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oak
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
oak
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an oak/vine/spinach etc leaf (=a leaf from a specific plant or tree)
▪ Vine leaves stuffed with rice is a typical Greek dish.
poison oak
solid wood/pine/oak etc
▪ a chest made of solid oak
walnut/maple/oak etc veneer
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
carved
▪ She pressed her back against the door, grateful for the support of its solid carved oak.
▪ A long, carved oak table dominated the room, heavy chairs to match.
▪ He ignored the mottled marble floor, the neo-Doric pillars and the intricately carved oak ceiling.
▪ She traced with her forefinger the silky whorls of the carved garland of oak leaves that swung across both doors.
▪ The balustrades were carved oak panels decorated with scrolls of acanthus foliage, each newel surmounted by a heavy oak pineapple.
dark
▪ The floor at the edge was stained a dark oak.
▪ There were tapestries on the walls and lots of dark oak furniture.
▪ There is a choice of two traditional timber colours, mahogany or dark oak.
▪ The new Hampshire collection as a dining range in rich, dark oak.
great
▪ Above it, on the wall itself, were great tea-chest-sized oak cupboards.
▪ Here beside a great oak tree I counted the corpses of fifteen men.
▪ Beyond the river had been a forest, one of the great primeval oak forests of ancient Ireland.
▪ It was the old one about the tree, the empty wood, the unheard moan of a great oak falling unobserved.
▪ There, on the great high-backed oak chair, sat the same enormous rat.
▪ The Judge was sitting in a great, high-backed oak chair, on the right-hand side of a great stone fireplace.
▪ He resembled a great old oak, now dying, ancient limbs sagging under their own weight, the sap no longer rising.
▪ Eve's ashes are interred under a great oak at Mottisfont Abbey in Hampshire.
heavy
▪ Its feet were the size of dinner platters, and its tail was as long and heavy as an oak limb.
▪ A heavy oak chair stood by the window.
▪ She stared, teeth chattering, at white-painted walls, a heavy oak chest, the ornate brass-work of the bed.
▪ They were both panting slightly by the time they reached the heavy oak door on the third floor.
▪ And there he stayed as porter Mike Creamer slammed shut its heavy oak door.
▪ The balustrades were carved oak panels decorated with scrolls of acanthus foliage, each newel surmounted by a heavy oak pineapple.
huge
▪ On the corner was a huge oak tree.
▪ Inside, a huge leafless oak has been planted in a glass floor with the roots splayed out beneath your feet.
▪ She found ample room for her things in the huge oak wardrobe in which Edward's clothes already hung.
▪ He found a huge, high-backed oak chair and pulled it up beside the fire.
▪ Bonanza sat in a huge oak chair.
large
▪ It was a large airy oak beamed room.
▪ Her office is dominated by a large oak table where she spreads out her work.
▪ To 1982 again, to the high-ceilinged room in east Beirut where Pierre Gemayel sits behind his large oak desk.
▪ She followed him into the field and they sat beneath the shade of a large oak tree.
▪ The creature was hanging from a branch of a large dead oak tree, several hundred feet away.
▪ Beneath the coffered ceiling, lit by chandeliers, were a number of large oak desks.
live
▪ But the single factor sacred to everything is the use of live red oak as the heat source.
▪ It was at the base of this giant live oak that Gen.
▪ The vegetation consists of coastal sage scrub, chaparral and groves of Englemann oak and live oak.
▪ Most of the island is covered by a maritime forest of live oak trees with a dense understory of palmettos.
▪ It is commonly found among California live oak trees.
▪ One section drops into a ravine filled with live oak and bay.
▪ It will remove 46 coast live oak trees, they note, and damage some habitat of endangered animals.
▪ Caltrans says it intends to plant 460 more coast live oak trees along the highway and replace damaged wildlife habitat.
old
▪ He'd start with the gnarled old oak tree in the graveyard.
▪ We are coming into the clearing, we are back by the old oak.
▪ The firelight danced on the old oak walls and threw strange shadows around the room.
▪ The basement is just ahead of us, the clearing with the old oak is beyond that.
▪ Up and down they rushed, behind the old oak walls, over the ceiling and under the floor.
▪ The wedding will be in June under an old oak tree.
▪ He resembled a great old oak, now dying, ancient limbs sagging under their own weight, the sap no longer rising.
▪ The old ruined oak tree beckoned him like some great finger thrust up from the green grass.
red
▪ But the single factor sacred to everything is the use of live red oak as the heat source.
▪ A basswood, a red oak.
▪ Local restaurants had also begun serving foods cooked over red oak.
▪ See that red oak over there?
▪ In the last five years the hickory and the red oak are going away really quick.
solid
▪ She pressed her back against the door, grateful for the support of its solid carved oak.
▪ His cell was eight by fifteen with a solid oak door supported by steel bands.
▪ The village will be made of solid oak and then exported, flat-pack style, to Tokyo.
▪ It is solid oak, not veneer.
▪ She peered through the security peephole in the solid Edwardian oak door.
▪ Made from solid oak with veneered interiors, the wood has been limed to enhance the grain.
▪ But the point is that it's solid oak.
▪ The solid oak staff caught Guy a brutal blow on his wounded arm.
■ NOUN
barrel
▪ Maturation: fine red wines may be matured in oak barrels for one to two years.
▪ They aged their tequila in oak barrels for longer periods.
▪ This particular whisky is aged in oak barrels used previously for sherry.
beam
▪ The Manor kitchen has an enormous Tudor fireplace with the original oak beam.
▪ The bar is warm and cosy, with an open fire and oak beams.
▪ His silks, his plaited hair, his very foreign-ness seemed out of place amongst the low oak beams and sturdy yeoman furniture.
▪ The prettiest bedroom has oak beams and original wide floor boards.
cask
▪ Clarets are aged in stainless steel vats or oak casks, and are bottled only when they are considered ready for sale.
▪ Many of these molecules seeped into the initially crystal-clear whisky from the oak casks in which the liquor was aged.
chair
▪ A heavy oak chair stood by the window.
▪ Sonny Stoner squirmed in the hard oak chair.
▪ There, on the great high-backed oak chair, sat the same enormous rat.
▪ The Judge was sitting in a great, high-backed oak chair, on the right-hand side of a great stone fireplace.
▪ He found a huge, high-backed oak chair and pulled it up beside the fire.
▪ He carried him over to the great oak chair and stood him on it.
▪ Bonanza sat in a huge oak chair.
▪ As he looked, the great rat dropped from the rope on to the old oak chair.
chest
▪ She stared, teeth chattering, at white-painted walls, a heavy oak chest, the ornate brass-work of the bed.
▪ Carefully she felt her way past an oak chest.
▪ Helen stared at the oak chest and wondered what was in it.
door
▪ They were both panting slightly by the time they reached the heavy oak door on the third floor.
▪ His cell was eight by fifteen with a solid oak door supported by steel bands.
▪ Heavy oak doors open into an impenetrable warren of bleak rooms painted in regulation Ministry of Works cream.
▪ Ahead of me was a glass-panelled oak door which led out to the sun terrace.
▪ She peered through the security peephole in the solid Edwardian oak door.
▪ And there he stayed as porter Mike Creamer slammed shut its heavy oak door.
▪ The passage was quiet, unlit, the oak door to the Little Vestry on the left tightly closed.
▪ The oak door opened easily, and swung back to reveal a wide hall.
leave
▪ The smell of last year's oak leaves filled the air.
▪ The leaves are sometimes nearly entire, but their sides are usually incised and resemble oak leaves.
▪ In summer, oak leaves shivered on its body.
▪ Mounds containing members of the Soviet armed forces were marked with engraved oak leaves and stars.
▪ They afford a level bed, free of rocks, upholstered with oak leaves, curtained by shrubs.
panelling
▪ She waited in a hall rich in oak panelling.
▪ I was ushered into a high-ceilinged room dark with oak panelling.
▪ I said my vows a bit too loud and they seemed to echo round the light oak panelling of the room.
▪ The house has fine oak panelling.
poison
▪ There were casualties: One soldier burned out his chain saw; another got poison oak.
▪ Fire officials said bee stings and poison oak were the most serious problems.
table
▪ A long, carved oak table dominated the room, heavy chairs to match.
▪ Sonny scraped his fingernail along the soft grime on the lip of the oak table.
▪ It was a big room with a polished oak table and a door that opened to the garden.
▪ Two fine oak tables were missing, and the space was for me to fill.
▪ The four of us then took our places around a seventeenth-century oak table that could comfortably have seated twenty.
▪ The Reichsführer sat at an oak table working his way through a mound of papers.
▪ When I did return, I locked myself in and heaved the great oak table against the door and fastened the windows.
tree
▪ On the corner was a huge oak tree.
▪ A willow oak tree grows at the edge of this patio.
▪ And tied around the oak tree was the largest yellow ribbon I'd yet seen.
▪ The mountains all were calling and the oak trees answering, Oh, woe, woe for Adonis.
▪ He'd start with the gnarled old oak tree in the graveyard.
▪ Women and children were lined up in a half-circle facing an old, perfectly formed oak tree.
▪ Earlier that morning I had awoken lying on the grass underneath an oak tree in Regent's Park.
▪ Most of the island is covered by a maritime forest of live oak trees with a dense understory of palmettos.
wood
▪ Volunteers in Knapdale, in south Argyll, have helped to remove sitka spruce and invasive rhododendrons from oak woods.
▪ Pied-fly numbers have increased dramatically since nest box provision has become widespread practice in the sessile oak woods they prefer.
Wood warblers are another typical bird of sessile oak woods.
■ VERB
age
▪ It was like trying to age an oak.
▪ They aged their tequila in oak barrels for longer periods.
▪ This wine is made from 100 percent Cabernet Sauvignon and is aged in small oak casks.
▪ They are also aging in new oak barrels, giving their tequila a surprising aroma and taste of bourbon.
▪ It is aged in oak, which gives a bit of a boost to the classic scent of petrol and honey.
▪ This particular whisky is aged in oak barrels used previously for sherry.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
oak floors
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Above them, the branches of the oak tree were beginning to creak and sway.
▪ Limewood is contrasted with oak, and the chapter finishes: The properties of the material made limewood sculpture a special medium.
▪ May acorns fall from an oak.
▪ The door was of oak, buckled with age and studded with rusting iron bolts and bands of steel.
▪ The soldiers pointed him towards the oak.
▪ There were many paths leading west but they must take the one which was marked by a riven oak.
▪ This particular whisky is aged in oak barrels used previously for sherry.
▪ We must not squash that wisdom, strength and caring as we help them grow from saplings to oak trees.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Oak

Oak \Oak\ ([=o]k), n. [OE. oke, ok, ak, AS. [=a]c; akin to D. eik, G. eiche, OHG. eih, Icel. eik, Sw. ek, Dan. eeg.]

  1. (Bot.) Any tree or shrub of the genus Quercus. The oaks have alternate leaves, often variously lobed, and staminate flowers in catkins. The fruit is a smooth nut, called an acorn, which is more or less inclosed in a scaly involucre called the cup or cupule. There are now recognized about three hundred species, of which nearly fifty occur in the United States, the rest in Europe, Asia, and the other parts of North America, a very few barely reaching the northern parts of South America and Africa. Many of the oaks form forest trees of grand proportions and live many centuries. The wood is usually hard and tough, and provided with conspicuous medullary rays, forming the silver grain.

  2. The strong wood or timber of the oak.

    Note: Among the true oaks in America are:

    Barren oak, or

    Black-jack, Quercus nigra.

    Basket oak, Quercus Michauxii.

    Black oak, Quercus tinctoria; -- called also yellow oak or quercitron oak.

    Bur oak (see under Bur.), Quercus macrocarpa; -- called also over-cup or mossy-cup oak.

    Chestnut oak, Quercus Prinus and Quercus densiflora.

    Chinquapin oak (see under Chinquapin), Quercus prinoides.

    Coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, of California; -- also called enceno.

    Live oak (see under Live), Quercus virens, the best of all for shipbuilding; also, Quercus Chrysolepis, of California.

    Pin oak. Same as Swamp oak.

    Post oak, Quercus obtusifolia.

    Red oak, Quercus rubra.

    Scarlet oak, Quercus coccinea.

    Scrub oak, Quercus ilicifolia, Quercus undulata, etc.

    Shingle oak, Quercus imbricaria.

    Spanish oak, Quercus falcata.

    Swamp Spanish oak, or

    Pin oak, Quercus palustris.

    Swamp white oak, Quercus bicolor.

    Water oak, Quercus aquatica.

    Water white oak, Quercus lyrata.

    Willow oak, Quercus Phellos. [1913 Webster] Among the true oaks in Europe are:

    Bitter oak, or

    Turkey oak, Quercus Cerris (see Cerris).

    Cork oak, Quercus Suber.

    English white oak, Quercus Robur.

    Evergreen oak,

    Holly oak, or

    Holm oak, Quercus Ilex.

    Kermes oak, Quercus coccifera.

    Nutgall oak, Quercus infectoria.

    Note: Among plants called oak, but not of the genus Quercus, are:

    African oak, a valuable timber tree ( Oldfieldia Africana).

    Australian oak or She oak, any tree of the genus Casuarina (see Casuarina).

    Indian oak, the teak tree (see Teak).

    Jerusalem oak. See under Jerusalem.

    New Zealand oak, a sapindaceous tree ( Alectryon excelsum).

    Poison oak, a shrub once not distinguished from poison ivy, but now restricted to Rhus toxicodendron or Rhus diversiloba.

    Silky oak or Silk-bark oak, an Australian tree ( Grevillea robusta).

    Green oak, oak wood colored green by the growth of the mycelium of certain fungi.

    Oak apple, a large, smooth, round gall produced on the leaves of the American red oak by a gallfly ( Cynips confluens). It is green and pulpy when young.

    Oak beauty (Zo["o]l.), a British geometrid moth ( Biston prodromaria) whose larva feeds on the oak.

    Oak gall, a gall found on the oak. See 2d Gall.

    Oak leather (Bot.), the mycelium of a fungus which forms leatherlike patches in the fissures of oak wood.

    Oak pruner. (Zo["o]l.) See Pruner, the insect.

    Oak spangle, a kind of gall produced on the oak by the insect Diplolepis lenticularis.

    Oak wart, a wartlike gall on the twigs of an oak.

    The Oaks, one of the three great annual English horse races (the Derby and St. Leger being the others). It was instituted in 1779 by the Earl of Derby, and so called from his estate.

    To sport one's oak, to be ``not at home to visitors,'' signified by closing the outer (oaken) door of one's rooms. [Cant, Eng. Univ.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
oak

Old English ac "oak tree," from Proto-Germanic *aiks (cognates: Old Norse eik, Old Saxon and Old Frisian ek, Middle Dutch eike, Dutch eik, Old High German eih, German Eiche), of uncertain origin with no certain cognates outside Germanic.\n

\nThe usual Indo-European base for "oak" (*deru-) has become Modern English tree (n.); likewise in Greek and Celtic words for "oak" are from the Indo-European root for "tree," probably reflecting the importance of the oak to ancient Indo-Europeans. The Old Norse form was eik, but as there were no oaks in Iceland the word came to be used there for "tree" in general. Used in Biblical translations to render Hebrew elah (probably usually "terebinth tree") and four other words.

Wiktionary
oak

a. 1 (colour) of a rich brown colour, like that of oak wood. 2 made of oak wood or timber 3 consisting of oak trees n. 1 (senseid en tree)(lb en countable) A tree of the genus ''Quercus''. 2 (lb en uncountable) The wood of the oak. 3 A rich brown colour, like that of oak wood.

WordNet
oak
  1. n. the hard durable wood of any oak; used especially for furniture and flooring

  2. a deciduous tree of the genus Quercus; has acorns and lobed leaves; "great oaks grow from little acorns" [syn: oak tree]

Gazetteer
Oak, NE -- U.S. village in Nebraska
Population (2000): 60
Housing Units (2000): 36
Land area (2000): 0.148115 sq. miles (0.383617 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.148115 sq. miles (0.383617 sq. km)
FIPS code: 35245
Located within: Nebraska (NE), FIPS 31
Location: 40.237287 N, 97.902920 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 68964
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Oak, NE
Oak
Wikipedia
Oak (wine)

Oak is used in winemaking to vary the color, flavor, tannin profile and texture of wine. It can be introduced in the form of a barrel during the fermentation or aging periods, or as free-floating chips or staves added to wine fermented in a vessel like stainless steel. Oak barrels can impart other qualities to wine through evaporation and low level exposure to oxygen.

Oak

An oak is a tree or shrub in the genusQuercus (; Latin "oak tree") of the beech family, Fagaceae. There are approximately 600 extant species of oaks. The common name "oak" may also appear in the names of species in related genera, notably Lithocarpus. The genus is native to the Northern Hemisphere, and includes deciduous and evergreen species extending from cool temperate to tropical latitudes in the Americas, Asia, Europe, and North Africa. North America contains the largest number of oak species, with approximately 90 occurring in the United States, while Mexico has 160 species of which 109 are endemic. The second greatest center of oak diversity is China, which contains approximately 100 species.

Oaks have spirally arranged leaves, with lobate margins in many species; some have serrated leaves or entire leaves with smooth margins. Many deciduous species are marcescent, not dropping dead leaves until spring. In spring, a single oak tree produces both male flowers (in the form of catkins) and small female flowers. The fruit is a nut called an acorn, borne in a cup-like structure known as a cupule; each acorn contains one seed (rarely two or three) and takes 6–18 months to mature, depending on species. The live oaks are distinguished for being evergreen, but are not actually a distinct group and instead are dispersed across the genus.

Oak (disambiguation)

An oak is a tree or shrub in the genus Quercus in the plant family Fagaceae.

Oak or OAK may also refer to:

Oak (band)
Oak is not to be confused with the American band of the same name, whose lead singer was Rick Pinette and who had a Top 40 hit in the U.S. in 1980 with "King of the Hill."

Oak was an English folk band in the early 1970s; it had a major influence on folk revival in the UK, despite being together for only two years.

Members of Oak:

The members of Oak met in the 1960s in Kingston upon Thames, where Rod Stradling ran a folk club. The Stradlings moved to Camden Town in 1968 and became involved in running another folk club in Islington. Engle and Webb also moved to North London soon afterwards. In 1970, while his wife Danny was pregnant, Rod Stradling played together with Tony Engle as a successful duo and as part of The Garland, replacing Mel Dean. After the birth of their son, the Stradlings and Engle and Webb joined forces as Oak and had soon performed at most of the folk clubs in the London area.

They were asked by Bill Leader to make an LP for his Trailer label, but as Engle worked for Topic Records, he felt obliged to offer to record for them first. To his surprise, the offer was accepted and Welcome to Our Fair was recorded on May Day, 1971. The record caused enormous interest and the band played 163 gigs in the 18 months between the record's release and their final performance, on 19 December 1972.

Oak (programming language)

Oak was a programming language created by James Gosling in 1991, initially for Sun Microsystems' set-top box project. The language later evolved to become Java.

The name Oak was used by Gosling after an oak tree that stood outside his office.

Oak (CTA station)

Oak was a station on the Chicago Transit Authority's North Side Main Line, which is now part of the Brown Line. The station was located at 319 W. Oak Street in the Near North Side neighborhood of Chicago. Oak was situated south of Division, which closed at the same time as Oak, and north of Chicago. Oak opened in 1906 and closed on August 1, 1949, along with 22 other stations as part of a CTA service revision.

Oak (flavoured milk)

The OAK brand first emerged in 1903 in Newcastle, NSW. It was known as the Hunter Valley milk brand and made its name as a flavoured milk brand in 1967. The brand was launched into Queensland, South Australia and Victoria in 1998 - deleted in Victoria by 2007 and relaunched in 2010. Oak now uses skim milk instead of full cream in products.

Usage examples of "oak".

Val died, his gardens were abloom with chrysanthemums, the air golden, the oaks in his yard sculpted against a hard blue sky.

A hogshead of ale was abroach under an oak, and a fire was blazing in an open space before the trees to roast the fat deer which the foresters brought.

She emerged from the oaks, expecting to see Acorn still frozen upon the riverbank.

After shaping the slope of the barrel chime of yet another red oak slack barrel, Kharl set the adze down and blotted his forehead with the back of his forearm.

Even from his viewpoint more than ten meters away, Aiken could see the slabs of thick oak tremble from the force of rhythmic smashes.

The yard was filled with weeds and trash, along with a riot of sumac and ailanthus bushes and a pair of dead oaks.

It was a place to quote Alastor in, and nothing but a bad memory prevented my affrighting the oaks and rills with declamation.

The alcalde took his station near the trunk of the great oak, and summoned the prisoners and their accusers before him, while the crowd gathered in a grim and stern-faced circle around this improvised courtroom.

Whatever misgivings Thryis might have had about him that first night, she had soon taken to Alec and made him welcome in the group that gathered around the scrubbed oak table each morning.

Their Thor and Odin were at first, probably, only the thunder and the wind: but they had to be appeased in the dark marches of the forest, where hung rotting on the sacred oaks, amid carcases of goat and horse, the carcases of human victims.

One afternoon there rose up a flock of rooks out of a large oak tree standing separate in the midst of an arable field which was then at last being ploughed.

He would not after all be lucky enough to sit under that oak on that dreamed hillside someday with a miraculously saved Weed Atman, in some 1980s world of the future.

There was no time for him to move out of the way, no time for more than a strangled cry to escape him as the heavy oak aumbry bore him to the floor with a resounding crash.

She set an oak bench against the south wall and flanked it with buddleias for the butterflies - and decades later, the Basher, who had fought her all the way, came there to die.

The heart-shaped leaves have dropped from the bine, leaving thick bunches of red and green berries clustering about the greyish stem of the oak.