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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

read

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a compass bearing/reading (=a direction shown by a compass)
▪ We took a compass bearing to ensure we were walking in the right direction.
a poetry reading (=when poems are read to people, usually by the writer)
▪ I used to like giving poetry readings.
a spelling/reading/listening test
▪ I didn’t do very well in the listening test.
compulsive reading/viewing
▪ ‘Gardening World’ is compulsive viewing for gardeners.
essential reading
▪ The journal is essential reading for doctors.
light reading
▪ It’s a really good book if you want a bit of light reading.
look/go/read through your notes
▪ I read through my notes before the exam.
read a book
▪ What book are you reading at the moment?
read a chapter
▪ I haven’t even read the first chapter yet.
read a diary
▪ I wish you’d let me read your diary.
read a headline
▪ I just read the main headlines.
read a letter
▪ May I read her letter?
read a map (=look at and understand the information on a map)
▪ He drove while I read the map.
read a newspaper
▪ Which newspaper do you read?
read an account
▪ Have you read his account of the journey?
read an email
▪ It took most of the morning to read my emails.
read an essay
▪ Did you read her essay on ‘The Waste Land’?
read and write
▪ Kerry could read and write when she was five.
read (sb) a story
▪ She read a lot of detective stories.
read sb’s expression (=understand how someone is feeling by looking at their expression)
▪ In the half light, Ellen could not read his expression.
read sb’s handwriting
▪ I’m afraid I find it very difficult to read your handwriting.
read sth from cover to cover (=read a book, magazine etc very thoroughly)
▪ He read it from cover to cover in less than three hours.
read the instructions
▪ Always read the instructions before switching on the machine.
read the signals (=to understand signals correctly)
▪ President Nixon read the signals and decided it was time to resign.
read voraciously
▪ Anne has always read voraciously.
read your mail
▪ The first thing he did was read his mail.
read/check the small print
▪ Always read the small print before you sign anything.
reading glasses (=for reading)
▪ She looked at him over the frames of her reading glasses.
reading/writing etc material(s)
▪ Videos often make good teaching material.
reading/writing skills
▪ Their reading skills are poor.
read/say sth aloud
▪ Joanne, would you read the poem aloud?
read/see an article
▪ It was good to see such an intelligent article on censorship.
read/study the menu
▪ Sandy read the menu, but didn’t see anything he wanted to eat.
see/read sth in the newspaper
▪ I saw in the newspaper that he had died.
speed reading
take it as read/given (=assume that something is correct or certain, because you are sure that this is the case)
▪ It isn’t official yet, but you can take it as read that you’ve got the contract.
the gauge reads sth (=it shows something)
▪ The petrol gauge read empty.
the headlines read/say (=the headlines say something)
▪ The next morning’s headlines read: ‘Moors Search for Missing Boys’.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
about
▪ Licensed dealers still deal in certain shares the punter reads about in the tip sheets.
▪ You read about them in National Geographic.
▪ So the following six months to a year I spent the time abroad walking and seeing the places I had read about.
▪ Also, he seemed to remember reading about stolen jewels.
▪ Perhaps she had acknowledged his wartime exploits, up there in his Spitfire inflicting those severe losses she had read about.
▪ He enjoyed reading about military history and adventure stories.
▪ The maximum is 74 minutes which is, therefore, the maximum time available to read about 650 megabytes of data.
▪ Places you see pictures of and read about.
aloud
▪ So one can not say that grapheme-phoneme conversion is the way non-words are read aloud.
▪ She changed her mind about reading aloud to Irene, who was looking at her, she felt, skeptically.
▪ The paragraph can be first written, then corrected, and then read aloud.
▪ Maryellen reads aloud the sign on the wall.
▪ Some reading requires quiet and calm; some reading cries out to be shared, perhaps to be read aloud.
▪ We spent a few evenings reading aloud these books.
▪ He was reading aloud from Sara's Alan Coren collection.
▪ Justin sat in a chair at the front of the class and read aloud from Bears on Hemlock Mountain.
out
▪ As the scores were read out like a football draw it became clear that it would be a close contest.
▪ An Illustration: NETtalk NETtaik4 is a program that teaches itself to read out loud.
▪ ERROR-RETURN-DETAIL/ - is a return parameter providing a report of the errors encountered during the attempt to read out the requested modules.
▪ Lacan gives us a way of reading out both.
▪ They'd been read out in court.
▪ With an official manner, a man loudly read out her crime for the crowd to hear.
▪ They are more like a succession of monologues read out before a dismally empty assembly.
▪ But then at 11.10, there was the result being read out, live, by the Torbay returning officer.
■ NOUN
article
▪ After some fumbling I had managed to read my first article by Julie Bitchkill.
▪ I read your article and would love to talk to you.
▪ He started reading an article about the lifestyle of the rich and famous.
▪ A senior manager read one of the articles and promptly promoted the marketing manager to a position as his assistant.
▪ Having read the article, I admit that aspects of it caused my eyebrows to rise.
▪ David Klugman remembers his anger after reading the article.
▪ Listen to talks - read articles - then jot down a few headings on what message is being conveyed.
▪ I read your article on NaviPress and it looks like a great way to start a home page.
book
▪ His books are still read, though more now for the nostalgia they generate than for their real-world relevance.
▪ If no one involved with a book has read it properly, why should the public bother?
▪ She had lists and lists of books to read.
▪ I thought about all the books I had read in the past and remembered one in particular which I had enjoyed immensely.
▪ So does toilet tissue, which makes you wonder where a book is being read.
▪ Anyway, Alan needed his sleep, he had books to read, plans to draw, and essays to write.
▪ And children often have to write about every book they read.
child
▪ During the midday meal the older children read edifying passages chosen by Nicholas from religious or secular history.
▪ Some children will pretend to read while others attend to the print.
▪ Many of the children probably could not read or write.
▪ All you have to do, it seems, is teach a child to read.
▪ This form is widely - though by no means universally - adopted in writing text for young children to read.
▪ The important thing is that children learn to read with confidence, understanding and pleasure.
▪ I wish my child would read different, better, more advanced books.
letter
▪ He wanted to read books and the letters his many friends sent him.
▪ Wade read the letter through again, then lay back and watched the snow slanting across the yellow firelight.
▪ For some one whose knees shook when she tried to read a letter to her classmates, the training was more than useful.
▪ She watched Léonie finish reading the letter.
▪ I was able to turn away from all the staring faces and simply read my letter.
▪ Peter read the letter twice before its meaning sank in.
▪ Gwenellen was at tea, and reading a letter she had had from Aline by the second post.
magazine
▪ It was quite half an hour before he gave a sigh and settled down again to reading his magazine.
▪ I used to send my songs off to outfits in Hollywood that I had read about in magazines.
▪ Then I get up and read the papers and magazines.
▪ His interest in the business grew after reading trade magazines and other material about the business.
▪ She read it in a magazine.
▪ He follows the auctions and reads the auction magazines.
▪ I guess you read one porno magazine and the second one is just the same.
▪ They are reading books and magazines.
mind
▪ Surely he hadn't somehow read her mind and shared that foolish thought that stress and tiredness had put into her head?
▪ She knows he can read her mind, she knows her thoughts are open to him.
▪ He might have been rather less relieved if he could have read her mind.
▪ It may respond to voice commands or it may read minds.
▪ He had read her mind with perfect accuracy.
newspaper
▪ He was reading a newspaper, apparently oblivious to the contribution he was making to the traffic chaos.
▪ But it has been shrinking steadily in terms of the percentage of the population reading a daily newspaper.
▪ Vargas sat in the corner drinking coffee and reading a newspaper.
▪ I think of a starving boy I read about in the newspaper.
▪ They only realised he was autistic after reading a newspaper article on the symptoms.
▪ The description, which I had read in a recent newspaper account, had struck me as infinitely ironic and strange.
▪ Normally he never read a newspaper or listened to the radio.
paper
▪ Characters and their philosophies can be cobbled together from Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift and a reading of contemporary papers.
▪ Down the block the neighborhood dead-ended in abandoned farmland that Mami read in the local paper the developers were negotiating to buy.
▪ In 1945 most people read a broadsheet paper - four populars and the two qualities, compared with two tabloids.
▪ One grunt in the Far East read one of my papers.
▪ Everybody stopped reading the music papers and switched to Smash Hits.
▪ Five years from now you are not going to be able to remember the book you read for a term paper.
▪ But Conservative and Labour partisans who disagreed about the bias in their daily papers were reading different papers.
▪ Jody reads the paper and winces.
report
▪ He sat at his desk, reading reports but not taking in what he read.
▪ But reading the reports can provide reassurance that nothing was held back.
▪ But, Father, you only read the medical reports.
▪ They will not be reading the reports released by blue-ribbon commissions.
▪ How well a company performs is judged by customers at the point of sale, not by reading financial reports.
▪ Just reading these late census reports and it shows that the small town is passing.
▪ She watched him as he read the report.
▪ After reading the reports and deciding that her dream car is too expensive, our consumer decides to buy jewelry.
story
▪ You have no authority to read stories like that.
▪ You go upstairs and read Campbell a story before she goes to sleep.
▪ Even so, I locked myself in the bathroom where I could read the story slowly and without fear of interruption.
▪ People read the story and laughed.
▪ I tried once to get out of reading him a story.
▪ Then Aunt Branwell read her a story from the Bible, and I forgot about it.
▪ A few who do not dare to read aloud will ask the ones who do to read their stories too.
text
▪ Perhaps they don't read the text books.
▪ How much more fulfilling it is to meet a genre by having our parents read from many different texts.
▪ In terms of the principles involved, we could be talking here about playing chess or reading a page of text.
▪ To do this you can read texts, making systematic changes of person, tense, and vocabulary items.
▪ The crucial thing to remember is that at no cost do we want our children to read without understanding a text.
▪ Shortly afterwards Villepin called Jospin's chief adviser, Olivier Schrameck, to read out the full text to him.
▪ You read the text by placing a hand-shaped cursor on to the document window.
thought
▪ She did not read his thoughts or hear him talking in his sleep.
▪ You could almost read Horton's thoughts as the chances kept going by.
▪ If he had been able to read my thoughts, he would have been disgusted.
▪ He seemed to read my thoughts.
▪ I read your thoughts and letters weeks ago.
▪ But I can't read your thoughts.
▪ In the first instance, more reading and thought will be necessary in order to satisfactorily cover the topics.
word
▪ Rachaela could only read the words Come to me.
▪ I wonder if Lincoln had read those words when he presented the Emancipation Proclamation to his cabinet.
▪ Proofreading means reading each word of your work carefully and also making sure the layout is right.
▪ These and other strategies encourage Evan to read the words on the page.
▪ When she read the first word, J O E, her heart gave a great leap.
▪ I can read the notes and words as I sing.
▪ It had a red and yellow band on which I could just read the word Cubana.
▪ At that time, I could not see or read the words.
■ VERB
learn
▪ The processes of learning to read and reading with competence an concerned essentially with developing intellectually skills and abilities.
▪ On the first day, the woman, whose name was Fania, had expressed a strong desire to learn to read.
▪ I learned to read the galley proofs and familiarised myself with printers' hieroglyphics.
▪ The next spring, Callie learned to read.
▪ It is not until women learn to read that they internalize the masculine schema.
▪ This marks a huge step in the process of learning to read.
▪ A model prisoner, he learned to read and write, even publishing a small book of poetry.
▪ Over the years you learn to read the plays, see the way the game develops.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a must-have/must-see/must-read etc
a rattling good yarn/story/read
▪ On one level, it is vastly entertaining and a rattling good read.
▪ We bet the Weatherfield Advertiser was a rattling good read under Ken's editorship.
make (for) interesting/fascinating/compelling etc reading
▪ A glance at the provisions of the Convention makes interesting reading.
▪ He also has a collection of Rentokil news letters going back to his early days which made for fascinating reading after dinner.
▪ His observations may make interesting reading.
▪ In the context of the £33 million earmarked for 20 City Technology Colleges, that figure makes interesting reading.
▪ Its Report was published in 1867 and makes fascinating reading.
▪ The guidance, when it appears, should make interesting reading.
▪ The report I commissioned on you makes for interesting reading.
▪ This, unlike the first one, makes interesting reading, and is referred to continually.
read (sb) the riot act
▪ Stephanie read Ted the riot act for seeing his old girlfriend.
read sb's palm
read/shout etc sth out (loud)
▪ Everything I had read before turned out to be outdated.
▪ He comes up to my room in the evenings so that I can read them out to him.
▪ He read it out loud to his colleagues, quite sarcastically, expecting them to agree that it was ridiculous.
▪ He shouts her out into the street for a harlot.
▪ Laura listened attentively while Yoyo read the speech out loud, and in the end, her eyes were glistening too.
▪ North read it out at his trial four years later as evidence of approval, but it was all delightfully vague.
▪ She brings her notes about it to the meeting and reads them out.
▪ We can read the books children are reading, find out what happens in class, ask what the guidance counselor said.
reading/printed etc matter
▪ Armed with the knowledge gleaned from reading matter and known computer buffs I travelled far and wide.
▪ But they also noted whether there was reading matter in the house.
▪ I was grateful for the information you conveyed regarding Heather's reading matter on Rhodes.
▪ The noble Lord is not, you understand a personal friend of mine: just my current reading matter.
▪ There were also other changes, such as in available reading matter.
▪ Thus the best libretto ever written for the best opera ever written is scarcely tolerable as reading matter.
▪ Typographer a specialist in the design of printed matter, and in particular the art of typography.
▪ Typography the design and planning of printed matter using type.
something to eat/drink/read/do etc
▪ But he was walking to a truck stop across the street, probably getting something to eat during his break.
▪ It had something to do with being a man.
▪ It had something to do with skills, and something to do with expectation and hope.
▪ Most calendar programs remind you gently when you have something to do.
▪ No, you can't dash out for something to eat.
▪ Of course, the beer might have had something to do with this.
▪ Then I rolled up my things in a blanket and went out and had something to eat.
▪ You've done it a thousand times already, but you do it again, just for something to do.
widely read
▪ But even though his book was intended for contemplatives, it was also widely read by lay men and women.
▪ But he was one of the most well-informed, widely read and serious political figures in public life.
▪ For all its note of fantasy, however, the article was widely read and well timed.
▪ Herbert is widely read, where Collins is seldom even heard of.
▪ Local newspapers are widely read and relatively cheap to advertise in.
▪ Newspapers with a significant political reporting are not widely read, whereas television news programs are often among the most-watched programs.
▪ The older works listed first are still widely read and most are generally available in both hardcover and paperback.
you only have to read/look at/listen to etc sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Read me Aunt Evelyn's letter while I cook dinner.
▪ Always read the label before you wash your clothes.
▪ Did you read about that terrible car crash?
▪ Don't believe everything you read in the newspapers.
▪ Good managers are usually able to read a situation quickly and take the right action.
▪ Have you read Jean Martin's latest novel?
▪ Have you read Stephen King's new book yet?
▪ I can read Spanish but I can't speak it very well.
▪ I learned to read music when I was taking piano lessons.
▪ I was astonished to read that half of all sixteen year olds have experimented with drugs.
▪ Jean can't read a word without her glasses on.
▪ map reading
▪ Men shouldn't be surprised if women read this behaviour as threatening.
▪ My parents taught me how to read.
▪ Oliver is reading philosophy at Oxford.
▪ She learnt to read when she was only three years old.
▪ She went on to read medicine at Edinburgh.
▪ Someone came to read the electricity meter this morning.
▪ Soon utility companies may be able to read your meter by computer.
▪ The headline read: "Firefighters Save Girl From Flames."
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Finally, it never hurts to wear our own love of reading on our sleeve.
▪ I marveled at her physical beauty, wanting her to like me, to read to me, to even hold me.
▪ I opened the seals as carefully as I could and read the file.
▪ On the other hand, your readers might be bright and fully conscious of what they are reading.
▪ On the way out I noticed a photograph of a benign-looking chap and read about his gifts to charity.
▪ The Government is also to rush through a ban on fox hunting by holding the bill's second reading on December 18.
▪ The judge had been reading the court file.
▪ We can not help signing so long as there is another human being who needs to read the signs.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
good
▪ Journal in double triumph Roy Castle takes a break from record-breaking and relaxes with a good read.
▪ It is certainly worth a good read, and I can recommend it to anyone interested in this subject.
▪ I just sit and have a good read until they are done.
▪ On one level, it is vastly entertaining and a rattling good read.
▪ Barnes and Hughes for a good read, Levin ton for the examinations.
▪ It is a recipe which makes for a very good read.
▪ Nevertheless, the book is undoubtedly a good, racy read, especially in its first 100 pages.
▪ Taken as a good read, this is an excellent book.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a must-have/must-see/must-read etc
a rattling good yarn/story/read
▪ On one level, it is vastly entertaining and a rattling good read.
▪ We bet the Weatherfield Advertiser was a rattling good read under Ken's editorship.
read (sb) the riot act
▪ Stephanie read Ted the riot act for seeing his old girlfriend.
read sb's palm
read/shout etc sth out (loud)
▪ Everything I had read before turned out to be outdated.
▪ He comes up to my room in the evenings so that I can read them out to him.
▪ He read it out loud to his colleagues, quite sarcastically, expecting them to agree that it was ridiculous.
▪ He shouts her out into the street for a harlot.
▪ Laura listened attentively while Yoyo read the speech out loud, and in the end, her eyes were glistening too.
▪ North read it out at his trial four years later as evidence of approval, but it was all delightfully vague.
▪ She brings her notes about it to the meeting and reads them out.
▪ We can read the books children are reading, find out what happens in class, ask what the guidance counselor said.
something to eat/drink/read/do etc
▪ But he was walking to a truck stop across the street, probably getting something to eat during his break.
▪ It had something to do with being a man.
▪ It had something to do with skills, and something to do with expectation and hope.
▪ Most calendar programs remind you gently when you have something to do.
▪ No, you can't dash out for something to eat.
▪ Of course, the beer might have had something to do with this.
▪ Then I rolled up my things in a blanket and went out and had something to eat.
▪ You've done it a thousand times already, but you do it again, just for something to do.
widely read
▪ But even though his book was intended for contemplatives, it was also widely read by lay men and women.
▪ But he was one of the most well-informed, widely read and serious political figures in public life.
▪ For all its note of fantasy, however, the article was widely read and well timed.
▪ Herbert is widely read, where Collins is seldom even heard of.
▪ Local newspapers are widely read and relatively cheap to advertise in.
▪ Newspapers with a significant political reporting are not widely read, whereas television news programs are often among the most-watched programs.
▪ The older works listed first are still widely read and most are generally available in both hardcover and paperback.
you only have to read/look at/listen to etc sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Children are taught reading and writing in their first years at school.
▪ I do a lot of reading when I'm on vacation.
▪ The newspaper is trying to attract more young readers.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A careful read of this book will show that underpinning it is a terrible truth.
▪ I would like to recommend it to both sexes as a jolly exciting read.
▪ It is certainly worth a good read, and I can recommend it to anyone interested in this subject.
▪ Not even the most unreconstructed Keynesian would ever claim that the General Theory was an easy read.
▪ On one level, it is vastly entertaining and a rattling good read.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Read

Read \Read\ (r[=e]d), n. Rennet. See 3d Reed. [Prov. Eng.]

Read

Read \Read\ (r[=e]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Read (r[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Reading.] [OE. reden, r[ae]den, AS. r[=ae]dan to read, advise, counsel, fr. r[=ae]d advice, counsel, r[=ae]dan (imperf. reord) to advise, counsel, guess; akin to D. raden to advise, G. raten, rathen, Icel. r[=a][eth]a, Goth. r[=e]dan (in comp.), and perh. also to Skr. r[=a]dh to succeed. [root]116. Cf. Riddle.]

  1. To advise; to counsel. [Obs.] See Rede.

    Therefore, I read thee, get thee to God's word, and thereby try all doctrine.
    --Tyndale.

  2. To interpret; to explain; as, to read a riddle.

  3. To tell; to declare; to recite. [Obs.]

    But read how art thou named, and of what kin.
    --Spenser.

  4. To go over, as characters or words, and utter aloud, or recite to one's self inaudibly; to take in the sense of, as of language, by interpreting the characters with which it is expressed; to peruse; as, to read a discourse; to read the letters of an alphabet; to read figures; to read the notes of music, or to read music; to read a book.

    Redeth [read ye] the great poet of Itaille.
    --Chaucer.

    Well could he rede a lesson or a story.
    --Chaucer.

  5. Hence, to know fully; to comprehend.

    Who is't can read a woman?
    --Shak.

  6. To discover or understand by characters, marks, features, etc.; to learn by observation.

    An armed corse did lie, In whose dead face he read great magnanimity.
    --Spenser.

    Those about her From her shall read the perfect ways of honor.
    --Shak.

  7. To make a special study of, as by perusing textbooks; as, to read theology or law.

    To read one's self in, to read aloud the Thirty-nine Articles and the Declaration of Assent, -- required of a clergyman of the Church of England when he first officiates in a new benefice.

Read

Read \Read\ (r[=e]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Read (r[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Reading.] [OE. reden, r[ae]den, AS. r[=ae]dan to read, advise, counsel, fr. r[=ae]d advice, counsel, r[=ae]dan (imperf. reord) to advise, counsel, guess; akin to D. raden to advise, G. raten, rathen, Icel. r[=a][eth]a, Goth. r[=e]dan (in comp.), and perh. also to Skr. r[=a]dh to succeed. [root]116. Cf. Riddle.]

  1. To advise; to counsel. [Obs.] See Rede.

    Therefore, I read thee, get thee to God's word, and thereby try all doctrine.
    --Tyndale.

  2. To interpret; to explain; as, to read a riddle.

  3. To tell; to declare; to recite. [Obs.]

    But read how art thou named, and of what kin.
    --Spenser.

  4. To go over, as characters or words, and utter aloud, or recite to one's self inaudibly; to take in the sense of, as of language, by interpreting the characters with which it is expressed; to peruse; as, to read a discourse; to read the letters of an alphabet; to read figures; to read the notes of music, or to read music; to read a book.

    Redeth [read ye] the great poet of Itaille.
    --Chaucer.

    Well could he rede a lesson or a story.
    --Chaucer.

  5. Hence, to know fully; to comprehend.

    Who is't can read a woman?
    --Shak.

  6. To discover or understand by characters, marks, features, etc.; to learn by observation.

    An armed corse did lie, In whose dead face he read great magnanimity.
    --Spenser.

    Those about her From her shall read the perfect ways of honor.
    --Shak.

  7. To make a special study of, as by perusing textbooks; as, to read theology or law.

    To read one's self in, to read aloud the Thirty-nine Articles and the Declaration of Assent, -- required of a clergyman of the Church of England when he first officiates in a new benefice.

Read

Read \Read\, n. [AS. r[=ae]d counsel, fr. r[=ae]dan to counsel. See Read, v. t.]

  1. Saying; sentence; maxim; hence, word; advice; counsel. See Rede. [Obs.]

  2. [ Read, v.] Reading. [Colloq.]
    --Hume.

    One newswoman here lets magazines for a penny a read.
    --Furnivall.

Read

Read \Read\ (r[e^]d), imp. & p. p. of Read, v. t. & i.

Read

Read \Read\ (r[e^]d), a. Instructed or knowing by reading; versed in books; learned.

A poet . . . well read in Longinus.
--Addison.

Read

Read \Read\, v. i.

  1. To give advice or counsel. [Obs.]

  2. To tell; to declare. [Obs.]
    --Spenser.

  3. To perform the act of reading; to peruse, or to go over and utter aloud, the words of a book or other like document.

    So they read in the book of the law of God distinctly, and gave the sense.
    --Neh. viii. 8.

  4. To study by reading; as, he read for the bar.

  5. To learn by reading.

    I have read of an Eastern king who put a judge to death for an iniquitous sentence.
    --Swift.

  6. To appear in writing or print; to be expressed by, or consist of, certain words or characters; as, the passage reads thus in the early manuscripts.

  7. To produce a certain effect when read; as, that sentence reads queerly.

    To read between the lines, to infer something different from what is plainly indicated; to detect the real meaning as distinguished from the apparent meaning.

Wikipedia

Read (surname)

Read is a surname of English origins.

Read (magazine)

READ Magazine is a children's classroom magazine for grades 6–10, published by Weekly Reader Corporation. It includes a mix of classic and contemporary fiction and nonfiction, including plays, personal narratives, poetry, and more to help build reading comprehension and verbal skills.

READ has 15 printed issues and 3 electronic issues per publishing year, and features the work of a number of illustrators, including Bethany Culp, Alex Bradley, Noma Bliss, and many others.

Read (Biology)

In biology, genomics, transcriptomics, DNA-Seq or RNA-Seq context, "read" means a short sequence of dna, typically 25-400 base pairs long. Basically, reads are raw sequences that come off a sequencing machine. In the RNA-Seq methodology, RNA is converted in DNA ( reverse transcription), fragmented and sequenced based on High-throughput sequencing technologies; the final result is millions of reads.

Read

Read may refer to:

  • Read (process), language acquisition, communication, and learning
  • Read (magazine), children's magazine
  • Reading Excellence and Discovery Foundation, a non-profit charitable organization founded in 1999
  • Rural Educational and Development Foundation, not-for-profit educational network in rural Pakistan
  • Read (computer), to retrieve data from a storage device
  • read (system call), a low level IO function on a file descriptor in a computer
  • Read, a term relating to " passing" in gender identity
  • Read (surname), people with this surname
  • Read, Lancashire, town in England
  • Read, West Virginia
  • Read codes, a standard clinical terminology system used in General Practice in the United Kingdom
  • Read (automobile), American car manufactured 1913-1915
  • Read Township, Butler County, Nebraska

Read (All-England cricketer, 1773)

Read (first name and dates unknown) was an English first-class cricketer who made a single appearance for All-England against the Hambledon Club at the Artillery Ground in 1773. Blake made one known first-class appearance, scoring 13 runs in his only innings. He did not bowl.

As Read had established his reputation by 1773, he must have been active for some years previously and his career probably began in the 1760s. Very few players were mentioned by name in contemporary reports and there are no other references to Read.

Read (automobile)

The Read car was manufactured by the Read Motor Company in Detroit, Michigan from 1913-1914. It produced a five-seater touring car costing $850. It was powered by a 4-cylinder 3.3 liter engine, and had a grey body with black striping.

Read (Unix)

''' read ''' is a command found on Unix and Unix-like operating systems such as Linux. It reads a line of input from standard input or a file passed as an argument to its -u flag, and assigns it to a variable. In Linux based shells, like Bash, it is present as a shell built in function, and not as a separate executable file.

Read (system call)

In modern POSIX compliant operating systems, a program that needs to access data from a file stored in a file system uses the read system call. The file is identified by a file descriptor that is normally obtained from a previous call to open. This system call reads in data in bytes, the number of which is specified by the caller, from the file and stores then into a buffer supplied by the calling process.

The read system call takes three arguments:

  1. The file descriptor of the file,
  2. the buffer where the read data is to be stored and
  3. the number of bytes to be read from the file.
WordNet

read

n. something that is read; "the article was a very good read"

read

  1. v. interpret something that is written or printed; "read the advertisement"; "Have you read Salman Rushdie?"

  2. have or contain a certain wording or form; "The passage reads as follows"; "What does the law say?" [syn: say]

  3. look at, interpret, and say out loud something that is written or printed; "The King will read the proclamation at noon"

  4. obtain data from magnetic tapes; "This dictionary can be read by the computer" [syn: scan]

  5. interpret the significance of, as of palms, tea leaves, intestines, the sky, etc.; also of human behavior; "She read the sky and predicted rain"; "I can't read his strange behavior"; "The gypsy read his fate in the crystal ball"

  6. interpret something in a certain way; convey a particular meaning or impression; "I read this address as a satire"; "How should I take this message?"; "You can't take credit for this!" [syn: take]

  7. indicate a certain reading; of gauges and instruments; "The thermometer showed thirteen degrees below zero"; "The gauge read `empty'" [syn: register, show, record]

  8. be a student of a certain subject; "She is reading for the bar exam" [syn: learn, study, take]

  9. audition for a stage role by reading parts of a role; "He is auditioning for `Julius Cesar' at Stratford this year"

  10. to hear and understand; "I read you loud and clear!"

  11. make sense of a language; "She understands French"; "Can you read Greek?" [syn: understand, interpret, translate]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

read

1580s, "having knowledge gained from reading," in well-read, etc., past participle adjective from read (v.).

read

"an act of reading," 1825, from read (v.).

read

Old English rædan (West Saxon), redan (Anglian) "to advise, counsel, persuade; discuss, deliberate; rule, guide; arrange, equip; forebode; read, explain; learn by reading; put in order" (related to ræd, red "advice"), from Proto-Germanic *redan (cognates: Old Norse raða, Old Frisian reda, Dutch raden, Old High German ratan, German raten "to advise, counsel, guess"), from PIE root *re(i)- "to reason, count" (cognates: Sanskrit radh- "to succeed, accomplish," Greek arithmos "number amount," Old Church Slavonic raditi "to take thought, attend to," Old Irish im-radim "to deliberate, consider"). Words from this root in most modern Germanic languages still mean "counsel, advise."\n

\nSense of "make out the character of (a person)" is attested from 1610s. Connected to riddle via notion of "interpret." Transference to "understand the meaning of written symbols" is unique to Old English and (perhaps under English influence) Old Norse raða. Most languages use a word rooted in the idea of "gather up" as their word for "read" (such as French lire, from Latin legere). Read up "study" is from 1842; read out (v.) "expel by proclamation" (Society of Friends) is from 1788. read-only in computer jargon is recorded from 1961.

Wiktionary

read

n. A reading or an act of reading, especially an actor's part of a play. vb. 1 (context obsolete English) To think, believe; to consider (that). 2 (context transitive or intransitive English) To look at and interpret letters or other information that is written. 3 (context transitive or intransitive English) To speak aloud words or other information that is written. ''Often construed with a ''to'' phrase or an indirect object.''

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "read".

Guillaume Erard unfolded a double sheet of paper, and read Jeanne the form of abjuration, written down according to the opinion of the masters.

Hotel, and has been attended by the most happy results, yet the cases have presented so great a diversity of abnormal features, and have required so many variations in the course of treatment, to be met successfully, that we frankly acknowledge our inability to so instruct the unprofessional reader as to enable him to detect the various systemic faults common to this ever-varying disease, and adjust remedies to them, so as to make the treatment uniformly successful.

I have ever conversed, or whose treatises I have read, are firmly convinced that the several breeds to which each has attended, are descended from so many aboriginally distinct species.

It seemed to Smith, upon reading the individual reports, that many of them would have been absolved before their cases got beyond the deputy level, so flimsy were the accusations made against them.

I read, and turning my face to the Heavens, thanked God that I was absolved by the dear subject of my crimes.

Abuse victims, we often read, continue the cycle by becoming abusers themselves.

It matters not whether he is professional or amateur, so he is untouched by academicism and has not done so much reading or writing as to impair his mental digestion and his clarity of vision.

At the edge of the field of vision, the Doppler telemeter and accelerometer spat out their little red numbers so rapidly that it was difficult to read the indicated speed.

Pasgen would read in her words how much her arms ached to curve around a small, warm body, to hold a child that wriggled and laughed and cuddled against her for comfort.

Jayme has read your reports and listened to the news from the north of Achar with growing alarm.

Charley had to read it through red achiote juice and purple tattoo stippling, but the eyes seemed to belong to a man he could do bidness with, as they say in Texas.

These words are read out by the priest in a deep voice to all who are about to observe the Holy Supper, and are listened to by them in full acknowledgment that they are true.

And more than this, read nine of these cases, which he has published, as I have just done, and observe the absolute nullity of aconite, belladonna, and bryonia, against the symptoms over which they are pretended to exert such palpable, such obvious, such astonishing influences.

V With shudders chill as aconite, The couchant chewer of the cud Will start at times in pussy fright Before the dogs, when reads her sprite The streaks predicting streams of blood.

He therefore resolved immediately to acquaint him with the fact which we have above slightly hinted to the reader.