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let
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
let
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
give/let out a laugh
▪ She gave a loud laugh.
give/let out a shriek
▪ Ella let out a piercing shriek.
give/let out a sigh
▪ She let out a sigh of disappointment.
give/let out a yelp of pain/dismay/surprise etc
▪ The water was hotter than she had expected, and she gave an involuntary yelp.
let in a goal (=let the other team score a goal)
▪ Chelsea let in a goal in the 63rd minute.
let in some air (=let fresh air into a room)
▪ It would be nice to open the door and let in some air.
let it pass
▪ Carla made some comment about my work but I decided to let it pass.
let it slide
▪ Well, I guess we can let it slide this time.
let it slip that
▪ He let it slip that they were planning to get married.
let out a scream
▪ He let out a piercing scream.
let out/give a yell
▪ She let out a yell when she saw me.
let out/utter a cry
▪ Seeing the fields and mountains, she let out a cry of delight.
let sb in on a secret (=tell them a secret)
▪ Frank let me in on the secret.
let sb out of prison
▪ When's he going to be let out of prison?
let the matter rest/drop (=stop discussing or worrying about something)
▪ I was too curious to let the matter drop.
let us imagine … (=used to encourage someone else to think about a possibility)
▪ Let us imagine that you are an employer who wants to recruit some new staff.
let us/let’s assume (that) (=used when thinking about a possible event or situation and its possible results)
▪ Let us assume for a moment that we could indeed fire her. Should we?
let your breath out (=breathe out)
▪ Let your breath out slowly and relax.
let your gaze/eyes/thoughts/mind etc drift
▪ Idly she let her eyes drift over his desk.
let your imagination run wild (also let your imagination run riot British English) (= allow yourself to imagine many strange or wonderful things)
▪ He uses painting as a way of letting his imagination run riot.
let...go to pot
▪ The government has let the whole country go to pot.
let...guess
▪ What star sign are you? No, let me guess.
Let...know (=tell me)
Let me know what time you’re planning to arrive.
let/put the cat out (=let it or make it go outside)
▪ Can you let the cat out?
lets...walk all over her
▪ It’s terrible – she lets her kids just walk all over her.
turn/let/set sth loose (=let something go free)
▪ Don’t let your dog loose on the beach.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
down
▪ There were horse-drawn cabs with the hoods let down, and cars going by.
▪ When I was young, I let down my parents by quitting Sorbonne.
▪ She, too, was let down by those in authority whose job it was to protect her.
▪ Balletomanes got to see their favorite dancers let down their hair.
▪ At night, part of the panel was let down, revealing a bed with concealed lighting behind.
▪ Keep it coming like you are. Let down a little.
▪ Ferguson then said he would buy the title for the fans he had so badly let down.
▪ Quickly, Della let down her beautiful, long hair.
off
▪ Not for the first time this year, Seles had been let off with a mere slap on the wrist.
▪ Parents were let off the hook.
▪ Then, to mark the end of the service, three enormous thunder-flashes were let off in the rear gatehouse.
▪ Lousy schools and dysfunctional teachers were let off the hook.
▪ We let off steam in graffiti, vandalism and football hooliganism.
▪ Or did the high turnout suggest a letting off of steam after three intense years of flood recovery?
▪ When Manly-Warringah dropped out of the chase, St George stepped up the pressure and have never really let off.
▪ He was moving in slow motion when Jimmy let off a sudden burst that sent chunks of sidewalk flying everywhere.
out
▪ On Thursday Major Vanavskaya suffered her first serious set-back, let out a very unladylike expletive and slammed the phone down.
▪ Balor let out a bellow of fear and, in the same moment, the Trees closed in.
▪ And with that he let out a long raspberry that inspired some applause.
▪ He let out a long-held breath.
▪ It was only as my sister reopened the front door to let out her pet cat that I was noticed.
▪ It was to be hoped that Joanna didn't let out details of their various clients and the pet shop.
▪ And he was fully expecting to be let out.
■ NOUN
pass
▪ So Kylie, never one to let a lesson pass unheeded, acted on it.
▪ Mr Punsalong taught me to let pain pass through me.
▪ And Lisbie knew Fiona wasn't going to let this one pass without a major counterattack.
▪ She could not stand the thought that she would be left again; she always let the warning pass.
▪ I think not, Clive, but let that pass.
▪ I let the subject pass and made a mental note for myself.
▪ He let the timber pass by intending to slip the hook over the rope at its head.
rest
▪ Its opponents, however, were unlikely to let the matter rest where it stood in September 1932.
▪ She rolled on top of him, letting her full weight rest on his body.
▪ He let his hammer rest on the shoe sole and looked up.
▪ Attention creates the foreground of consciousness, letting the rest slip into peripheral awareness.
▪ Anyway, you really should have just taken the useful tips from his lecture and let the rest slide.
▪ When she sat down she didn't let herself rest against the back of the chair.
▪ Season buffalo steaks with salt and pepper to taste and let them rest for 1 hour at room temperature.
run
▪ It lets you copy and run files and search for and rename programs.
▪ She played the fish, gave it some slack and let it run till it hesitated, then slowly drew it back.
▪ They let Celtic fire run, uninhibitedly.
▪ Some people let their under-fives run riot.
▪ Never let a man run the whole show.
▪ Equally unexpectedly, he let the contest run to the bitter end.
▪ We would let his interest run its course.
slip
▪ Be careful lads not to let this one slip away!
▪ He tried to let Billie and Carlo slip to the back of his mind.
▪ On the few occasions I have met him it has been very difficult for me not to let slip something about you.
▪ Not a word had Dooley let slip, not even a hint.
▪ And on most of the occasions when they had been alone together he hadn't let a chance slip by.
▪ Just a little slower, maybe let the needle slip back down toward eighty, maybe seventy.
▪ Even if he did not allow himself to betray his secret directly he might let slip something that would provide a clue.
▪ The chance to convert a proposal long mooted into reality was too precious to let slip.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
let (sth ↔) loose
let bygones be bygones
▪ Why don't we let bygones be bygones and forget about the whole thing.
▪ Although the book ended on a positive note in that the enemy's group leader tried to let bygones be bygones.
▪ He lets bygones be bygones, they say, and is always happy to welcome back the wayward.
▪ It raps a defector over the knuckles instantly but, after that, lets bygones be bygones.
▪ McVie credits Buckingham for letting bygones be bygones.
▪ Nor was he willing to let bygones be bygones once a quarrel had finally come to an end.
▪ We will let bygones be bygones.
let me be the judge of that
let nature take its course
▪ Just relax and let nature take its course.
▪ With a cold, it's better to just let nature take its course.
▪ I meant that, in the case of any other industry, we probably would have let nature take its course.
▪ I think we should let nature take its course.
▪ Should I just let nature take its course or stop it now?
▪ Stay calm and let nature take its course.
▪ The best is to obtain juveniles from a number of sources, rear them together and let nature take its course.
let sb loose on sth
▪ He seemed to have forgotten about only letting me loose on water.
▪ We let the Pacer loose on two testers - one fast, one slow.
▪ Who was feeding him or even letting him loose on occasions?
let the cat out of the bag
▪ I'm sorry. Jim knows about last week's party. I'm afraid I let the cat out of the bag.
▪ Some idiot's let the cat out of the bag -- Mrs Simpson realizes there's something going on.
▪ Inadvertently perhaps, the BiE report lets the cat out of the bag.
let the dust settle/wait for the dust to settle
let the genie out of the bottle
let the side down
▪ Brown was constantly letting the side down.
▪ Essentially, it's the ageing drivetrain that lets the side down.
▪ I don't want to let the side down - don't send me to the Sick Room!
▪ It is an unmentionable subject, a terrible way of letting the side down.
let your hair down
▪ Chat rooms on the Internet are a place we can let our hair down and say what we think.
▪ I spotted Juanita really letting her hair down on the dance floor.
▪ Playing softball is just a good way to let your hair down and have fun.
▪ You can really let your hair down and do what you want at the club.
▪ Among the many booksellers and publishers whom I spotted letting their hair down on the dance floor was independent publisher Christopher Hurst.
▪ He liked this: what his pub was all about, for people to let their hair down.
▪ In the second half Complicite let their hair down in their own inimitable way.
▪ Man's got ta let his hair down.
▪ Out in the pasture, the princess let her hair down.
▪ This was the day our friends let their hair down and spoke with amazing frankness.
▪ We know when we can afford to let our hair down and when we can't.
let's get this show on the road
let/blow off steam
▪ Recess is a good chance for kids to blow off steam.
▪ It was recreation hour, explained Brother Andrew with a smile, and the Brothers were letting off steam.
▪ Jody lets her blow off steam first.
▪ Others have behavioural problems and need to let off steam in a safe and controlled setting.
▪ She just needed to blow off steam.
▪ So kicking the cat, biting a towel or pounding a pillow aren't really much use, except for letting off steam.
▪ We let off steam in graffiti, vandalism and football hooliganism.
▪ You got upset, blew off steam.
▪ You want to let off steam?
let/get sb off the hook
▪ People will think they let Charmaine off the hook because she's a woman.
▪ And he was at the heart of two of the double plays that got Johns off the hook.
▪ And this time there is no second match to get anyone off the hook!
▪ Apologising for ourselves Apologising and being self-deprecating can let you off the hook.
▪ Home striker Paul Crimmen let them off the hook on a number of occasions and Horsham had two goals disallowed.
▪ I emphasize the tense because Congress has the habit of letting itself off the hook when convenient.
▪ It could even, in a pinch, get him off the hook for the nightly walk to the monument.
▪ Why, she wondered, when she had effectively let him off the hook?
▪ You could let them off the hook, or you could reel them in.
not let sb out of your sight
▪ Stay here, and don't let the baby out of your sight.
not let the grass grow under your feet
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Let him come home safely, she prayed.
▪ 200,00 sq ft of land was let to a local firm.
▪ I know he's grown up now, but it's hard for me to let go.
▪ I want to go to Europe this summer, but my parents won't let me.
▪ It'll drive you crazy if you let it.
▪ Nellie's house had a 'To Let' sign in the window.
▪ Sue doesn't let her kids eat candy.
▪ Thanks for letting me spend the night at your place.
▪ The company owns about 170 cottages in Britain, which it lets out to tourists.
▪ We wanted to go camping, but our parents wouldn't let us.
▪ You'd better let the dog out.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Away from her, he must feel like a boy let out of school.
▪ Because if you drive... hold on, let me just check some-thing.
▪ But let no one doubt that this earthquake will happen.
▪ If hungry he'd gnaw your ankle just to let you know to fill his bowl.
▪ My parents didn't want to let me go, but I begged them and promised to come back very quickly.
▪ So let us look at what factors appear to affect the performance of individuals in their jobs.
▪ They are the reason he asked Mobil to let him build a bigger store.
▪ Under no circumstances, however, should the Dole campaign let Buchanan speak during prime time at the Republican Convention.
II.noun
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
let (sth ↔) loose
let bygones be bygones
▪ Why don't we let bygones be bygones and forget about the whole thing.
▪ Although the book ended on a positive note in that the enemy's group leader tried to let bygones be bygones.
▪ He lets bygones be bygones, they say, and is always happy to welcome back the wayward.
▪ It raps a defector over the knuckles instantly but, after that, lets bygones be bygones.
▪ McVie credits Buckingham for letting bygones be bygones.
▪ Nor was he willing to let bygones be bygones once a quarrel had finally come to an end.
▪ We will let bygones be bygones.
let fly (sth)
▪ And there all the time, a line of kneeling archers, letting fly from behind their ranked shields.
▪ He located running back John Fuqua 20 yards downfield and let fly.
▪ If the threat still persists, he will let fly with one or both hindlegs.
▪ It seems that the Battler and Rico let fly at somebody who was coming out of the back door of the Regal Arms.
▪ Kimberley let fly at the dangling men from a hopeless range.
▪ Sit it on a hill and wait till the enemy is within half range and then let fly.
▪ The Bashers tightened lips, hunched shoulders, and let fly.
▪ You have only to come close enough to my hide and I let fly.
let it all hang out
▪ Each time you let it all hang out, you lower your threshold for doing it again.
▪ My face resembled the back of one of those baboons who let it all hang out at mating time.
▪ Now you can anonymously let it all hang out online.
▪ Was it possible to go too far, or should he just let it all hang out?
▪ We let it all hang out.
let it be known/make it known (that)
let it/her rip
let me be the judge of that
let me remind you/may I remind you (that)
let me see
▪ And Martini rolls a big, let me see, a big nineteen.
▪ But you could give me this project, put me in charge of the entire operation - and let me see it through.
▪ I promised to give it the fifty-one hours, so that's, let me see, forty-five left.
▪ Now let me see if I can split the difference.
▪ So far, let me see, it's two-eighty.
▪ Why won't you let me see your schoolbooks nowadays?
let nature take its course
▪ Just relax and let nature take its course.
▪ With a cold, it's better to just let nature take its course.
▪ I meant that, in the case of any other industry, we probably would have let nature take its course.
▪ I think we should let nature take its course.
▪ Should I just let nature take its course or stop it now?
▪ Stay calm and let nature take its course.
▪ The best is to obtain juveniles from a number of sources, rear them together and let nature take its course.
let rip
▪ Harriet finally let rip with 20 years of stored resentment.
▪ And picture the scene when a bunch of the boys let rip with the Toreador Song from Carmen.
▪ And, quite frankly, I just let rip.
▪ But Lord McNally, a Liberal Democrat, was able to let rip.
▪ Encouraged, and not noticing in his excitement the look of horror on his Rachel's face, Alfred let rip.
▪ He had carte blanche to let rip.
▪ In the end, the market is let rip.
▪ Out on the motorway he let rip.
let sb get on with it
let sb loose on sth
▪ He seemed to have forgotten about only letting me loose on water.
▪ We let the Pacer loose on two testers - one fast, one slow.
▪ Who was feeding him or even letting him loose on occasions?
let sb stew
let sleeping dogs lie
▪ The best plan is just to let sleeping dogs lie.
let sth drift
let sth pass
▪ When she started criticizing my parents, I couldn't let it pass.
let sth ride
▪ We can't just let this ride - this kid's future is at stake.
let sth slide
▪ Management has let safety standards slide at the plant.
let sth slip
let sth slip (through your fingers)
▪ And on most of the occasions when they had been alone together he hadn't let a chance slip by.
▪ As an aside, the parties let it slip that the idea of a true playoff system had been scrapped.
▪ Attention creates the foreground of consciousness, letting the rest slip into peripheral awareness.
▪ Be careful lads not to let this one slip away!
▪ Colin, on the other hand, became discouraged and let things slip.
▪ He held it up, and let it slip between his fingers.
▪ The Celtics let this one slip away slowly, painfully and needlessly.
▪ Wrapped up with visions of kissing Deborah, I had ignored his bedtime rituals and let him slip away.
let the cat out of the bag
▪ I'm sorry. Jim knows about last week's party. I'm afraid I let the cat out of the bag.
▪ Some idiot's let the cat out of the bag -- Mrs Simpson realizes there's something going on.
▪ Inadvertently perhaps, the BiE report lets the cat out of the bag.
let the genie out of the bottle
let the matter rest
▪ However, she can rest assured that we will not let the matter rest.
▪ I was going to knock for I was still intrigued by him but Benjamin called me so I let the matter rest.
▪ In her opinion anybody with any sense would let the matter rest there.
▪ Innocent maintained that Philip should have gone to Rome for absolution but for the moment he let the matter rest.
▪ Its opponents, however, were unlikely to let the matter rest where it stood in September 1932.
▪ She simply refused to let the matter rest where it.was.
let your hair down
▪ Chat rooms on the Internet are a place we can let our hair down and say what we think.
▪ I spotted Juanita really letting her hair down on the dance floor.
▪ Playing softball is just a good way to let your hair down and have fun.
▪ You can really let your hair down and do what you want at the club.
▪ Among the many booksellers and publishers whom I spotted letting their hair down on the dance floor was independent publisher Christopher Hurst.
▪ He liked this: what his pub was all about, for people to let their hair down.
▪ In the second half Complicite let their hair down in their own inimitable way.
▪ Man's got ta let his hair down.
▪ Out in the pasture, the princess let her hair down.
▪ This was the day our friends let their hair down and spoke with amazing frankness.
▪ We know when we can afford to let our hair down and when we can't.
let's get this show on the road
let's hear it for sb
let's just say
▪ "So who was she with?" "Let's just say it wasn't Ted."
let's roll
let/blow off steam
▪ Recess is a good chance for kids to blow off steam.
▪ It was recreation hour, explained Brother Andrew with a smile, and the Brothers were letting off steam.
▪ Jody lets her blow off steam first.
▪ Others have behavioural problems and need to let off steam in a safe and controlled setting.
▪ She just needed to blow off steam.
▪ So kicking the cat, biting a towel or pounding a pillow aren't really much use, except for letting off steam.
▪ We let off steam in graffiti, vandalism and football hooliganism.
▪ You got upset, blew off steam.
▪ You want to let off steam?
let/get sb off the hook
▪ People will think they let Charmaine off the hook because she's a woman.
▪ And he was at the heart of two of the double plays that got Johns off the hook.
▪ And this time there is no second match to get anyone off the hook!
▪ Apologising for ourselves Apologising and being self-deprecating can let you off the hook.
▪ Home striker Paul Crimmen let them off the hook on a number of occasions and Horsham had two goals disallowed.
▪ I emphasize the tense because Congress has the habit of letting itself off the hook when convenient.
▪ It could even, in a pinch, get him off the hook for the nightly walk to the monument.
▪ Why, she wondered, when she had effectively let him off the hook?
▪ You could let them off the hook, or you could reel them in.
live and let live
▪ She couldn't live and let live.
▪ The Smiths, though, have little time for the live and let live view.
not let sb out of your sight
▪ Stay here, and don't let the baby out of your sight.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ This would justify the fact that to is not used with this sense of let.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Let

Let \Let\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Let ( Letted (l[e^]t"t[e^]d), [Obs].); p. pr. & vb. n. Letting.] [OE. leten, l[ae]ten (past tense lat, let, p. p. laten, leten, lete), AS. l[=ae]tan (past tense l[=e]t, p. p. l[=ae]ten); akin to OFries. l[=e]ta, OS. l[=a]tan, D. laten, G. lassen, OHG. l[=a]zzan, Icel. l[=a]ta, Sw. l[*a]ta, Dan. lade, Goth. l[=e]tan, and L. lassus weary. The original meaning seems to have been, to let loose, let go, let drop. Cf. Alas, Late, Lassitude, Let to hinder.]

  1. To leave; to relinquish; to abandon. [Obs. or Archaic, except when followed by alone or be.]

    He . . . prayed him his voyage for to let.
    --Chaucer.

    Yet neither spins nor cards, ne cares nor frets, But to her mother Nature all her care she lets.
    --Spenser.

    Let me alone in choosing of my wife.
    --Chaucer.

  2. To consider; to think; to esteem. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

  3. To cause; to make; -- used with the infinitive in the active form but in the passive sense; as, let make, i. e., cause to be made; let bring, i. e., cause to be brought.

    This irous, cursed wretch Let this knight's son anon before him fetch.
    --Chaucer.

    He . . . thus let do slay hem all three.
    --Chaucer.

    Anon he let two coffers make.
    --Gower.

  4. To permit; to allow; to suffer; -- either affirmatively, by positive act, or negatively, by neglecting to restrain or prevent.

    Note: In this sense, when followed by an infinitive, the latter is commonly without the sign to; as to let us walk, i. e., to permit or suffer us to walk. Sometimes there is entire omission of the verb; as, to let [to be or to go] loose.

    Pharaoh said, I will let you go.
    --Ex. viii. 28.

    If your name be Horatio, as I am let to know it is.
    --Shak.

  5. To allow to be used or occupied for a compensation; to lease; to rent; to hire out; -- often with out; as, to let a farm; to let a house; to let out horses.

  6. To give, grant, or assign, as a work, privilege, or contract; -- often with out; as, to let the building of a bridge; to let out the lathing and the plastering. Note: The active form of the infinitive of let, as of many other English verbs, is often used in a passive sense; as, a house to let (i. e., for letting, or to be let). This form of expression conforms to the use of the Anglo-Saxon gerund with to (dative infinitive) which was commonly so employed. See Gerund, 2. `` Your elegant house in Harley Street is to let.'' --Thackeray. In the imperative mood, before the first person plural, let has a hortative force. `` Rise up, let us go.'' --Mark xiv. 42. `` Let us seek out some desolate shade.'' --Shak. To let alone, to leave; to withdraw from; to refrain from interfering with. To let blood, to cause blood to flow; to bleed. To let down.

    1. To lower.

    2. To soften in tempering; as, to let down tools, cutlery, and the like. To let fly or To let drive, to discharge with violence, as a blow, an arrow, or stone. See under Drive, and Fly. To let in or To let into.

      1. To permit or suffer to enter; to admit.

      2. To insert, or imbed, as a piece of wood, in a recess formed in a surface for the purpose. To let loose, to remove restraint from; to permit to wander at large. To let off.

        1. To discharge; to let fly, as an arrow; to fire the charge of, as a gun.

        2. To release, as from an engagement or obligation. To let out.

          1. To allow to go forth; as, to let out a prisoner.

          2. To extend or loosen, as the folds of a garment; to enlarge; to suffer to run out, as a cord.

    3. To lease; to give out for performance by contract, as a job.

    4. To divulge.

      To let slide, to let go; to cease to care for. [Colloq.] `` Let the world slide.''
      --Shak.

Let

Let \Let\ (l[e^]t), v. t. [OE. letten, AS. lettan to delay, to hinder, fr. l[ae]t slow; akin to D. letten to hinder, G. verletzen to hurt, Icel. letja to hold back, Goth. latjan. See Late.] To retard; to hinder; to impede; to oppose. [Archaic]

He was so strong that no man might him let.
--Chaucer.

He who now letteth will let, until he be taken out of the way.
--2. Thess. ii. 7.

Mine ancient wound is hardly whole, And lets me from the saddle.
--Tennyson.

Let

Let \Let\, n.

  1. A retarding; hindrance; obstacle; impediment; delay; -- common in the phrase without let or hindrance, but elsewhere archaic.
    --Keats.

    Consider whether your doings be to the let of your salvation or not.
    --Latimer.

  2. (Lawn Tennis) A stroke in which a ball touches the top of the net in passing over.

Let

Let \Let\, v. i.

  1. To forbear. [Obs.]
    --Bacon.

  2. To be let or leased; as, the farm lets for $500 a year. See note under Let, v. t.

    To let on, to tell; to tattle; to divulge something. [Low]

    To let up, to become less severe; to diminish; to cease; as, when the storm lets up. [Colloq.]

Let

Let \Let\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Let ( Letted (l[e^]t"t[e^]d), [Obs].); p. pr. & vb. n. Letting.] [OE. leten, l[ae]ten (past tense lat, let, p. p. laten, leten, lete), AS. l[=ae]tan (past tense l[=e]t, p. p. l[=ae]ten); akin to OFries. l[=e]ta, OS. l[=a]tan, D. laten, G. lassen, OHG. l[=a]zzan, Icel. l[=a]ta, Sw. l[*a]ta, Dan. lade, Goth. l[=e]tan, and L. lassus weary. The original meaning seems to have been, to let loose, let go, let drop. Cf. Alas, Late, Lassitude, Let to hinder.]

  1. To leave; to relinquish; to abandon. [Obs. or Archaic, except when followed by alone or be.]

    He . . . prayed him his voyage for to let.
    --Chaucer.

    Yet neither spins nor cards, ne cares nor frets, But to her mother Nature all her care she lets.
    --Spenser.

    Let me alone in choosing of my wife.
    --Chaucer.

  2. To consider; to think; to esteem. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

  3. To cause; to make; -- used with the infinitive in the active form but in the passive sense; as, let make, i. e., cause to be made; let bring, i. e., cause to be brought.

    This irous, cursed wretch Let this knight's son anon before him fetch.
    --Chaucer.

    He . . . thus let do slay hem all three.
    --Chaucer.

    Anon he let two coffers make.
    --Gower.

  4. To permit; to allow; to suffer; -- either affirmatively, by positive act, or negatively, by neglecting to restrain or prevent.

    Note: In this sense, when followed by an infinitive, the latter is commonly without the sign to; as to let us walk, i. e., to permit or suffer us to walk. Sometimes there is entire omission of the verb; as, to let [to be or to go] loose.

    Pharaoh said, I will let you go.
    --Ex. viii. 28.

    If your name be Horatio, as I am let to know it is.
    --Shak.

  5. To allow to be used or occupied for a compensation; to lease; to rent; to hire out; -- often with out; as, to let a farm; to let a house; to let out horses.

  6. To give, grant, or assign, as a work, privilege, or contract; -- often with out; as, to let the building of a bridge; to let out the lathing and the plastering. Note: The active form of the infinitive of let, as of many other English verbs, is often used in a passive sense; as, a house to let (i. e., for letting, or to be let). This form of expression conforms to the use of the Anglo-Saxon gerund with to (dative infinitive) which was commonly so employed. See Gerund, 2. `` Your elegant house in Harley Street is to let.'' --Thackeray. In the imperative mood, before the first person plural, let has a hortative force. `` Rise up, let us go.'' --Mark xiv. 42. `` Let us seek out some desolate shade.'' --Shak. To let alone, to leave; to withdraw from; to refrain from interfering with. To let blood, to cause blood to flow; to bleed. To let down.

    1. To lower.

    2. To soften in tempering; as, to let down tools, cutlery, and the like. To let fly or To let drive, to discharge with violence, as a blow, an arrow, or stone. See under Drive, and Fly. To let in or To let into.

      1. To permit or suffer to enter; to admit.

      2. To insert, or imbed, as a piece of wood, in a recess formed in a surface for the purpose. To let loose, to remove restraint from; to permit to wander at large. To let off.

        1. To discharge; to let fly, as an arrow; to fire the charge of, as a gun.

        2. To release, as from an engagement or obligation. To let out.

          1. To allow to go forth; as, to let out a prisoner.

          2. To extend or loosen, as the folds of a garment; to enlarge; to suffer to run out, as a cord.

    3. To lease; to give out for performance by contract, as a job.

    4. To divulge.

      To let slide, to let go; to cease to care for. [Colloq.] `` Let the world slide.''
      --Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
let

"stoppage, obstruction" (obsolete unless in legal contracts), late 12c., from archaic verb letten "to hinder," from Old English lettan "hinder, delay," from Proto-Germanic *latjan (cognates: Old Saxon lettian "to hinder," Old Norse letja "to hold back," Old High German lezzen "to stop, check," Gothic latjan "to hinder, make late," Old English læt "sluggish, slow, late"); see late.

let

Old English lætan "to allow to remain; let go, leave, depart from; leave undone; to allow; bequeath," also "to rent" (class VII strong verb; past tense let, past participle læten), from Proto-Germanic *letan (cognates: Old Saxon latan, Old Frisian leta, Dutch laten, German lassen, Gothic letan "to leave, let"), from PIE *le- (2) "to let go, slacken" (cognates: Latin lassus "faint, weary," Lithuanian leisti "to let, to let loose;" see lenient). If that derivation is correct, the primary sense would be "let go through weariness, neglect."\n

\nOf blood, from late Old English. To let (something) slip originally (1520s) was a reference to hounds on a leash; figurative use from 1540s. To let (someone) off "allow to go unpunished" is from 1814. To let on "reveal, divulge" is from 1725; to let up "cease, stop" is from 1787. Let alone "not to mention" is from 1812.

Wiktionary
let

Etymology 1 vb. (label en transitive) To allow to, not to prevent (+ infinitive, but usually without (term: to)). Etymology 2

n. 1 An obstacle or hindrance. 2 (context tennis English) The hindrance caused by the net during serve, only if the ball falls legally. vb. 1 (context archaic English) To hinder, prevent; to obstruct (someone or something). 2 (context obsolete English) To prevent or obstruct (term: to) do something, or (term: that) something happen.

WordNet
let
  1. v. make it possible through a specific action or lack of action for something to happen; "This permits the water to rush in"; "This sealed door won't allow the water come into the basement"; "This will permit the rain to run off" [syn: allow, permit] [ant: prevent]

  2. actively cause something to happen; "I let it be known that I was not interested"

  3. consent to, give permission; "She permitted her son to visit her estranged husband"; "I won't let the police search her basement"; "I cannot allow you to see your exam" [syn: permit, allow, countenance] [ant: forbid, forbid]

  4. cause to move; cause to be in a certain position or condition; "He got his squad on the ball"; "This let me in for a big surprise"; "He got a girl into trouble" [syn: get, have]

  5. leave unchanged; "let it be"

  6. grant use or occupation of under a term of contract; "I am leasing my country estate to some foreigners" [syn: lease, rent]

  7. [also: letting]

Wikipedia
Let

Let or LET may refer to:

  • -let, an English diminutive suffix
  • Let, a shot or point that must be replayed in certain racquet sports
  • Let, a name binding construct in computer programming languages
  • Let statement, a statement used in word problems requiring algebraic equations
  • LET, part of a font name indicating the font is owned by Letraset; for example, Academy Engraved LET
  • Letting, a system of payment for the temporary use of something owned by someone else, also known as "rental"
  • Linear energy transfer, a property of ionizing radiation's interactions with matter
  • Let Kunovice (LET), a Czechoslovak and Czech aircraft manufacturer
  • Let, West Virginia
  • Leţ, a village in Boroșneu Mare Commune, Covasna County, Romania
  • Let, a fictional character from the anime series Rave Master
  • Lashkar-e-Toiba (LeT), a militant Pakistani Islamist organization
  • Ladies European Tour, the ladies professional golf tour of Europe
  • Lorentz ether theory, a scientific theory
  • LET solution or gel, a topical anesthetic consisting of 4% lidocaine, 1:2,000 epinephrine, and 0.5% tetracaine
  • LET is IATA code of Alfredo Vásquez Cobo International Airport, in Leticia, Colombia.
  • Light Emitting Transistor, a future technology that could be used in OLET screens.

Usage examples of "let".

A volley of gunfire tore into the Aberrant creature and it squawked in fury, but it would not let go of its prize.

Nicholas, hear of me therein, they must even let me alone to abide here.

Then grew Ralph shamefaced and turned away from her, and miscalled himself for a fool and a dastard that could not abide the pleasure of his lady at the very place whereto she had let lead him.

Wilt thou abide here by Walter thyself alone, and let me bring the imp of Upmeads home to our house?

Since Bull Shockhead would bury his brother, and lord Ralph would seek the damsel, and whereas there is water anigh, and the sun is well nigh set, let us pitch our tents and abide here till morning, and let night bring counsel unto some of us.

If he was gravely suspected, and refused to appear when he was summoned to answer for his faith, and was therefore excommunicated and had endured that excommunication obstinately for a year, but becomes penitent, let him be admitted, and abjure all heresy, in the manner explained in the sixth method of pronouncing sentence.

But if he shall appear, and not consent to abjure, let him be delivered as a truly impenitent heretic to the secular Court, as was explained in the tenth method.

I just sat back on my heels and let her tongue lash over me, until at last it dawned on me that the old abo must have gone running to her and she thought we were responsible for scaring him out of what wits he had.

Whilst the mechanist abridges, and the political economist combines labour, let them beware that their speculations, for want of correspondence with those first principles which belong to the imagination, do not tend, as they have in modern England, to exasperate at once the extremes of luxury and want.

Panting, Abrim let his muscles go slack, black spots crowding the edge of his vision.

Handing it over, she absently flicked a glance at the cowboy then let it stay when she recognized the sandy-haired rider she had noticed earlier with Jessy.

He felt in no mood for conversation, and as he sipped his absinth he let his mind run rather sorrowfully over the past few weeks of his life.

Whether Walter West let him watch while he abused young girls, or whether he encouraged his son to take his place, or whether, in fact, he abused him directly Frederick West was never to reveal.

Let them accede, then, to his proposition for a committee, and he would pledge himself to explode the fallacy of agricultural protection, and to put an end to the present system within two years from the publication of its report.

All I wanted was a drive that would let us accelerate at multiple gees without flattening the passengers.