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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

say

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a lot to do/learn/say etc
▪ I still have a lot to learn.
▪ It’s a great city, with lots to see and do.
a report says/states (that)
▪ The report said that it would cost another £250 million to repair the damage.
a watch says ...
▪ My watch says twenty past one.
ask/say your age (=ask or say how old you are)
▪ It’s rude to ask a woman her age.
as...rightly said
▪ I was, as you rightly said, the smallest boy in the class.
be right in saying/thinking etc
▪ I think I’m right in saying they once employed 2000 people.
bound to say (=I feel I ought to say)
▪ Well, I’m bound to say, I think you’re taking a huge risk.
come out and say
▪ At least he’s got the courage to come out and say what he thinks.
experts say sth
▪ Experts are saying that the economy is likely to improve towards the end of this year.
extraordinary thing to do/say/happen
▪ What an extraordinary thing to do!
final decision/say/approval etc
▪ We can advise the client, but in the end it is he who has the final say.
▪ Is that your final answer?
forgive me for asking/saying etc sth (also forgive my asking/saying etc)
Forgive me for saying so, but that’s nonsense.
▪ Forgive my phoning you so late.
have/find a good word (to say)
▪ No one had a good word to say for her.
heard it said
▪ I’ve heard it said that they met in Italy.
hope so/think so/say so etc
▪ ‘Will I need my umbrella?’ ‘I don’t think so.’
▪ If you want to go home, just say so.
I can truly say
I can truly say I’ve never enjoyed myself so much.
I hear what you say/what you’re sayingspoken (= used to tell someone that you have listened to their opinion, but do not agree with it)
▪ I hear what you say, but I don’t think we should rush this decision.
I hear what you say/what you’re sayingspoken (= used to tell someone that you have listened to their opinion, but do not agree with it)
▪ I hear what you say, but I don’t think we should rush this decision.
it's no exaggeration to say that ... (=used to emphasize that something is really true)
▪ It's no exaggeration to say that residents live in fear of the local gangs.
it’s fair to say (that) (=used when you think what you are saying is correct or reasonable)
▪ It’s fair to say that by then he had lost the support of his staff.
it’s safe to say/assume (that)
▪ I think it’s safe to say that the future is looking pretty good.
It’s untrue to say
It’s untrue to say that the situation has not changed.
meant what...said
▪ I meant what I said earlier.
omit to mention/say/tell etc
▪ Oliver omitted to mention that he was married.
overhear sb say (that)
▪ We overheard the teacher say there would be a pop quiz today.
quoted as saying
▪ A military spokesman was quoted as saying that the border area is now safe.
read/say sth aloud
▪ Joanne, would you read the poem aloud?
said grace
▪ My father said grace.
said no
▪ He wanted to take me to a disco but I said no.
said yes
▪ He proposed to me and I said yes.
say a prayer
▪ Say a prayer for me.
say goodbye
▪ I just have to say goodbye to Jane.
say hello
▪ Stanley, come and say hello to your nephew.
say nothing
▪ I promised to say nothing about it to anyone.
say (you are) sorry (=tell someone that you feel bad about hurting them, causing problems etc)
▪ It was probably too late to say sorry, but she would try anyway.
say your goodbyes (=say goodbye to several people or everyone)
▪ We said our goodbyes and left.
say/add/ask etc pointedly
▪ ‘I thought you were leaving,’ she said pointedly.
say/celebrate Mass (=perform this ceremony as a priest)
say/recite the rosary
▪ Three nuns knelt there, reciting the rosary.
say/speak a word
▪ She said the words ‘my husband’ in a firm voice.
say/speak/reply etc coldly
▪ ‘Well, what can I do for you?’ he asked coldly.
say/whisper sth into sb's ear
▪ He whispered something into his wife's ear.
So they say
▪ ‘Has he lost a fortune?’ ‘So they say.’
strange to sayBritish English (= strangely)
▪ Strange to say, I was just thinking that myself.
that’s not saying much (=none of his books is very good)
▪ It’s the best book he’s written, but that’s not saying much.
the clock says eight/nine etc (=shows a particular time)
▪ The clock said five so I went back to sleep.
the headlines read/say (=the headlines say something)
▪ The next morning’s headlines read: ‘Moors Search for Missing Boys’.
the instructions say/tell you to do sth
▪ The instructions say that you should take the tablets after meals.
(the) legend says
▪ Legend says King Arthur’s sword was thrown into one of the pools here.
the rule says ...
▪ The rule says that you must be standing inside the line.
what to do/say/expect etc
▪ They’re discussing what to do next.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
official
▪ After the ship's arrival, the officials said the truth would probably not be known until the government finished an investigation.
▪ Despite complaints about his suitability, officials said they were powerless to stop him because police had no evidence to ban him.
▪ Volleyball officials say that the team is picked purely on merit.
▪ Industry officials said the development could result in the creation of 300, 000 jobs, mostly in the construction sector.
▪ Baker was unavailable for comment, and a club official said Sabean would not comment beyond a short written statement.
▪ The case against Thanong represents one of the largest marijuana prosecutions ever brought by federal authorities, officials said.
spokesman
▪ A spokesman said the freight train driver spotted the danger but could not prevent the collision.
▪ At least 996 delegates are needed to ensure a nomination on the first ballot, a party spokesman said.
▪ A Hollywoood spokesman for Kidman said she could not be contacted.
▪ About 1, 000 people were hired in November, a company spokesman said.
▪ An army spokesman said that the security vetting of personnel was a normal procedure in all defence forces.
▪ A NationsBank spokesman declined to say what title that person might hold.
▪ A spokesman said the 56-year-old singer pianist had flu.
▪ Lawrence Livermore Lab was also affected, but apparently not as severely as others, a spokesman there said.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(say) cheese!
I can't rightly say/don't rightly know
I might say/add
▪ And battling it gracefully, I might add, wielding his mighty pen like a sword.
▪ Hair: grey and losing it, I might add.
▪ In passing, I might say how extraordinarily lucky I am to have them here with me.
▪ Likewise. I might add a little oregano, garlic, onions, salt, and butter once in a while.
▪ None of which has been answered yet, I might add.
▪ Very expensive method too I might add.
▪ Yes, they have decided to reinstate you, over my violent objections, I might add.
I must admit/say/confess
▪ At this point I must say that I haven't yet found a carp that didn't eat Tropicanas.
▪ But I must say I was deeply disappointed.
▪ But I must say she's not always as fractious as she appears now.
▪ He went very red in the face. I must say he never did it again.
▪ Lovely site for it, I must say.
▪ Some one must have brought it here for a purpose, but I must admit it looks abandoned.
▪ They were very polite, I must confess.....
▪ This procedure is, I must admit, a limited one, and it is vulnerable to criticism.
I would think/imagine/say
▪ And that, I would say, is what we, in our own religious rites, had best be doing too.
▪ Dominic remains, I would say, a preposterously beautiful creature.
▪ Elizabeth: I would say about 185 pounds.
▪ Is there a chance Chrysler might buy Fiat? I would think there's essentially zero chance of that happening.
▪ Perhaps it is more a matter for philosophers than scientists, but I would say not.
▪ Pretty heavily on fire, too, I would think.
▪ That is a prime question, I would say, of this hour in the bringing up of children.
▪ This looks tough, I would think, and then immediately forget about it.
I'll say this/that much for sb/sth
▪ I'll say this much for him, he was consistent until the end.
I'm sorry to say (that)
anything you say
▪ But she won't do anything I say.
▪ If you are a teacher I do not ask you to believe or take on trust anything I say.
▪ It was so cold that anything you said had frozen up before leaving your mouth.
▪ She did not seem surprised by anything I said.
▪ The whole audience became like one and anything somebody say is like you say it.
▪ There's something baldly there about him which inclines me, like Kevin, to distrust anything he says.
▪ They don't expect to understand anything he says.
▪ Why should anything we say have any validity?
be/go on (the) record as saying (that)
before you can say Jack Robinson
easier said than done
enough said
▪ The other trust hospital is at Ayr: enough said.
it's/that's easy for you to say
like I say/said
Like I said, I really appreciate your help.
▪ And like I said, he won't be getting his kicks from smashing up other people's property.
▪ Answer, like I said everybody had materials on that rug.
▪ Anyway, like I said, she wants to make you some food, man.
▪ But like I say now, I want nice furniture to go along with it.
▪ But they're mostly like I say.
▪ Okay, I can picture it happening, like I said I have, one of those things that happen.
might I say/ask/add etc
▪ And what happened to yours, might I ask?
needless to say
Needless to say, we're on a very tight budget.
▪ Basil, needless to say, has found the butter.
▪ But, needless to say, things can get a little crazy in the 24-hour news biz.
▪ Janice, needless to say, was quite unaware of her presence.
▪ Musical value, needless to say, usually ends up being the last thing these folks consider.
▪ The armed robber, needless to say, did not stay around to be sued.
▪ The whole thing, needless to say, is demoralizing.
▪ There was no bathroom, needless to say.
▪ This kind of banter, needless to say, is not acceptable flirting behavior.
never say die
never say never
▪ I don't want to run for office, but I've learned to never say never. Who knows what will happen in 10 years?
no sooner said than done
not have a bad word to say about/against sb
not say a word
▪ Could Sandra please not say a word to anyone, not even the women or the other rescue workers?
▪ He did not say a word, just stared at the sky.
▪ Marty was offering her his handkerchief, not saying a word.
▪ She did not say a word.
▪ She knew that she could not say a word until she had something.
▪ We sit there for a few more minutes not saying a word.
▪ Williams did not say a word until we got back to the company after the mission.
▪ Yoyo does not say a word.
say a mouthful
say a word/say a few words
say hello
▪ As she came level, I got to my feet and said hello.
▪ But could he come over and say hello to the money machine of the lousy network?
▪ I'd come in from school and he wouldn't say hello to me.
▪ I am quite new to this area and only know people to say hello to.
▪ I boarded the Five McAllister, forgetting to say hello to the cheery Muni driver.
▪ I said hello and sat down on a stack of C-ration cases.
▪ I waited for him to come into my room and say hello.
▪ Then he sat down next to the old man and said hello.
say sth/tell sb sth to their face
say uncle
say/think/decide etc otherwise
▪ But he knew that people thought otherwise, and that their false impression was his own fault.
▪ But I wanted to have it on the record, in case any of you think otherwise.
▪ Donald thinks otherwise - and the upshot may be that he will sue.
▪ Many might seek to use the asylum route and, indeed, it would be naive to think otherwise.
▪ People think otherwise, surely, from politicians: more simply, about horror, fear, survival?
▪ The rich supposedly think otherwise -- and manage to pay very little.
▪ To say otherwise would be bitterness and we know better than to surrender.
▪ To think otherwise, it seems, is to reveal oneself as an ignoramus who does not know enough characters.
that is (to say)
▪ One solution would be to change the shape of the TV screen -- that is, to make it wider.
▪ A standard of service that is second to none, with a speed and quality guarantee for all repairs.
▪ But it is not a dream that is likely to come true, though perhaps not for the obvious reason.
▪ Could you describe the current selling collection hanging out there in a gallery that is also your front room?
▪ First, that is not so.
▪ I look to the current discussions, and also to the United States, to give the ground that is needed.
▪ Scientific knowledge is not proven knowledge, but it does represent knowledge that is probably true.
▪ Uncomplicated computer interface that is truly easy to use.
▪ You won't convince me that the answer to that is necessary for your enquiry.
they say/think etc
▪ Black children from middle-class or affluent families, they say, are more apt to adopt what is commonly called black slang.
▪ But the president essentially endorsed Rumsfeld's approach, they said.
▪ Employers' groups welcomed the reforms, though they said more are necessary to encourage employers to take on permanent staff.
▪ Goodness only knows what makes them tick, or why they thought they could get away with it here.
▪ I thanked them for praying for me and seeing me now, hoped they thought their efforts worthwhile.
▪ Light a match, they say, and flames flicker over it like brandy on a Christmas pudding.
▪ She asked them why; they said it was because they had information that the two children had been sexually abused.
▪ These others stand on something they said.
think/say etc as much
▪ Archaeological analyses say as much about the interpreters as about the extinct cultures.
▪ Even the defense attorneys who went up against him said as much.
▪ He felt convinced that Aeneas was the son-in-law Faunus had predicted, and he said as much to the envoys.
▪ He said as much to Katherine on their second evening together.
▪ He said as much when he finally let things loose.
▪ Kennedy said as much in the summer of 1961, when he met Khrushchev in Vienna.
▪ The women stood in silence, glad of each other's presence and without the need to say as much.
▪ They will do and say as much as they dare, to get the client's money.
to say the least
▪ Mrs. Russel was upset, to say the least.
▪ These maps are difficult to understand, to say the least.
▪ As captain and opening bat, he's an important member of the side, to say the least.
▪ Cartoonish, to say the least.
▪ It is a bizarre setting, to say the least, where the boredom and indifference can be measured in metric tons.
▪ The lamps look, to say the least, unreliable.
▪ The outlook for their national teams is, to say the least, uncertain.
▪ The results of these experiments were, to say the least, puzzling to the researchers.
▪ There would be a bit of confusion, to say the least.
▪ Try as she might, her working relationship with Stephanie Marsa was strained to say the least.
well said!
what else can sb do/say?
▪ I told her it looked good. What else could I say?
▪ I do about three hundred sit-ups a day and it still refuses to firm up, but what else can I do?
▪ P.S. Awful - but what else can one do?
▪ So what else can Florida do?
▪ What else can a sinner say?
▪ What else can he realistically do?
▪ What else can I do for you Jim?
▪ What else can I do to improve things?
whatever you say/think/want
▪ And she always did whatever she wanted, which was mostly enjoy herself and ignore her homework.
▪ Dare they call her bluff and just let her get on with whatever she thought she could do to inconvenience them?
▪ Eurydice said her daughter could do whatever she wanted to do.
▪ I eat whatever I want and run three miles a day.
▪ I know that I had no intention of stopping the procedure, whatever anyone said or did to influence me.
▪ In my stupidity-or whatever you want to call it-I tried to move around to his left.
▪ The hon. Gentleman can make whatever he wants of it, but it will still not save his seat.
▪ You think you should get whatever you want right away.
when all's said and done
without (saying) a word
▪ He throws himself without a word on to the blanket beside him.
▪ Jed began to know where Creed wanted to go without a word being uttered.
▪ Now this woman of endless stories, a teacher, lies without words, waiting to die.
▪ She turned without a word and walked back to where her friends lay like casualties.
▪ Sitting down opposite without a word he picked up the glass and emptied the contents down his throat.
▪ Still without a word Pearl brought Ezra to the tiny kitchen.
▪ The place is empty but for the bar and three or four slightly-built lads shooting pool without words.
▪ Then she turned and without a word left him and the house, too.
wouldn't say boo to a goose
you can't say fairer than that
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "I'm in love," said Dennis.
▪ "I must be going," she said.
▪ "Is Joyce coming over later?" "She didn't say."
▪ "Where's Pam going?" "I don't know. She didn't say."
Say a student came to you with a problem. You'd try to help them, right?
▪ Although we must have done about 100 miles, the petrol gauge still said half-full.
▪ Did Peter say that he would be late?
▪ Did they say how long the operation would take?
▪ How do you say your last name?
▪ I asked Dad if he'd lend me some money, but he said no.
▪ I couldn't think of anything to say.
▪ If there's anything you're not happy about, please say so.
▪ It says here that the police are closing in on the killer.
▪ It says in today's paper that gas prices are going up again.
▪ James wrote to the bank and said we needed a loan.
▪ Julie's clothes and her whole attitude just said "New York".
▪ Lauren came over to say goodbye to us.
▪ Most modern art doesn't say much to me.
▪ One look said it all -- Richard knew that Sally wouldn't marry him.
▪ So what you're saying, Mr President, is that you don't have a policy on this issue.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
final
▪ We should not go so far as to hold a referendum, but the people must have the final say.
▪ You can do all the planning you like, but in the end the Old Course has the final say.
▪ The Good Friday agreement leaves the final say to the people of Northern Ireland in a referendum.
▪ Huckelberry makes a final recommendation to the Board of Supervisors, which has the final say.
▪ The commission says it's adamant that the public will have the final say.
▪ The state Board of Education -- Florida's governor and Cabinet -- has the final say.
▪ Under the constitution, the supreme leader, appointed by conservative clerics, has the final say in matters of state.
▪ It was she who would have the final say as to whether I was migration material or not.
■ VERB
allow
▪ It was only after protests from landlords that they were allowed to have their say.
▪ The corporation was allowed no say in an authoritative international arena in its own demise.
give
▪ Now the anti-Maastricht movement plans to give the voters a say in a Yes-No phone poll after the New Year.
▪ Osborne believes the only way to give physicians a say in how their patients are cared for is to unionize.
▪ The government first designated six areas to be turned into HATs, without the tenants being given a say.
▪ It's time for sports followers to be given their say.
▪ The statute gives him no such say.
▪ And this gives us the final say.
▪ They also give people a say in decisions that affect their lives.
▪ Wives were given a say for the first time, and what they wanted was romantic practicality.
let
▪ Talk too much, and not let others have their say.
▪ Probably the best thing about his show was that he let people have their say.
▪ Typically a group might have a system of going round the table, letting everyone have their say.
▪ Don't let anyone say politics is not about personalities.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(say) cheese!
I can't rightly say/don't rightly know
I dare say
▪ I dare say things will improve.
▪ Although it was correct, I dare say, and he no doubt intended it as a mark of respect.
▪ His mouth twitches almost imperceptibly. I dare say that mine, under the cover of my beard, twitches faintly back.
▪ There's lots of things that ought, I dare say.
▪ They're all these chemical things now - I dare say they're just as good really.
▪ They sang in perfect harmony, although I dare say Alex Ferguson will complain about the pitch.
▪ Were it not fur her, I dare say Edward Plantagenet would long since have succumbed to ennui and despair.
▪ What Miguel says goes around here, I dare say.
▪ You understand not - how could you? I dare say you never will.
I don't mind admitting/telling you/saying etc
I hate to say it, but .../I hate to tell you this, but ...
I have to say/admit/confess
▪ I have to say I don't know anything about computers.
▪ At this point I have to say he was, from an early age, exceedingly theatrical.
▪ He did not, I have to say, look at all pleased.
▪ He looked, I have to say, absolutely great.
▪ I am rather shaken, I have to confess.
▪ I shall say yes, she was thinking. I have to say yes.
▪ If you find that what I have to say about the specialisation is difficult, don't worry.
▪ Looking through Woodworker I have to say that many of the chairs are anything but comfortable!
▪ None of us slept very easily, I have to say.
I just wanted to say/know etc
▪ I asked them, and this is what they told me. I just wanted to know did you know any more.
▪ In the ambulance, I just wanted to know the damage.
▪ The truth of it was, as miserable as things were, I just wanted to say I had been there.
I mean to say
▪ Good ... Dorothy, I meant to say on Sunday how wonderful the flowers looked.
▪ Really, I mean to say, Stevens.
▪ Well the first main stop light you hit I guess is what I mean to say.
▪ Well, I mean to say, I've got total admiration for the way you chaps work.
I might say/add
▪ And battling it gracefully, I might add, wielding his mighty pen like a sword.
▪ Hair: grey and losing it, I might add.
▪ In passing, I might say how extraordinarily lucky I am to have them here with me.
▪ Likewise. I might add a little oregano, garlic, onions, salt, and butter once in a while.
▪ None of which has been answered yet, I might add.
▪ Very expensive method too I might add.
▪ Yes, they have decided to reinstate you, over my violent objections, I might add.
I must admit/say/confess
▪ At this point I must say that I haven't yet found a carp that didn't eat Tropicanas.
▪ But I must say I was deeply disappointed.
▪ But I must say she's not always as fractious as she appears now.
▪ He went very red in the face. I must say he never did it again.
▪ Lovely site for it, I must say.
▪ Some one must have brought it here for a purpose, but I must admit it looks abandoned.
▪ They were very polite, I must confess.....
▪ This procedure is, I must admit, a limited one, and it is vulnerable to criticism.
I need hardly say/tell/remind etc
▪ Birds have never been one of my major interests, I need hardly say.
▪ How I welcomed Night Duty, I need hardly say.
▪ I need hardly say how heartily I sympathize with the purposes of the Audubon Society.
▪ I need hardly say that I don't care to have things so.
▪ I need hardly say that my wife's first impression of Lewis differed somewhat from my own.
▪ Mr Bawn, I need hardly tell you, is a man of considerable dignity and I would not leave him here.
▪ Type 4 I need hardly say how glad I am.
I would think/imagine/say
▪ And that, I would say, is what we, in our own religious rites, had best be doing too.
▪ Dominic remains, I would say, a preposterously beautiful creature.
▪ Elizabeth: I would say about 185 pounds.
▪ Is there a chance Chrysler might buy Fiat? I would think there's essentially zero chance of that happening.
▪ Perhaps it is more a matter for philosophers than scientists, but I would say not.
▪ Pretty heavily on fire, too, I would think.
▪ That is a prime question, I would say, of this hour in the bringing up of children.
▪ This looks tough, I would think, and then immediately forget about it.
I'll say this/that much for sb/sth
▪ I'll say this much for him, he was consistent until the end.
I'm sorry to say (that)
anything you say
▪ But she won't do anything I say.
▪ If you are a teacher I do not ask you to believe or take on trust anything I say.
▪ It was so cold that anything you said had frozen up before leaving your mouth.
▪ She did not seem surprised by anything I said.
▪ The whole audience became like one and anything somebody say is like you say it.
▪ There's something baldly there about him which inclines me, like Kevin, to distrust anything he says.
▪ They don't expect to understand anything he says.
▪ Why should anything we say have any validity?
before you can say Jack Robinson
come right out with sth/come right out and say sth
dare I say/suggest
▪ Dohnányi, dare I say it, is merely bland.
▪ Fashionwise, it was not a night to look, dare I say it, nice.
▪ For children of all ages this is a fascinating display and one, dare I say it, which reaches new heights.
▪ Of course some of Our Guild Members are dare I say it just that wee bit narrow minded.
▪ What if some one could undergo that absorption with a cool ... dare I say it? ... scientific rationale.
▪ You may, dare I say it, need the money.
easier said than done
enough said
▪ The other trust hospital is at Ayr: enough said.
if you don't mind my saying so/if you don't mind me asking
it goes without saying (that)
▪ And it goes without saying that Wild is a Lisztian of the finest order.
▪ Concentrated, clear meat juice, must, it goes without saying, be added.
▪ Despite these difficulties, it goes without saying that no book should be ordered unless the price is known.
▪ Historically it goes without saying that we have used all kinds of nature, and especially animals, for human benefit.
▪ I think it goes without saying that a rested person is a better person, more able to face life.
▪ Non-fiction books, too, it goes without saying, are a good source.
▪ Of course it goes without saying that the aquarium glass must always be perfectly clean for best results.
it's/that's easy for you to say
let's just say (that)
like I say/said
Like I said, I really appreciate your help.
▪ And like I said, he won't be getting his kicks from smashing up other people's property.
▪ Answer, like I said everybody had materials on that rug.
▪ Anyway, like I said, she wants to make you some food, man.
▪ But like I say now, I want nice furniture to go along with it.
▪ But they're mostly like I say.
▪ Okay, I can picture it happening, like I said I have, one of those things that happen.
might I say/ask/add etc
▪ And what happened to yours, might I ask?
need I ask/need I say more/need I go on etc?
needless to say
Needless to say, we're on a very tight budget.
▪ Basil, needless to say, has found the butter.
▪ But, needless to say, things can get a little crazy in the 24-hour news biz.
▪ Janice, needless to say, was quite unaware of her presence.
▪ Musical value, needless to say, usually ends up being the last thing these folks consider.
▪ The armed robber, needless to say, did not stay around to be sued.
▪ The whole thing, needless to say, is demoralizing.
▪ There was no bathroom, needless to say.
▪ This kind of banter, needless to say, is not acceptable flirting behavior.
never say die
never say die
never say never
▪ I don't want to run for office, but I've learned to never say never. Who knows what will happen in 10 years?
no sooner said than done
not have a bad word to say about/against sb
pardon me for interrupting/asking/saying
Pardon me for asking, but where did you buy your shoes?
say hello
▪ As she came level, I got to my feet and said hello.
▪ But could he come over and say hello to the money machine of the lousy network?
▪ I'd come in from school and he wouldn't say hello to me.
▪ I am quite new to this area and only know people to say hello to.
▪ I boarded the Five McAllister, forgetting to say hello to the cheery Muni driver.
▪ I said hello and sat down on a stack of C-ration cases.
▪ I waited for him to come into my room and say hello.
▪ Then he sat down next to the old man and said hello.
say sth/tell sb sth to their face
say uncle
say/think/decide etc otherwise
▪ But he knew that people thought otherwise, and that their false impression was his own fault.
▪ But I wanted to have it on the record, in case any of you think otherwise.
▪ Donald thinks otherwise - and the upshot may be that he will sue.
▪ Many might seek to use the asylum route and, indeed, it would be naive to think otherwise.
▪ People think otherwise, surely, from politicians: more simply, about horror, fear, survival?
▪ The rich supposedly think otherwise -- and manage to pay very little.
▪ To say otherwise would be bitterness and we know better than to surrender.
▪ To think otherwise, it seems, is to reveal oneself as an ignoramus who does not know enough characters.
suffice (it) to say (that)
Suffice it to say that prayer is an important activity in the Synagogue.
▪ For the moment, suffice it to say that I take a skeptical view of the structural analyses offered.
▪ It suffices to say we launched a host of programs to rectify the situation.
that is (to say)
▪ One solution would be to change the shape of the TV screen -- that is, to make it wider.
▪ A standard of service that is second to none, with a speed and quality guarantee for all repairs.
▪ But it is not a dream that is likely to come true, though perhaps not for the obvious reason.
▪ Could you describe the current selling collection hanging out there in a gallery that is also your front room?
▪ First, that is not so.
▪ I look to the current discussions, and also to the United States, to give the ground that is needed.
▪ Scientific knowledge is not proven knowledge, but it does represent knowledge that is probably true.
▪ Uncomplicated computer interface that is truly easy to use.
▪ You won't convince me that the answer to that is necessary for your enquiry.
they say/think etc
▪ Black children from middle-class or affluent families, they say, are more apt to adopt what is commonly called black slang.
▪ But the president essentially endorsed Rumsfeld's approach, they said.
▪ Employers' groups welcomed the reforms, though they said more are necessary to encourage employers to take on permanent staff.
▪ Goodness only knows what makes them tick, or why they thought they could get away with it here.
▪ I thanked them for praying for me and seeing me now, hoped they thought their efforts worthwhile.
▪ Light a match, they say, and flames flicker over it like brandy on a Christmas pudding.
▪ She asked them why; they said it was because they had information that the two children had been sexually abused.
▪ These others stand on something they said.
think/say etc as much
▪ Archaeological analyses say as much about the interpreters as about the extinct cultures.
▪ Even the defense attorneys who went up against him said as much.
▪ He felt convinced that Aeneas was the son-in-law Faunus had predicted, and he said as much to the envoys.
▪ He said as much to Katherine on their second evening together.
▪ He said as much when he finally let things loose.
▪ Kennedy said as much in the summer of 1961, when he met Khrushchev in Vienna.
▪ The women stood in silence, glad of each other's presence and without the need to say as much.
▪ They will do and say as much as they dare, to get the client's money.
to say the least
▪ Mrs. Russel was upset, to say the least.
▪ These maps are difficult to understand, to say the least.
▪ As captain and opening bat, he's an important member of the side, to say the least.
▪ Cartoonish, to say the least.
▪ It is a bizarre setting, to say the least, where the boredom and indifference can be measured in metric tons.
▪ The lamps look, to say the least, unreliable.
▪ The outlook for their national teams is, to say the least, uncertain.
▪ The results of these experiments were, to say the least, puzzling to the researchers.
▪ There would be a bit of confusion, to say the least.
▪ Try as she might, her working relationship with Stephanie Marsa was strained to say the least.
turn around and say/do etc sth
▪ After a couple of months, the Sioux turned around and came back west without permission.
▪ Each was turned around and the wrists cuffed behind their backs.
▪ He turned around and saw the first Stillman shuffling off in the other direction.
▪ He turned around and slowed down, seeing no sign of the monsters.
▪ Lepine turns around and starts spraying the students in the front rows with gunfire.
▪ She turned around and went back to sit in the road.
▪ There was no way to maneuver, even to turn around and get out if we had to.
▪ Why turn around and do the same to one of our own?
well said!
what else can sb do/say?
▪ I told her it looked good. What else could I say?
▪ I do about three hundred sit-ups a day and it still refuses to firm up, but what else can I do?
▪ P.S. Awful - but what else can one do?
▪ So what else can Florida do?
▪ What else can a sinner say?
▪ What else can he realistically do?
▪ What else can I do for you Jim?
▪ What else can I do to improve things?
whatever you say/think/want
▪ And she always did whatever she wanted, which was mostly enjoy herself and ignore her homework.
▪ Dare they call her bluff and just let her get on with whatever she thought she could do to inconvenience them?
▪ Eurydice said her daughter could do whatever she wanted to do.
▪ I eat whatever I want and run three miles a day.
▪ I know that I had no intention of stopping the procedure, whatever anyone said or did to influence me.
▪ In my stupidity-or whatever you want to call it-I tried to move around to his left.
▪ The hon. Gentleman can make whatever he wants of it, but it will still not save his seat.
▪ You think you should get whatever you want right away.
when all's said and done
wouldn't say boo to a goose
you can't say fairer than that
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Huckelberry makes a final recommendation to the Board of Supervisors, which has the final say.
▪ Probably the best thing about his show was that he let people have their say.
▪ The public hospitals are managed by the states, and the federal government has very little direct say in them.
III.interjection
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(say) cheese!
I can't rightly say/don't rightly know
I dare say
▪ I dare say things will improve.
▪ Although it was correct, I dare say, and he no doubt intended it as a mark of respect.
▪ His mouth twitches almost imperceptibly. I dare say that mine, under the cover of my beard, twitches faintly back.
▪ There's lots of things that ought, I dare say.
▪ They're all these chemical things now - I dare say they're just as good really.
▪ They sang in perfect harmony, although I dare say Alex Ferguson will complain about the pitch.
▪ Were it not fur her, I dare say Edward Plantagenet would long since have succumbed to ennui and despair.
▪ What Miguel says goes around here, I dare say.
▪ You understand not - how could you? I dare say you never will.
I don't mind admitting/telling you/saying etc
I hate to say it, but .../I hate to tell you this, but ...
I have to say/admit/confess
▪ I have to say I don't know anything about computers.
▪ At this point I have to say he was, from an early age, exceedingly theatrical.
▪ He did not, I have to say, look at all pleased.
▪ He looked, I have to say, absolutely great.
▪ I am rather shaken, I have to confess.
▪ I shall say yes, she was thinking. I have to say yes.
▪ If you find that what I have to say about the specialisation is difficult, don't worry.
▪ Looking through Woodworker I have to say that many of the chairs are anything but comfortable!
▪ None of us slept very easily, I have to say.
I just wanted to say/know etc
▪ I asked them, and this is what they told me. I just wanted to know did you know any more.
▪ In the ambulance, I just wanted to know the damage.
▪ The truth of it was, as miserable as things were, I just wanted to say I had been there.
I mean to say
▪ Good ... Dorothy, I meant to say on Sunday how wonderful the flowers looked.
▪ Really, I mean to say, Stevens.
▪ Well the first main stop light you hit I guess is what I mean to say.
▪ Well, I mean to say, I've got total admiration for the way you chaps work.
I might say/add
▪ And battling it gracefully, I might add, wielding his mighty pen like a sword.
▪ Hair: grey and losing it, I might add.
▪ In passing, I might say how extraordinarily lucky I am to have them here with me.
▪ Likewise. I might add a little oregano, garlic, onions, salt, and butter once in a while.
▪ None of which has been answered yet, I might add.
▪ Very expensive method too I might add.
▪ Yes, they have decided to reinstate you, over my violent objections, I might add.
I must admit/say/confess
▪ At this point I must say that I haven't yet found a carp that didn't eat Tropicanas.
▪ But I must say I was deeply disappointed.
▪ But I must say she's not always as fractious as she appears now.
▪ He went very red in the face. I must say he never did it again.
▪ Lovely site for it, I must say.
▪ Some one must have brought it here for a purpose, but I must admit it looks abandoned.
▪ They were very polite, I must confess.....
▪ This procedure is, I must admit, a limited one, and it is vulnerable to criticism.
I need hardly say/tell/remind etc
▪ Birds have never been one of my major interests, I need hardly say.
▪ How I welcomed Night Duty, I need hardly say.
▪ I need hardly say how heartily I sympathize with the purposes of the Audubon Society.
▪ I need hardly say that I don't care to have things so.
▪ I need hardly say that my wife's first impression of Lewis differed somewhat from my own.
▪ Mr Bawn, I need hardly tell you, is a man of considerable dignity and I would not leave him here.
▪ Type 4 I need hardly say how glad I am.
I would think/imagine/say
▪ And that, I would say, is what we, in our own religious rites, had best be doing too.
▪ Dominic remains, I would say, a preposterously beautiful creature.
▪ Elizabeth: I would say about 185 pounds.
▪ Is there a chance Chrysler might buy Fiat? I would think there's essentially zero chance of that happening.
▪ Perhaps it is more a matter for philosophers than scientists, but I would say not.
▪ Pretty heavily on fire, too, I would think.
▪ That is a prime question, I would say, of this hour in the bringing up of children.
▪ This looks tough, I would think, and then immediately forget about it.
I'll say this/that much for sb/sth
▪ I'll say this much for him, he was consistent until the end.
I'm sorry to say (that)
anything you say
▪ But she won't do anything I say.
▪ If you are a teacher I do not ask you to believe or take on trust anything I say.
▪ It was so cold that anything you said had frozen up before leaving your mouth.
▪ She did not seem surprised by anything I said.
▪ The whole audience became like one and anything somebody say is like you say it.
▪ There's something baldly there about him which inclines me, like Kevin, to distrust anything he says.
▪ They don't expect to understand anything he says.
▪ Why should anything we say have any validity?
be/go on (the) record as saying (that)
before you can say Jack Robinson
come right out with sth/come right out and say sth
dare I say/suggest
▪ Dohnányi, dare I say it, is merely bland.
▪ Fashionwise, it was not a night to look, dare I say it, nice.
▪ For children of all ages this is a fascinating display and one, dare I say it, which reaches new heights.
▪ Of course some of Our Guild Members are dare I say it just that wee bit narrow minded.
▪ What if some one could undergo that absorption with a cool ... dare I say it? ... scientific rationale.
▪ You may, dare I say it, need the money.
easier said than done
enough said
▪ The other trust hospital is at Ayr: enough said.
if you don't mind my saying so/if you don't mind me asking
it goes without saying (that)
▪ And it goes without saying that Wild is a Lisztian of the finest order.
▪ Concentrated, clear meat juice, must, it goes without saying, be added.
▪ Despite these difficulties, it goes without saying that no book should be ordered unless the price is known.
▪ Historically it goes without saying that we have used all kinds of nature, and especially animals, for human benefit.
▪ I think it goes without saying that a rested person is a better person, more able to face life.
▪ Non-fiction books, too, it goes without saying, are a good source.
▪ Of course it goes without saying that the aquarium glass must always be perfectly clean for best results.
it's/that's easy for you to say
let's just say (that)
like I say/said
Like I said, I really appreciate your help.
▪ And like I said, he won't be getting his kicks from smashing up other people's property.
▪ Answer, like I said everybody had materials on that rug.
▪ Anyway, like I said, she wants to make you some food, man.
▪ But like I say now, I want nice furniture to go along with it.
▪ But they're mostly like I say.
▪ Okay, I can picture it happening, like I said I have, one of those things that happen.
might I say/ask/add etc
▪ And what happened to yours, might I ask?
need I ask/need I say more/need I go on etc?
needless to say
Needless to say, we're on a very tight budget.
▪ Basil, needless to say, has found the butter.
▪ But, needless to say, things can get a little crazy in the 24-hour news biz.
▪ Janice, needless to say, was quite unaware of her presence.
▪ Musical value, needless to say, usually ends up being the last thing these folks consider.
▪ The armed robber, needless to say, did not stay around to be sued.
▪ The whole thing, needless to say, is demoralizing.
▪ There was no bathroom, needless to say.
▪ This kind of banter, needless to say, is not acceptable flirting behavior.
never say die
never say die
never say never
▪ I don't want to run for office, but I've learned to never say never. Who knows what will happen in 10 years?
no sooner said than done
not have a bad word to say about/against sb
not say a word
▪ Could Sandra please not say a word to anyone, not even the women or the other rescue workers?
▪ He did not say a word, just stared at the sky.
▪ Marty was offering her his handkerchief, not saying a word.
▪ She did not say a word.
▪ She knew that she could not say a word until she had something.
▪ We sit there for a few more minutes not saying a word.
▪ Williams did not say a word until we got back to the company after the mission.
▪ Yoyo does not say a word.
pardon me for interrupting/asking/saying
Pardon me for asking, but where did you buy your shoes?
say a mouthful
say a word/say a few words
say hello
▪ As she came level, I got to my feet and said hello.
▪ But could he come over and say hello to the money machine of the lousy network?
▪ I'd come in from school and he wouldn't say hello to me.
▪ I am quite new to this area and only know people to say hello to.
▪ I boarded the Five McAllister, forgetting to say hello to the cheery Muni driver.
▪ I said hello and sat down on a stack of C-ration cases.
▪ I waited for him to come into my room and say hello.
▪ Then he sat down next to the old man and said hello.
say sth/tell sb sth to their face
say uncle
say/think/decide etc otherwise
▪ But he knew that people thought otherwise, and that their false impression was his own fault.
▪ But I wanted to have it on the record, in case any of you think otherwise.
▪ Donald thinks otherwise - and the upshot may be that he will sue.
▪ Many might seek to use the asylum route and, indeed, it would be naive to think otherwise.
▪ People think otherwise, surely, from politicians: more simply, about horror, fear, survival?
▪ The rich supposedly think otherwise -- and manage to pay very little.
▪ To say otherwise would be bitterness and we know better than to surrender.
▪ To think otherwise, it seems, is to reveal oneself as an ignoramus who does not know enough characters.
suffice (it) to say (that)
Suffice it to say that prayer is an important activity in the Synagogue.
▪ For the moment, suffice it to say that I take a skeptical view of the structural analyses offered.
▪ It suffices to say we launched a host of programs to rectify the situation.
that is (to say)
▪ One solution would be to change the shape of the TV screen -- that is, to make it wider.
▪ A standard of service that is second to none, with a speed and quality guarantee for all repairs.
▪ But it is not a dream that is likely to come true, though perhaps not for the obvious reason.
▪ Could you describe the current selling collection hanging out there in a gallery that is also your front room?
▪ First, that is not so.
▪ I look to the current discussions, and also to the United States, to give the ground that is needed.
▪ Scientific knowledge is not proven knowledge, but it does represent knowledge that is probably true.
▪ Uncomplicated computer interface that is truly easy to use.
▪ You won't convince me that the answer to that is necessary for your enquiry.
they say/think etc
▪ Black children from middle-class or affluent families, they say, are more apt to adopt what is commonly called black slang.
▪ But the president essentially endorsed Rumsfeld's approach, they said.
▪ Employers' groups welcomed the reforms, though they said more are necessary to encourage employers to take on permanent staff.
▪ Goodness only knows what makes them tick, or why they thought they could get away with it here.
▪ I thanked them for praying for me and seeing me now, hoped they thought their efforts worthwhile.
▪ Light a match, they say, and flames flicker over it like brandy on a Christmas pudding.
▪ She asked them why; they said it was because they had information that the two children had been sexually abused.
▪ These others stand on something they said.
think/say etc as much
▪ Archaeological analyses say as much about the interpreters as about the extinct cultures.
▪ Even the defense attorneys who went up against him said as much.
▪ He felt convinced that Aeneas was the son-in-law Faunus had predicted, and he said as much to the envoys.
▪ He said as much to Katherine on their second evening together.
▪ He said as much when he finally let things loose.
▪ Kennedy said as much in the summer of 1961, when he met Khrushchev in Vienna.
▪ The women stood in silence, glad of each other's presence and without the need to say as much.
▪ They will do and say as much as they dare, to get the client's money.
to say the least
▪ Mrs. Russel was upset, to say the least.
▪ These maps are difficult to understand, to say the least.
▪ As captain and opening bat, he's an important member of the side, to say the least.
▪ Cartoonish, to say the least.
▪ It is a bizarre setting, to say the least, where the boredom and indifference can be measured in metric tons.
▪ The lamps look, to say the least, unreliable.
▪ The outlook for their national teams is, to say the least, uncertain.
▪ The results of these experiments were, to say the least, puzzling to the researchers.
▪ There would be a bit of confusion, to say the least.
▪ Try as she might, her working relationship with Stephanie Marsa was strained to say the least.
turn around and say/do etc sth
▪ After a couple of months, the Sioux turned around and came back west without permission.
▪ Each was turned around and the wrists cuffed behind their backs.
▪ He turned around and saw the first Stillman shuffling off in the other direction.
▪ He turned around and slowed down, seeing no sign of the monsters.
▪ Lepine turns around and starts spraying the students in the front rows with gunfire.
▪ She turned around and went back to sit in the road.
▪ There was no way to maneuver, even to turn around and get out if we had to.
▪ Why turn around and do the same to one of our own?
well said!
what else can sb do/say?
▪ I told her it looked good. What else could I say?
▪ I do about three hundred sit-ups a day and it still refuses to firm up, but what else can I do?
▪ P.S. Awful - but what else can one do?
▪ So what else can Florida do?
▪ What else can a sinner say?
▪ What else can he realistically do?
▪ What else can I do for you Jim?
▪ What else can I do to improve things?
whatever you say/think/want
▪ And she always did whatever she wanted, which was mostly enjoy herself and ignore her homework.
▪ Dare they call her bluff and just let her get on with whatever she thought she could do to inconvenience them?
▪ Eurydice said her daughter could do whatever she wanted to do.
▪ I eat whatever I want and run three miles a day.
▪ I know that I had no intention of stopping the procedure, whatever anyone said or did to influence me.
▪ In my stupidity-or whatever you want to call it-I tried to move around to his left.
▪ The hon. Gentleman can make whatever he wants of it, but it will still not save his seat.
▪ You think you should get whatever you want right away.
when all's said and done
without (saying) a word
▪ He throws himself without a word on to the blanket beside him.
▪ Jed began to know where Creed wanted to go without a word being uttered.
▪ Now this woman of endless stories, a teacher, lies without words, waiting to die.
▪ She turned without a word and walked back to where her friends lay like casualties.
▪ Sitting down opposite without a word he picked up the glass and emptied the contents down his throat.
▪ Still without a word Pearl brought Ezra to the tiny kitchen.
▪ The place is empty but for the bar and three or four slightly-built lads shooting pool without words.
▪ Then she turned and without a word left him and the house, too.
wouldn't say boo to a goose
you can't say fairer than that
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Say, Mike, how about a beer after work?
Say, my lights don't work.
Wikipedia

Say

To say is to communicate orally.

Say or SAY may refer to:

Say (magazine)

'Say ' is a magazine published by and for Aboriginal youth in Canada. The magazine was started in 2002. It is published four times a year. In addition to special editions, the magazine is published as five regional editions.

Say (song)

"Say" is a song by John Mayer written for the Rob Reiner film The Bucket List in 2007. It was released as a single on November 20 and is the first commercial single in Mayer's career that was not originally released on one of his albums but added to the special edition re-release of his album, Continuum. In the U.S., it has become the artist's highest charting single to date, reaching number twelve on the Billboard Hot 100 in May, 2008. The song earned Mayer another Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, his fourth win on the category.

Say (Ryan Cabrera song)

"Say" is a selfwritten song by American pop singer Ryan Cabrera, produced by Daniel James, Leah Haywood for Cabrera's third studio album The Moon Under Water (2008). The track was released as the first single from the album in the first quarter of 2008. This song has won Star Shine magazine's independent song of the year.

Say (Method Man song)

"Say" is the first and only single from rapper Method Man's fourth studio album, 4:21... The Day After. It samples Lauryn Hill's "So Many Things to Say" from MTV's Unplugged. The song finds Method Man addressing critics and fickle fans for disrespecting him, his swag and his Wu-Tang brethren.

Say (All I Need)

"Say (All I Need)" is a song by American pop rock band OneRepublic. It is the third single released from their debut album Dreaming Out Loud and follows the global success of their previous top ten singles, " Apologize" and " Stop and Stare". OneRepublic vocalist Ryan Tedder has commented that "Say (All I Need") is his "favorite track on the album." All five members of the band Ryan Tedder, Zach Filkins, Drew Brown, Eddie Fisher and Brent Kutzle share writing and composing credits on the song. The single was released in the UK on June 2, 2008 and features their Live Lounge cover of Duffy's single "Mercy". The single was released on June 24, 2008 in the United States.

The song was recorded at Rocket Carousel Studios in Culver City by producer Greg Wells and engineer Drew Pearson. The chorus of the song was featured during the most recent season of The Hills. Also it featured in the pilot episode of the TV series, The Vampire Diaries. On July 3, 2008, OneRepublic made a guest appearance on So You Think You Can Dance (U.S. season 4) for a live performance of "Say (All I Need)". In France, the song was recorded as a duet with the French R&B singer Sheryfa Luna and was renamed as Say (À l'infini).

Say (album)

is the solo second album by J-pop singer Misono, released on July 16, 2008. The album can be found on two different formats, CD-Only and CD+DVD. The album held the following single releases before its initial release: " Hot Time / A.(Answer)", " Pochi", " Zasetsu Chiten", " Jūnin Toiro", " Mugen Kigen", and " Ninin Sankyaku". The title of the album is a pun: is a homonym for the English word Say.

The album contains all of Misono's singles since "Pochi" up until "Ninin Sankyaku", and all of those singles' A-side and B-side tracks (save for "Ninin Sankyaku"'s medley) and the DVD contains alternate versions of the music videos released for the singles. For example, the "Box ver." of "Zasetsu Chiten" takes place solely in the box setting of the original video.

Say made it to number 13 on the Oricon Daily Album Charts but went to number 20 on the Oricon Weekly Album Charts.

Say (The Creatures song)

"Say" is a song recorded by English band The Creatures (aka singer Siouxsie Sioux and drummer Budgie). It was co-produced by Steve Levine.

It was the second single taken from their third album, Anima Animus. The song is about the suicide of Billy Mackenzie of Associates. The single entered the UK Singles Chart at No. 72 in March 1999.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Say

Say \Say\, v. i. To speak; to express an opinion; to make answer; to reply.

You have said; but whether wisely or no, let the forest judge.
--Shak.

To this argument we shall soon have said; for what concerns it us to hear a husband divulge his household privacies?
--Milton.

Say

Say \Say\, v. t. To try; to assay. [Obs.]
--B. Jonson.

Say

Say \Say\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Said (s[e^]d), contracted from sayed; p. pr. & vb. n. Saying.] [OE. seggen, seyen, siggen, sayen, sayn, AS. secgan; akin to OS. seggian, D. zeggen, LG. seggen, OHG. sag[=e]n, G. sagen, Icel. segja, Sw. s["a]ga, Dan. sige, Lith. sakyti; cf. OL. insece tell, relate, Gr. 'e`nnepe (for 'en-sepe), 'e`spete. Cf. Saga, Saw a saying.]

  1. To utter or express in words; to tell; to speak; to declare; as, he said many wise things.

    Arise, and say how thou camest here.
    --Shak.

  2. To repeat; to rehearse; to recite; to pronounce; as, to say a lesson.

    Of my instruction hast thou nothing bated In what thou hadst to say?
    --Shak.

    After which shall be said or sung the following hymn.
    --Bk. of Com. Prayer.

  3. To announce as a decision or opinion; to state positively; to assert; hence, to form an opinion upon; to be sure about; to be determined in mind as to.

    But what it is, hard is to say.
    --Milton.

  4. To mention or suggest as an estimate, hypothesis, or approximation; hence, to suppose; -- in the imperative, followed sometimes by the subjunctive; as, he had, say fifty thousand dollars; the fox had run, say ten miles.

    Say, for nonpayment that the debt should double, Is twenty hundred kisses such a trouble?
    --Shak.

    It is said, or They say, it is commonly reported; it is rumored; people assert or maintain.

    That is to say, that is; in other words; otherwise.

Say

Say \Say\ (s[=a]), n. [Aphetic form of assay.]

  1. Trial by sample; assay; sample; specimen; smack. [Obs.]

    If those principal works of God . . . be but certain tastes and says, as it were, of that final benefit.
    --Hooker.

    Thy tongue some say of breeding breathes.
    --Shak.

  2. Tried quality; temper; proof. [Obs.]

    He found a sword of better say.
    --Spenser.

  3. Essay; trial; attempt. [Obs.]

    To give a say at, to attempt.
    --B. Jonson.

Say

Say \Say\ (s[=a]), obs. imp. of See. Saw.
--Chaucer.

Say

Say \Say\, n. [OE. saie, F. saie, fr. L. saga, equiv. to sagum, sagus, a coarse woolen mantle; cf. Gr. sa`gos. See Sagum.]

  1. A kind of silk or satin. [Obs.]

    Thou say, thou serge, nay, thou buckram lord!
    --Shak.

  2. A delicate kind of serge, or woolen cloth. [Obs.]

    His garment neither was of silk nor say.
    --Spenser.

Say

Say \Say\, n. [From Say, v. t.; cf. Saw a saying.] A speech; something said; an expression of opinion; a current story; a maxim or proverb. [Archaic or Colloq.]

He no sooner said out his say, but up rises a cunning snap.
--L'Estrange.

That strange palmer's boding say, That fell so ominous and drear Full on the object of his fear.
--Sir W. Scott.

WordNet

say

  1. n. the chance to speak; "let him have his say"

  2. [also: said]

say

  1. v. express in words; "He said that he wanted to marry her"; "tell me what is bothering you"; "state your opinion"; "state your name" [syn: state, tell]

  2. report or maintain; "He alleged that he was the victim of a crime"; "He said it was too late to intervene in the war"; "The registrar says that I owe the school money" [syn: allege, aver]

  3. express a supposition; "Let us say that he did not tell the truth"; "Let's say you had a lot of money--what would you do?" [syn: suppose]

  4. have or contain a certain wording or form; "The passage reads as follows"; "What does the law say?" [syn: read]

  5. state as one's opinion or judgement; declare; "I say let's forget this whole business"

  6. utter aloud; "She said `Hello' to everyone in the office"

  7. give instructions to or direct somebody to do something with authority; "I said to him to go home"; "She ordered him to do the shopping"; "The mother told the child to get dressed" [syn: order, tell, enjoin]

  8. speak, pronounce, or utter in a certain way; "She pronounces French words in a funny way"; "I cannot say `zip wire'"; "Can the child sound out this complicated word?" [syn: pronounce, articulate, enounce, sound out, enunciate]

  9. recite or repeat a fixed text; "Say grace"; "She said her `Hail Mary'"

  10. communicate or express nonverbally; "What does this painting say?"; "Did his face say anything about how he felt?"

  11. indicate; "The clock says noon"

  12. [also: said]

Wiktionary

say

Etymology 1 n. One's stated opinion or input into a discussion or decision. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To pronounce. 2 (context transitive English) To recite. Etymology 2

adv. 1 (context colloquial English) (non-gloss definition: Used to gain one's attention before making an inquiry or suggestion) 2 for example; let us assume. conj. (context informal English) (non-gloss definition: Used to introduce a hypothetical) Etymology 3

n. A type of fine cloth similar to serge. Etymology 4

n. 1 Trial by sample; assay; specimen. 2 Tried quality; temper; proof. 3 Essay; trial; attempt. vb. To try; to assay.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

say

"what someone says," 1570s, from say (v.). Meaning "right or authority to influence a decision" is from 1610s. Extended form say-so is first recorded 1630s. Compare Old English secge "speech."

say

Old English secgan "to utter, inform, speak, tell, relate," from Proto-Germanic *sagjanan (cognates: Old Saxon seggian, Old Norse segja, Danish sige, Old Frisian sedsa, Middle Dutch segghen, Dutch zeggen, Old High German sagen, German sagen "to say"), from PIE *sokwyo-, from root *sekw- (3) "to say, utter" (cognates: Hittite shakiya- "to declare," Lithuanian sakyti "to say," Old Church Slavonic sociti "to vindicate, show," Old Irish insce "speech," Old Latin inseque "to tell say").\n

\nPast tense said developed from Old English segde. Not attested in use with inanimate objects (clocks, signs, etc.) as subjects before 1930. You said it "you're right" first recorded 1919; you can say that again as a phrase expressing agreement is recorded from 1942, American English. You don't say (so) as an expression of astonishment (often ironic) is first recorded 1779, American English.

Usage examples of "say".

He had learned her opinions on the subject of Aberrancy over the weeks they had spent together, and while he did not agree with much of what she said, it had enough validity to make him think.

James abetted him in saying that fifty pounds was not a penny too much to lend on such a treasure.

Dale of the Tower: there shall we abide a while to gather victual, a day or two, or three maybe: so my Lord will hold a tourney there: that is to say that I myself and some few others shall try thy manhood somewhat.

The said Folk received them in all joy and triumph, and would have them abide there the winter over.

Moreover, thou sayest it that the champions of the Dry Tree, who would think but little of an earl for a leader, are eager to follow me: and if thou still doubt what this may mean, abide, till in two days or three thou see me before the foeman.

Notary take care to set it down that the said abjuration was made by one gravely suspected of heresy, so that if she should be proved to have relapsed, she should then be judged accordingly and delivered up to the secular Court.

And although, as has been said, a person who is found to be suspected in this way is not to be branded as a heretic, yet he must undergo a canonical purgation, or he must be caused to pronounce a solemn abjuration as in the case of one convicted of a slight heresy.

We are willing to absolve you from them provided that first, with a sincere heart and unfeigned faith, in our presence you abjure, curse and detest the said errors and heresies, and every other error and heresy contrary to the Catholic and Apostolic Church in the manner and form we will prescribe to you.

Eminences and of all faithful Christians this vehement suspicion justly conceived against me, I abjure with a sincere heart and unfeigned faith, I curse and detest the said errors and heresies, and generally all and every error and sect contrary to the Holy Catholic Church.

That is the fidelity of a woman speaking, for Sier Valence has already said that he has abjured his oaths for the sake of this woman, and she does not deny it.

And since according to those same canonical institutions all such are to be condemned as heretics, but you holding to wiser counsel and returning to the bosom of our Holy Mother the Church have abjured, as we have said, all vile heresy, therefore we absolve you from the sentence of excommunication by which you were deservedly bound as one hateful to the Church of God.

And even if he were to relapse into the same heresy which he had abjured, he would still not be liable to the said penalty, although he would be more severely punished than would have been the case if he had not abjured.

For it says there: He who has been involved in one kind or sect of heresy, or has erred in one article of the faith or sacrament of the Church, and has afterwards specifically and generally abjured his heresy: if thereafter he follows another kind or sect of heresy, or errs in another article or sacrament of the Church, it is our will that he be judged a backslider.

And when I asked him how an abo could possibly have known what copper looked like in the ground, he said the man had been employed at one of the mines near Nullagine.

She often returned home pale and silent, having reached the uttermost depths of human abomination, and never daring to say all.