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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
pace
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a steady pace/rate
▪ He moved at a slow and steady pace through the maze of corridors.
at a rapid rate/pace
▪ Deforestation is occurring at a rapid rate as a result of agricultural development.
at a sedate pace
▪ We continued our walk at a sedate pace.
at a smart pace (=fairly fast)
▪ She set off at a smart pace.
brisk pace
▪ They set off at a brisk pace.
force the pace
▪ We need to force the pace on alternative energy policies.
frantic pace/rush/haste etc
▪ There was a frantic rush to escape from the building.
furious pace
▪ Neil set off at a furious pace.
keep pace with inflation (=be at the same level as inflation)
▪ Salaries have not kept pace with inflation.
quickened...pace (=began to walk faster)
▪ Ray glanced at his watch and quickened his pace .
set the pace (=move or change quickly, so that others try to do the same)
▪ With regard to industrialization, Britain set the pace in the first half of the nineteenth century.
slacken your pace/speed (=go or walk more slowly)
▪ Guy slackened his pace as he approached the gate.
the pace/rate of change
▪ People sometimes feel alarmed by the pace of technological change.
walking pace (=the speed that you normally walk at)
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
breakneck
▪ Cirrus, known mostly for multimedia chips, had been growing at a breakneck pace until last year.
brisk
▪ Smith has a second claim with his knack of producing wicket-taking spells at a brisk pace.
▪ Some, of course, want to move at too brisk a pace for safety.
▪ He set off at a brisk pace for the lower station of the funicolare by Piazza Amedeo.
▪ We were determined to go through the speakers listed at a calm but brisk pace, then leave.
▪ None the less, research and development in post-war fighter aircraft went forward at a brisk pace and over a wide range of options.
▪ With knapsack in hand, a brisk pace is assumed.
▪ It was better once I had rounded the corner and I set off at a brisk pace for the west.
fast
▪ Terry Hands's direction whips all this along at a fast pace.
▪ That in itself was a risk and imposed a fast pace on the designers and builders.
▪ Wide roads lead to a new bridge crossing the water and traffic can proceed at a fast pace without a halt.
▪ Technological developments have been at a fast pace since the 1950s.
▪ The overweight people in this experiment, however, kept eating at the same fast pace throughout the meal.
▪ Unemployment has reached post-war records, and government schemes for the unemployed have replaced each other at a very fast pace.
▪ The intensity of instruction is a combination of fast pace and close focus.
▪ The traffic moves at a fast pace and averaging a speed of over one hundred kilometres an hour is not difficult.
faster
▪ Her words were written down by recorders, whom she sometimes exhorted to write faster to keep pace with her.
▪ Events were moving at a faster pace than ever before, thanks to improved transportation and communication.
▪ They toured with another Leeds' band, Age Of Chance, who were breaking at a faster pace than themselves.
▪ To that end, Wilkens says he might try a full-court press in the interest of forcing a faster pace.
▪ This proceeded at a faster pace in services than in industry.
▪ This means that man-made substances are not produced at a faster pace than they can be broken down by nature.
▪ The South has also been adding jobs at a much faster pace, especially in the cities.
▪ John nodded and revolved his right hand, indicating a faster pace.
frantic
▪ It posed a problem for Charman because he could not sustain the song's frantic pace.
▪ Change continues at a frantic pace, and many voters are waiting till the last minute to make decisions.
▪ The fourth-round replay began at a frantic pace and burst into life after 12 minutes.
▪ That threat set the frantic pace at Los Alamos.
▪ The path continues to the Strid - a spectacular chasm where the Wharfe reaches a frantic pace.
furious
▪ The facts are that within a decade of the Vienna Congress, nationalism was gathering furious pace.
▪ Both major parties raised soft money at a furious pace in 1995 and 1996, each gathering more than $ 100 million.
▪ The stage hands grumbled at the furious pace they were expected to work.
▪ Small banks are also merging at a furious pace, a trend expected to continue in 1996.
leisurely
▪ Lennon followed at a more leisurely pace, his weapon concealed once more.
▪ The horse cropped at a leisurely pace through the flat Fenland countryside, Illingworth fretting while my friend gazed about calmly.
▪ They moved upon a level trajectory and travelled at what appeared to be an even and leisurely pace.
▪ Maybe it has something to do with the leisurely pace of the sport.
▪ Again, beautifully rounded characters which established themselves at a leisurely pace are the secret of its appeal.
▪ La Plante lets her mystery unfold at a leisurely but absorbing pace.
▪ Since you are not connecting up at this stage, the rising main can be installed at a leisurely pace.
▪ The President lived at a somewhat more leisurely pace, as was the intended result of the frenetic activity of his aides.
rapid
▪ Gripping the sides of the sidecar, he urged Yanto to increase the already rapid pace.
▪ C.-Only eight games into the season and the Raiders are on a rapid pace to being written off.
▪ The very rapid pace of change in the computer market does mean that second-hand computers can be excellent value.
slow
▪ There is little doubt that their handwriting skills develop at a slower pace than their linguistic skills.
▪ What you do not do is rush it by warming it up; just let it grow at its own slow pace.
▪ Life seventy years ago was at a slower pace and people were able to cope more easily with upset routines.
▪ This means that spending continues to rise, but at a slower pace than had been previously planned.
▪ Byrne was walking beside him at the slow pace required by their orders.
▪ As long as you go at a slow, steady pace, the job can be done and you none the wiser.
▪ Bloomfield Hills, Canton and Carleton have grown at the slowest pace.
steady
▪ As long as you go at a slow, steady pace, the job can be done and you none the wiser.
▪ Louis: Regional economy is growing at a slow-but-#steady pace.
▪ They had been trying to maintain a steady pace, between hopping and running, and it had come hard.
▪ Huntsville continues to build its high-tech infrastructure and should add jobs in that sector at a steady pace.
▪ It was impossible to hurry but they moved at a steady pace, pausing seldom.
▪ You go to work and toil at a hard, steady pace all day, accomplishing as much as you can?
▪ The rhythm of the cart, moving once more at a steady pace, rocked the kaleidoscope of memory.
▪ Recent surveys show that charity donations maintain a steady pace and that some giving to some charities by some people is increasing.
walking
▪ Riders are sometimes slowed to a walking pace and punch the supporters who try to embrace them.
Walking pace often seems to give us the pulse of a movement; and walking pace and heartbeat are often linked.
▪ You advance at walking pace behind the barrage.
▪ Even with the wind of generosity at their back, why did they travel at a man's walking pace?
▪ The target was man-shaped, man-sized, and was moved electronically across the sandbagged wall at a brisk walking pace.
■ NOUN
bowler
▪ The pace bowlers capitalised during the abbreviated first day, even if the close catchers didn't.
▪ Clive Lloyd devised the concept of a quartet of pace bowlers who would carry all relentlessly before them.
▪ Bob Woolmer, the county's director of coaching, claims the pace bowler was used unnecessarily in the World Cup.
▪ Kent had expressed interest in the pace bowler.
■ VERB
change
▪ Not all subjects are changing at the same pace although the national curriculum will in time no doubt reach some kind of consistency.
▪ They did it with defensive pressure that changed the pace of the game in their favor in the second half.
▪ Didn't change their pace one iota.
▪ He was able to go directly to the railroad supervisor and convince him to change the pace of slab deliveries.
▪ In the world of corporate real estate, things changed at a bewildering pace.
▪ Postures change, pace slows, bustle becomes murmur.
continue
▪ The rate of change in media will continue at this pace for some years and we can take nothing for granted.
▪ The downsizing of big firms with high wages and good fringe benefits continues at an unrelenting pace.
▪ In recent months that rate continued, keeping pace with the stepped-up U.S. flights.
▪ Change continues at a frantic pace, and many voters are waiting till the last minute to make decisions.
▪ Development of new ranges has also continued at a considerable pace.
▪ She wondered how long she would be able to continue at her present pace.
fail
▪ Interest rates paid on checking and passbook savings accounts failed to keep pace with inflation.
▪ Many loan programs have failed to keep pace with skyrocketing tuition, said Dare.
▪ Student loans continue to balloon as federal grants and aid have failed to keep pace with college costs.
force
▪ There will be no attempt to force the pace at the Luxembourg summit next month.
▪ To that end, Wilkens says he might try a full-court press in the interest of forcing a faster pace.
▪ He climbed the steep slope to the Incident Room, forcing his pace, and arrived just a little out of breath.
▪ To force the pace now was irresponsible, and could lead to a power vacuum.
▪ Why loot and burn when you can participate, force the pace of change?
▪ There was an alternative view, however, that forcing the pace was necessary if real change was to be effected.
▪ But she was not to force the pace in any way.
▪ Boxer was forced to reduce pace at this point by the congestion of traffic in and out of the Barracks.
gather
▪ The facts are that within a decade of the Vienna Congress, nationalism was gathering furious pace.
▪ The novel gathers the pace of a thriller as the resourceful Birdie becomes a runaway searching for her scattered family.
▪ This enables the design phase to gather pace before the hardware is ready for implementation.
▪ Air Quality work has gathered pace, after the disastrous loss of our mobile unit at the beginning of the year.
▪ He had started only one of the previous eight games and talk of a summer move was gathering pace.
▪ Britain's conservative approach to damages began to break down in the 1980s and the revolution has lately gathered pace.
▪ It stood in contrast to the totalitarianism gathering pace under Lenin and Trotsky which accelerated out of control under Stalin.
▪ Labour protest in the cities might pose no immediate security risk but it had gathered pace ominously throughout the 1870s.
grow
▪ Voice over Bamboo grows at an amazing pace.
▪ Bloomfield Hills, Canton and Carleton have grown at the slowest pace.
▪ We discover that prayer grows as it keeps pace with the moral and emotional changes within us.
▪ Cirrus, known mostly for multimedia chips, had been growing at a breakneck pace until last year.
▪ The economy was growing at an unsustainable pace, and the trade deficit was exploding.
▪ The numbers grew and the pace of activity became a thick and steady march.
▪ Membership grew at an astonishing pace, reaching close to 30,000 in the late 1970s.
▪ But the on-line service is still growing at a breathtaking pace.
increase
▪ Parallel action cutting is a good way to increase the pace and interest of your movies.
▪ I imagined Ly Keang would relent, as she looked over her shoulder; but instead she increased her pace.
▪ Gripping the sides of the sidecar, he urged Yanto to increase the already rapid pace.
▪ My new neighbor has passersby; they increase their pace when he barks at them.
▪ Vologsky increased his pace, momentarily, gaining a few feet so that he could look back at Kirov's grim face.
▪ To begin with, gradually increasing your pace until you are walking comfortably in your training zone.
▪ He increased his pace and arrived back at the hall as the church clock was striking six.
▪ She didn't increase her pace - it would only alert her pursuer.
maintain
▪ Bristol plans to issue revisions to maintain pace with the changes made in Windows and Unix.
▪ Ashton took over the directorship and maintained the pace.
▪ They had been trying to maintain a steady pace, between hopping and running, and it had come hard.
▪ He had six rushes Sunday, maintaining a pace way below last year.
▪ Recent surveys show that charity donations maintain a steady pace and that some giving to some charities by some people is increasing.
move
▪ It might be short on intrigue and backstabbing but it would move at a cracking pace.
▪ Events were moving at a faster pace than ever before, thanks to improved transportation and communication.
▪ FitzAlan moved a pace to meet them, his free hand unfastening his cloak.
▪ It was impossible to hurry but they moved at a steady pace, pausing seldom.
▪ Hughes kept moving at a deliberate pace, turning right and left to give his benediction.
▪ He punched one of them in the hindquarters; it moved a pace and grazed on.
▪ You move at your own pace.
pick
▪ Next time, stay calm and pick up the pace when you can.
▪ Then he picked up his pace.
▪ On the long walk down the hall Glover picked a crawling pace calculated to paralyze an opponent this young.
proceed
▪ Wide roads lead to a new bridge crossing the water and traffic can proceed at a fast pace without a halt.
▪ Arkin offers tips that a beginner can use, proceeds at a slow pace and focuses on correct breathing and placement.
▪ Indeed, the entire rescue operation seems to have proceeded at a glacial pace.
▪ Every child enters at a set age and is expected to proceed at the same pace.
▪ Were it running more slowly, all geologic activity would have proceeded at a slower pace.
put
▪ Joshua found a seat and watched Hyacinth Scragg being put through her paces.
▪ Every hour on the hour a different doctor would walk into the room and put me through my paces.
▪ Prospective buyers could see the horses put through their paces down a street that still bears the name Horsefair.
▪ She worked with several hawks and falcons, putting each through its paces according to its maturity and natural ability.
quicken
▪ He quickened his pace to try and intercept her but the crowds on the pavement and the traffic on the street intervened.
▪ This meant that he was constantly in danger of quickening his pace and crashing into Stillman from behind.
▪ I chirruped to the horse, and he quickened his pace.
▪ The back-to-back executions would quicken the pace of capital punishment in Maryland.
▪ As the old man shuffled off into the drizzle Henry quickened his pace.
▪ Then teammate Joel Zide of Northridge quickened the pace to reach the five-fish plateau first.
▪ I quickened my pace and by the time I reached the top of Paton's Lane I was running.
▪ When they pass out of the gate and into the concourse the man quickens his pace and the distance between them increases.
set
▪ Or is it your children who are setting the ecological pace?
▪ He or she controls the room and sets the pace.
▪ Zeta's Lad set the pace.
▪ Thus, the infant is setting the pace.
▪ This should result in fundholders setting the pace and others benefiting.
▪ He blamed me for setting too fast a pace.
▪ Crossing the Judith Mountains, Poker Joe set a hard pace, and the elderly and wounded silently drifted behind their people.
▪ Your rhythm should set the pace of the fight.
slacken
▪ Rose, exhausted with running, slackened her pace a little and took in long gulps of air.
▪ I tried to slacken pace but the slowest I went seemed to be faster than I had ever run before.
▪ I was warned again and again by friendly police officers of some rank to slacken the pace: and I refused.
stand
▪ If you hot foot it whatever the weather, there's only one watch that can stand the pace.
▪ Petey stood at fifty paces and pushed a leaf with his foot.
▪ Those who could stand the pace flourished; those who could not went to the wall.
▪ I remember one lad, Nobby Clark, who could not stand the pace.
▪ The real man stood back a pace and watched.
▪ When she reaches him, the security guard stands back a pace, and her people hold back.
▪ I can stand the pace all right.
▪ And if you have what it takes and can stand the pace, a jolly good salary.
step
▪ He stepped back a pace, smiling broadly as he saw the young woman who stood before him, looking slightly surprised.
▪ Through the information technologies they have spawned, computers step up the pace of the ticking.
▪ She stepped back a pace and watched as he looked across at the Fiesta then at the house once more.
▪ But by mid-1993, Ed Dillard knew he had to step up the pace if he was to make a living.
▪ So why not step back a pace, and discuss values?
▪ She stepped back a pace in the floury dust.
▪ Sharpe stepped a pace forward to look down at the map.
▪ Elliott stepped forward a pace, then stopped.
walk
▪ He walked, his pace swift, down the twisting path, then hesitated where it veered off to the staff-cabins.
▪ I trotted for half a block or so, then switched back to my brisk walking pace.
▪ It will soon learn to walk at the right pace.
▪ He walked at his regular pace toward the Astor House.
▪ Jotan walked perhaps thirty paces, and then he halted.
▪ After Alexei had walked about fifty paces, he stopped and turned.
▪ Slow up and walk my pace.
▪ Most sports contain the vital ingredient of moving your legs forward at a quicker-than-#walking pace.
work
▪ The child then has to work out how many paces to each side and where to turn through 90o.
▪ But she works at her own pace, with no boss to make tea for.
▪ Your legs keep working, your pace is unvarying.
▪ The slaves were driven to work at such a pace that their entire population had to be replaced about every 20 years.
▪ You can work at your own pace and choose from a wide range of flowers from around the world.
▪ Indeed, Moffett worked at a breathless pace to ensure that those issues were addressed before the annual meeting took place.
▪ Yet the structure of the civil court and the way they work has not kept pace with these changes.
▪ We worked at an unheard-of pace.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
at (a) breathless pace/speed
▪ Indeed, Moffett worked at a breathless pace to ensure that those issues were addressed before the annual meeting took place.
▪ Though she has had little education, her vocabulary is excellent: she fountains out ideas and observations at breathless speed.
at a snail's pace
at a spanking pace/rate
▪ In the distance, ponies in long-shafted light chariots trotted at a spanking pace, the wheels spinning around.
at breakneck speed/pace
▪ As most travelers know, you can only travel at breakneck speed for so long.
▪ Dorothy Newman nudged her fellow conspirator back to reality, then they ran at breakneck speed to their respective homes.
▪ If they had been alone ... She shook her head in disbelief; everything was suddenly moving at breakneck speed.
▪ Neither do I. Tradition is being manufactured at breakneck pace.
▪ Some guides are indeed very brief, suggesting visits at breakneck speed where only a few items or rooms will be seen.
the pace hots up
▪ Remember this when the pace hots up!
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ About 20 paces from the house is an old oak tree.
▪ Eddie walked a few paces behind his mother, his head hung low.
▪ He took a couple of paces forward, then stopped.
▪ I'd gone about ten paces, when I heard a strange sound behind me.
▪ I'm enjoying the relaxed pace of life of Jamaica.
▪ Paul stepped three paces into the room and dropped his bag.
▪ The pace of political change has been rapid.
▪ The Kumon method involves students learning at their own pace.
▪ The soldiers were marching at a steady pace.
▪ We climbed at a leisurely pace, stopping occasionally to enjoy the view.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And it built them at a pace that would have left the most ambitious pharaoh dazzled-something like six hundred in sixty years.
▪ Finally I got the ax to stick from ten paces.
▪ He fell from power in 1987, resigning from the Politburo over the slow pace of reform.
▪ Since November, the pace of borrowing likely slowed as department and chain stores reported dismal holiday sales.
▪ The numbers grew and the pace of activity became a thick and steady march.
▪ There are obvious benefits in allowing each student to go at his own pace.
▪ These are the experiences of monotony, fragmentation and excessive pace in work and social interaction patterns.
▪ They stood close to the door, the boy a pace behind the official.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
about
▪ He was tall and elegant, with a good head of hair, and was much given to pacing about.
▪ I wonder if there is a smoking-room here, where I could pace about while I enjoy a 97 pipe.
▪ He paced about with arms folded.
▪ Unidentified creatures paced about near their camp, and green eyes looked out on them from the bushes.
around
▪ The Doctor paced around the excavation measuring the depth and imprint of the relics.
▪ He stood up from his chair, paced around, shut the window.
▪ His fur leggings became saturated as he paced around the edge.
▪ Emily paced around the book-lined study and blamed her father for his hostile attitude to Craig.
▪ I enjoyed this comparative freedom and spent a lot of time pacing around the cell.
▪ He paced around constantly drying his hands on a handkerchief, sat, then stood and paced some more.
▪ I paced around smoking while I decided what to do.
back
▪ Joseph found he couldn't sit still and he rose to pace back and forth at a distance from the others.
▪ Once again, I took to pacing back and forth.
▪ He paced back and forth on the tarmac, occasionally stopping to talk to his men.
▪ I began to pace back and forth, silently, so that Meir Ahronson would not hear.
▪ He paced back and forth, muttering things I could barely make out.
▪ He was pacing back and forth; his agitation was mounting.
up
▪ After they'd gone Sukey paced up and down sipping Evian water.
▪ She might be pacing up and down, chewing her fingernails.
▪ He began pacing up and down the room.
▪ A tiger in a zoo paces up and down the cage and can worry like crazy about a ball of string.
▪ As he paced up and down the narrow kitchen, shouting curses through the bedroom door, Constance smiled.
▪ He paced up and down the sidelines, too.
▪ He paced up and down between the scullery and the living-room as if on the deck of a ship.
▪ My father was on the phone, pacing up and down in front of the aquarium.
■ NOUN
floor
▪ She paced the floor, waiting until she judged the rooms would be full of people.
▪ He had spent a ruinous and totally sleepless night, pacing the floors but being able to find no solace.
▪ Then I began to pace the floor and think about this thing.
▪ He was pacing the floor when Dannie Bulman spun a deep cross into the Leicester penalty area.
▪ As she moved closer to him on the sofa, he leapt to his feet and began pacing the floor.
▪ Suddenly unable to sit still, she stood up and began pacing the floor until she ended up sitting by the phone.
▪ He gets up, sits down, paces the floor.
room
▪ He might wake to watch her pacing the room in the dark, hour after hour.
▪ For more than an hour, Jess paces the small room, yelling and crying.
▪ She paced her room, back and forth, back and forth.
▪ Augusta rose and paced the room, stopped and put the heels of both palms against her temples.
▪ The Reichsminister rose from his chair and began to pace the small room, trailing one foot behind him.
▪ She paced around the room, one hand on her hip and the other at her chin.
▪ Back at the villa, after she'd showered and changed, Ronni spent the next hour pacing her room.
▪ I was pacing in the next room, talking to the Lord.
■ VERB
begin
▪ He began pacing up and down the room.
▪ Then I began to pace the floor and think about this thing.
▪ He began to pace slowly around the clearing.
▪ As she moved closer to him on the sofa, he leapt to his feet and began pacing the floor.
▪ Suddenly unable to sit still, she stood up and began pacing the floor until she ended up sitting by the phone.
▪ I began to pace back and forth, silently, so that Meir Ahronson would not hear.
▪ The Reichsminister rose from his chair and began to pace the small room, trailing one foot behind him.
▪ He let go of her arms and began pacing the area.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
at (a) breathless pace/speed
▪ Indeed, Moffett worked at a breathless pace to ensure that those issues were addressed before the annual meeting took place.
▪ Though she has had little education, her vocabulary is excellent: she fountains out ideas and observations at breathless speed.
at a snail's pace
at a spanking pace/rate
▪ In the distance, ponies in long-shafted light chariots trotted at a spanking pace, the wheels spinning around.
at breakneck speed/pace
▪ As most travelers know, you can only travel at breakneck speed for so long.
▪ Dorothy Newman nudged her fellow conspirator back to reality, then they ran at breakneck speed to their respective homes.
▪ If they had been alone ... She shook her head in disbelief; everything was suddenly moving at breakneck speed.
▪ Neither do I. Tradition is being manufactured at breakneck pace.
▪ Some guides are indeed very brief, suggesting visits at breakneck speed where only a few items or rooms will be seen.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "We're going to be late,'' Jordan said irritably, pacing up and down the room.
▪ A lion paced up and down the cage, growling.
▪ He paced off the distance just to make sure.
▪ I need someone to pace me or I fall too far behind.
▪ Kernan paced the Monarchs with 17 points and 15 rebounds.
▪ Meryl was also awake, pacing the floor in her dressing-gown.
▪ Sarah paced back and forth along the corridor, waiting for the doctor to come back.
▪ Stewart was pacing the floor while watching the game on TV.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Augusta resumed her pacing, throwing her hands outward in little distracted gestures.
▪ Emmanuel Adigun and Haywood Vital paced the second-half surge for the Wildcats with 14 and 11 points, respectively.
▪ He began pacing up and down the room.
▪ I was pacing in the next room, talking to the Lord.
▪ I went back to the tree, and I found Barbra pacing.
▪ She paced the floor, waiting until she judged the rooms would be full of people.
▪ The Doctor paced around the excavation measuring the depth and imprint of the relics.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
pace

pace \pace\ (p[=a]s), n. [OE. pas, F. pas, from L. passus a step, pace, orig., a stretching out of the feet in walking; cf. pandere, passum, to spread, stretch; perh. akin to E. patent. Cf. Pas, Pass.]

  1. A single movement from one foot to the other in walking; a step.

  2. The length of a step in walking or marching, reckoned from the heel of one foot to the heel of the other; -- used as a unit in measuring distances; as, he advanced fifty paces. ``The height of sixty pace .''
    --Chaucer.

    Note: Ordinarily the pace is estimated at two and one half linear feet; but in measuring distances be stepping, the pace is extended to three feet (one yard) or to three and three tenths feet (one fifth of a rod). The regulation marching pace in the English and United States armies is thirty inches for quick time, and thirty-six inches for double time. The Roman pace (passus) was from the heel of one foot to the heel of the same foot when it next touched the ground, five Roman feet.

  3. Manner of stepping or moving; gait; walk; as, the walk, trot, canter, gallop, and amble are paces of the horse; a swaggering pace; a quick pace.
    --Chaucer.

    To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day.
    --Shak.

    In the military schools of riding a variety of paces are taught.
    --Walsh.

  4. A slow gait; a footpace. [Obs.]
    --Chucer.

  5. Specifically, a kind of fast amble; a rack.

  6. Any single movement, step, or procedure. [R.]

    The first pace necessary for his majesty to make is to fall into confidence with Spain.
    --Sir W. Temple.

  7. (Arch.) A broad step or platform; any part of a floor slightly raised above the rest, as around an altar, or at the upper end of a hall.

  8. (Weaving) A device in a loom, to maintain tension on the warp in pacing the web.

  9. The rate of progress of any process or activity; as, the students ran at a rapid pace; the plants grew at a remarkable pace.

    Geometrical pace, the space from heel to heel between the spot where one foot is set down and that where the same foot is again set down, loosely estimated at five feet, or by some at four feet and two fifths. See Roman pace in the Note under def. 2. [Obs.]

    To keep pace with or To hold pace with, to keep up with; to go as fast as. ``In intellect and attainments he kept pace with his age.''
    --Southey.

    To put (someone) through one's paces to cause (someone) to perform an act so as to demonstrate his/her skill or ability.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
pace

late 13c., "a step in walking; rate of motion," from Old French pas "a step, pace, trace," and directly from Latin passus, passum "a step, pace, stride," noun use of past participle of pandere "to stretch (the leg), spread out," probably from PIE *pat-no-, a nasalized variant of root *pete- "to spread" (cognates: Greek petannynai "to spread out," petalon "a leaf," patane "plate, dish;" Old Norse faðmr "embrace, bosom," Old English fæðm "embrace, bosom, fathom," Old Saxon fathmos "the outstretched arms"). Also, "a measure of five feet" [Johnson]. Pace-setter in fashion is from 1895.

pace

"with the leave of," 1863, from Latin pace, ablative of pax "peace," as in pace tua "with all deference to you;" from PIE *pak- "to fasten" (see pax). "Used chiefly as a courteous or ironical apology for a contradiction or difference of opinion" [OED].

pace

1510s, "to walk at a steady rate," from pace (n.). Meaning "to measure by pacing" is from 1570s. That of "to set the pace for" (another) is from 1886. Related: Paced; pacing.

Wiktionary
pace

Etymology 1

  1. (context cricket English) Describing a bowler who bowls fast balls. n. 1 (context obsolete English) Passage, route. 2 # (context obsolete English) One's journey or route. (14th-18th century) 3 # (context obsolete English) A passage through difficult terrain; a mountain pass or route vulnerable to ambush etc. (14th-17th century) 4 # (context obsolete English) An aisle in a church. (15th-19th century) 5 Step. 6 # A step taken with the foot. (from 14th century) 7 # The distance covered in a step (or sometimes two), either vaguely or according to various specific set measurements.'''[http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/custom.html How Many? A Dictionary of Units of Measurement]''': English Customary Weights and Measures, © Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (§: ''Distance'', ¶ № 6) (from 14th century) 8 Way of stepping. 9 # A manner of walking, running or dancing; the rate or style of how someone moves with their feet. (from 14th century) v

  2. 1 Walk to and fro in a small space. 2 Set the speed in a race. 3 Measure by walking. Etymology 2

    prep. (context formal English) with all due respect to. Etymology 3

    n. Easter.

WordNet
pace
  1. v. walk with slow or fast paces; "He paced up and down the hall"

  2. go at a pace; "The horse paced"

  3. measure (distances) by pacing; "step off ten yards" [syn: step]

  4. regulate or set the pace of; "Pace your efforts"

pace
  1. n. the rate of moving (especially walking or running) [syn: gait]

  2. the distance covered by a step; "he stepped off ten paces from the old tree and began to dig" [syn: footstep, step, stride]

  3. the relative speed of progress or change; "he lived at a fast pace"; "he works at a great rate"; "the pace of events accelerated" [syn: rate]

  4. a step in walking or running [syn: stride, tread]

  5. the rate of some repeating event [syn: tempo]

  6. a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride [syn: yard]

Gazetteer
Pace, FL -- U.S. Census Designated Place in Florida
Population (2000): 7393
Housing Units (2000): 3096
Land area (2000): 9.382194 sq. miles (24.299770 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 9.382194 sq. miles (24.299770 sq. km)
FIPS code: 53725
Located within: Florida (FL), FIPS 12
Location: 30.595593 N, 87.153712 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 32571
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Pace, FL
Pace
Pace, MS -- U.S. town in Mississippi
Population (2000): 364
Housing Units (2000): 131
Land area (2000): 0.153895 sq. miles (0.398586 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.006126 sq. miles (0.015866 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.160021 sq. miles (0.414452 sq. km)
FIPS code: 54920
Located within: Mississippi (MS), FIPS 28
Location: 33.791797 N, 90.858289 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Pace, MS
Pace
Wikipedia
Pace (transit)

Pace is the suburban bus division of the Regional Transportation Authority in the Chicago metropolitan area. It was created in 1983 by the RTA Act, which established the formula that provides funding to CTA, Metra and Pace. In 2013, Pace had 39.925 million riders.

Pace's headquarters are in Arlington Heights, Illinois. Pace is governed by a 13-member Board of Directors, 12 of which are current and former suburban mayors, with the other being the Commissioner of the Chicago Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities, to represent the city's paratransit riders.

The six counties that Pace serves are Cook, Lake, Will, Kane, McHenry and DuPage. Some of Pace's buses also go to Chicago and Indiana. In some areas, notably Evanston, River Forest, Oak Park, and Skokie, Pace and Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) both serve the community.

Many of Pace's route terminals are located at CTA rail stations and bus terminals and Metra stations. CTA and Pace have shared a payment system since 2014 called Ventra. Ventra accounts are required to obtain transfers. Metra fares are completely separate, but a phone app is being developed that may allow Metra payment with Ventra.

Pace buses generally have longer headways (often between 20 and 60 minutes) than CTA buses. Due to its broad geographic service area, service is provided by 9 operating divisions, as well as under agreements with several municipalities and private operators ( school bus and motor coach companies).

All Pace buses are wheelchair accessible and have racks accommodating two bicycles, available during all hours of operation.

Pace buses provide service from the suburbs to various special events in the city, such as Routes #282 & #779 for Chicago Cubs games, Routes #773, #774 and #775 for Chicago White Sox games, Routes #237, #768, #769 and #776 for Chicago Bears games, Route #222 provides extra service to the Allstate Arena in Rosemont for events scheduled there, Route #284 to Six Flags Great America, Route #387 for events at Toyota Park in Bridgeview, and Route #238 for Northwestern University events at Ryan Field.

Pace is responsible for ADA paratransit service in its service area, and, effective July 1, 2006, for paratransit service in Chicago. Pace also coordinates various Dial-a-Ride projects, usually sponsored by various municipalities and townships. One of the largest is Ride DuPage, sponsored by Du Page County Human Services. Pace states that it is the nation's largest paratransit service provider, providing approximately 17,000 daily trips on paratransit, dial-a-ride and ADvAntage vanpools.

Pace operates a Vanpool Incentive Program, where groups save by commuting together in a van owned and maintain by Pace and driven by one of the participants. There is also a Municipal Vanpool Program, under which Pace provides a van to a municipality, for any public transportation purpose (such as demand response service for senior citizens).

Pace is not an acronym, but a marketing name.

In late 2011, Pace received its first Diesel-Electric Hybrid buses from Orion Bus Industries. These Orion VII 3G buses are the first buses in the Pace fleet to not be powered directly by Diesel.

During weekday rush hours, Pace buses are authorized to use the shoulder on the Stevenson Expressway.

The majority of Pace bus routes run daily, morning through early to late evening. Others run Monday through Saturday, weekdays only, or weekday rush hours only. The Brookfield Zoo Express bus route runs on weekends during summertime. One route, #352, runs 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Pacé

Pacé refers to two communes in France:

  • Pacé, Ille-et-Vilaine
  • Pacé, Orne

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Pace (surname)

Pace is a surname in both Italian and English. In addition to being found in Italy and England, it is also found in Germany, is common in Malta, and can be found among Italian and British immigrants in the United States and other countries. Families called Pace have been prominent in Malta and in Sicily and held feudal estates in both of these areas.

The pronunciation varies according to a family's origins and linguistic heritage, but the two most commonly used are the English "Pace", rhyming with "race", and the Italian "PAH-chay".

Pace (speed)

Pace, also called rhythm or tempo, is the rate of activity or movement, such as in running or the flow of events in an entertainment piece.

Pace (unit)

A pace is a unit of length consisting either of one normal walking step (~0.75 m), or of a double step, returning to the same foot (~1.5 m). Like other traditional measurements, paces started as informal units but have since been standardized, often with the specific length set according to a typical brisk or military marching stride.

In the US, it is an uncommon customary unit of length denoting a brisk single step and equal to 2½  feet or 30  inches (76.2  cm).

The term "pace" is also used to translate similar formal units in other systems of measurement. Pacing is also used as an informal measure in surveying, with the "pace" equal to two of the surveyor's steps reckoned through comparison with a standard rod or chain.

Pace (narrative)

In literature, pace, or pacing is the speed at which a story is told. The pace is determined by the length of the scenes, how fast the action moves, and how quickly the reader is provided with information. It is also sometimes determined by the genre of the story. Comedies move faster than dramas; action adventures move faster than suspense. The number of words needed to write about a certain event does not depend upon how much time the event takes to happen; it depends upon how important that moment is to the story.

Usage examples of "pace".

He stopped pacing when he heard the whistles, set to welcome the general aboard with a salute that accorded with his rank.

I knew he would be true to himself, and now how proud I am to see my Jonathan rising to the height of his advancement and keeping pace in all ways with the duties that come upon him.

He had, in fact, crossed the designs of no less a power than the German Empire, he had blundered into the hot focus of Welt-Politik, he was drifting helplessly towards the great Imperial secret, the immense aeronautic park that had been established at a headlong pace in Franconia to develop silently, swiftly, and on an immense scale the great discoveries of Hunstedt and Stossel, and so to give Germany before all other nations a fleet of airships, the air power and the Empire of the world.

But in the upper-air currents, it would have been dangerous to drive at a pace slow enough to keep level with the automobile, and so the aeroplane soon dashed on ahead.

Sareitha Tomares, who had worn her brown-fringed shawl only a few years and still did not have the ageless appearance, glared with a disgust that should have flayed the Shadowrunner at fifty paces.

Belial introduced Magariz to Azhure, then all were interrupted by the sound of barking, and they turned to watch the Alaunt hounds pacing solemnly across the bridge.

Councillor Albedo, pacing back and forth in front of the altar once again.

Here Councillor Albedo quit pacing and stood directly in front of the altar.

Halting at last, Rolan opened a narrow door and disappeared into the darkness beyond, whispering for Alec to watch his step just in time to save the boy from tumbling down more stairs that descended less than a pace from the door.

Giving wide berth to the few steadings and inns that lay along the road, they kept up a steady pace for as long as Micum could stay in the saddle, slept in the open, and ate whatever Alec shot.

When Alec returned, he found Seregil pacing restlessly in the narrow confines of the cabin.

Seregil paced restlessly around the dining room as Alec wolfed down his sausage and tea.

Indeed, Alienor had competition for that honor at this moment, for Duncan halted a few paces away to address Eglantine.

Elizabeth continued her walk alone, crossing field after field at a quick pace, jumping over stiles and springing over puddles with impatient activity, and finding herself at last within view of the house, with weary ancles, dirty stockings, and a face glowing with the warmth of exercise.

Even Hollywood scriptwriters and apolitical actors were fascinated by the dramatic pace and structure of the hearings.