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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

rent

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a rent riseBritish English
▪ Tenants face huge rent rises.
a rented flat
▪ He returned to his rented flat in Cheltenham.
a rented house (=one owned by someone who rents it to people)
▪ She shares a rented house with three other students.
buy/rent an apartment
▪ Tom rented an apartment at the top of the building.
charge rent/a fee/interest etc
▪ The gallery charges an entrance fee.
collect tax/rent/a debt
▪ The landlady came around once a month to collect the rent.
exorbitant rent/prices etc
▪ exorbitant rates of interest
gas man/rent man etc
▪ I waited all day for the gas man.
ground rent
non-payment of rent
▪ She was finally evicted in April for non-payment of rent.
peppercorn rent
rent a bike (also hire a bike British English)
▪ You can rent bikes and explore the island's cycle paths.
rent a flat
▪ Renting a flat can be very expensive in this part of town.
rent a house
▪ While he was working in London, Ken rented a house in Fulham.
rent boy
rent control
rent rebate
rent strike
rented accommodation
rented accommodation
rent/mortgage/tax arrears
▪ He was ordered to pay rent arrears of £550.
rent/price/wage etc controls
▪ Rent controls ensured that no one paid too much for housing.
the rented sector (=homes that people can rent)
▪ We have lost 2 million homes from the rented sector.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
out
▪ For example, you may be working abroad and renting out your home.
▪ Just get some samples together, print up pretentious business cards, inflate values, rent out tent space and voila!
▪ Party chairman Sir Norman Fowler is also said to be considering renting out part of the building in Westminster.
▪ In addition to the City-organized leagues, there are also independent leagues that rent out the San Francisco fields for their use.
▪ He didn't say anything to me about renting out his house.
▪ Recently it had been rented out to a whole parcel of Negroes, who had left the state.
▪ She ran a caravan site and rented out grazing and stables at the lowest rate in the neighbourhood - naturally!
▪ Every available hotel room was rented out and, on some weekends, county gasoline pumps ran dry.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
back rent/taxes/pay etc
▪ A former landlord said she was still owed several thousand dollars in back rent.
▪ Dave Escott bought at the height of the boom, and any back rent will only add to his negative equity.
▪ He owes $ 10, 000 in back taxes.
▪ Homar sued for reinstatement of his job, back pay and money damages.
▪ I needed a release from the tax office showing that I owed no back taxes.
▪ Look, she said, he's left, bolted, owing three months' back rent.
▪ Next: What to do when you can not afford to pay back taxes.
▪ The Internal Revenue Service has been battling him for years for back taxes and penalties related to one venture.
be torn/split/rent etc asunder
▪ If the momentum picks up, conventional politics could be torn asunder.
▪ In 1964, the Republican Party was torn asunder by the nomination of conservative Barry Goldwater.
▪ The veils are parting, the mists are rent asunder.
▪ This unity was to be rent asunder by changes in technology and by the impact of the Modern Movement in architecture.
rented accommodation/housing/apartment etc
▪ Ed, who lives in rented accommodation, plans to use the money as a down-payment on a house.
▪ Many are trapped in the inner cores because of the unavailability of rented housing beyond the cities.
▪ Many potential homeowners decided to sit out the recession in rented accommodation, leaving their money in high-earning accounts.
▪ The group will also recommend improved access to private rented accommodation through rent deposit schemes.
▪ The report points out that the idea of local housing companies as landlord bodies for social rented housing originated in Glasgow.
▪ They remain very vulnerable in privately rented accommodation as they can often be ignorant of their rights.
▪ This would apply to rented accommodation, council houses, etc.
▪ Those in public and privately rented housing do not obtain the same sense of personal identity.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Beck and his wife are renting while they look for a house to buy.
▪ Did you know you can rent a fax machine from the telephone company?
▪ Do you own your home or are you renting?
▪ He finally decided to rent a condo on the lake.
▪ I can't afford to rent an office in this part of town.
▪ Many young couples rent an apartment until they've saved enough money to buy a house.
▪ Should we rent a video tonight?
▪ Vicky put the house up for rent a month ago, but changed her mind the next day.
▪ We rented a couple of movies this weekend.
▪ When she got to Dallas she rented a Ford convertible from the Avis desk.
▪ You rented a tuxedo for two hundred dollars? Are you crazy?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He rented a further acre of land and erected five kilns, a drying floor and engine house.
▪ Imagine tossing the keys to a 300-horsepower rented Corvette to a seventeen-year-old boy who likes race cars.
▪ Instead, many fell upon him and rent him.
▪ Later, they rented an apartment to other refugees in a building they own.
▪ Of the 4,190,000 households entitled to rent rebates only 2,930,000 received them.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
annual
▪ Yields, expressed as a percentage, indicate the annual rent as a proportion of the property value.
▪ Barneys signed leases under which it paid $ 25 million in annual rent for two years to Isetan.
▪ At the date of this assignment, the annual rent payable under the lease was £9,800.
▪ The land is rented to the village by Sir Ian MacDonald for the annual rent of one white rose.
▪ Under the terms of their lease, they have to pay maintenance charges and annual ground rent to a landlord.
▪ I do believe that in years gone by they paid the annual rent for Low Birk Hatt by spinning and knitting.
▪ But the Council's annual rent of £8,000 was more than they could afford.
▪ The new rateable values will be based on current annual rents.
back
▪ Look, she said, he's left, bolted, owing three months' back rent.
▪ A former landlord said she was still owed several thousand dollars in back rent.
▪ Dave Escott bought at the height of the boom, and any back rent will only add to his negative equity.
free
▪ It has built empty factories which it lets out free of rent for up to five years.
▪ That new job will mean free rent but fewer food stamps, he said.
high
▪ We will not be paying these higher rents.
▪ Others were living in places that made them ill or were paying high rents.
▪ Now those landowners have become greedy and demand high rents - and we help to exploit the peasants by levying crippling taxes.
▪ The four metropolitan areas with the highest rents were located in California: San Jose, $ 1, 330.
▪ This means that they will have different tenancy rights and possibly higher rents.
▪ How did mall stores battle back, saddled with higher rents, less floor space and lower volume than their competitors?
▪ The protest focused on high rents and called for the resignation of township councillors.
▪ Just how high rents will rise depends on location.
low
▪ The new offices have been obtained on advantageous terms, the refurbishment costs being offset against a significantly lower rent.
▪ When this was combined with the lower rent it could also argue for, the finally agreed deal had quite an effect.
▪ In exchange, homesteaders will pay a lower rent or be able to buy at a reduced price.
▪ He has chosen a $ 790 per-month apartment on the eighth floor, the lowest rent in the San Fernando.
▪ In fact all his empties could be let at low rents for perhaps three years.
▪ Many have balanced their lives on low rents.
▪ Jane had also done up and let the cottage at a low rent.
▪ Under this system tenants paid low annual rents and a large entry fine at the beginning of their tenancy.
■ NOUN
arrears
▪ Argue, take advice - whatever - but rent arrears are a certain route to eviction.
▪ Now I've been informed that I have £200 rent arrears.
▪ Council tenants' rent arrears have risen to over £450 million, the Audit Commission reveals.
▪ In 1987 rent arrears and mortgage default accounted for 13 percent of homelessness.
▪ Latest figures show rent arrears stand at £10.8m for former tenants and £7.9m for current tenants.
▪ Except in the case of rent arrears, almost anyone can act as a private bailiff.
▪ Council house rent arrears amounted to over £1m, though they are at long last being reduced.
▪ The report anticipates increasing rent arrears.
control
▪ Although a temporary measure, it soon became apparent that rent control could not be abolished with the war's end.
▪ Because of the rent control that had predominated since 1914, houses in Warsaw had become run down.
▪ Clearly, only one of the aggrieved parties of rent control is the property owner who subsidizes renters.
▪ Private rented accommodation has been increasingly freed of rent control, taking it beyond the reach of the young homeless.
▪ In between New York and California, 33 states have preempted rent control.
▪ The strict rent control, introduced in the war to protect private tenants, was partly lifted during the inter war period.
▪ I am a property owner who has challenged rent control for many years.
ground
▪ Amounts of ground rent, other rents and premiums must also be disclosed with the frequency of rent reviews.
▪ The committee offered £300 plus £1 a year ground rent.
▪ The terms were a payment of £325 and a ground rent of £1 a year.
▪ Cash Flow: Club expenses include wages, transfer fees and ground rent.
▪ There is also something called ground rent, which is attached to leasehold flats.
house
▪ Darlington council house rents will rise by £2.85 from April an average increase of 14 percent.
▪ Council house rent levels have increasingly been influenced - if not determined - by central government order to reduce subsidies.
▪ You with five kids and council house rent to pay?
▪ Council house rent arrears amounted to over £1m, though they are at long last being reduced.
increase
▪ The meeting came on the same day the latest casualty of the rent increases left his pub.
▪ So naturally you were upset at the thought of a rent increase.
▪ These statistics indicate that even slight rent increases would cause considerable hardship among housing association tenants.
▪ I asked Grand Met how it justified the rent increases being imposed.
level
▪ Covers both the private and social rented sectors and considers rent levels, rent patterns, house prices and rates of return.
▪ The council will have no control at all over rent levels.
▪ Council house rent levels have increasingly been influenced - if not determined - by central government order to reduce subsidies.
▪ Thus, tenants were singled out for protection regarding rent levels and security, but mere licensees were excluded from this.
▪ Employees may find it difficult to gain information on rent levels which could apply to their own homes.
market
▪ There is no doubt that the old rating system was based on the nebulous concept of a fair market rent.
▪ There is limited access to a Rent Assessment Committee, but it will set what it judges to be a market rent.
▪ There will not be much margin for resource or market rents at the well-head or in the electricity system.
▪ The landlord can let at an agreed market rent.
▪ Many landlords are desperate to let their buildings and to make market rents look high.
▪ This would entitle the tenant to have a new tenancy at the then prevailing market rent.
payment
▪ It is believed he had fallen behind on rent payments for the four-bedroom house and had difficulties funding the children's education.
▪ The landlord Les Helm could not afford the rent payments under the new lease as his rent had gone up sevenfold.
▪ This clause should be amended to provide that the first rent payment will be due on the Rent Commencement Date.
▪ Bailiffs stripped the Forester's Arms last year when Mr Helm could not keep up rent payments.
peppercorn
▪ Fortunately the ground comes cheap, leased from the patron Lord Camrose on a peppercorn rent.
rebate
▪ Normally you will have to pay this fixed amount, even if you get a full rent rebate.
▪ Filled in a new rent rebate form.
▪ The grants include scholarships and maintenance awards for students is well as rent rebates and allowances.
review
▪ A major change in the composition of the index is one of the gambles inherent in this form of rent review.
▪ The effect on the final rent review would be even more drastic.
▪ This reflects the second five year rent review for Head Office which took place in 1989 and became effective from August 1989.
▪ The interrelationship of this clause with the rent review clause should be considered.
▪ Commercially, such a rent review clause may work to the disadvantage of either party.
▪ The tenant will, however, need to ensure that too wide a use will not have adverse consequences on rent review.
rise
▪ Average rent rises of £2-£2.50 a week would result in an average rent of about £27.25.
▪ The proposed rent rise was no bigger than those of other local district councils, he said.
▪ Council tenants also face a 60% rent rise.
strike
▪ But the rent strikes brought her out to the world with her small fists clenched in a white-knuckle fury.
▪ She organised a rent strike and got her whole street rehoused.
▪ There could be a rent strike, a rates strike, or both.
■ VERB
afford
▪ We couldn't afford to buy and rents are exorbitant.
▪ They can not afford the extra rent and if they are driven away they will starve.
▪ Many can afford the rents but find themselves excluded - often ostensibly because they have children.
▪ Morgan must have done quite well out of his business, being able to afford the rent on the entire house.
▪ She could afford to pay rent - for she had decided there was no way she was moving into Ivy Cottage.
▪ Council Houses are a valuable asset for those who can not buy or afford private rents.
▪ The landlord Les Helm could not afford the rent payments under the new lease as his rent had gone up sevenfold.
▪ But he claims he could not afford the rent out of his £61-a-week benefit.
charge
▪ Unless you charge a fortune in rent, it follows that rental yields tend to be lower on more expensive properties.
▪ The Housing Act 1957 vested the management of local authority houses in the Corporation and gave it power to charge reasonable rents.
▪ Said he didn't charge her much rent for her flat.
▪ Halls normally charge a term's rent in advance.
▪ Freedom to charge higher rents will reopen some doors but the court orders still necessary to remove tenants could block real advances.
▪ Tenants will receive the money in a lump sum but will also be charged a low rent while repairs are carried out.
collect
▪ Many of them do not even bother to collect rents.
▪ In regulated industries such as trucking and airlines, workers collected some of the rents that accrued from regulation.
▪ These councils do not collect their rents and have lost control of their rented housing stock.
▪ We could just sit back and collect rents from an ever-decreasing number of tenants.
▪ Council houses and flats are owned by the districts who maintain them and collect the rents.
▪ He too had abandoned Mayo, leaving an agent to manage the estate and collect the rents.
▪ When you invited me to stay here, I didn't realise you planned to collect the rent in kind.
▪ A VAT-registered landlord may have a managing agent to collect standard-rated rents.
determine
▪ An umpire was appointed to determine the rent of a mill.
▪ If the parties wish to adduce evidence in support of their cases, the appropriate way of determining the rent is by arbitration.
pay
▪ I got slung out of my flat when I couldn't pay the rent, and wound up in a hostel.
▪ Others were living in places that made them ill or were paying high rents.
▪ Either she pays her rent or she can buy a property and pay £500 a month mortgage.
▪ He pays the rent by tending bar and working for a couple of unlicensed moving companies.
▪ You must also have a rent book, if you pay rent weekly, as proof of your financial transactions.
▪ I had not paid the rent for the second half of the month.
▪ They still owed the grocer and Dad said he had had to pay another month's rent.
▪ Relatives helped care for her children while she was in school, and they paid her rent.
raise
▪ Improvements to rented property may raise rents to the detriment of the producers as opposed to the landowners.
▪ Increasing demand allowed landowners to raise rents and grant leases on less advantageous terms.
▪ Richmondshire council was raising its rents by £3 and Sedgefield borough council by £2.95.
▪ The management at South Forks raised the rent in anticipation of downtown businesses relocating.
▪ His Landlord, designing profit himself by it, by raising his rent or otherwise proposing to turn him out.
receive
▪ He received manors and rents from the earl.
▪ The trust spends £100,000 to buy land in the United Kingdom and receives rent of £1,000.
▪ Until recently, any money you received in rent was counted as part of your taxable income.
▪ The farmer receives a rent of £15,000 a year and is relieved of the need to do any work for it.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ If my landlord raises the rent again, I'll have to look for somewhere smaller.
▪ Office rents are highest in the city centre.
▪ She pays £350 a month rent for a one-bedroomed apartment.
▪ The rent is $850 a month.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ At a staggering £385 a week rent.
▪ His regular commitments - rent, electricity, etc. - are £38.08 and 50p insurance.
▪ It also established the first Crofters Commission as a permanent body empowered to fix fair rents and administer crofting legislation.
▪ Many S corporation owners are rich people on paper but can barely pay the rent.
▪ Meyer said the shortage of apartments and continued pressure on rents would continue for the next three years.
▪ One resident was evicted after she withheld rent.
▪ The group will also recommend improved access to private rented accommodation through rent deposit schemes.
▪ When they could pay rent, they did.
III.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
out
▪ Now it transpires he owns a portfolio of around eight properties that he either lives in or rents out.
▪ Just get some samples together, print up pretentious business cards, inflate values, rent out tent space and voila!
▪ He had a great love of music and when the rehearsal rooms were rented out would join the musicians.
▪ Later she got a second loan, which she used to buy a rickshaw which she rents out to the villagers.
▪ She ran a caravan site and rented out grazing and stables at the lowest rate in the neighbourhood - naturally!
▪ In addition to the City-organized leagues, there are also independent leagues that rent out the San Francisco fields for their use.
▪ Then taking in a lodger or renting out a room may be the answer.
▪ Recently it had been rented out to a whole parcel of Negroes, who had left the state.
■ NOUN
apartment
▪ He moved out of the hotel and into some serviced apartments that rented by the week and were slightly cheaper.
▪ The rental market is so tight that applicants battle one another for apartments that often are rented in hours or days.
▪ Do you know what studio apartments are renting for in this neighborhood?
▪ Cleveland Street proposed all three-bedroom apartments, renting for $ 873.
▪ Shomof's units are not lofts, but apartments and condominiums renting for $ 759 for a one-bedroom.
▪ From there he goes to the apartment that White has rented for him.
car
▪ She'd flown to Bordeaux the previous day, and rented a car at the airport.
▪ Twenty minutes after they had arrived, Bodnar turned up in his rented car.
▪ McCready rented a car and drove past Hildesheim and Salzgitter to his destination in the forests outside Goslar.
▪ Slopeside lodgings cost more, but often you are spared the expense of renting a car.
▪ I rented a car and two buses for the funeral.
▪ He felt like calling the airline immediately and flying nonstop to Shannon, then renting a car and driving to Sligo.
▪ Traveling with a child would remove some suspicion, as would renting a car on arrival, and using two-way tickets.
cottage
▪ They had rented a cottage overlooking the sea on the East Hill at Hastings.
▪ Hewlett rented a cottage behind their house in Palo Alto.
▪ One Easter, we rented a cottage in Sandwick.
▪ In the kitchen of our rented seaside cottage, something was moving.
▪ I understand that you have rented the cottage, miss.
▪ With Marjorie, she rented a tiny cottage at the edge of a dairy farm in Dorset, Vermont.
▪ Today they have a 14-year-old son and rent a tiny white cottage in Delano.
family
▪ In 1952, the family rented an 800-square-foot, two-bedroom apartment that the elderly couple still call home.
▪ Everything the family built was easily rented and money was plentiful.
▪ Another 800 families rent apartments in the city at their own expense, spending on average about half of their military pay.
▪ After a few days of traveling on the bus without the family car, they rented a pickup truck.
▪ This bitter struggle was personified by the Soong family, for years rent by political differences and petty jealousies.
flat
▪ By that time I'd heard my pimp was in custody, and I started renting a flat.
▪ They bought small frame homes or rented flats.
▪ It was too big for her to look after alone, and it would save him the expense of renting a flat.
▪ I did the right thing, he told himself, renting that flat.
▪ We could rent one of those flats they are proposing to build.
▪ It cost money to rent a town centre flat and everyone was neurotic about burglars.
home
▪ She is planning to move into the house on Monday from the home she rented in Eldon Street, Darlington.
▪ They bought small frame homes or rented flats.
▪ Increasingly, Potton's customers will sell their homes and rent while their Potton home is being built.
▪ The price is pegged at about $ 30 per month. Home is expected to rent the modems.
▪ A more modest seven-bedroom, 6 and 1 / 2-bath home can be rented for $ 125, 000.
▪ Howard and his sister lived there five years, enjoying the home, and have rented it for the past decade.
▪ Some of the temporary Olympic landlords are moving in with relatives while their homes are rented.
house
▪ The second day he started looking for a house to rent.
▪ Then the owner arrived and broke the news: The house had been rented a few days before.
▪ Now the government's being called on to allow councils to buy repossessed houses and rent them out.Simon Garrett reports.
▪ Know approximately how large a house you want to rent.
▪ I am delighted with the house I am renting from him.
▪ Most landlords comply, and let government inspectors roam through the bedrooms and bathrooms of the houses they rent out.
▪ The scheme to buy up empty houses and rent them to homeless families will help to solve two problems.
land
▪ Foreigners would also be allowed to rent land.
▪ Besides, in most vacation areas the locals learn to give a wide berth to tourists in their rented land yachts.
▪ The 500,000 state farm workers would now be able to organize themselves as trading companies and rent the land as individuals.
▪ We rented a plot of land and so I would have to take the meal out to my husband at mid-day.
▪ More important was the status of loans raised to buy or rent land and erect a stadium.
▪ Some leased part of their own tenements while renting additional land.
money
▪ It cost money to rent a town centre flat and everyone was neurotic about burglars.
▪ To save money, Helen rented a Western-style, white gown with a matching veil.
▪ Enterprising police departments in California are earning money by renting out motel rooms as weekend jails.
office
▪ You could rent office space and video equipment there.
▪ See what the normal start-up costs are for renting and furnishing an office, a salesroom, or a studio.
▪ Most City firms rent their office space from the big institutions that invest in commercial developments.
▪ About two years ago, Afara said, Nancy called up and asked to rent a post office box.
▪ It rented an office in Knightsbridge for a while and actually bought a house in Tunbridge Wells.
place
▪ They are suddenly faced with finding a place to rent and budgeting the cost of living.
▪ I decided that Farmington was not a good place for renting.
▪ And there might be places to rent, but I just couldn't afford them.
▪ One of my last interviews took place in a rented hotel room filled with cheap, nondescript tables.
▪ I found a place to rent and Nick came with me to look at it.
▪ Remember the place you rented At the end of a muddy lane Somewhere near Muckamore?
▪ Students not in residential places usually rent accommodation or take lodgings in the city.
property
▪ Even the cities were secured by the settlers: native people were confined to rented property in peripheral townships.
▪ Taxes on rented and business property are a different story.
▪ No one else rents the property, although our client does sometimes have guests to stay overnight during his weekend visits.
▪ Property: Don't let yourself in for trouble Choosing the right agent is essential if you want to rent your property.
▪ Estate agents openly refuse to rent property to foreigners and several bath houses have banned gaijin.
▪ Make like you are prospective clients, looking to rent a secluded property to write a book or something.
▪ The more people seeking to rent small properties reduces void periods, times when the property is empty.
▪ There may be opportunities to rent out existing service property or surplus service property.
room
▪ For a few days, she had become a hermit, closeted in the small room which Sam had rented.
▪ It may be a cabin in the woods or a motel room that you rent at the beach.
▪ I left the woman's house as soon as I found work and a room to rent.
▪ The two men stood in the room rented by the Stock and Exchange Board.
▪ He had a great love of music and when the rehearsal rooms were rented out would join the musicians.
▪ They have another room to rent.
▪ From the tack room Umberto's snores rent the air.
▪ Every available hotel room was rented out and, on some weekends, county gasoline pumps ran dry.
space
▪ You could rent office space and video equipment there.
▪ Just get some samples together, print up pretentious business cards, inflate values, rent out tent space and voila!
▪ Most City firms rent their office space from the big institutions that invest in commercial developments.
▪ Everybody is having to rent space in this dangerous studio.
▪ They will decide who will rent the space.
▪ He rented a large space and hired several assistants.
▪ Campers usually supply sleeping bags, food, drinks and other vehicles, which can be rented if additional space is required.
▪ He sells his Turnstile Adsleeves to sports arenas, which rent the space to advertisers.
truck
▪ So we had to rent a forklift truck from somewhere, then manhandle the saw into the workshop.
▪ Pieces from the inside of the rented Ryder truck box.
▪ After a few days of traveling on the bus without the family car, they rented a pickup truck.
▪ So they rented a truck and drove through the countryside around the Cusiana prospect.
video
Video those magic moving moments ... Capture those moving moments - for ever, when you rent a video camera from Radio Rentals.
▪ Customers would go in and give their five-digit card number to rent videos.
▪ You could rent office space and video equipment there.
■ VERB
buy
▪ Now the government's being called on to allow councils to buy repossessed houses and rent them out.Simon Garrett reports.
▪ You can decide whether you wish to buy, lease or rent them.
▪ But people do buy and rent in the valley, drawn by location, accessibility and affordability.
▪ Should you buy or rent equipment?
▪ On their end, customers will have to install network interface cards in their computers and buy or rent special cable modems.
▪ More important was the status of loans raised to buy or rent land and erect a stadium.
charge
▪ Quite apart from any other reason, if I charged you rent, it would give you security of tenure.
▪ Your goal should be to charge enough rent to cover the mortgage payment, maintenance and other expenses.
own
▪ Premises and equipment are owned or rented by the person carrying on the business. 2.
▪ If they did not own property, they rented rooms wherever they could find them.
▪ It is also becoming polarized between those who own and those who rent their houses.
▪ Will such organisations own information or merely rent it?
▪ The Old Arab ought to know; he owned both dhows, rented them to Husayn and Shaaban.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Every available hotel room was rented out and, on some weekends, county gasoline pumps ran dry.
▪ He rented a further acre of land and erected five kilns, a drying floor and engine house.
▪ I had to rent a driveway across the street.
▪ Imagine tossing the keys to a 300-horsepower rented Corvette to a seventeen-year-old boy who likes race cars.
▪ Instead, many fell upon him and rent him.
▪ It was something connected with three students who rented their house some years ago.
▪ Later, they rented an apartment to other refugees in a building they own.
▪ Of the 4,190,000 households entitled to rent rebates only 2,930,000 received them.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Rent

Rent \Rent\ (r[e^]nt), v. t. To tear. See Rend. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Rent

Rent \Rent\ (r[e^]nt), n. [F. rente, LL. renta, fr. L. reddita, fem. sing. or neut. pl. of redditus, p. p. of reddere to give back, pay. See Render.]

  1. Income; revenue. See Catel. [Obs.] ``Catel had they enough and rent.''
    --Chaucer.

    [Bacchus] a waster was and all his rent In wine and bordel he dispent.
    --Gower.

    So bought an annual rent or two, And liv'd, just as you see I do.
    --Pope.

  2. Pay; reward; share; toll. [Obs.]

    Death, that taketh of high and low his rent.
    --Chaucer.

  3. (Law) A certain periodical profit, whether in money, provisions, chattels, or labor, issuing out of lands and tenements in payment for the use; commonly, a certain pecuniary sum agreed upon between a tenant and his landlord, paid at fixed intervals by the lessee to the lessor, for the use of land or its appendages; as, rent for a farm, a house, a park, etc.

    Note: The term rent is also popularly applied to compensation for the use of certain personal chattels, as a piano, a sewing machine, etc.

  4. (Polit. Econ.)

    1. That portion of the produce of the earth paid to the landlord for the use of the ``original and indestructible powers of the soil;'' the excess of the return from a given piece of cultivated land over that from land of equal area at the ``margin of cultivation.'' Called also economic rent, or Ricardian rent. Economic rent is due partly to differences of productivity, but chiefly to advantages of location; it is equivalent to ordinary or commercial rent less interest on improvements, and nearly equivalent to ground rent.

    2. Loosely, a return or profit from a differential advantage for production, as in case of income or earnings due to rare natural gifts creating a natural monopoly.

      Black rent. See Blackmail, 3.

      Forehand rent, rent which is paid in advance; foregift.

      Rent arrear, rent in arrears; unpaid rent.
      --Blackstone.

      Rent charge (Law), a rent reserved on a conveyance of land in fee simple, or granted out of lands by deed; -- so called because, by a covenant or clause in the deed of conveyance, the land is charged with a distress for the payment of it.
      --Bouvier.

      Rent roll, a list or account of rents or income; a rental.

      Rent seck (Law), a rent reserved by deed, but without any clause of distress; barren rent. A power of distress was made incident to rent seck by Statute 4 George II. c. 28.

      Rent service (Eng. Law), rent reserved out of land held by fealty or other corporeal service; -- so called from such service being incident to it.

      White rent, a quitrent when paid in silver; -- opposed to black rent.

Rent

Rent \Rent\ (r[e^]nt), v. i. To rant. [R. & Obs.]
--Hudibras.

Rent

Rent \Rent\ (r[e^]nt), imp. & p. p. of Rend.

Rent

Rent \Rent\ (r[e^]nt), n. [From Rend.]

  1. An opening made by rending; a break or breach made by force; a tear.

    See what a rent the envious Casca made.
    --Shak.

  2. Figuratively, a schism; a rupture of harmony; a separation; as, a rent in the church.

    Syn: Fissure; breach; disrupture; rupture; tear; dilaceration; break; fracture.

Rent

Rent \Rent\, v. i. To be leased, or let for rent; as, an estate rents for five hundred dollars a year.

Rent

Rent \Rent\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Rented; p. pr. & vb. n. Renting.] [F. renter. See Rent, n.]

  1. To grant the possession and enjoyment of, for a rent; to lease; as, the owwner of an estate or house rents it.

  2. To take and hold under an agreement to pay rent; as, the tennant rents an estate of the owner.

Rent

Rend \Rend\ (r[e^]nd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Rent (r[e^]nt); p. pr. & vb. n. Rending.] [AS. rendan, hrendan; cf. OFries. renda, randa, Fries. renne to cut, rend, Icel. hrinda to push, thrust, AS. hrindan; or cf. Icel. r[ae]na to rob, plunder, Ir. rannaim to divide, share, part, W. rhanu, Armor. ranna.]

  1. To separate into parts with force or sudden violence; to tear asunder; to split; to burst; as, powder rends a rock in blasting; lightning rends an oak.

    The dreadful thunder Doth rend the region.
    --Shak.

  2. To part or tear off forcibly; to take away by force.

    An empire from its old foundations rent.
    --Dryden.

    I will surely rend the kingdom from thee.
    --1 Kings xi. 11.

    To rap and rend. See under Rap, v. t., to snatch.

    Syn: To tear; burst; break; rupture; lacerate; fracture; crack; split.

Wikipedia

Rent (musical)

Rent is a rock musical with music and lyrics by Jonathan Larson loosely based on Giacomo Puccini's opera La Bohème. It tells the story of a group of impoverished young artists struggling to survive and create a life in New York City's East Village in the thriving days of Bohemian Alphabet City , under the shadow of HIV/AIDS.

The musical was first seen in a workshop production at New York Theatre Workshop in 1993. This same Off-Broadway theatre was also the musical's initial home following its official 1996 opening. The show's creator, Jonathan Larson, died suddenly of an aortic dissection, believed to have been caused by undiagnosed Marfan syndrome, the night before the Off-Broadway premiere. The show won a Pulitzer Prize, and the production was a hit. The musical moved to Broadway's larger Nederlander Theatre on April 29, 1996.

On Broadway, Rent gained critical acclaim and won a Tony Award for Best Musical among other awards. The Broadway production closed on September 7, 2008 after a 12-year run of 5,123 performances. On February 14, 2016, the musical Wicked surpassed Rent's number of performances with a 2pm matinee, pushing Rent from the tenth to eleventh longest-running Broadway show. The production grossed over $280 million.

The success of the show led to several national tours and numerous foreign productions. In 2005 it was adapted into a motion picture featuring most of the original cast members.

Rent

Rent may refer to:

Rent (film)

Rent is a 2005 American musical drama film directed by Chris Columbus. It is an adaptation of the Broadway musical of the same name, in turn based on Giacomo Puccini's opera La bohème. The film depicts the lives of several Bohemians and their struggles with sexuality, drugs, paying their rent, and life under the shadow of AIDS. It takes place in the East Village of New York City from 1989 to 1990. The film features six of the original Broadway cast members reprising their roles.

Rent (song)

"Rent" is a 1987 single by the Pet Shop Boys. It was released in the UK by Parlophone on 12 October 1987.

Rent (albums)

Rent (Original Broadway Cast Recording) is an album of music from the Tony Award- and Pulitzer Prize-winning musical Rent. It is produced by DreamWorks with music and lyrics by Jonathan Larson. The album is a 2-disc (in its CD format) collection of every song from the musical; some small segments of narration and spoken dialogue from the play are not included in the recording. The collection ends with a studio-recorded rearrangement of the song " Seasons of Love" featuring Stevie Wonder. The album was recorded by the original Broadway cast of RENT and was released on August 27, 1996. A second one-disc album was released in 1999 containing highlights from the original cast album.

Rent (MUD)

Rent, in MUDs (primarily DikuMUDs), is a mechanism for both enabling and limiting persistence of a player character's possessions. In the "traditional" rent paradigm, in order to keep belongings between game sessions, the player must travel to an inn and use the rent command there, and is assessed a price, in game money, for each inventory item; items that cannot be paid for are not persisted. If the player simply uses the quit command rather than rent, inventory items are not kept, and fall to the ground. Many evolutions of this approach exist: the rent command is often made to be performable anywhere rather than only at an inn, sometimes costs are removed or made negligible, and so on. At times, in MUDs where inventory is made to simply persist automatically when the player quits the game, the conceptualization of inventory persistence as "rent" is sufficiently ingrained that this is referred to as "autorent".

Rent is often considered an annoyance to players, which is a factor that drives the many variations seen on the concept. On the other hand, the need to pay to retain one's items can provide an impetus to engagement with the game, though this may be seen as unduly coercive.

WordNet

rend

  1. v. tear or be torn violently; "The curtain ripped from top to bottom"; "pull the cooked chicken into strips" [syn: rip, rive, pull]

  2. [also: rent]

rent

  1. v. let for money; "We rented our apartment to friends while we were abroad" [syn: lease]

  2. grant use or occupation of under a term of contract; "I am leasing my country estate to some foreigners" [syn: lease, let]

  3. engage for service under a term of contract; "We took an apartment on a quiet street"; "Let's rent a car"; "Shall we take a guide in Rome?" [syn: lease, hire, charter, engage, take]

  4. hold under a lease or rental agreement; of goods and services [syn: hire, charter, lease]

rent

  1. n. a regular payment by a tenant to a landlord for use of some property

  2. an opening made forcibly as by pulling apart; "there was a rip in his pants"; "she had snags in her stockings" [syn: rip, snag, split, tear]

  3. the return derived from cultivated land in excess of that derived from the poorest land cultivated under similar conditions [syn: economic rent]

  4. the act of rending or ripping or splitting something; "he gave the envelope a vigorous rip" [syn: rip, split]

rent

See rend

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

rent

"payment for use of property," mid-12c., a legal sense, originally "income, revenue" (late Old English), from Old French rente "payment due; profit, income," from Vulgar Latin *rendita, noun use of fem. past participle of rendere "to render" (see render (v.)).

rent

mid-15c., "to rent out property, grant possession and enjoyment of in exchange for a consideration paid," from Old French renter "pay dues to," or from rent (n.1). Related: Rented; renting. Earlier (mid-14c.) in the more general sense of "provide with revenue." Sense of "to take and hold in exchange for rent" is from 1520s. Intransitive sense of "be leased for rent" is from 1784. Prefix rent-a- first attested 1921, mainly of businesses that rented various makes of car (Rentacar is a trademark registered in U.S. 1924); extended to other "temporary" uses since 1961.

rent

"torn place," 1530s, noun use of Middle English renten "to tear, rend" (early 14c.), variant of renden (see rend (v.)).

Wiktionary

rent

Etymology 1 n. A payment made by a tenant at intervals in order to occupy a property. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To occupy premises in exchange for rent. 2 (context transitive English) To grant occupation in return for rent. 3 (context transitive English) To obtain or have temporary possession of an object (e.g. a movie) in exchange for money. 4 (context intransitive English) To be leased or let for rent. Etymology 2

n. 1 A tear or rip in some surface. 2 A division or schism. vb. (en-past of: rend)

Usage examples of "rent".

As to the advice you give me that if some honest person would pay me my rent, or at least a part of it, I should have no scruples about taking it because a little more, or a little less, would be of little importance .

This pleased rupert but then he had found out she was renting a small bedsit in Vauxhall, rammed to the ceiling with pottery turtles, leatherette footstools and flowery, applique table mats, where she would sneak off as if visiting a lover and would sit for hours, rocking backwards and forwards stroking a ceramic clown amidst a mountain of knick-knacks.

I draw from that money once a month, to pay for the rented rooms, the archival fees, the meals in restaurants.

They had arrived by rented coach, bidden to wait under the portico, and identified themselves as Inspector Edgars and three constables from Scotland Yard.

In the meane season Thrasillus not able to refraine any longer, before Charites had asswaged her dolor, before her troubled mind had pacified her fury, even in the middle of all her griefes, while she tare her haire and rent her garments, demanded her in marriage, and so without shame, he detected the secrets and unspeakeable deceipts of his heart.

Anyway, copious quantities of hydrogen gas were pouring from the shaft maw, coming from the rent where the unfortunate brown man had fallen into a ballonet and suffocated.

Mittin, besought her, the next morning, to demand all her Southampton bills, to add to them those for the rent and the stores of Higden, and then to transact the business with Mr.

He started to tell Bonner how he and his buddies were going to rent a car and drive to Pompeii and see the porn.

Mrs Mooney told me Alice brout some more money to look after me and for the rent.

Polly lived in a studio-style maisonette and had set the rent accordingly.

Pittsburgh on Wednesday evening she rented a car and drove to the hotel where the Mandrill Institute had reserved an apartment for her, until she could find her own place, Peter had said when she called him.

Claude Heath, the rising young composer, who recently married the beautiful Miss Charmian Mansfield, of Berkeley Square, has just rented and furnished elaborately a magnificent studio in Renwick Place, Chelsea.

Amid cheers that rent the welkin, responded to by answering cheers from a big muster of henchmen on the distant Cambrian and Caledonian hills, the mastodontic pleasureship slowly moved away saluted by a final floral tribute from the representatives of the fair sex who were present in large numbers while, as it proceeded down the river, escorted by a flotilla of barges, the flags of the Ballast office and Custom House were dipped in salute as were also those of the electrical power station at the Pigeonhouse and the Poolbeg Light.

Steam billowed as the sea was rent by sudden gouts of flame, leaving behind a measureless, bottomless hole.

In the room which he had rented in the city of Melos, he continued the task.