, reign, prevail]

  4. decide on and make a declaration about; "find someone guilty" [syn: find]

  5. have an affinity with; of signs of the zodiac

  6. mark or draw with a ruler; "rule the margins"

  7. keep in check; "rule one's temper" [syn: harness, rein]

Gazetteer
Rule, TX -- U.S. town in Texas
Population (2000): 698
Housing Units (2000): 386
Land area (2000): 0.695637 sq. miles (1.801692 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.695637 sq. miles (1.801692 sq. km)
FIPS code: 63752
Located within: Texas (TX), FIPS 48
Location: 33.183118 N, 99.893300 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 79547
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Rule, TX
Rule
Wikipedia
Rule

Rule and ruling usually refers to standards for activities. They may refer to:

Rule (horse)

Rule (foaled January 13, 2007) at WinStar Farm, is an American Thoroughbred racehorse by Roman Ruler out of Rockcide (whose dam was Belle's Good Cide, also the dam of Funny Cide. He is trained by Todd Pletcher. At the age of two in 2009, he won the Delta Jackpot Stakes and was considered a contender for the 2010 Kentucky Derby but failed to enter.

In 2012 Rule won the Monmouth Cup.

Rule (song)

"Rule" is the first single from rapper Nas' 2001 album Stillmatic. It features a chorus sung by Amerie and production provided by Poke and Tone of Trackmasters Entertainment. The song is known for both sampling and interpolating " Everybody Wants to Rule the World" by Tears for Fears. The song's lyrics are political, inspiration and reminiscent of those on Nas' 1996 single " If I Ruled the World (Imagine That)." It references this song in the beginning when Nas says:

"Life, they wonder, can they take me under? Naw, never that."

This references the intro to "If I ruled the World (Imagine That)" which is:

"Life, I wonder, will it take me under? I don't know."

As a single, "Rule" was not heavily promoted, but still reached #67 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart. " Got Ur Self A..." is mistakenly thought to be the first single on Stillmatic because "Rule" was not heavily promoted, did not receive music video treatment and was never released in compact disc format. It was released as a vinyl 12-inch single with "No Idea's Original" as its b-side.

It was featured in the 2003 film, Honey, it is also featured on the Like Mike soundtrack, but includes the edited version.

Rule (surname)

Rule is a surname. Notable people with the name include:

  • Albert Leroy Rule, World War I documentary film producer & director
  • Ann Rule (1935–2015), American true crime writer.
  • Bert L. Rule (1891–1878), Popular music composer & arranger
  • Bob Rule (born 1944), American basketball player
  • Christopher Rule (1895–1983), American comic book artist
  • Elton Rule (1916–90), American television executive
  • Francis Rule (born 1835), Cornish miner who moved to Mexico and became immensely wealthy.
  • Gilbert Rule (c. 1629–1701), Principal of Edinburgh University
  • Glenn Rule (born 1989), English soccer player
  • Ja Rule (born 1976), American rapper, singer and actor
  • Jack Rule, Jr. (born 1938), American professional golfer
  • Jane Rule (1931–2007), Canadian writer
  • Janice Rule (1931–2003), American actress
  • Margaret Rule (1928-2015), English underwater archaeologist
  • Stan Rule (1924-2007), Australian rules footballer
  • Stephen Rule (born 1952), English Rugby Union and Rugby League player and coach
  • Wendy Rule, Australian musical artist
  • William Rule (American editor) (1839–1928), American newspaper editor and politician

Usage examples of "rule".

Mishani would never have believed it possible - not only that Lucia had been allowed to reach eight harvests of age in the first place, but also that the Empress was foolish enough to think the high families would allow an Aberrant to rule Saramyr.

The Weavers know they could not thrive in a realm where an Aberrant ruled.

He had figured to himself some passionate hysterique, merciless as a cat in her hate and her love, a zealous abettor, perhaps even the ruling spirit in the crime.

Sranc, Bashrags, Dragons, all the abominations of the Inchoroi, are artifacts of the Tekne, the Old Science, created long, long ago, when the Nonmen still ruled Earwa.

Court, in conformity with the aforementioned theories of economics and evolution, was in fact committed to the principle that freedom of contract is the general rule and that legislative authority to abridge the same could be justified only by exceptional circumstances.

With a few thousand absentee ballots still uncounted and Republican Perry Hooper appearing to be ahead, the Democrats rushed into court to ask a judge to change the rules.

He always knew if someone was absent, but the rule of thumb was that unless he was asked a direct question he would not volunteer this information and therefore would not have to lie or turn the absentee in.

In a variety of analogous forms in different countries throughout Europe, the patrimonial and absolutist state was the political form required to rule feudal social relations and relations of production.

The Zondarians quickly saw the wisdom in acceding to our gentle guidance, and put themselves under Thallonian rule.

The reds, as a rule, are affected by acids, and, therefore, it is not possible to use an acid bath with Benzopurpurine, Congo red, with the possible exception of the Titan reds and scarlets, Diamine scarlet, Benzo fast scarlet, Purpuramine, which are faster to acetic acid than the other reds of this class of dye-stuffs.

Ravensbund as he ruled the rest of Achar, but as far as the Ravensbundmen knew or cared, the Achar King had as much control over them as he did over the Forbidden.

The braziers began giving off a thick, resinous, overly sweet smoke with something astringent to it but I had no way of knowing if it was, in fact, the perfume the grimoire had specified for operations ruled by the planet Mercury: a mixture of mastic, frankincense, cinquefoil, achates, and the dried and powdered brains of a fox.

It was apparent that the acquaintanceship of Irene and Dave Elden had not been according to rule.

If the Supreme Court of the United States shall decide that States cannot exclude slavery from their limits, are you in favor of acquiescing in, adopting, and following such decision as a rule of political action?

Supreme Court of the United States shall decide that the States cannot exclude slavery from their limits, are you in favor of acquiescing in, adhering to, and following such decision as a rule of political action?