Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

patent

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
patent leather
▪ patent leather shoes
patent medicine
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
application
▪ It is essential that any ideas and development work concerning a possible future patent application are kept absolutely secret and confidential.
▪ A record 5-year high in the number of published patent applications is indicative of the increased level of innovation throughout the company.
leather
▪ When found, she was wearing a pink floral dress, lilac tights, a white cardigan and black patent leather shoes.
▪ Marion looked down at her low-heeled patent leather pumps and sighed.
■ VERB
apply
▪ His company has applied for patents on the method.
▪ He applied for a patent for his design on 26 July 1907.
▪ From the priority date, the patentee normally has up to 12 months to apply for patents in other countries.
▪ The Megan and Morag experiments also enabled us to apply for patents.
file
▪ Following in the well-trodden footsteps of Christopher Columbus, western corporations have filed a number of patents on these attributes.
▪ By the time he died, though, he had filed over a thousand patents and was a very wealthy man.
▪ The first person to file a patent on the idea was W. Bartlett Jones of Chicago in 1927.
▪ He has filed a patent on his idea, and hopes to have a working prototype by the end of the year.
grant
▪ But if an application is made to patent a computer-controlled furnace it may well succeed and be granted a patent.
▪ They were granted the first patent on the airplane in 1906.
▪ The United States patent and trademark office has granted three patents to RiceTec of Texas.
hold
▪ The group displayed material from Syngenta, the multinational which holds the golden rice patents.
▪ Does he hold the patent on himself, so that every part of him is his, and only his?
▪ The institute will hold the patent and distribute the royalties.
▪ Bristol-Myers Squibb holds the international patent on stavudine.
infringe
▪ At about the time of the exhibition, it emerged that the firm was infringing the Medlock patent.
▪ D infringes the patent for the computer chips, regardless of knowledge.
▪ The Heinen letter claims' Latitude appears to specifically infringe Apple's patents and copyrights.
▪ It has filed a lawsuit against Microsoft stating that it has infringed two Stac patents.
obtain
▪ By this time Sadler was interested in steam engines: in 1791 he obtained a patent for an unsuccessful rotary engine.
▪ Unocal obtained the patent in February 1994 and was sued in April 1995.
protect
▪ Some computer inventions have to be protected by copyright rather than patents.
▪ S., Roundup remains protected by patents until 2000.
▪ Farmers must also agree to destroy any leftover seed each year in order to protect Monsanto's patent.
take
▪ He has taken out patents for the process and for the chips.
▪ And they are taking out a patent on it.
▪ Murdock lost no time in setting out for London to take out a patent for his model.
▪ Peregrine Phillips took out a patent in 1831 for the contact or catalytic process for the manufacture of sulphuric acid.
▪ Roebuck was very interested in Watt's invention and suggested that he take out a patent for it.
▪ When, in 1979, he had found that the technology was available for his ideas, Campbell took out patents.
▪ Albright purchased the patents, and then took out his own patents on improvements to Schrötter's method.
▪ I haven't forgotten the way you talked about taking out patents on some of the techniques I developed here.
use
▪ In some cases a patentee can be compelled to grant a licence to use his patent on reasonable terms.
▪ Each company seeks unspecified damages and injunctions that would stop the other from using its patents.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ At about the time of the exhibition, it emerged that the firm was infringing the Medlock patent.
▪ He had a patent and had earned millions of dollars in royalties.
▪ However, spilled milk and out-dated patents are two things equally useless, so I shall catch the late train tomorrow.
▪ It is essential that any ideas and development work concerning a possible future patent application are kept absolutely secret and confidential.
▪ It is indoctrination Misguided pride leaves us impervious to any version of success that does not bear the patent of our system.
▪ The Megan and Morag experiments also enabled us to apply for patents.
▪ The United States patent and trademark office has granted three patents to RiceTec of Texas.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
leather
▪ She noticed with disgust that there were several droplets of blood on the patent leather.
▪ And black patent leather tap shoes covered her most famous toes, which nobody realized yet were famous.
▪ The woman stepped lightly away on her high-heeled, patent leather boots to her basket-work Mini parked beside the public convenience.
▪ Footwear first, of course: Gucci patent leather, square-toed boots are in.
▪ He reached centre-stage and crossed one leg in front of the other - patent leather pumps whining in the glow from the footlights.
▪ Pearlized white patent leather handbags are popular, says Aaronson.
medicine
▪ Taken on to sell insurance, patent medicines and beauty products, I sold my own animals and bought an old bicycle.
▪ We are exposed to chemicals everywhere, in oven cleaners, detergents, patent medicines, hair sprays-everywhere.
▪ For instance, he collects on his little card index all references in Wells to feeding, eating, and patent medicines.
▪ Now, when I stopped at the Emporium, I looked at the patent medicine display first.
▪ He had sorted the boxes of patent medicines and stacked them in one corner away from the cartons of collar studs and bootlaces.
▪ The new display focuses primarily on the role of patent medicines from 1870 to 1906.
system
▪ It should also be noted that no patent system can be watertight.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Footwear first, of course: Gucci patent leather, square-toed boots are in.
▪ Her reluctance to go made her heart ache, but the truth was patent.
▪ This entitled them to bring a patent action against the buyers to enforce the patent.
III.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
process
▪ What remains For MacDonald and Wimpey, of course, is patenting their process and cloning their hybrid for the purpose of franchising.
▪ Union Carbide have patented a process for the catalytic conversion of synthesis gas to ethylene glycol.
▪ Fox Talbot continued to work on his own photographic process in 1839-40 and patented his positive-negative process in 1841.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Cox made millions by patenting a device used in steel production.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ For the outside walls, he used cinder-block masonry, with a patented concrete stucco sprayed on.
▪ He was scarcely out of school before he had patented a rock-boring machine for coal mines.
▪ Healthcare companies are scrambling to patent the new approach first.
▪ The advantage of tera-ethyl lead was that it could be patented and royalties charged.
▪ They patented the Sam Torrance Putter and Sam signed a contract.
▪ They took Joly's method a step further when they patented their autochrome system in 1904.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Patent

Patent \Pat"ent\ (p[a^]t"ent or p[=a]t"ent), a. [L. patens, -entis, p. pr. of patere to be open: cf. F. patent. Cf. Fathom.]

  1. Note: (Oftener pronounced p[=a]t"ent in this sense) Open; expanded; evident; apparent; unconcealed; manifest; public; conspicuous.

    He had received instructions, both patent and secret.
    --Motley.

  2. Open to public perusal; -- said of a document conferring some right or privilege; as, letters patent. See Letters patent, under 3d Letter.

  3. Appropriated or protected by letters patent; secured by official authority to the exclusive possession, control, and disposal of some person or party; patented; as, a patent right; patent medicines.

    Madder . . . in King Charles the First's time, was made a patent commodity.
    --Mortimer.

  4. (Bot.) Spreading; forming a nearly right angle with the steam or branch; as, a patent leaf. Patent leather, a varnished or lacquered leather, used for boots and shoes, and in carriage and harness work. Patent office, a government bureau for the examination of inventions and the granting of patents. Patent right.

    1. The exclusive right to an invention, and the control of its manufacture.

    2. (Law) The right, granted by the sovereign, of exclusive control of some business of manufacture, or of the sale of certain articles, or of certain offices or prerogatives.

      Patent rolls, the registers, or records, of patents.

Patent

Patent \Pat"ent\, n. [Cf. F. patente. See Patent, a.]

  1. A letter patent, or letters patent; an official document, issued by a sovereign power, conferring a right or privilege on some person or party. Specifically:

    1. A writing securing to an invention.

    2. A document making a grant and conveyance of public lands.

      Four other gentlemen of quality remained mentioned in that patent.
      --Fuller.

      Note: In the United States, by the act of 1870, patents for inventions are issued for seventeen years, without the privilege of renewal except by act of Congress.

  2. The right or privilege conferred by such a document; hence, figuratively, a right, privilege, or license of the nature of a patent.

    If you are so fond over her iniquity, give her patent to offend.
    --Shak.

Patent

Patent \Pat"ent\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Patented; p. pr. & vb. n. Patenting.] To grant by patent; to make the subject of a patent; to secure or protect by patent; as, to patent an invention; to patent public lands.

Wikipedia

Patent (disambiguation)

A patent a set of exclusive rights granted by a state (national government) to an inventor or their assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for the public disclosure of an invention.

Patent

A patent ( or ) is a set of exclusive rights granted by a sovereign state to an inventor or assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for detailed public disclosure of an invention. An invention is a solution to a specific technological problem and is a product or a process. Patents are a form of intellectual property.

The procedure for granting patents, requirements placed on the patentee, and the extent of the exclusive rights vary widely between countries according to national laws and international agreements. Typically, however, a granted patent application must include one or more claims that define the invention. A patent may include many claims, each of which defines a specific property right. These claims must meet relevant patentability requirements, such as novelty, usefulness, and non-obviousness. The exclusive right granted to a patentee in most countries is the right to prevent others, or at least to try to prevent others, from commercially making, using, selling, importing, or distributing a patented invention without permission.

Under the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, patents should be available in WTO member states for any invention, in all fields of technology, and the term of protection available should be a minimum of twenty years. Nevertheless, there are variations on what is patentable subject matter from country to country.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

patent

late 14c., "open letter or document from some authority," shortened form of Anglo-French lettre patent (also in Medieval Latin (litteræ) patentes), literally "open letter" (late 13c.), from Old French patente (see patent (adj.).\nThe Letters Patent were ... written upon open sheets of parchment, with the Great Seal pendent at the bottom ... [while] the 'Litteræ Clausæ,' or Letters Close, ... being of a more private nature, and addressed to one or two individuals only, were closed or folded up and sealed on the outside. [S.R. Scargill-Bird, "A Guide to the Principal Classes of Documents at the Public Record Office," 1891]\nMeaning "a license covering an invention" is from 1580s.

patent

"to obtain right to land," 1670s, from patent (n.). The meaning "copyright an invention" is first recorded 1822, from earlier meaning "obtain exclusive right or monopoly" (1789), a privilege granted by the Crown via letters patent. Related: Patented; patenting.

patent

late 14c., in letters patent, literally "open letter," from Old French patente, from Latin patentum (nominative patens) "open, lying open," present participle of patere "lie open, be open," from PIE *pete- "to spread" (see pace (n.)). Sense of "open to view, plain, clear" is first recorded c.1500. Related: Patently.

WordNet

patent

  1. v. obtain a patent for; "Should I patent this invention?"

  2. grant rights to; grant a patent for

  3. make open to sight or notice; "His behavior has patented an embarrassing fact about him"

patent

  1. adj. (of a bodily tube or passageway) open; affording free passage; "patent ductus arteriosus"

  2. clearly apparent or obvious to the mind or senses; "the effects of the drought are apparent to anyone who sees the parched fields"; "evident hostility"; "manifest disapproval"; "patent advantages"; "made his meaning plain"; "it is plain that he is no reactionary"; "in plain view" [syn: apparent, evident, manifest, plain]

patent

  1. n. a document granting an inventor sole rights to an invention [syn: patent of invention]

  2. an official document granting a right or privilege [syn: letters patent]

Wiktionary

patent

Etymology 1 n. A declaration issued by a government agency declaring someone the inventor of a new invention and having the privilege of stopping others from making, using or selling the claimed invention; a letter patent. vb. To successfully register an invention with a government agency; to secure a letter patent. Etymology 2

  1. 1 (context biology English) open, unobstructed, expanded. 2 explicit and obvious. 3 (context of flour English) that is fine, and consists mostly of the inner part of the endosperm 4 Open; unconcealed; conspicuous. 5 Open to public perusal; said of a document conferring some right or privilege. 6 Protected by a legal patent.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "patent".

If they held the patent on the proper adenovirus, it could be worth billions of dollars.

And so we find him now about to show to his chum, Ned Newton, his latest patent, an aerial warship, which, however, was not the success Tom had hoped for.

And that old, specious, dressed-up, garbled, sea-sick ptomaine prancing about avidiously like an irremediable turkey gobbler with patent leather shoes on is my best friend.

Golightly The Nipper Lanky Jones Blue Baccy Nancy Nutall and the Mongrel Our John Willie Bill and the Mary Ann Shaughnessy AUTOBIOGRAPHY Our Kate Catherine Cookson Country Let Me Make Myself Plain WRITING AS CATHERINE MAR CHANT House of Men Heritage of Folly The Fen Tiger THE House of Women CORGI BOOKS THE HOUSE OF WOMEN A CORGI BOOK 0 552 13303 5 Originally published in Great Britain by Bantam Press a division of Transworld Publishers Ltd PRINTING HISTORY Bantam Press edition published 1992 Corgi edition published 1993 Corgi edition reprinted 1993 Copyright Catherine Cookson 1992 The right of Catherine Cookson to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted in accordance with sections 77 and 78 of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988.

Golightly The Nipper Lanky Jones Blue Baccy Nancy Nutall and the Mongrel Our John Willie AUTOBIOGRAPHY Our Kate Catherine Cookson Country Let Me Make Myself Plain WRITING AS CATHERINE MAR CHANT House of Men Heritage of Folly The Fen Tiger THE GILLYVORS Catherine Cookson CORGI BOOKS THE GILLYVORS A CORGI BOOK 0 552 13621 2 Originally published in Great Britain by Bantam Press, a division of Transworld Publishers Ltd PRINTING HISTORY Bantam Press edition published 1990 Corgi edition published 1991 Corgi edition reissued 1991 Copyright Catherine Cookson 1990 The right of Catherine Cookson to be identified as author of this work has been asserted in accordance with sections 77 and 78 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.

His closely trimmed hair was grey at the temples and although most of the men flying that night would be wearing white roll-neck sweaters and stained battledress, Munro was never seen on duty in anything other than his well-tailored barathea with his hand-made shoes polished like patent leather.

A second patent cause of the mania was the zeal and the bibliolatry of Protestantism.

And this patented inner tread means Bungee Condoms hug the surface to prevent dangerous slips and slides.

The patent claims effects on neurotransmitter potentials in the cingulate gyrus.

The thesis for some reason is not citable as a good, sufficient, and competent reference under the Patent Office rules.

Henry Creamer has seven patents on steam traps, and more than a dozen among the number have patented as many as five different inventions.

Preliminary Treatment of the Fabric -- Waterproofing with Acetate of Alumina -- Impregnation of the Fabric -- Drying -- Waterproofing with Paraffin -- Waterproofing with Ammonium Cuprate -- Waterproofing with Metallic Oxides -- Coloured Waterproof Fabrics -- Waterproofing with Gelatine, Tannin, Caseinate of Lime and other Bodies -- Manufacture of Tarpaulin -- British Waterproofing Patents -- Index.

I had only a dilettantish idea what he was talking about, a modest background from answering a rash of alarmed questions about patented new forms of life.

A patent ductus arteriosus makes a continuous shushing murmur, soft, but audible with a little concentration, particularly in the supraclavicular and cervical regions.

A patent ductus arteriosus may have no symptoms, beyond that odd, continuous murmur.