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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

have

I.auxiliary verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
As we have seen
As we have seen in chapter four, women’s pay is generally less than men’s.
As...had predicted
As Liz had predicted, the rumours were soon forgotten.
be bigger/smaller/worse etc than you had imagined
▪ The job interview proved to be much worse than I had imagined it would be.
be estimated to be/have/cost etc
▪ The tree is estimated to be at least 700 years old.
bear/have a resemblance to sb/sth
▪ People said he bore a striking resemblance to the President.
be/have yet to come (=used when something has not happened yet but will happen)
▪ The most exciting part is yet to come.
could have...pick of
▪ Sarah could have her pick of any university in the country.
demand to know/see/have etc sth
▪ I demand to know what’s going on.
describe sb/sth as (being/having) sth
▪ After the operation her condition was described as comfortable.
▪ The youth is described as being 18 to 19 years old.
do/have an MBA
do/play/have a gig
▪ The band are doing a gig in Sheffield on Nov 12.
eat/have a diet
▪ People in Mediterranean areas generally have a very good diet.
feel/have a sense of sth
▪ I felt a great sense of pride.
feel/have an urge
▪ I still sometimes feel an urge to have a cigarette.
feel/have/experience a sensation
▪ He felt a tingling sensation down his left side.
feel/show/have compassion
▪ Did he feel any compassion for the victim of his crime?
get/have a call (also receive a callformal)
▪ At 11 in the evening we got a call from the police.
get/have a chance to do sth
▪ I’d like a job in which I get the chance to travel.
get/have a fright
▪ I got an awful fright when I realised how much money I owed.
get/have a shock
▪ I got a shock when I saw how thin he had become.
get/have a surprise
▪ We got a surprise when we got home and found him waiting for us.
get/have a warm etc reception (also receive a warm etc receptionformal)
▪ As he came on, Rocky got a great reception from the crowd.
get/have an inquiry (=receive it)
▪ We’ve already had a lot of inquiries about membership of the new sports centre.
get/have hiccupsBrE,get/have the hiccups American English
▪ Don’t drink so fast – you’ll get hiccups.
get/have your wish (=get what you want)
▪ She wanted him to leave, and she got her wish.
get/have/receive treatment
▪ Two boys received treatment for gunshot wounds.
give sb/get/have a head start
▪ Give your children a head start by sending them to nursery school.
go for a pee/have a peeBrE,take a pee American Englishnot polite
▪ Have I got time to go for a pee before we leave?
go for/have/take a piss
▪ I need to have a piss.
had a barbecue
▪ We had a barbecue on the beach.
had a blast
▪ We had a blast at the fair.
had a brainstorm
▪ I must have had a brainstorm that afternoon.
had a clear-out
▪ I had a clear-out and got rid of a lot of old toys.
had a criminal record
▪ He already had a criminal record.
had a death wish
▪ Before I did the jump, people would ask if I had a death wish.
had a good cry
▪ She sat down and had a good cry.
had a good go (=tried hard)
▪ I had a good go at cleaning the silver.
had a high opinion of
▪ I’ve always had a high opinion of her work.
had a liking
▪ Jim and Keith had a liking and respect for each other.
had a lot in common with
▪ I found I had a lot in common with these people.
had a narrow escape
▪ A woman had a narrow escape yesterday when her car left the road.
had a natter
▪ We sat down and had a natter and a cup of tea.
had a run-in
▪ Michael got drunk and had a run-in with the police.
had a scratch
▪ He stretched and had a scratch.
had a senior moment
▪ I had a senior moment and just couldn’t think of his name.
had a special place in...heart
▪ Her second son had a special place in her heart.
had a sudden brainstorm
▪ Kirby had a sudden brainstorm.
had a weak spot for
▪ I’ve always had a weak spot for chocolate.
had a yen
▪ She’d always had a yen to write a book.
had a...crush on
▪ She had a huge crush on her geography teacher.
had a...hangover
▪ I had a terrible hangover the next day.
had all the hallmarks of
▪ The explosion had all the hallmarks of a terrorist attack.
had an inkling
▪ I had an inkling that she was pregnant.
had an orgasm
▪ women who have never had an orgasm
had a...yearning
▪ He had a deep yearning to return to his home town.
had better not (=it is not a good idea)
▪ You had better not tell Oliver .
had cancer
▪ She was told last year that she had cancer.
had carte blanche
▪ She had carte blanche to produce a film suitable for children.
had control over
▪ By the end of the year, the rebels had control over the northern territories.
had dealings with
▪ We’ve had dealings with him in the past.
had discussions
▪ We have had discussions about her legal situation.
had flu
▪ I couldn’t go because I had flu.
had gone by the book (=had obeyed all the rules)
▪ There was no doubt that the referee had gone by the book.
had it all worked out (=had made very careful plans)
▪ I had it all worked out.
had much to commend it (=was very good)
▪ McKellen’s performance had much to commend it .
had no illusions about
▪ She had no illusions about her physical attractiveness.
had nothing to offer
▪ He felt he had nothing to offer her that she wanted.
had on
▪ All he had on was a pair of tattered shorts.
had recourse to
▪ We may conclude that he never had recourse to this simple experiment.
had repercussions
▪ The collapse of the company had repercussions for the whole industry.
had scarcely...when
▪ He had scarcely sat down when there was a knock at the door.
had sex
▪ They had sex in the back seat of his car.
had something on...mind
▪ He looked as though he had something on his mind.
had supper
▪ We had supper in a small Italian place.
had the consolation of
▪ He had the consolation of knowing that he couldn’t have done any better.
had the desired effect
▪ His remarks had the desired effect.
had the dubious honor
▪ The Stephensons had the dubious honor of being the 100th family to lose their home in the fire.
had the foresight
▪ Luckily I’d had the foresight to get in plenty of food.
had the forethought
▪ No one had the forethought to bring a map.
had the nous
▪ At least she had the nous to ring.
had the opposite effect
▪ I thought the medicine would make him sleep, but it had the opposite effect.
had the run of
▪ We had the run of the house for the afternoon.
had the temerity to
▪ He actually had the temerity to tell her to lose weight.
had to be seen to be believed (=you would not believe it if you did not see it yourself)
▪ The accommodation was so awful it had to be seen to be believed.
had to content...with
▪ Mr Lal has been asking for more responsibility, but has had to content himself with a minor managerial post.
had...brief fling
▪ They had a brief fling a few years ago.
had...brief flirtation
▪ She had a brief flirtation with Tim.
had...concussion
▪ I had a concussion and a lot of scrapes and bruises.
had...conversation
▪ They had a short conversation in German and seemed to be disagreeing about something.
had...deep affection
▪ Bart had a deep affection for the old man.
had...fall (=fell to the ground)
▪ Mrs Evans had a fall and broke her leg.
had...girlfriend
▪ He’s never had a girlfriend.
had...gumption
▪ At least she had the gumption to phone me.
had...in a headlock
▪ His opponent had him in a headlock.
had...in fits (=made us laugh a lot)
▪ Carl had us all in fits with his stories.
had...in spades
▪ Beauty, intelligence, wealth – my mother had all of them in spades.
had...kip
▪ I’ve only had an hour’s kip.
had...marriage blessed
▪ The couple later had their marriage blessed in their local parish church.
had...miscarriages
▪ She had two miscarriages before she had her first child.
had...monopoly
▪ For years Bell Telephone had a monopoly on telephone services in the US.
had...nibble
▪ We’ve had the house on the market for a month and not even had a nibble yet.
had...pegged as
▪ I’d had him pegged as a troublemaker.
had...preconceptions
▪ I had the same preconceptions about life in South Africa that many people have.
had...premonition
▪ When Anne didn’t arrive, Paul had a premonition that she was in danger.
had...privilege
▪ I had the great privilege to play for Yorkshire.
had...puncture
▪ She was cycling home when she had a puncture.
had...relapse
▪ She had a relapse and died soon after.
had...ripple effect
▪ The increase had a ripple effect through the whole financial market.
had...scruples
▪ He had no scruples about selling faulty goods to people.
had...seizure
▪ He had an epileptic seizure.
had...seniority
▪ I had 15 years seniority, and they couldn’t fire me.
had...set-to
▪ Tom and I had a bit of a set-to last night.
had...sinking feeling
▪ I had a sinking feeling inside as I realized I was going to fail yet again.
had...slant
▪ The article had an anti-union slant.
had...snowball fight
▪ We had a massive snowball fight.
had...soak
▪ I had a good long soak in the bath.
had...thrust upon
▪ He had marriage thrust upon him.
had...tiff
▪ Dave’s had a tiff with his girlfriend.
had...to contend with
▪ The rescue team also had bad weather conditions to contend with.
had...under control
▪ Firefighters had the blaze under control by 9:44 p.m.
has a bright future
▪ I’m sure the company has a bright future now.
has a fever
▪ Andy has a fever and won’t be coming into work today.
has a flair for
▪ Jo has a flair for languages.
has a genius for
▪ That woman has a genius for organization.
has a vocation
▪ Jan has a vocation for teaching.
has control of
▪ She’s a good teacher who has control of her class.
has flashbacks
▪ Eaton still has flashbacks of the crash.
has fleas
▪ Are you sure the dog has fleas?
has given...blessing to
▪ The Defense Department has given its blessing to the scheme.
has its roots in
▪ Jazz has its roots in the folk songs of the southern states of the US.
has jurisdiction
▪ The committee has jurisdiction over all tax measures.
has much to offer
▪ Canada has much to offer in terms of location and climate.
has right of way
▪ I never know who has right of way at this junction.
has something to do with (=is related to them in some way)
▪ I don’t know what he does exactly, but I know it has something to do with computers .
has style
▪ You may not like her, but she certainly has style.
has the final say (=has the right to make the final decision about something)
▪ The chairman has the final say.
has title
▪ He has title to the land.
has...control of
▪ The Johnson family has effective control of the company, owning almost 60% of the shares.
has...drive
▪ Brian has got tremendous drive.
has...fetish
▪ Sue has a real fetish about keeping everything tidy.
has...give
▪ The rope has quite a bit of give in it.
has...high profile
▪ The star has a high profile in Britain.
has...on the go
▪ He has at least two other projects on the go.
has...phobia
▪ Owen has a phobia about snakes.
has...qualms about
▪ The manager has no qualms about dropping players who do not perform well.
has...resonance
▪ a tradition that has little resonance in the 21st century
has...snob appeal
▪ That kind of car has real snob appeal.
has...stashed away
▪ He has money stashed away in the Bahamas.
has...ulterior motives
▪ He’s just being nice. I don’t think he has any ulterior motives.
has...vested interest
▪ Since he owns the strip of land, Cook has a vested interest in the project being approved.
have ... hair
▪ She has beautiful blonde hair.
have ... tastes
▪ Josh and I have the same tastes.
have a ... appearance
▪ The young girl had a pleasing appearance.
have a baby/give birth to a baby
▪ She had the baby at home.
▪ Sue gave birth to a baby boy.
have a background (in sth)
▪ We are looking for someone who has a background in science.
have a bad night (=not sleep well, especially when you are ill)
▪ I had a bad night last night.
have a base
▪ Permanent staff have a better base from which to plan their career development.
have a basis
▪ Our constitution has a democratic basis.
have a bathespecially BrE, take a bath especially AmE
▪ She usually has a bath in the evening.
have a belief
▪ You must always have the belief that you can succeed.
have a bet
▪ Are you going to have a bet on the race?
have a bond
▪ Twins often have a very close bond.
have a budget
▪ Hospital caterers have a budget of about £20 per person per week.
have a bug
▪ Two of us had a nasty bug on holiday.
have a capacity of 5/10 etc litres
▪ It’s a small microwave which has a capacity of 0.6 cubic feet.
have a career
▪ All my sons had careers in education.
have a cast
▪ The play had a cast of almost unknown actors.
have a cat
▪ We always had a cat when I was young.
have a celebration
▪ The villagers were having a celebration of some kind.
have a characteristic (also possess a characteristicformal)
▪ He has all the characteristics of a great husband.
have a chat
▪ We were just having a chat.
have a checkBritish English
▪ Always have a final check to make sure you’ve got your ticket and passport.
have a cheerful/sunny etc disposition (=have a happy character)
have a choice
▪ Students have a choice between German and Spanish.
have a circle of friends/acquaintances etc
▪ She was beautiful and had a wide circle of admirers.
have a classespecially AmE (= as a student or teacher)
▪ What classes do you have this morning?
have a clear/guilty etc conscience
▪ Does he have a guilty conscience about his role in the crime?
have a code
▪ Most professional organizations have a code of ethics.
have a coffee
▪ She stopped in a café to have a quick coffee.
have a collection
▪ She has an extensive collection of Chinese vases.
have a column (=write one)
▪ Lynch had a weekly column in a Sydney newspaper.
have a comment (=want to make a comment)
▪ Do you have any comments on that, David?
have a complaint (=want to complain about something)
▪ Please let us know if you have any complaints about our service.
have a concept of sth
▪ Animals have no concept of their own mortality.
have a condition
▪ The baby has a rare skin condition.
have a confession (to make) (=used humorously when you want to admit to doing something)
▪ I have a confession to make – I’ve eaten all the chocolates.
have a connection (with/to sth)
▪ A lot of social problems have a direct connection to alcohol or drug use.
have a contract
▪ The company had a contract to build a new hotel there.
have a conviction for sth
▪ You must declare whether you have any convictions.
have a crack
▪ The competition’s open to anyone – why don’t you have a crack?
have a crash (also be involved in a crash) (= in a car)
▪ I’ve been nervous about driving since I had a crash last year.
have a cut on sth
▪ He had a cut on his forehead.
have a deadline
▪ It's easier to work hard if you have a deadline.
have a dealinformal (= have made or agreed on a deal)
▪ Do we have a deal?
have a debate
▪ I think we should have a public debate on this issue.
have a defect
▪ The old system had some serious defects.
have a deficit
▪ We had a trade deficit of more than $4 billion.
have a degree
▪ You will earn more if you have a college degree.
have a delivery
▪ We've just had a delivery of tiles from Italy.
have a desire
▪ Milly had a sudden strong desire to laugh.
have a difference of opinion (= two people disagree)
▪ He and Luke had a difference of opinion.
have a dig
▪ Here was a chance to have a dig at trade unionists.
have a dirty mindBritish English (= think about sex a lot)
have a disadvantage
▪ Cheap air travel has considerable environmental disadvantages.
have a disagreement
▪ The only disagreements we have are about money.
have a disease
▪ How long have you had the disease?
have a disorder
▪ The singer admitted she had an eating disorder.
have a dog (=keep one as a pet)
▪ We have one dog and two cats.
have a dream
▪ I had a dream about you last night.
have a dream/dreams
▪ I had dreams of becoming a doctor.
have a drink (=drink something, especially an alcoholic drink)
▪ Let’s go and have a drink.
have a duty to do sth
▪ Parents have a duty to make sure that their children receive an education.
have a feast
▪ We decided to have a feast to celebrate the victory.
have a fight
▪ I didn’t want to have a fight with him.
have a friend
▪ Suzie has plenty of friends.
have a gameBritish English
▪ They were having a game of pool.
have a gene
▪ Identical twins have the same genes.
have a go at
▪ On the tour, everyone can have a go at making a pot.
have a go on
▪ Can I have a go on your guitar?
have a go
▪ ‘I can’t open this drawer.’ ‘Here, let me have a go.’
have a goal
▪ She had one goal in life: to accumulate a huge fortune.
have a good time/day/weekend etc
▪ Did you have a good vacation?
have a good/bad etc reputation
▪ The law firm has an excellent reputation.
have a good/bad etc start
▪ We’ve had a disappointing start but we are hoping to improve.
have a good/bad/long etc day
▪ Simon looked as if he’d had a bad day at the office.
have a good/long/unusual etc menu
▪ The new restaurant on Fifth Street has an excellent menu.
have a good/nice etc birthday
▪ Did you have a nice birthday?
have a good/religious/tough etc upbringing
▪ He had a rather unsettled upbringing, moving with his father from town to town.
have a grievance (against sb)
▪ I had no grievance against him.
have a grip
▪ You need to have a good grip on your tennis racket.
have a guarantee
▪ All our boots have a one-year guarantee for being waterproof.
have a guessBritish English, take a guess AmE:
▪ Go on, have a guess at how much it cost.
▪ Take a guess. How many people do you think showed up?
have a habit (of doing sth)
▪ He has a habit of being late.
have a happy/unhappy etc childhood
▪ I wish I'd had a happy childhood like yours.
have a hard time doing sth (=be difficult for someone to do something)
▪ You’ll have a hard time proving that.
▪ I had a hard time persuading him to accept the offer.
have a hard time of it
▪ Vegetarians still often have a hard time of it when it comes to eating out.
have a hatred of sb/sth (=hate someone or something very much)
▪ Gang members have a hatred of the police.
have a head for heights (=not be afraid of heights)
have a headache (also have got a headachespoken)
▪ She’s not coming – she says she’s got a headache.
have a healthy/simple etc lifestyle
▪ We had very different lifestyles.
have a heart-to-heart with
▪ Why don’t you have a heart-to-heart with him and sort out your problems?
have a high regard for sb/sth
▪ I had the highest regard for him.
have a hunt around for sthBritish Englishinformal (= look for something)
▪ I’ll have a hunt around for it in my desk.
have a job
▪ Mark doesn’t have a job right now.
have a knack
▪ He seems to have a knack for getting people to agree with him.
have a laugh about/at/over sth (=laugh about something)
▪ The farmer had a good laugh at our attempts to catch the horse.
have a length of 1 metre/2 feet etc
▪ These leaves have a length of about 7 cm.
have a licence
▪ Café Metropole does not yet have a license to sell liquor.
have a lie down
▪ I’m going upstairs to have a lie down.
have a lie-in
▪ I always have a lie-in on a Sunday.
Have a listen
Have a listen to this new album!
have a long memory (=if you have a long memory, you remember things for a long time)
▪ He has a long memory for people who have let him down.
have a long/happy etc marriage
▪ They have a happy marriage.
Have a look
▪ I can’t find them anywhere. Have a look yourself.
have a lot of curiosity
▪ Bright children often have a lot of curiosity.
have a lot/too much to lose (=used to say that you could make your situation much worse)
▪ These youngsters know they have too much to lose by protesting against the system.
have a lucky escape
▪ We had a lucky escape when a tree crashed through the ceiling.
have a mandate
▪ In Venezuela, Chavez said he had a mandate for reform.
have a match (=be scheduled to play a match)
▪ Do we have a match on Sunday?
have a maximum
▪ Each submarine will have a maximum of 128 warheads.
have a meal (=eat a meal)
▪ We usually have our evening meal fairly early.
have a meaning
▪ The same word may have several different meanings.
have a meeting
▪ I had a long meeting with my manager.
have a melody
▪ All his songs have good melodies.
have a memory like a sieve (=forget things very easily)
▪ I'm sorry, I have a memory like a sieve. I forgot you were coming today!
have a minimum of sth
▪ Candidates should have a minimum of five years’ work experience.
have a miraculous escape (=be extremely lucky to escape)
▪ Ellie had miraculous escape after a firework exploded in her hand.
have a moment (=have a short time to use)
▪ Can you come and see me when you have a moment?
have a mortgage
▪ They have a mortgage on a small house in North London.
have a motive
▪ Who might have had a motive for killing him?
have a name (for sth)
▪ They have a name for good quality food.
have a name
▪ All their children have French names.
have a nappy on
▪ He was three and a half, so he didn't have a nappy on.
have a narrow escape (=to only just avoid danger or difficulties)
▪ The team had a narrow escape from relegation last season.
have a nervous breakdown
▪ My mother had a nervous breakdown after my father's death.
have a new/social etc dimension
▪ Learning a language has an important cultural dimension.
have a nice/good day!spoken (= used when saying goodbye to someone in a friendly way)
▪ Bye Sam! Have a good day!
have a nice/pleasant etc stay
▪ We hope you have a pleasant stay.
have a niche
▪ She feels that she has her own niche in the company.
have a notion
▪ He didn’t have a clear notion of what he had to do.
have a pain
▪ I’ve got a terrible pain in my stomach.
have a part
▪ He had a small part in ‘Casino Royale'.
have a party
▪ We’re having a party on Saturday night.
have a passing/nodding acquaintance with sth (=have only slight knowledge or experience of something)
▪ He has a passing acquaintance with a lot of different subjects.
have a passion for sth
▪ She had a passion for music.
have a permit
▪ Do you have a resident's parking permit?
have a perspective
▪ Everyone seems to have a different perspective on the issue.
have a pet
▪ Do you have any pets?
have a picnic
▪ They were having a picnic on the beach.
have a picture
▪ I've never been there, but I have a picture of it in my mind.
have a plan
▪ Don’t worry – I have a plan.
have a point (=have made a good point)
▪ Maybe she has a point.
have a preference
▪ Do you have a preference for red or white wine?
have a problem
▪ We saw water rushing in and realised we had a serious problem.
have a problem
▪ He's always had a weight problem.
have a purpose
▪ A meeting should have a clear purpose.
have a qualification (also hold a qualificationformal)
▪ You don't need to have any qualifications for this job.
have a quarrel
▪ We had a terrible quarrel last night.
have a question (=want to ask a question)
▪ I just have one question: is the treatment effective?
have a race
▪ Let’s have a race!
have a reason
▪ We had many reasons to celebrate.
have a relationship
▪ We’ve always had a good relationship with our neighbours.
have a report (=receive one)
▪ The police say they had reports of a gang shooting in East London.
have a reservation
▪ We have a reservation for seven o'clock.
have a result (=cause something to happen)
▪ The campaign did have some positive results.
have a right
▪ People have a right to know the truth.
have a ring on
▪ They saw I didn’t have a wedding ring on.
have a role
▪ His son has a small role in the series.
have a row
▪ Have you and Peter had a row?
Have a rummage
Have a rummage in my jewellery box and see if you can find something you like.
have a scar
▪ He had a small white scar under his left eye.
have a seat on the board
▪ He gave up his seat on the board after 40 years' service.
have a seat
▪ We had really good seats, just in front of the stage.
have a secret
▪ We have no secrets from each other.
have a sense of sth
▪ You have to have a good sense of hearing to play the violin.
have a sense of sth
▪ She seems to have a great sense of the right thing to say.
have a session
▪ We had a special training session yesterday.
have a shaveBritish English
▪ I’ll just have a shave before we go.
have a short memory (=if you have a short memory, you soon forget things)
▪ Voters have short memories.
have a showerespecially BrE
▪ Mary loves having a hot shower after she’s been swimming.
have a sixth sense
▪ He seemed to have a sixth sense for knowing when his brother was in trouble.
have a skill
▪ He didn’t have the right skills for the job.
have a sleepBritish English (= sleep for a short while)
▪ Are you going to have a sleep after lunch today?
have a smile on your face/lips
▪ They all had broad smiles on their faces.
have a stinkerBritish English (= play badly)
▪ In the last game he had a stinker.
have a stranglehold
▪ Just a few firms have a stranglehold on the market for this software.
have a strong/sweet etc smell
▪ The flowers had a lovely sweet smell.
have a suggestion
▪ I have a suggestion for you.
have a surprise for sb (=be planning to give someone a surprise)
▪ I think Jenny might have a surprise for you.
have a suspicion
▪ I have a suspicion that he forgot to post the letter.
have a sweet/strange etc taste
▪ The soup had a funny taste.
have a sweet/strong etc flavour
▪ These biscuits have a very distinctive flavour.
have a talk
▪ I must have a talk with Frank before I leave.
have a taste for sth (=like something)
▪ She certainly has a taste for adventure.
have a temper
▪ Grandad had quite a temper, so we usually tried to keep out of his way.
have a test (also undergo a testformal) (= be tested)
▪ She had to have a blood test.
have a thought
▪ I just had a funny thought.
have a tooth outBritish English, have a tooth pulled American English (= have a tooth removed)
▪ He's gone to the dentist to have a tooth out.
have a tough time (of it) (=face a lot of difficult problems)
▪ The family has had a tough time of it these last few months.
have a try
▪ I decided to have one last try.
have a vacancy
▪ We have no vacancies for cleaners at present.
have a vested right to
▪ Shareholders have a vested right to 10% per annum.
have a vocabulary
▪ By eighteen months of age, the girl had a vocabulary of around 300 words.
have a warped sense of humour (=think strange and unpleasant things are funny)
▪ You really have a warped sense of humour .
have a way
▪ Do you have any way of finding out if that is true?
have a website
▪ Does the company have its own website?
have a word
▪ It is not true that Eskimos have more than forty words for snow.
have access
▪ Cats should always have access to fresh, clean water.
have a/have no memory of sth (=remember/not remember something)
▪ She had no memory of the accident.
have a/have no memory of sth (=remember/not remember something)
▪ She had no memory of the accident.
have an accent
▪ The man had a Spanish accent.
have an accident
▪ I had an accident on my way to work.
have an advantage (also enjoy an advantageformal)
▪ Our parents didn’t have all the advantages that we have.
▪ Western countries enjoyed considerable advantages in terms of technology.
have an agenda
▪ Brown has an agenda for the university’s future.
have an agreement
▪ They have an agreement that all workers should be union members.
have an aim
▪ His trip to Milan, his third in two weeks, had a precise aim.
have an air of authorityapproving (= look like you have authority, in a way that makes people obey you)
▪ The commander had an unmistakeable air of authority.
have an allergy
▪ I have an allergy to cats.
have an alternative
▪ You have a few alternatives to choose from.
have an ambition
▪ He had an ambition to be a top cello player.
have an answer
▪ Doctors are supposed to have all the answers.
have an appetite
▪ There’s lots of food – I hope you have a good appetite.
have an appointment
▪ She has an appointment with the dentist at 5 o'clock.
have an approach
▪ In the US they have a somewhat different approach.
have an argument
▪ I could hear my parents having an argument downstairs.
have an audience
▪ The programme has a massive audience, ranging from children to grandparents.
have an easy time of it
▪ You can have an easy time of it now that the kids have all left home.
have an education
▪ The women have had little education.
have an effect on sth/sb
▪ Eating junk food will eventually have an effect on your health.
have an engagement
▪ I don't have any engagements tomorrow.
have an equivalent
▪ This institution has no equivalent in any other European country.
have an even chance
▪ I think we have an even chance of winning.
have an examination
▪ He was examined by Dr Bower yesterday and will have another examination today.
have an excuse
▪ Companies have no excuse for breaking the law.
have an exhibition
▪ The college is having an exhibition of the students’ work in April.
have an explanation
▪ Does the hospital have any explanation for why he died?
have an expression on your face
▪ He had a very serious expression on his face.
have an expression
▪ His face had a puzzled expression.
have an idea
▪ I’ve had an idea. Why don’t we walk into town?
have an illness
▪ When did you first find out that you had the illness?
have an image
▪ The product has a rather downmarket image.
have (an) imagination
▪ Her poems show that she has a lot of imagination.
have an impact
▪ New technology has had a massive impact on our lives.
have an incentive
▪ Companies have an incentive to maximize efficiency.
have an income (also receive an incomeformal)
▪ We have an income of over $100,000 a year.
have an infection
▪ I think you’ve got an infection, so you need to rest.
have an influence on sb/sth
▪ His works have had an influence on many modern writers.
have an injection
▪ He had to have an injection to relieve the pain.
have an injury
▪ Tom was OK, and had just a few minor injuries.
have an inspiration (=suddenly have an idea)
▪ He had an inspiration while he was taking a walk in the countryside.
have an interest in sth
▪ Steve has a keen interest in bird-watching.
have an interview
▪ She has an interview next week for a teaching job in Paris.
have an invitation
▪ The following week, I had an invitation to give a talk in Cambridge.
have an objection
▪ Does anyone have any objections to the proposal?
have an objective
▪ Our main objective is to reduce road accidents.
have an obligation
▪ Citizens have an obligation to obey the law.
have an obsession
▪ The poet seems to have an obsession with death.
have an occupation
▪ The people in the region have a variety of occupations.
have an operation (also undergo an operationformal)
▪ Harris had a hip operation in October.
▪ She has undergone 50 operations since birth.
have an option
▪ At the moment, children have the option of leaving school at 16.
▪ In a situation like this, you have two options.
have an outcome
▪ The meeting had a very satisfactory outcome.
have an outlook
▪ He has quite a conventional outlook.
have an overview
▪ We need someone who will have an overview of the whole system.
have an understanding
▪ The authorities don’t seem to have a clear understanding of the problem.
have any pretensions
▪ The group don’t have any pretensions to be pop stars.
have a...read
▪ I sat down to have a nice quiet read.
have a...to catch
▪ I have to hurry – I have a bus to catch.
have authority
▪ Teachers should have the authority to discipline their students.
▪ He has no authority over us anymore.
have a...wait
▪ They’ll have a long wait.
have a...weakness for
▪ I have a real weakness for fashionable clothes.
have been to (=have travelled to)
▪ I have been to Germany several times.
have brains
▪ You should have more brains than to smoke.
have broad appeal (=be attractive to many different types of people)
▪ Their music has a very broad appeal.
have cause to complain
▪ Patients sometimes have cause to complain about the hospital treatment they receive.
have charm
▪ Richard was clever and he had a lot of charm.
have command
▪ Athens had command of the oceans.
have common sense
▪ Some people are brilliant thinkers, but they have no common sense.
have competence
▪ Older people often feel that they don't have any competence with computers.
have confidence in sb/sth
▪ The people no longer have any confidence in their government.
have confidence
▪ Young teenagers often don’t have a lot of confidence.
have consequences
▪ Taking financial risks can have serious consequences.
have contact with sb
▪ I haven’t had any contact with her for at least two years.
have contempt for sb/sth (also feel contempt for sb/sth)
▪ He had a deep contempt for authority.
have courage
▪ She certainly has a lot of courage.
have curry
▪ For dinner we had curry and rice.
have custody of sb
▪ Anna has custody of their six-year-old daughter.
have debts
▪ Fortunately, I have no debts.
have determination
▪ To become a professional musician, you need to have a lot of determination.
have difficulties
▪ By the age of eight, Robbie was having difficulties at school.
have doubts
▪ Scientists still have some doubts about the theory.
have employees
▪ The Birmingham-based company has over 200 employees.
have energy
▪ He always has plenty of energy!
have enough/plenty etc to eat
▪ Have you had enough to eat?
have enthusiasm
▪ He never had much enthusiasm for work.
have ever had the misfortune to do/of doing (=used for emphasizing how bad something is)
▪ He was the most arrogant man I'd ever had the misfortune of meeting.
have ever had the misfortune to do/of doing (=used for emphasizing how bad something is)
▪ He was the most arrogant man I'd ever had the misfortune of meeting.
have every faith in sb/sth (=trust them completely)
▪ We have every faith in your ability to solve the problem.
have every sympathy for sb (=feel very sorry for someone - often used when you have had a similar experience yourself)
▪ I have every sympathy for people who find it hard to give up smoking.
have every/complete/absolute confidence in sb/sth
▪ A manager must be able to have complete confidence in his staff.
have evidence
▪ Do the police have any evidence against him?
have expectations (also hold expectationsformal)
▪ Many migrant workers had high expectations when they arrived, but not any more.
have experience
▪ Applicants must have experience of working with children.
have expertise
▪ Each scientist had expertise in either mammals, insects, birds, or plants.
have faith
▪ The public no longer has faith in the government’s policies.
have fantasies about
▪ I used to have fantasies about living in Paris with an artist.
have first dibs on
▪ Freshmen have first dibs on dormitory rooms.
have fits
▪ She used to have fits as a baby.
have food
▪ The family hadn’t had any food for days.
have fun
▪ Did you have fun at the party?
have (good) reason to complain
▪ We felt we had good reason to complain about the food at the hotel.
have good/bad etc hearing
▪ Dogs have excellent hearing.
have good/bad etc weather
▪ We have had lovely weather all week.
have good/bad luck
▪ I’ve had a bit of bad luck.
have good/bad manners
▪ All their children have such good manners.
have good/quick/slow reflexes
▪ A tennis player needs to have very quick reflexes.
have (got) a cold
▪ She’s staying at home today because she’s got a cold.
have (got) a cough
▪ I’ve had a cough for weeks now.
have great/deep/a lot of etc admiration
▪ She always had great admiration for people who could speak so many languages.
have guilt
▪ I had a lot of guilt about what had happened.
have had one too many (=have drunk too much alcohol)
have had one too many (=have drunk too much alcohol)
have hassle (=experience problems)
▪ If we book now, we won’t have the hassle of picking up the tickets at the box office.
have heating
▪ The house didn't have any heating when we moved in.
have high hopes/expectations
▪ Like many young actors, I had high hopes when I first started out.
have high/low status (also enjoy high/low status)
▪ Here, old people are respected and have high social status.
have hold of sth (=be holding something)
▪ Nathan had hold of her hand again.
have hope
▪ The situation looked bad, but we still had hope that things would get better soon.
have hystericsBritish English (= be extremely upset or angry)
▪ Mum’d have hysterics if she knew what you’d done.
have implications
▪ This is an environmental disaster which will have implications for more than one country.
have importance
▪ This is an issue that has importance for all of us.
have information
▪ Do you have any information about coach trips to Oxford?
have insurance (=have an insurance policy)
▪ Do you have insurance on your yacht?
have its merits (=have some good qualities)
▪ Each idea has its merits.
have its origin in sth (=begin to exist)
▪ The ceremony has its origins in medieval times.
have lessons
▪ I have swimming lessons on Friday.
have liability
▪ The parents of these children may have some liability.
have limitations
▪ The system does have its limitations.
have little to eat (=not have enough food)
▪ The refugees had very little to eat and no clean water.
have little/no incentive to do sth
▪ Poor farmers have little incentive to grow crops for export.
have little/no patience with sb
▪ I'm afraid I have little patience with bureaucrats and their official rules.
have little/no reason to complain
▪ The school is good and parents have little reason to complain.
have lunch
▪ Have you had lunch?
have make-up on (=be wearing make-up)
▪ She had no make-up on.
have mastery of sth
▪ She has complete mastery of her instrument.
have meat in it (=contain meat)
▪ Does this stew have meat in it?
have mercy (on sb) (=act in a kind or forgiving way - often used to express a hope or prayer)
▪ ‘God have mercy on me!’ Miss Barton cried.
have merit
▪ Both suggestions had some merit.
have misgivings
▪ I had some misgivings about her marriage. She was very young.
have mixed feelings (=have both positive and negative feelings)
▪ Her parents had mixed feelings about the marriage.
have money
▪ I didn’t have enough money to pay for it.
have more/less luck
▪ I hope you have more luck in the next competition.
have much in common
▪ The two games have much in common.
have neat/small etc handwriting
▪ Yu Yin has tiny handwriting.
have no basis in fact (=be not true)
▪ Many of these rumours have no basis in fact.
have no choice (but to do sth)
▪ The men had no choice but to obey.
have no choice in the matter
▪ The village people had no choice in the matter.
have no desire to do sth (=used to emphasize that you do not want to do something)
▪ It was raining outside and I had no desire to go out.
have no fear of sth
▪ He had no fear of death.
have no interest in sth
▪ Andy had no interest in politics.
have no luck (also not have much/any luck) (= not be lucky or successful)
▪ I’d been looking for a job for weeks, but had had no luck.
have no manners (=regularly not behave politely)
▪ He has no manners and he eats like a pig.
have no recollection (of sth) (=not remember)
▪ I have no recollection of how I found my way there in the dark.
have no regard for sth
▪ Some motorists have no regard for other road users.
have no trouble
▪ We had no trouble finding her house.
have no/any/some means of doing sth
▪ There was no path, and they had no means of knowing where they were.
have no/every intention of doing sth
▪ I have no intention of retiring just yet.
have no/little alternative (but to do sth)
▪ He had no alternative but to resign.
have no/little doubt
▪ I have no doubt that you are right.
have no/little option but to do sth (=have no other choice than to do something)
▪ I had no option but to fire him.
have nostalgia
▪ The immigrants I spoke to often had an intense nostalgia for their homeland.
have nothing better to do
▪ Have you got nothing better to do than sit there playing that silly game?
have nothing but admiration for sb (=have a lot of admiration for someone)
▪ I have nothing but admiration for his work.
have nothing but praise for sb/sth (=praise them a lot, especially when they have had to deal with a difficult situation)
▪ Passengers had nothing but praise for the pilot.
have nothing to lose but your pride/reputation etc
▪ The working class has nothing to lose but its chains.disadvantages, restrictions etc.
(have) one for the road (=have one last alcoholic drink before you leave a place)
have opportunity
▪ I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to travel.
have orders to do sth
▪ The soldiers had orders to shoot anyone on the streets after 10 o'clock.
have originality
▪ This book does not have the originality and power of his first novel.
have permission to do sth
▪ They did not have permission to build on the land.
have phone sex
▪ She claimed the relationship consisted mainly of him calling her up to have phone sex.
have plans
▪ I have no plans to retire yet.
have potential
▪ When he saw I had some potential, he gave me extra coaching.
have power
▪ People who have power never seem to use it to help others.
have principles
▪ I may have no money and no power but I have principles.
have priority
▪ Couples may have to decide whose career has priority.
have proof
▪ The newspaper claimed it had proof that I worked for the CIA.
have regard to sth formal:
▪ The court must have particular regard to the factors listed in section 13.
have regrets
▪ I have absolutely no regrets.
have reservations
▪ I have reservations about her work.
have resources
▪ Do the police have the resources they need?
have respect for sb
▪ I have a lot of respect for my boss.
have respect for sb/sth
▪ These kids have no respect for authority.
have responsibility for (doing) sth
▪ The Council has responsibility for maintaining the streetlights.
have room
▪ My suitcase was so full I didn’t have room for anything else.
have room
▪ Children need to have room to develop their natural creativity.
have sb for/to dinner
▪ We're having a few friends round to dinner.
have sb’s consent
▪ He claimed to have the consent of the car’s owner.
have sb’s promise (=they have promised you something)
▪ ‘It’ll remain a secret?’ ‘Yes, you have my promise.’
have sex with
▪ She no longer wanted to have sex with him.
have significance
▪ A child's relationship to his parents has a lasting signficance for his future relationships.
have signs
▪ It had all the signs of a crime of passion.
have similarities (=be similar)
▪ The two towns have many similarities.
have some company (=not be alone)
▪ ‘Come in,’ she said, pleased to have some company.
have some knowledge of sth
▪ The book assumes that you already have some knowledge of physics.
have some news (for sb)
▪ I could tell by his face that he had some news.
have some/more etc practice (=do practice)
▪ I’m not a very good dancer. I haven’t had enough practice.
have some/no/little credibility
▪ By then the president had ceased to have any credibility.
have some/no/little say in sth
▪ The workers had no say in how the factory was run.
have something/anything/nothing to say
▪ He usually has something to say about just about everything.
have something/nothing to eat (=eat something/nothing)
▪ We’ll leave after we’ve had something to eat.
have staff (also employ staffformal)
▪ The hotel has 145 staff.
have sth for breakfast
▪ What do you usually have for breakfast?
have sth for dinner
▪ I thought we might have pasta for dinner tonight.
have sth for lunch
▪ I usually have sandwiches for lunch.
have sth in your possession (=have it)
▪ My father had in his possession a letter written by Winston Churchill.
have support
▪ The extreme right-wing parties don’t have much popular support.
have surgery
▪ Leslie had surgery on her toe last year.
have symptoms
▪ Many people with the disease have no symptoms.
have talent
▪ Greg has a real talent for drawing.
have the ability to do sth (also possess the ability to do sthformal)
▪ She has the ability to make people feel relaxed.
have the audacity to do sth
have the benefit of sth
▪ All the hotel rooms have the benefit of a balcony.
have the clout
▪ Few companies have the clout to handle such large deals.
have the courage to do sth
▪ I didn’t have the courage to say what I really thought.
have the decency to
▪ If they’re going to charge people a fee, they ought to at least have the decency to tell them in advance.
have the edge over sb/sth (=to be slightly better than someone or something else)
▪ We believe our products have the edge over the competition.
have the effect of doing sth
▪ The news had the effect of making everyone feel better.
have the freedom to do sth
▪ We have the freedom to travel nearly anywhere in the world.
have the giggles (=laugh in a way that is difficult to control)
▪ The girls had the giggles, and couldn’t stop laughing.
have the (good/bad) luck to do sth
▪ He had the good luck to meet a man who could help him.
have the heating on (=use the heating)
▪ It's getting colder, but we haven't had the heating on yet.
have the honourformal
▪ As a young man, he had the honour of meeting Winston Churchill.
have the instinct to do sth
▪ She had the instinct to see what made people unhappy.
have the know-how to
▪ those who have the know-how to exploit the technology to the fullest
have the lead
▪ He has a one-shot lead in the golf tournament.
have the misfortune to do sth/of doing sth
▪ Last year, he had the misfortune to be involved in a car crash.
have the nerve to do sth
▪ I just didn't have the nerve to tell them the truth.
have the patience to do sth
▪ He didn't have the patience to listen to another point of view.
have the right of way
▪ The law here says that pedestrians always have the right of way.
have the right to complain
▪ You have the right to complain if you’re not satisfied with the service you’re getting.
have the satisfaction of doing sth
▪ They have the satisfaction of knowing that the company needs them.
have the strength to do sth
▪ He didn't even have the strength to sit up.
have the strength to do sth
▪ This proved that he has the strength to cope with such a high-powered job.
have the task of doing sth
▪ He had the task of judging the competition.
have the unfortunate habit of doing sth (=do something that makes other people feel embarrassed or offended)
▪ Teenage girls have the unfortunate habit of laughing too loudly.
have the vote
▪ At that time black people did not yet have the vote.
have the will to do sth (=be determined enough to do it)
▪ Do you have the will to win?
have the...wherewithal
▪ Does Cath have the creative wherewithal to make it as a solo act?
have time to kill (=have time to do something unimportant while waiting for something)
▪ I still had some time to kill, so I thought I’d make a couple of phone calls.
have time (=have enough time to do something)
▪ I didn’t do it because I didn’t have time.
have to wing it
▪ We’ll just have to wing it.
have trouble sleeping (=to not sleep well)
▪ Why do so many elderly people have trouble sleeping?
have trouble
▪ He is having trouble getting his message across to the voters.
have trouble/difficulty breathing
▪ In high altitudes some people have trouble breathing.
have two weeks/six months etc to live
▪ He knows he’s only got a few months to live.
have what it takesinformal (= to have the qualities that are needed for success)
▪ Neil’s got what it takes to be a great footballer.
Have you ever been to (=have you ever travelled to)
Have you ever been to Japan?
Have you heard the one about
Have you heard the one about the chicken who tried to cross the road?
Have you no shame
▪ How could you do such a thing? Have you no shame?
Have you seen (=do you know where he is)
Have you seen Chris ?
have your doubts (=have some doubts)
▪ Everyone else thinks it’s a good idea, but I have my doubts.
have your ears pierced (=have a hole put into the skin, so that you can wear an earring)
▪ I had my ears pierced when I was quite young.
have your hair cut/done/permed (also get your hair cut etc) (= by a hairdresser)
▪ I need to get my hair cut.
have your own transport
▪ The supermarket offers a free bus service for customers who do not have their own transport.
have your reasons (=have a secret reason for doing something)
▪ ‘Why did he marry her?’ ‘He must have had his reasons.’
have your revenge
▪ One day I’ll have my revenge.
have your suspicions
▪ Many of us had our suspicions, but we couldn't prove anything.
have...abortion
▪ She decided to have an abortion.
have/achieve success
▪ China has had considerable success in conserving water since 1983.
have...ahead
▪ You have a long trip ahead of you.
have/bring/take sb/sth with you
▪ She had her husband with her.
▪ You’d better bring your passport with you.
have...caesarean
▪ She had to have a caesarean.
have/carry a headline
▪ The Times carried the headline ‘7.4 Earthquake hits Los Angeles.’
have...checkups
▪ It’s important to have regular checkups.
have/contain an error
▪ If the data contains errors, the results will be wrong.
have...control over
▪ Artists like to have some control over where their works are hung in a gallery.
have...crosses to bear
▪ I feel sorry for you, but we all have our crosses to bear.
have...doctored
▪ You should have your cat doctored.
have/eat breakfast
▪ Paul got up, washed and had breakfast.
have/eat dinner
▪ Why don't you come and have dinner with us?
have...faults
▪ I may have my faults, but ingratitude is not one of them.
have/feel an impulse to
▪ Rosa had an impulse to tell Henry the truth.
have/feel no compunction about (doing) sth
▪ He had no compunction about interfering in her private affairs.
have/feel sympathy for sb
▪ It’s hard not to feel sympathy for the losing team.
have/feel/show etc nothing but contempt
▪ The public should have nothing but contempt for bad journalism.
have/find a good word (to say)
▪ No one had a good word to say for her.
have/get a bad name
▪ The bar had a bad name and was avoided by all the locals.
have/get (a) cramp
▪ One of the swimmers got cramp and had to drop out of the race.
have/get a haircut
▪ I haven’t had a haircut for months!
have/get a migraine
▪ I won’t be coming this evening – I’ve got a migraine.
have/get a view of sth
▪ She had a clear view of the street from her window.
have/get an erection
have/get first pick (of sth)
▪ She always gets first pick of the videos.
have/get leave
▪ How much annual leave do you get?
have/get sb/sth sussed
▪ Don’t worry, I’ve got him sussed.
have/get sth down to a fine art (=do something very well)
▪ I’ve got the early morning routine down to a fine art.
have/get sth seen to
▪ You should get that tooth seen to by a dentist.
have/get the munchies
▪ Get me a packet of crisps – I have the munchies.
have/get time to do sth
▪ We never get time to do anything together.
have/get/receive a telephone call
▪ I had a telephone call from George this morning.
have...hair permed
▪ I’m going to have my hair permed.
have...handy
▪ Do you have a piece of paper handy?
have/hold a competition
▪ Each year the school holds a painting competition.
have/hold a contest
▪ My college holds an athletics contest once a year.
have/hold a festival
▪ Tucson had a film festival last month.
have/hold a grudge
▪ The police asked if anyone might have had a grudge against the victim.
have/hold a lease
▪ Who has the lease on the flat?
have/hold a majority
▪ The Democratic party has a majority in the Senate.
have/hold a passport
▪ I have a Canadian passport.
have/hold a reception
▪ The wedding reception will be held at The Grand Hotel.
have/hold a seat
▪ The Liberals now hold 292 seats in Parliament.
have/hold a view (=have an opinion)
▪ He has very left-wing views.
have/hold an election
▪ The government plans to hold an election in November.
have/hold an evening (=organize an event in the evening)
▪ The college is holding an open evening on May 6th for year 9 to 11 pupils.
have/hold an opinion
▪ Everyone seemed to have a different opinion.
▪ He holds strong opinions on these issues.
have/hold dominion over sb/sth
▪ The King held dominion over a vast area.
have/hold talks
▪ He called on the rebels to hold talks with the government.
have/hold/carry a gun
▪ I could see he was carrying a gun.
have/hold/own shares
▪ A lot of the employees own shares in the company.
have...itch
▪ Scratch my back – I have an itch.
have/keep etc your eyes glued to sth (=be watching something with all your attention)
▪ Ted sat with his eyes glued to the television.
have/keep sb in stitches (=make someone laugh)
▪ Her jokes had us all in stitches.
have/know sb’s address
▪ Do you know Helen’s address?
▪ No one seems to have his address.
have...leeway
▪ The government does not have much leeway in foreign policy.
have/make/take a stab at (doing) sth
▪ I’ll have one more stab at it.
have...massage
▪ Why don’t you have a massage?
have...monopoly on
▪ Teachers do not have a monopoly on educational debate.
have/owe a duty to sb
▪ A tenant owes a duty to the landlord to keep the house in reasonable condition.
have/own a business
▪ Nick owned a software business in Boston.
have/own a car
▪ Do you have a car?
have...privilege
▪ Today, we have the privilege of listening to two very unusual men.
have...propensity
▪ He seems to have a propensity for breaking things.
have...queries
▪ Give us a ring if you have any queries about the contract.
have...ramifications
▪ an agreement which was to have significant ramifications for British politics
have/receive a visit from sb
▪ I've just had a visit from Lou Stacey.
have/receive notice
▪ If I’d had more notice, I could have done a better job.
have/score a win
▪ We haven’t had a win for three games.
have...sensitivity
▪ Many children have a sensitivity to cow’s milk.
have/show a disposition to do sth
▪ Neither side shows the slightest disposition to compromise.
have...side effects
▪ These policy changes could have beneficial side effects for the whole economy.
have/spend Christmas
▪ No one wants to spend Christmas alone.
have/stand a chance (of sth) (=it is possible you will do it)
▪ I think you have a good chance of getting the job.
have/suffer a heart attack
have/suffer a reaction
▪ People who eat these products could have an allergic reaction.
have/suffer a stroke
▪ My father had a stroke.
have/take a break
▪ After two hours, she took a break and switched on the radio.
have/take a catnap
▪ Nomes slept badly, and had to take catnaps during the day.
have/take a holiday
▪ Teachers cannot take holidays during term time.
have/take a look around (also have/take a look round British English) (= look at all the things in a particular place)
▪ I have a special interest in old houses. Do you mind if I take a look around?
have/take a look (at sb/sth)
▪ Have you had a chance to take a look at my proposal yet?
have/take a look (at sb/sth)
▪ Let me have a look at that – I think it’s mine.
▪ Take a good look at the photo and see if you recognize anyone in it.
have/take a nap
▪ I took a nap after lunch.
have/take a rest
▪ I’m going upstairs to have a rest.
have/take a sauna
▪ I have a sauna and massage every week.
have/take a seat (=sit down)
▪ Take a seat, please.
have/take milk (=drink milk in your tea or coffee)
▪ Do you take milk in your coffee?
have/take/adopt an attitude
▪ Not everyone takes a positive attitude towards modern art.
have/throw a tantrum
▪ She throws a tantrum when she can’t have the toy she wants.
have...to support
▪ I have a wife and two children to support.
have...tonsils out (=have them removed)
▪ If you keep getting throat infections you might have to have your tonsils out .
have...wash
▪ I’ll just have a quick wash before we go out.
having a roll
▪ a young horse having a roll in the field
having an off day
▪ Brian never usually loses his temper – he must be having an off day.
having an open house
▪ We’re having an open house Sunday, noon to 5 pm.
having...delivered
▪ I’m having some flowers delivered for her birthday.
having...serviced
▪ I’m having the car serviced next week.
having...sulk
▪ She’s having a sulk.
hold/have a stake in sth
▪ He holds a 51% stake in the firm.
hold/have values
▪ People brought up in different times hold different social values.
I have a horrible feeling that
I have a horrible feeling that we’re going to miss the plane.
I (have to/must) confess (=used when admitting something you feel slightly embarrassed about)
▪ I must confess I don’t visit my parents as often as I should.
if I had known/if I’d have known
▪ I wouldn’t have come if I’d known you were so busy.
if I had known/if I’d have known
▪ I wouldn’t have come if I’d known you were so busy.
It had...slipped...mind that
It had completely slipped her mind that Dave still had a key to the house.
It has been suggested that
It has been suggested that the manager will resign if any more players are sold.
it is comforting to think/have/know etc
▪ It’s comforting to know I can call my parents any time.
I’ll have to see (=used when you cannot make a decision immediately)
▪ ‘How long can you stay?’ ‘I’ll have to see. It depends .’
keep/have your wits about you (=be ready to think quickly and do what is necessary in a difficult situation)
lack ambition/have no ambition
▪ Many of the students lack ambition.
legend has it that (=says that)
▪ Legend has it that Rhodes was home to the sun god Helios.
Let’s have a bit of hush
Let’s have a bit of hush, please, gentlemen.
might have known (=I am annoyed but not surprised)
▪ I might have known you would take that attitude.
must have dreamt it
▪ I was sure I posted the letter but I must have dreamt it.
must obey/have to obey
▪ She felt she had to obey her father, even though she thought he was wrong.
myth has it that ... (=there is a myth that)
▪ Myth had it that Mrs Thatcher only needed four hours sleep a night.
never had/did/was etc
▪ Never had she been so confused.
not have the faintest/foggiest notion (=not know or understand something at all)
▪ He had not the foggiest notion how far he might have to walk.
own/have a farm
▪ The family owned a small farm in Suffolk.
play/have a role
▪ He played a prominent role in the company’s success.
receive/get/have coverage
▪ The exhibition has received extensive coverage in the press.
receive/have/undergo training
▪ A small group would receive intensive training, and then would train others.
rumour has it (=it is being said)
▪ Rumour has it that they plan to get married.
sb has a sharp tongue (=they speak in a very disapproving way which often upsets people)
sb has an attitude problem (=someone is not helpful or pleasant to be with)
▪ Some of the male students have a real attitude problem.
sb has to admit sth
▪ In the end, he had to admit I was right.
sb/sth has never been known to do sth (=used to say that something is strange because it has never happened before)
▪ Max had never been known to leave home without telling anyone.
should have known
▪ I should have known it wouldn’t be easy.
sth has lost a button
▪ His favourite shirt had lost a button.
sth has/contains calories
▪ These yoghurts have approximately 90 calories per pot.
take/go for/have a wander
▪ I had a bit of a wander round the shops.
take/have a bite (of sth/out of sth)
▪ She picked up the sandwich and took a bite.
▪ Can I have a bite of your apple?
take/have a day off
▪ I’m taking a few days off before the wedding.
take/have a dip
▪ Let’s take a dip in the lake.
take/have a ride
▪ Visitors can take a ride on a steam train.
take/have a siesta
▪ The stores all close after lunch when everyone takes a siesta.
take/have a vacation
▪ We usually take a vacation once a year.
take/have a vote (on sth)
▪ Unless anyone has anything to add, we’ll take a vote.
▪ Let’s have a vote on it.
take/have a walk
▪ She took a walk through the town.
take/have pity (on sb) (=feel sorry for someone and treat them with sympathy)
▪ He was expecting a prison sentence but the judge took pity on him.
the ayes have it (=used to say that most people in a meeting have voted in favour of something)
the groundwork has...been done
▪ Much of the groundwork has already been done.
the thought has (never) crossed my mind (=used to tell someone you have thought of the thing they are suggesting, or have never thought of it)
there has been a misunderstanding
▪ There’s been a misunderstanding about what I meant.
Things have come to a pretty pass
Things have come to a pretty pass, if you can’t say what you think without causing a fight.
time flies when you’re having fun
▪ ‘Is it midnight already?’ ‘Well, you know what they say – time flies when you’re having fun!’
what sb had imagined (=what someone thought something would be like, before they saw it or experienced it)
▪ The office was not what he had imagined.
what...had in mind
▪ It was a nice house, but it wasn’t quite what we had in mind.
would have none of it
▪ We offered to pay our half of the cost but Charles would have none of it.
you have my sympathy (=used when saying that you feel sorry for someone)
▪ It must be difficult – you have my sympathy.
you should have seen sb’s face (=used to say that someone was very angry, surprised etc)
▪ You should have seen his face when I told him that I was resigning.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(I) must dash/(I) have to dash
(have a) late/early night
(have) a mountain to climb
(have) egg on your face
▪ If we think they are easy meat we will end up with egg on our faces.
▪ Meanwhile, Hutcheson observed that in 1995 all the chip forecasters had varying degrees of egg on their face.
▪ People like me, who believed the firing squad had been assembled, were left with egg on our faces.
(have) patience
▪ First, be kind to yourself, so you will have patience.
▪ You have to have patience on the defensive end.
(have) sb's blood on your hands
▪ But I already have too much blood on my hands.
▪ Dad with blood on his hands.
▪ He hated to see her with blood on her hands.
▪ I want him to know he has my son's blood on his hands.
▪ Republicans spent eight years trying to prove President Clinton had blood on his hands.
▪ There's blood on my hands, mine or hers I don't know.
▪ There was blood on his hands and I thought he'd had an accident.
(have/drop) a word in sb's ear
▪ A word in the ear of the Weatherfield constabulary.
▪ His resolve ends when again he wakes at dawn with prophetic words in his ears.
▪ If I were you I'd drop a quiet word in her ear before it's too late.
▪ Mixed blessings' A word in your ear.
... and what have you
▪ The shelves were crammed with books, documents, and what have you.
Do you have a problem with that?
▪ "You're going to wear that dress?" "Do you have a problem with that?"
Elvis/sb/sth has left the building
Houston, we have a problem
I could have wept
▪ Without knowing what he'd got. I could have wept thinking what I'd missed.
I have it on good authority
▪ I have it on good authority that the school board wants to fire the principal.
I might have known/guessed etc
▪ All those years I might have known her!
▪ Although I might have known you'd arrive just as drinks were being ordered!
▪ Dear little Papa, as I might have known!
▪ If you'd had a big fat bottom I might have guessed.
▪ It was nothing I might have guessed.
▪ Of course, I might have known that you'd have some clever way of dealing with everything, though.
▪ Ooh! I might have known it!
▪ Some years before, I might have guessed Bond's enigmatic presence in the scene.
I nearly died/I could have died
I should have thought ...
▪ And marriage, I should have thought, is a false step you must have been well warned against.
▪ Any leader, I should have thought, would have demanded loyalty and support from a vice-president as a basic minimum.
▪ It's very important to me - and, I should have thought, to you too.
▪ She's a pretty child, but hardly his intellectual level, I should have thought.
▪ That is rather obvious, I should have thought.
▪ The royal crest is used on the front of the annual report, which I should have thought was improper.
▪ The scent of the tea as I poured it ... I should have thought.
▪ This seems an odd argument for smoking to me and, I should have thought, to smokers, too.
I'll have sb's guts for garters
I/we don't have all day
▪ Hurry up, we don't have all day!
▪ But Sally does not have all day here.
a must-have/must-see/must-read etc
afford/have/enjoy the luxury of sth
▪ Defenders have the luxury of double-teaming Riley.
▪ In the criminal trial, the prosecution did not have the luxury of depositions.
▪ Is this what women became if afforded the luxury of turned tables?
▪ The human species can no longer afford the luxury of such long double-takes or the leisurely changes of heart of entrenched scientists.
▪ They couldn't afford the luxury of open-market values.
▪ They did have the luxury of hit and run.
▪ We do not have the luxury of thinking our problems will miraculously be solved by better times ahead.
▪ When I painted it was for myself, I could afford the luxury of spending two years on a painting.
as luck would have it
▪ As luck would have it, it rained the next day and the game was canceled.
▪ As luck would have it, there were two seats left on the last flight.
▪ This was the first time I had ever seen a panda, and as luck would have it, I had my camera with me.
▪ But, as luck would have it, for them anyway, no buses ran on Sunday.
▪ But, as luck would have it, I didn't have an opportunity to follow up my intention at the time.
▪ Somewhere in the Great Hall, as luck would have it, were two managing directors from Salomon Brothers.
▪ This particular shoe, as luck would have it, is a flip-flop.
be having a thin time (of it)
be of/have no fixed abode/address
▪ Both were said to be of no fixed abode, although they originate from the Old Swan district of Liverpool.
▪ I was of no fixed abode, but I'd finished my time so they still let me go.
every cloud has a silver lining
every dog has its/his day
everyone has their price
get/have a good press
▪ Because officials are so anxious to get good press, there is often tremendous pressure on the government press agent.
▪ Even Quayle is getting better press than me.
▪ Even testosterone, so often blamed for aggressive behavior in men, is getting better press.
▪ For now Harriet's keener on seeing chess get a better press.
get/have a look-in
▪ Powys & Jones have real promise but can't get a look-in.
▪ Torque-steer wouldn't get a look-in.
▪ When it comes to the 3,000 metres steeplechase, no other country gets a look-in.
get/have cold feet
▪ They later got cold feet and canceled the order.
▪ But the prince got cold feet and failed to turn up.
▪ He and his neighbors bought a fire truck to protect their area, but the neighbors got cold feet.
▪ He gets cold feet and phones his bank manager asking him to stop the cheque.
▪ I began to get cold feet, but these other two guys were totally positive and they were absolutely right.
▪ Juicy, tender and sinfully rich, I immodestly enjoyed every one when my companion got cold feet.
▪ Some are said to be getting cold feet.
▪ Unfortunately he, the lover, had got cold feet at the last minute.
▪ We are all tired, and have cold feet and hands.
get/have the worst of it
▪ I should not have exasperated him for I always have the worst of it.
get/have wind of sth
▪ By February the local press had got wind of the affair.
▪ Certainly the last thing she wanted was for Max to get wind of it all.
▪ First it needs to boost its efforts to get wind of military-useful technology at an early stage.
▪ If she were to get wind of this.
▪ So, if she gets wind of Der Vampyr and wants to do it, you can believe it will get done.
▪ The extension director and the Wyoming dean of agriculture finally got wind of what I was up to.
▪ The notion of compulsion met a storm of controversy when mental health charities first got wind of the government's thoughts.
▪ When Johnny misbehaves, parents get wind of it by e-mail before he gets home.
get/have your (own) way
▪ Monica's so spoiled - she always gets her own way.
▪ Basilio still gets his way in the end because he marries his daughter to money.
▪ For two and a half years, the company can have its way.
▪ Our genes will take care of that, anyway, and it is natural to let them have their way.
▪ She mostly managed to get her own way with him.
▪ She remembered those days when they had played together as children, too, he always getting his own way.
▪ They both push you and have their own ways of motivating you.
▪ Under the genial exterior lay a considerable vanity, and a desire to have his own way.
▪ When some one or something stops them from getting their own way, their frustration can build up to explosion point.
get/have/keep your foot in the door
give sb/have a heart attack
▪ Doctors at Leicester Royal Infirmary are to assess the benefits of giving magnesium to heart attack victims immediately after an attack.
▪ I will surely give some one a heart attack ... I have varicose veins in my legs.
▪ That ought to give Francois a heart attack.
had best
▪ They had best be careful.
▪ All due, of course, to the fact that she had bested Travis McKenna.
▪ But pitchers had best take note as well.
▪ If so, we had best listen closely, since we will not get another chance.
▪ Meanwhile we had best prepare the way by showing that a medicine beyond verbal shamanism is an aching need.
▪ Perhaps we had best ask ourselves why our political institutions function as they do.
▪ Poets like Woodhouse had best go back to their jobs.
▪ The concept of differentiation is a key theme of our work, and we had best discuss it as the book unfolds.
had better
▪ I'd better not go out tonight; I'm really tired.
▪ You'd better phone Julie to say you'll be late.
▪ After what he has now said about a referendum, he had better watch out.
▪ Any organisation dismissing that vision as science-fiction had better look out.
▪ But Walter is a poor shade of what we have had better done.
▪ He thought he had better reread that part of the book.
▪ I did not want to go, but Dana said we had better do as they asked.
▪ I realized I had better hustle him out of there before he was asked about his acting career.
▪ In April 1911, he seemingly had better luck.
▪ They told Weary that he and Billy had better find somebody to surrender to.
have (a) thin/thick skin
▪ Some people have thick skins, others have thin ones and are more easily hurt.
have (got) it made
▪ Nowadays, these people have got it made.
▪ Others chimed in, saying those who have it made are pulling up the ladder on those less fortunate.
have (got) sth licked
have (got) sth/sb taped
▪ And when several events air live simultaneously, some of them have to be taped.
▪ It should have been taped for a campaign training film; it was too perfect.
▪ Several other infinitely more damaging conversations involving him have been taped over the past few weeks.
have (sexual) relations (with sb)
▪ How have relations between fellow workers changed in the flexible workplace?
have a (good) head for figures/facts/business etc
have a (good) nose for sth
▪ He must have a nose for money better than any hound for any fox.
▪ I have a nose for one thing.
have a (good) root round
have a (good) run for your money
have a ball
▪ The kids had a ball building sandcastles.
▪ A playground and playhouse keep the tots happy while the teenagers have a ball with a whole host of absorbing activities.
▪ Besides, to be really crass about it, the publicity people are going to have a ball with this.
▪ Have dinner, have a ball, then spend the night, provided you have reservations.
▪ He and I just have a ball.
▪ No matter where you go, what your interests, if you are into celebrating, you can have a ball.
▪ We have a ball in my bag.
have a bash (at sth)
▪ Maybe nothing at all, but for the love of a good woman he was at least prepared to have a bash.
▪ The women all have bashed in noses and black eyes and the men have scars.
▪ There's something to have a bash at while you're relaxing over the Christmas hols!
have a bee in your bonnet (about sth)
have a bone to pick with sb
have a bun in the oven
▪ Do I look like I have a bun in the oven?
have a care!
have a checkered history/career/past etc
have a chip on your shoulder
▪ The Doyle kid has had a chip on his shoulder ever since his mom and dad divorced.
▪ In some cases folks are just mad and have a chip on their shoulder.
have a cow
▪ Pat had a cow because you didn't tell her about the party.
have a down on sb
have a falling-out (with sb)
have a familiar ring
▪ Some findings will have a familiar ring in the West.
▪ The terrors which Mr Cash expresses about our future in the community have a familiar ring about them.
▪ These and other questions have a familiar ring because versions of these same questions are posted in various places on the walls.
have a field day
▪ Politicians and the media have had a field day with the incident.
▪ Any bacteria that may be in the food will have a field day and grow.
▪ In such situations, information biases have a field day....
▪ The court was agog and the journalists continued to scribble away, knowing they were about to have a field day.
▪ The slippery, deceptive Mr Clinton will have a field day.
▪ The tabloid newspapers would have a field day.
▪ They'd have a field day.
▪ Well, the crackpots will have a field day with these revelations, Holmes!
have a fighting chance
▪ All children must have a fighting chance at a good education.
▪ And that has encouraged the Geordies to believe they still have a fighting chance of keeping him.
▪ Central defender Tony Mowbray believes his former team have a fighting chance at Old Trafford.
have a finger in every pie/ in many pies
have a flick through sth
▪ Go on, have a flick through.
▪ Marie's left a load of mags behind, so I pick one up and have a flick through it.
▪ Sometimes I'd have a flick through.
have a flutter
▪ I'm not a heavy gambler, but I like to have a flutter from time to time.
▪ I had a little flutter on the Grand National and won £5.
▪ Journos are invited to have a flutter with the cash.
▪ She should never have fluttered the way she did.
have a foot in both camps
have a frog in your throat
have a go
▪ David kept saying she should simply not have gone up there ... but how could she not have gone, being Harriet?
▪ He says that when burning oak powder it's possible that a spark could have gone astray.
▪ Maybe he should have gone to work for a firm.
▪ Mrs James will certainly have gone home, but Gerard will still be up until after the last guest has gone.
▪ Presidential families have gone to great lengths before to preserve the privacy of their personal correspondence.
▪ Since then, scientists have gone back to the lab and improved it.
▪ So stay with me and have a go.
▪ The finish could have gone either way.
have a good one
▪ "I'm off to work." Alright, have a good one."
▪ And you have a good one.
have a good thing going
▪ They've got a good thing going with that little business of theirs.
have a good/fine/thick etc head of hair
have a habit of doing sth
▪ Be careful not to annoy the boss. He has a habit of losing his temper.
▪ My teenage daughter has a habit of leaving home without her house key.
▪ We shouldn't rule out a Democrat victory yet. These things have a habit of changing just when you least expect it.
▪ Arizonans have a habit of embracing wealthy businessmen with virtually no elective experience.
▪ Here, the guards have a habit of touching the women.
▪ I have a habit of filling small sketchbooks with hour or day-long sequences of watercolours.
▪ I have a habit of turning it off as soon as I hear the first commercial.
▪ Low-confidence people have a habit of trying to accomplish the impossible.-Praise yourself when you do something well.
▪ Myths have a habit of ignoring the truth.
▪ Things have a habit of disappearing there.
▪ Things he predicts have a habit of coming true.
have a hand in sth
▪ Thorpe has had a hand in restoring the 21 houses.
▪ They also agreed that the participants themselves should have a hand in deciding what they would discuss.
have a hard time
▪ A lot of people are having a hard time making ends meet.
▪ Anyone calling the 202 area code this weekend had a hard time getting through.
▪ I'm still having a hard time getting the company to pay me.
▪ I tried to find the house but I had such a hard time, I decided to give up.
▪ Premature babies have a hard time even under the best of circumstances.
▪ By contrast, books such as Randi's have a hard time finding enthusiastic editors.
▪ Cynics will have a hard time taking this seriously.
▪ Even the birds have a hard time of it, and you and Mr..
▪ He may have a hard time persuading lawmakers.
▪ I have a hard time eating meals when I should.
▪ The innovation of Private Eye ensured that deference, if not quite dead, would henceforth have a hard time.
▪ We have a hard time pulling off one conference.
▪ Your boy have a hard time getting it across?
have a heart!
▪ Have a heart! I'll never get all that done.
have a high/low/good/bad etc opinion of sb/sth
▪ All I can say to that is that I have a higher opinion of your judgement than he has.
▪ He did not, in any case, have a high opinion of Santayana - an animus which Santayana reciprocated towards Eliot.
▪ Politicians generally have a low opinion of the press, just as the press generally has a low opinion of lawmakers.
▪ She does not seem to have a high opinion of married life.
have a horror of sth
▪ I had long had a horror of alcohol.
▪ I have a horror of supermarkets.
▪ It showed itself to have a horror of socialism already in the nineteenth century.
have a hot temper
have a job doing sth/have a job to do sth
have a knack of doing sth
▪ Children have a knack of choosing the most inconvenient or embarrassing times for their Socratic dialogues.
▪ I have spent years using buses, and seem to have a knack of sitting next to some very odd people.
have a knock-on effect (on sth)
▪ Aid can have a knock-on effect in neighbouring countries which are also in great need.
▪ First, proposed increases in energy and payroll taxes could have a knock-on effect on wage demands and prices.
▪ It will cost hundreds of thousands of pounds, and may have a knock-on effect.
▪ Persecuting Nonconformists could have a knock-on effect in a community, hitting those who were loyal to the established Church.
▪ There are inevitable disruptions to deliveries such as vehicle breakdowns which have knock-on effects to delivery schedules.
▪ This will have a knock-on effect throughout the economy, and will drive up interest rates generally.
have a lot going for you
▪ With her brains and good looks, she certainly has a lot going for her.
▪ Human travel agents, paper guidebooks and newspaper ads still have a lot going for them.
have a lot of/no time for sb/sth
▪ Quite honestly I don't have a lot of time for any of them.
have a lot on
▪ He says he'll try and see you as soon as possible, but he has a lot going on this afternoon.
have a lot on your mind
▪ I'm sorry I wasn't paying attention, I have a lot on my mind at the moment.
▪ Since the divorce, Linda's had a lot on her mind.
▪ Stacy didn't go to the party on Saturday because she had a lot on her mind.
have a lot on your plate
▪ Don't bother your mother -- she's got a lot on her plate at the moment.
▪ Harris has a lot on his plate at the moment. Why don't we give the project to Melinda?
▪ Susan's had a lot on her plate recently, what with the car accident and everything.
have a lot to answer for
▪ That sister of yours has an awful lot to answer for.
have a lot to say for yourself
have a lot/enough on your plate
▪ Beckham may have enough on his plate attempting to recapture his early-season form without being burdened with any extra responsibilities.
have a memory like a sieve
▪ You'd better remind him about the party - he's got a memory like a sieve!
have a mind of your own
▪ But Mansell has a mind of his own, and he was adamant he would make racing his career.
▪ Joey's only two, but he has a mind of his own.
▪ My hair seems to have a mind of its own today.
▪ She's a woman with a mind of her own, who says what she thinks.
▪ I have a mind of my own.
▪ They have minds of their own and will form their own views on what is put before them.
have a moan (about sth)
have a nice day!
have a nodding acquaintance (with sb)
have a nodding acquaintance (with sth)
have a nose around
have a one-track mind
▪ That guy has a one-track mind.
have a part to play (in sth)
▪ All of us have a part to play.
▪ But literacy and the written word do have a part to play.
▪ However, the latter have a part to play from the period of nursery rhymes and finger and other basic-activity games.
▪ Look and Say does have a part to play.
▪ Might farm schools have a part to play?
▪ Models can be useful and have a part to play, if built on a sound theoretical basis.
▪ Now I think that the woman lawyer has been foregrounded as if the law actually does have a part to play.
▪ Now, many of the other items are also sound and have a part to play but they could be improved upon.
have a perfect right to do sth
▪ You have a perfect right to say "no" if you don't want to do it.
▪ They have a perfect right to object to it.
have a quick temper
have a quiet word (with sb)
▪ When all they needed to do was lift up the phone and have a quiet word.
have a right to be angry/concerned/suspicious etc
have a roving eye
have a screw loose
▪ "Fernando can be really weird sometimes." "Yeah, he's got a screw loose, no question."
have a short memory
▪ Bring any player back and he does not perform and people have short memories.
▪ Manufacturers have short memories, you know.
▪ Other strategies might be more forgiving and have shorter memories.
have a short temper/fuse
▪ Girls today sure have short fuses.
▪ Mrs Popple had long been known to have a short temper.
have a skinful
have a smattering of sth
have a sneaking feeling/suspicion/admiration
have a sniff around/round
▪ A dozen cemetery companies have sniffed around Hollywood Memorial and then walked away.
have a soft spot for sb
▪ Although I have a soft spot for him after his super-game Hennessy win, he does not appeal greatly as 7-2 favourite.
▪ I do have a soft spot for Britain's best-selling car, the Ford Fiesta.
▪ The reason why I have a soft spot for this notebook, he wrote.
have a stake in sth
▪ And the more you borrow, the more the bank will have a stake in your success.
▪ Both countries have a stake in using the World Trade Organization and in not allowing trade disputes to poison bilateral relations.
▪ Dow Jones and Intel also have stakes in Sohu.
▪ Many have a stake in the present system.
▪ Pharmaceuticals and health-products firms, which have a stake in Medicaid and Medicare reforms, $ 1. 3 million.
▪ The decisions will be made at the appropriate level by those who have a stake in them.
▪ They reasoned that, if neither main party won a commanding majority, both would have a stake in negotiating rather than fighting.
▪ We want all our people to share in growing prosperity and to have a stake in the country's future.
have a strong stomach
▪ It's a very violent film. You'll need a strong stomach to sit through it.
▪ You have to have a strong stomach to invest in today's bond market.
have a sure hold/footing
have a sweet tooth
▪ Danny's always had a sweet tooth.
▪ If you have a sweet tooth, it is much better to make them part of a meal.
have a swollen head/be swollen-headed
have a taste (of sth)
▪ And there were plenty left over for everyone else to have a taste, too.
▪ But the speculators have tasted blood and could yet force a devaluation of the franc.
▪ I guess you have a taste for the exotic though I was not exotic.
▪ I have tasted moose meat, though.
▪ I have tasted Vegemite and wretched.
▪ Now, people have tasted store food and they like it better, because it has sugar and salt in it.
▪ One taster remarked that it reminded him of what macaroni and cheese must have tasted like before Kraft.
▪ Since I came, I have tasted all I have been asked to.
have a temperature
▪ For example, a beaker of water may have a temperature of 50°C but it does not have heat.
▪ If you are feeling unwell, have a temperature or an infection, withdraw.
▪ Scaled to size. dinosaurs would have temperatures reaching from 38.5 to 40.6°C. which would imply severe heat stress.
▪ There was no improvement; she continued to have a temperature.
have a thick skin
▪ Some people have thick skins, others have thin ones and are more easily hurt.
have a thing about sb/sth
▪ Judith has a thing about people chewing gum.
▪ But, in this country, we used to have a thing about self-sufficiency.
have a think
▪ Amelia, absorbed with her projects, must have thought it a momentary phenomenon.
▪ Consensus like this means people have thought about this issue.
▪ His features were regular, rather ordinary, though some might well have thought him handsome.
▪ Maybe somebody should have thought to ask the whale.
▪ Only a sentimental, middle-class idiot would have thought of it.
▪ This in turn enables Janssen's customers to start production or synthesis sooner than they might have thought possible.
▪ Was that a thing anyone would have thought?
▪ You'd have thought that re-creating it on stage would have the same effect on a modern-day director.
have a tinkle
have a trick of doing sth
▪ But the agents have tricks of their own.
have a turn
▪ As we have seen, both the market and public policy have turned against work.
▪ At some point Solveig must have turned out the light.
▪ Even Sandie looks as if she might have turned the corner.
▪ He says that they could have turned the company around. he feels they've been treated in a shabby way.
▪ In a structural sense we have turned our model on its side.
▪ In recent weeks, even his friends seemed to have turned against him.
▪ Logic machines have turned out to be poor at dealing with images and making analogies.
▪ This day with me, here, you have turned back to face your past.
have a vague idea/feeling/recollection etc (that)
▪ I can remember nothing of them, but I have a vague feeling of having been well cared for.
have a way of doing sth
▪ Don't worry too much. These problems usually have a way of working out.
▪ And we have ways of making sure that the escapade of that silly young man at Southend gets widely reported.
▪ But the Washington Wizards have a way of bringing out the best in their opponents.
▪ Evenings like this have a way of going on!
▪ If history has taught us anything about imaginary customers, it is that they have a way of doing unexpected things.
▪ So do Humpbacks have ways of expressing the same request for the repetition of a pleasurable sonic experience?
▪ The powerful have a way of establishing contracts that suit them.
▪ Things like this have a way of surprising you.
▪ Yet things have a way of evening ut, and I paid a heavy price for my hypocrisy.
have a way with sb/sth
▪ David seemed to have a way with children.
have a whack at sth
have a whale of a time
have a whip-round
▪ It's Sally's birthday tomorrow. We'd better have a whip-round so we can get her a present.
have a word
▪ Before I went, though, I managed to have a word on the side with the lass.
▪ Better have a word with her about the domestic arrangements.
▪ Eventually the managing director was forced to have a word with him.
▪ I really came to have a word with Charles Julian.
▪ I wanted to have a word with you about Yorick.
▪ The cruise industry would love to have a word with you.
▪ You know, they have words, you read them?-Smartass, he said.
have a/no future
▪ All school systems are going to have to make similar innovative arrangements if school-to-work programs are to have a future.
▪ And Bosnia might have a future.
▪ Broadly-based companies without differentiated products have no future, he says.
▪ But those ideologies now have no future except in the history books.
▪ If I take on an artist, for example, I need to think they will have a future.
▪ Nick Ellis, London Does the human race have a future longer than its past?
have a/some/no etc bearing on sth
▪ And that it might have some bearing on what has happened now.
▪ But the facts of the past seemed to have no bearing on the facts of the present.
▪ It has come to have a bearing on the larger questions of civilized survival.
▪ Party political factors, professionalism and the dispositions of key personalities all usually have some bearing on internal management structures.
▪ The availability of security may, however, have a bearing on whether or not a particular loan will be granted.
▪ The observations on immortality in Chapter Thirteen may be seen to have some bearing on this.
▪ The outside influences have no bearing on what you can do for your basketball team....
▪ This year's form will have a bearing on all future claims.
have access to a car/a computer etc
▪ It is seen as an effective means of business communication where relevant staff have access to a computer network.
have an ace up your sleeve
have an axe to grind
have an easy time (of it)
▪ She hasn't had an easy time of it since Jack left.
▪ Hu did not have an easy time of it at first.
have an eye/a good eye for sth
▪ Greene has an eye for detail.
▪ Confidence men always have an eye for extra exits.
▪ She says women have an eye for minutiae, they see the curtain hasn't been drawn or the untied shoelace.
▪ They also have an eye for a catchy phrase.
have an idea (that)
▪ But whenever I have an idea, I need to act on it as soon as possible.
▪ I have an idea of her.
▪ Now that we have an idea how hyperinflation gets started we can look at the causes of run-of-the-mill inflation.
▪ Some have ideas for lyrical language.
▪ This is because I have ideas.
▪ We can have ideas of things we have not experienced.
▪ We need to have an idea of what perceptions we are triggering. 141 selling Selling is one stage further than communication.
▪ We write the first two chapters together so we have an idea of the characters.
have an off day
▪ His work isn't usually this bad - he must have had an off day.
▪ They must now get a result against free scoring Glenavon next Saturday and hope Bangor have an off day at Comrades.
▪ You will have off days when you are tired or a bit under the weather.
have another card up your sleeve
have ants in your pants
have been around
▪ I've been around the block a few times, and I think I know when someone's trying to cheat me.
▪ When you've been around as long as I have you realize some things aren't worth getting upset about.
▪ Armies are the main conventional weapon and have been around for over five millennia in various forms.
▪ Demos have been around as long as computer games.
▪ Most of them have been around a lot longer.
▪ Neural networks used for robotics and control applications have been around for a relatively long time.
▪ Some have been around a long time, others are of more recent origins.
▪ The usual suspects are labor unions, which have been around for a century.
▪ They have been around, practically unchanged, for at least 200 million years.
▪ Though I must have been around just at that time, I think.
have big ideas/plans
▪ Waller has big plans for her retirement.
▪ I have big plans for Selina.
▪ They have big plans for their life together.
have come a long way
▪ Computer technology has come a long way since the 1970s.
▪ Psychiatry has come a long way since the 1920s.
▪ Simulators have come a long way in recent years and today many of them use screen addressing to update the information.
▪ There are still many gaps, but we have come a long way.
▪ They have come a long way, so they spend the first few hours greeting each other.
▪ We certainly have come a long way.
▪ We have come a long way since then, and one of the greatest stresses in the world today is loneliness.
have designs on sb
have designs on sth
▪ Several developers have designs on the two-acre beachfront property.
have everything
▪ He wants his friends to have everything.
▪ I have everything that others packed on to trains, starving in camps, tortured, gassed, bludgeoned and shot do not.
▪ I want to have everything ready in good time.
▪ If he could have that, Kingsley believed, he could have everything.
▪ Insurers have everything to gain by supporting clinical trials.
▪ It is important to check this list ahead of time so that you have everything ready to complete the demonstration.
▪ It seemed they could have everything merely because they were boys, they would not have to sacrifice anything for anything else.
▪ Still, you can't have everything.
have everything going for you
▪ Barry had everything going for him -- charm, looks, intelligence, but still he was unemployed.
▪ Dan seemed to have everything going for him in college.
▪ She was bright and pretty and had everything going for her.
▪ It seems to have everything going for it.
▪ The events have everything going for them.
have eyes bigger than your belly
have eyes in the back of your head
▪ When you're looking after a two year old, you need to have eyes in the back of your head.
▪ You need to have eyes in the back of your head to be a teacher.
have eyes like a hawk
▪ My mother had eyes like a hawk.
have eyes like a hawk
have first call on sth
have fixed ideas/opinions
have fond memories of sth/sb
▪ He ought to have fond memories of the place.
▪ I have fond memories of Sussex-playing pool and, much more to the point, the excellent discussions on science.
▪ She would have been pleased that the youngsters who come and go will have fond memories of their day in hospital.
have friends in high places
▪ Bowen had friends in high places, and managed to raise large sums of money from the Carnegie and Rockefeller Foundations.
▪ He won't lose his job -- he has plenty of friends in high places.
▪ I just happened to have friends in high places, who could arrange things like meetings with the mayor.
▪ The Achym family had friends in high places, including the powerful Lord Burghley, and were allowed to return.
▪ But Tony and his colleagues have friends in high places.
▪ We have friends in high places, they said.
have gone and done sth
▪ Kay's gone and lost the car keys!
have green fingers
▪ He had green fingers, my grandfather. He could grow anything.
▪ The flower show season is upon us, and whether you have a green thumb or not, you should take a look at your garden.
▪ Tonight these dames were going to have greener fingers than Percy Thrower.
▪ You really do have green fingers.
have had a bellyful of sb/sth
have had a few (too many)
▪ Ralph Nader may have had a few, but then again far, far too few to mention.
have had enough (of sth)
▪ I'd had enough of the neighbors' noise, so I called the police.
▪ But I think perhaps you have had enough lessons for one night.
▪ By Saturday, both parties appeared to have had enough.
▪ Eat what is on offer and enjoy it without guilt, but stop when you have had enough.
▪ If you have had enough, stop eating.
▪ Male speaker People have had enough of crime in rural areas.
▪ My guess is that many of you have had enough of life before modernity.
▪ Others, if they have had enough attention, will simply start to struggle and then leap down or move away.
▪ Whatever the explanation, many people in Hong Kong have had enough.
have had more than your fair share of sth
▪ Tim's had more than his fair share of bad luck this year.
have had one too many
▪ Ron looked like he'd had one too many.
have had your chips
▪ Is not this subject wholly appropriate for the Minister, because his Government have had their chips?
have had your fill of sth
have half a mind to do sth
▪ I have half a mind to just go home.
▪ I have half a mind to tell her what I really think of her.
▪ I have half a mind to make you take this right back.
have half a mind to do sth
▪ I have half a mind to make you take this right back.
have heard of sb/sth
▪ Have you ever heard of a band called Big Star?
▪ I've heard of Louis de Bernieres, but I've never read anything by him.
▪ For the moment, none of them seems to have heard of it.
▪ From old Boston, in case you might have heard of it.
▪ I have heard of levels, of course.
▪ It would be incongruous to see her as an influence on later writers who may never have heard of her.
▪ She claimed never to have heard of Suzuki-san.
▪ The entire universe will have heard of her by then.
▪ There has been so much talk of saturated and unsaturated fats that most people have heard of them.
▪ You may have heard of his kid brother.
have high/great hopes for sb/sth
have issues (with sb/sth)
have it in mind
▪ I didn't have it in mind to go looking for a four-piece group.
▪ I still have it in mind that barbers take Mondays off.
have it made in the shade
have it your (own) way
▪ But remember that this Last Best Place can disappear if corporate colonizers and their lackeys in Congress have it their way.
▪ Well, have it your own way.
have its/your moments
▪ The Saints had their moments, but they still lost.
▪ Because, Ishmael says, all men have their moments of greatness.
▪ But I can assure you I have my moments.
▪ Even a railway journey with a missed connection can have its moments.
▪ Those observations made, it should be said that the Herioter did have his moments in the lineout.
▪ Yet, the show does have its moments.
have kittens
have legs
▪ You had to have legs like Marlene Dietrich to triumph over that get-up.
have money to burn
▪ Adventure expeditions are growing in popularity, particularly among older Americans with money to burn.
▪ Every time I see her she's wearing something new. She must have money to burn.
▪ People who buy expensive cars have money to burn, and they want you to know it.
▪ Unless you've got money to burn, these expensive guitars are not the instruments to get you started.
have more than one string to your bow
have nine lives
▪ The Michael Steins of this world have nine lives.
have no ambition to do sth
have no business doing sth/have no business to do sth
have no interest in doing sth
▪ I have no interest in continuing this conversation.
▪ He seemed to have no interest in doing anything.
▪ I have no interest in hating white people.
▪ I have no interest in high-tech commercial videos at all these days.
▪ I have no interest in the psychological interpretation of my sitters, I want to convey their physical appearance.
▪ Nor could they understand a young, good-looking man who appeared to have no interest in girls.
▪ Pound seems to have no interest in that.
▪ That is, leaders have no interest in proving themselves, but an abiding interest in expressing themselves.
▪ You might have no interest in building a fancy themed site or even learning anything about creating Web pages.
have no need of sth
▪ Gentlemen, we have no need of discretion to protect the life of Simon Cormack any more.
▪ I thought of leaving it to you, Cynthia, but you have no need of it.
▪ More straightforwardly, however, capitalism and technology have no need of religion.
▪ On Siporax, it is claimed, the bacteria have no need of this and get on with the important job.
▪ The rest of us find paracetamol an effective analgesic with no important side effects and have no need of an antidote.
▪ They appear to have no need of an anemone and usually ignore any placed in the aquarium with them.
▪ You have no need of a certificate.
have no parallel/be without parallel
have no place
▪ Exploitation and oppression will be concepts of history which have no place in the description of contemporary social reality.
▪ Honesty, decency, good will have no place in this business of selling or murdering an image.
▪ In a holy community Noyes thought that exclusiveness, jealousy, and quarreling should have no place.
▪ Personal opinion or preferences and speculative imaginings have no place in science.
▪ Religious celebrations have no place in public schools, although teaching about religion is acceptable.
▪ Some believe that values can not be taught apart from religion and therefore have no place in public schools.
▪ Some would argue that these enterprises have no place in a capitalist system, and should therefore be privatised as soon as possible.
▪ Therefore, the right of national self-determination could have no place in the party programme.
have no problem (in) doing sth
have no right to do sth
▪ You have no right to tell me what I can and can't do!
▪ But we have no right to force collection of child support for the kids.
▪ But you have no right to come in here meddling with my things.
▪ Finally, the relatives of patients have no right to make decisions on the patient's behalf.
▪ I have no right to be saying anything that goes against Church teaching.
▪ I have no right to intrude on their lives.
▪ The states have no rights to any money.
▪ You have no right to be here.
have no stomach for a fight/task etc
▪ They proved to have no stomach for a fight with only Steve Regeling showing any semblance of spirit.
have no use for sb/sth
▪ My company has no use for workers who are not motivated.
▪ Am I right in assuming that you have no use for it?
▪ For example, the business may be sold to some one else who decides they have no use for the present management.
▪ I have no use for second-hand books and unfashionable clothes and bits of ornament.
have no wish to do sth
▪ I have no wish to offend anybody.
▪ And believe me, I have no wish to keep score.
▪ I emphasize that I have no wish to come across here as the skunk at the process improvement garden party.
▪ I have no wish to attribute motives, but clearly finance intervenes.
▪ I have no wish to caddie for Brian Harley.
▪ I have no wish to change my nature over this matter and become a crusading journalist.
▪ I have no wish to create a posing pilots' paradise.
▪ I have no wish to get angry with my own invention, the so-named Miller.
▪ Mrs Hardman has grown used to her independence, and I have no wish to curtail her freedom.
have nothing against sb/sth
▪ I have nothing against Jack personally, I just don't like his line of work.
▪ Atari and Psion, like most companies, have nothing against enthusiasts making one or two copies for personal back-ups.
▪ I have nothing against Mr Jack Neighbours, who sadly, I understand, was killed in the war.
▪ I have nothing against the Arabs ... They are the same as us.
▪ I have nothing against the Arabs.
▪ I have nothing against these resorts, but my own shortlist of best resorts would not include any of them.
▪ I have nothing against thorns and prickles so long as you can admire them from a safe distance.
▪ Now I want this distinctly understood, that I have nothing against Cleveland.
have nothing on sb
▪ Another time she seemed to have nothing on under a grass skirt as she danced on a mirrored floor.
▪ He realized she must have nothing on.
▪ She seemed to have nothing on underneath, which made the wheel in my stomach behave in an entirely crazy fashion.
▪ When it comes to conniving, deceptive control freaks, ex-boyfriends have nothing on record companies.
▪ Where that girl is concerned I have nothing on my conscience.
have nothing to lose
▪ As the underdog here, they have nothing to lose and everything to gain.
▪ But you have nothing to lose - your life was being made a misery anyway.
▪ For a meeting or two, they have nothing to lose.
▪ If you are not sure whether you will be entitled to benefit, remember that you have nothing to lose by applying.
▪ The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains.
▪ You have nothing to lose but your monotony.
▪ You have nothing to lose by taking action in the small claims court.
▪ You have nothing to lose by trying out possible futures for size-it just requires an imaginative leap.
have nothing/not much/a lot etc going for sb/sth
have one foot in the grave
▪ She sounded like she had one foot in the grave.
have other/bigger fish to fry
▪ I can't deal with this now - I've got other fish to fry.
have oversight of sth
have possibilities
▪ This place has a lot of possibilities, but it will need some work.
have rough edges
▪ The play still has a few rough edges, but by next week it should be all right.
have sb eating out of your hand
▪ He's brilliant in job interviews -- he always manages to get the panel eating out of his hand.
▪ I introduced Mr Wilkinson to my mother, and within minutes she had him eating out of her hand.
▪ In a second or two a man might have these boys eating out of his hand.
have sb on a string
▪ Lester claims to have several women on a string.
have sb over a barrel
▪ The actor has the studio over a barrel - if they want to keep him, they have to pay him more money.
▪ You have them over a barrel on this issue, with all the right on your side.
have sb to thank for (doing) sth
▪ Do we have Lady Thatcher to thank for the improved state of the nation's teeth?
▪ I have Phil to thank for my first break on the Cutters.
▪ I have you to thank for that.
▪ In fact, I always have remembered - and I have Monty Lee to thank for that.
▪ Perhaps we have Pat Buchanan to thank for at least some of this raising of consciousness.
▪ We have Alan Austin to thank for this character-building little outing - an experience you won't forget in a hurry!
▪ We have Sigmund Freud to thank for a rather curious state of affairs.
have sb's ear
▪ He used to boast to his friends that he often had the President's ear.
have sb's number
▪ You can tell Cara has his number. She knows exactly how to handle him when he's mad.
have sb/sth at your feet
▪ I have lain at his feet.
have sb/sth in mind (for sth)
▪ But they're not saying if they have Bosnia in mind.
▪ Did she have Mr Gonzalez in mind?
▪ I have particularly in mind community nurseries and similar support.
▪ I still have it in mind that barbers take Mondays off.
▪ Socrates could not have had in mind the moral compromise peculiar to a nation like our own.
▪ Those seven heads, with their seven mouths and seven tongues, have other things in mind.
▪ What they both must have had in mind was a different future for Ameliaone much more lucrative than her past.
▪ You have to keep in mind the trains here are descending from the Continental Divide and move quickly and quietly.
have sb/sth to reckon with
▪ Anyone attempting to invade the country will have to reckon with the peacekeeping force.
▪ You'll have the boss to reckon with if you go home this early.
have second thoughts
▪ Couples contemplating divorce often have second thoughts when they realize how it will affect their children.
▪ It was obvious that the company was having second thoughts about the whole project.
▪ But now, with the raft travelling more slowly than I had planned, I began to have second thoughts.
▪ But then various men on the race committee and some male members of the National Aeronautic Association began to have second thoughts.
▪ I hope Darlington Transport have second thoughts on the matter.
▪ Keep him laughing and he might have second thoughts about eating you!
▪ Perhaps Mr Harrison would have second thoughts if he walked in our neck of the woods.
▪ Somewhere between second helpings I began to have second thoughts.
▪ Such incidents might have caused Sir Bernard to have second thoughts about the system; but he defends it with passion.
▪ Then, before she could have second thoughts, she picked up the telephone and dialled his number.
have seen better days
▪ Ms. Davis's car had certainly seen better days.
▪ Virginia's car had definitely seen better days.
▪ We are working at Nanking University, in rather cramped and primitive conditions, for the buildings have seen better days.
have several irons in the fire
have shot your bolt
have something of sth
▪ At last I have something of Father's.
▪ Clearly a stranger had emptied it, hence obviously they thought she might have something of interest in it.
▪ It seems you already have something of the greater power.
▪ The gardens have something of interest to offer throughout the year.
▪ They must each have something of reality about them.
▪ We have something of value to offer you, but you in return have something to offer us.
▪ William Right-well, then we have something of an impasse.
▪ You really do have something of Zbigniew in you.
have something to say about sth
▪ You'd better tell your dad about the dent in the car - I'm sure he'll have something to say about it.
▪ However, Trevor Francis' Birmingham will have something to say about that.
▪ I shall have something to say about original boards a little later.
▪ Jen looked at me as if I ought to have something to say about this.
▪ Jerome would have something to say about that...
▪ Mind you, Sunderland, of course, could have something to say about that at Hillsborough tomorrow afternoon.
▪ Rodman would have something to say about juvenile fantasies of self-reliance if I told him that one.
have something up your sleeve
▪ Don't worry. He still has a few tricks up his sleeve.
have stars in your eyes
have sth (all) to herself
▪ She had the house to herself while her parents were gone.
▪ Helen used to have the house to herself.
▪ How could she have done this to herself?
have sth (all) to himself
▪ Jerry wanted to have the company all to himself.
▪ But he might just as well have been talking to himself.
▪ Did Mr Oakley mean he was going to have a room to himself?
▪ I wanted Seve to have the stage to himself - he'd earned it.
▪ If he can't have you all to himself, he won't want you at all.
▪ She had hoped Travis would have kept it to himself.
have sth (all) to myself
▪ I had a whole lane in the swimming pool to myself.
▪ I didn't have Mum to myself because all the others were around.
▪ I get home and I have no time to myself.
▪ I have a duty to myself and to my reader to express what follows with truth and dignity.
▪ I have an office to myself.
▪ I have been re-transformed to myself and this civilised gloom.
▪ I have said to myself that that is wrong.
▪ I must have been jealous of her life away from me, and wished to have her entirely to myself.
▪ The bedroom upstairs is all ready for my brother, and I'd prefer to have that floor to myself anyway.
have sth (all) to yourself
▪ Do you feel like you don't have any time to yourself?
have sth against sb/sth
▪ I have nothing against people making lots of money.
have sth at your/their etc fingertips
have sth coming (to you)
▪ Both Microsoft and Apple have big updates coming this year, and you can expect a proportionate dose of hype.
▪ He added that to be accurate, the aircraft would have to risk coming under fire.
▪ If you have children, you may have experienced them coming home from school and immediately throwing a tantrum in front of you.
▪ People have been coming in and milling around to see if we actually have it.
▪ Walter: I have people coming up to me all the time and people are friendly, I like that.
▪ We have a guest coming, tomorrow evening.
▪ We have recruits coming in all the time.
have sth coming out (of) your ears
have sth in common (with sb)
have sth in common (with sth)
▪ All these companies have one thing in common: they deal in small, inexpensive consumer items.
▪ The smaller boats actually have more in common with sailboards than with the huge yachts usually seen in marinas.
have sth in your pocket
▪ It looks like the team has a chance at the Aloha Bowl firmly in their pocket.
▪ After all, we have Vargas in our pocket.
▪ Shoppers will have more in their pockets and it will not cost companies vast sums to borrow for expansion.
▪ You have money in your pocket, a cheque-book on you and one or two credit cards as well.
have sth off pat
▪ Like most politicians he had all his answers off pat, but he didn't have anything particularly new or interesting to say.
▪ She only had to repeat the lines once or twice, and she'd have them down pat.
have sth on
have sth on the brain
▪ It's unbelievable - you have sex on the brain 24 hours a day!
▪ You always have food on the brain.
▪ But the festering problem may have effects on the brain, just as it can elsewhere in the body.
▪ Must have maggots on the brain.
have sth on your side/sth is on your side
have sth ready
have sth sewn up
▪ IBM had the market for electric typewriters sewn up.
▪ For the lawyers have it all sewn up.
▪ The deal between the wholesaler and manufacturer will have been sewn up only minutes before Sanjay accepted his orders.
▪ To have lost a game against the local rivals that should have been sewn up was bad enough.
have sth to offer (sb)
▪ As if you have so much to offer us!
▪ Citing security, officials have declined to offer specifics on how profiling would work.
▪ Coin inscriptions do indeed have much to offer.
▪ Librarians have expertise to offer here and teachers are capitalising on it, often incorporating these elements in their lesson plans.
▪ Professional counselors, psychiatrists, and psychiatric hospitals have great gifts to offer.
▪ Saalbach is the larger of the two, but both have excellent facilities to offer.
▪ So does feminism have anything to offer?
▪ The schools might not have been able to offer courses that would pass muster.
have sth to show for sth
▪ But if you think about it, they really do have nothing to show for it even with Banks popping Woodson.
▪ It always feels like an admission of failure to come back from the Continent and have nothing to show for it.
▪ So, what have I got to show for my time as a hostage?
▪ The country is beginning to have something to show for all the pain.
▪ They have little to show for their trouble, but they continue.
have sth to your credit
have sth to your name
have sth under your belt
▪ Once you've had a few lessons under your belt, you're ready to buy your own ski equipment.
▪ It's difficult to get matches under your belt when you're like that.
have sth written all over it
have sth/be written all over your face
have sth/sb on your hands
▪ It is still instinctively held that those involved in engineering science should be useful handymen and will have oil on their hands.
▪ The Khedive is starting to realize that he might have trouble on his hands.
▪ They submitted lest they kill him; his death from the fast would have been on their hands.
have sticky fingers
have teeth
▪ Critics of the law say it has no teeth and will not prevent violent crime.
▪ Because after the Anna Climbie case, the social services wanted to show it does have teeth.
▪ Frankly, I'd rather have teeth extracted than sit through either again.
▪ Is it only a paper tiger, or does it really have teeth?
▪ It is important that it should also have teeth.
▪ The episode illustrates beyond doubt that the majority voting rules of the Treaty of Rome have teeth.
▪ The movement will have teeth to back its arguments.
▪ What can have teeth, of course, even if it is concealed by a friendly smile, is aid.
have the courage of your (own) convictions
▪ Larry displayed the courage of his convictions by saying no to his supervisor.
have the floor
▪ The Senator from Wyoming has the floor.
have the gall to do sth
▪ Congress actually had the gall to vote for a pay raise for themselves.
▪ I can't believe he had the gall to ask you for money.
▪ Ruth was always on the phone and yet she had the gall to tell me off for making one call.
have the goodness to do sth
▪ But I hope to learn these soon if anybody will have the goodness to bear with me.
have the last laugh
▪ Boy did he have the last laugh.
▪ Holding a rolling pin and determined to have the last laugh.
▪ Yet women drivers have the last laugh.
have the makings of sth
▪ We've got the makings of a winning team.
have the patience of Job
have the right idea
▪ The new superintendent has the right idea about attacking illiteracy, but the wrong method.
▪ Mrs Donaldson, in last month's letters page, certainly seems to have the right idea.
▪ The young lads have the right idea.
have the sniffles
have the whip hand
▪ With the advent of term limits in the state Legislature, Orange County will have the whip hand.
have the wit to do sth
▪ Thankfully, Reid had the wit to see what was wrong with the plan.
have the world at your feet
have the/a ring of sth
▪ Lies by their nature have the ring of truth.
▪ Some stories have a ring of truth, if a little exaggerated: They do fit the known biography.
▪ Thinkers, like the aforementioned, gained status because they suggest answers that have the ring of truth.
have turned the corner
▪ A superior actor might have turned the corner on this film.
▪ Even Sandie looks as if she might have turned the corner.
▪ I hope we have turned the corner.
▪ The economy may well have turned the corner by the next election.
have two left feet
have two left feet
have visions of sth
▪ I have visions of some of these poor women who work all day long exposed to such seductive sounds becoming hypnotised.
▪ I think of it with loathing and dread; have visions of designing the no-need-to-clear-mask and then return to reality.
have worms
have you got a minute?
have you heard the one about ...
have your back to/against the wall
have your cake and eat it
▪ First, is it an ethical investment policy to encourage people to try to have their cake and eat it?
▪ It appears the Ministry men can have their cake and eat it ... but only if we let them.
▪ It seems as though the council wants to have its cake and eat it.
▪ That way he could have his cake and eat it too.
▪ The benefits of standardization are coupled with the capacity to respond to change-a way to have your cake and eat it too.
▪ They don't imagine they can have their cake and eat it too.
▪ You can't have your cake and eat it.
▪ You can have your cake and eat it; the only trouble is, you get fat.
have your ears/nose etc pierced
▪ I am a female, mid-twenties and happen to have my nose pierced with one small silver ring.
have your eye on sth
▪ Rodrigues has his eye on the major leagues.
▪ We have our eyes on a nice little house near the beach.
▪ A few years more and white men will be all around you. they have their eyes on this land.
▪ As I told you, I have my eyes on a very different sort of market.
▪ He must have his eyes on a Ryder Cup spot.
have your hands full
▪ Diane has her hands full with housekeeping chores and a new baby.
▪ I'm sorry I can't help you -- I have my hands full right now.
▪ The Mexican government had its hands full fighting a war on three fronts.
▪ You must have your hands full with all this work to do and the children to look after.
▪ And Brooks would have his hands full.
▪ And you can bet we have our hands full.
▪ I know I am going to have my hands full when his session is over.
▪ So it looks as if the doctors and Osteopaths will continue to have their hands full.
▪ So when the shutdown finally ends, the agency will have its hands full.
▪ Steinbach will have his hands full with a pitching staff fresh out of the box.
▪ The parents and teachers of many of these youngsters have their hands full enough just looking after them.
▪ You guys have your hands full.
have your hands/fingers in the till
have your head in the clouds
have your head screwed on (straight/right)
▪ Cloughie probably gets closest to it - not he himself but the No. 9 seems to have his head screwed on.
▪ She seemed to have her head screwed on right, even if she was a girl.
have your heart/sights set on sth
▪ Teng is thought to have her sights set on the Board of Supervisors' presidency.
▪ But do the public have their sights set on an Urbanizer?
▪ If you have your hearts set on a joint endowment, you have two alternatives to cashing in the present one.
▪ Many of the Keishinkai parents have their hearts set on Keio.
▪ Movie sniper Jude Law and Rachel Weisz are covered in mud but still have their sights set on desire.
have your limits
▪ I have my limits. You will not use that kind of nasty language in my class.
▪ Alternatively it was seen by some as a warning to the opposition that the process of democratization would have its limits.
▪ But those official data sources have their limits.
▪ Denial does have its limits, though, whiteout being one of them.
▪ Even saints, it seems, have their limits.
▪ In a broader context, however, these variations have their limits.
▪ Joey is just kidding, but even I have my limits.
have your name in lights
have your nose in a book/magazine/newspaper
have your nose/snout in the trough
have your say
▪ At a public meeting yesterday, environmentalists were finally permitted to have their say about the future of the ancient forest.
▪ You've had your say -- now let someone else speak.
▪ But emotions don't like that; they love to have their say.
▪ Our advantage, however, was that we allowed the public to have their say on possible changes before proposals were published.
▪ Probably the best thing about his show was that he let people have their say.
▪ Talk too much, and not let others have their say.
▪ Tennis World would like you to have your say on the issue.
▪ The voters are entitled to have their say on Maastricht and should be given it.
▪ Whatever Kureishi may claim, minorities and special-interest groups have their say in his work.
▪ When the company finally makes a small offer to the widow, her lawyer will have his say, too.
have your stomach pumped
have your work cut out (for you)
▪ Election monitors will have their work cut out.
▪ So you have your work cut out for you.
▪ The home team has not beaten the Scarlets for some dozen matches and should still have their work cut out to win.
▪ They have their work cut out adapting themselves to it, and it to themselves.
▪ They have their work cut out for them.
▪ We have our work cut out for us.
▪ Whoever takes on the trout farm will have their work cut out.
have/be finished with sb
▪ And when he was finished with him there would be nothing left.
▪ But Teravainen went to Yale, and Woosnam was finished with school by the age of sixteen.
▪ I believe that I am finished with the war be-cause I no longer study obsessively the photographs of concentration-camp survivors.
▪ Provided that the other House now passes the Bill in the same form, it will have finished with it for good.
▪ So Duboc finally decided he was finished with Bailey.
▪ We should be finished with that in the next ten days.
▪ We were finished with training camp.
▪ You can avoid this problem by deleting any files in: RAM- as soon as you have finished with them.
have/be finished with sth
▪ And when he was finished with him there would be nothing left.
▪ But Teravainen went to Yale, and Woosnam was finished with school by the age of sixteen.
▪ I believe that I am finished with the war be-cause I no longer study obsessively the photographs of concentration-camp survivors.
▪ Provided that the other House now passes the Bill in the same form, it will have finished with it for good.
▪ So Duboc finally decided he was finished with Bailey.
▪ We should be finished with that in the next ten days.
▪ We were finished with training camp.
▪ You can avoid this problem by deleting any files in: RAM- as soon as you have finished with them.
have/be nothing to do with sb/sth
▪ But that smell might very well have nothing to do with it.
▪ Finally, he was publicly warned and barred from communion, and the people advised to have nothing to do with him.
▪ General Smuts will have nothing to do with you.
▪ He was nothing to do with her and Alan.
▪ I have nothing to do with the motel.
▪ These are things to be proud of, but they have nothing to do with rank or class.
▪ We have nothing to do with each other.
have/be to do with sb/sth
Did it have to do with space and time?
▪ Answer guide: Because the accounts are to do with measuring economic activity rather than the timing of receipts and payments. 7.
▪ It will have to do with Holy Week and Chimayo.
▪ Some equations, asserted in a certain context or on certain assumptions, have to do with parts of causal circumstances.
▪ The first two criteria have to do with setting agendas and the others with building networks.
▪ The reasons for this are various, but mostly have to do with interleague play and unbalanced schedules.
▪ The second issue is to do with other existing roles and job specifications.
▪ What did the secret have to do with?
have/exchange words (with sb)
▪ He and Kemp pound down the stairway, exchanging words.
▪ I have words before my eyes, as you might imagine.
▪ I would hear the women exchange words with Miss Fingerstop.
▪ Linda buried herself in the crowd, exchanging words with this one and that and heading for the bar.
▪ Nurses busily went up and down, sometimes pausing to exchange words and careless laughter.
▪ Sometimes, Britten seems to have written more naturally when he didn't have words to set.
▪ They exchanged words, not all of which appeared to be in jest.
▪ Without it, you have words virtually sprinkled across the page, each project an exercise in speed and frustration.
have/gain the upper hand
▪ Police have gained the upper hand over the drug dealers in the area.
▪ But slowly and surely the followers of Chaos gained the upper hand.
▪ If the two had been introduced simultaneously, the larger one would invariably have the upper hand.
▪ Now White gains the upper hand.
▪ Officials said they might reopen the freeway at 5 p. m. today, perhaps sooner if firefighters gain the upper hand overnight.
▪ The world can only pray that they do not gain the upper hand.
▪ Under the proposed law, she would have the upper hand.
▪ We must destroy them now, while we yet have the upper hand.
▪ When you have a gun you have the upper hand, it makes you feel big, bad.
have/get a corner on sth
▪ Any other old drunk would have got a corner on the fourth page.
have/get butterflies (in your stomach)
have/get sb by the short and curlies
have/get the feeling (that)
▪ As I contemplate the process of separation / individuation I may have feelings and sensations that I can not articulate.
▪ As soon as things are really good, I always have a feeling the rug is about to be pulled out from under me.
▪ But I have feeling in my hand back.
▪ Certainly, younger children show affection and have feelings of liking and disliking.
▪ I have a feeling he will win.
▪ I have a feeling that there is now more of my past life than my future.
▪ I have a feeling we may be wrong about the taxes.
▪ I have a feeling you won't need that radio.
have/get the goods on sb
▪ The two detectives went undercover to get the goods on the Parducci family.
▪ It is get the goods on him.
have/get the hots for sb
▪ I think he's got the hots for you, Elaine.
▪ But my, what a great body - no wonder Luke's got the hots for you.
▪ Well, Big Breakfast's Donna Air seems to have the hots for him.
have/get the measure of sb
▪ Booth and Rowntree were more concerned with getting the measure of poverty than with trying to devise a general theory about it.
▪ He may have the measure of the John Gosden-trained Anshan, running from stall 15.
have/get the measure of sth
▪ Booth and Rowntree were more concerned with getting the measure of poverty than with trying to devise a general theory about it.
▪ He may have the measure of the John Gosden-trained Anshan, running from stall 15.
have/get the shits
have/get/give a feel for sth
▪ Any guilt she many have felt for the loss of her son did not affect her longevity.
▪ Did you get a feel for that with those conversations and the two extremes, the shot-gun versus the follow-up?
▪ He was here to get a feel for the place.
▪ I can get a rhythm, get a feel for the offense.
▪ Playing the game itself is lots of fun, once you get a feel for the actual shot settings.
▪ Rather we get a feeling for the differences in the island societies through encounters with restaurant owners.
▪ Walk around the Tor and on the footpaths of the surrounding levels to get a feel for this legend-full land.
▪ Whenever possible I devoured local newspapers, trying to get a feel for the politics and social conditions of each place.
have/give sb first refusal on sth
have/hold sth in your hot little hand
have/hold/want no truck with sb/sth
▪ But it does lead inevitably to ignorance, for you can not understand what you deliberately chose to have no truck with.
▪ Its radicals, who dominate the leadership, want no truck with Mr Gorbachev.
▪ Then the people who get penalised are the majority who want no truck with him.
▪ We in the Conservative Party have no truck with that style of gutter journalism which we were forced to endure last Sunday.
have/keep both feet on the ground
▪ She's really creative, but she also has her feet firmly on the ground.
▪ So I guess inversely he taught me the need to be prepared and keep both feet on the ground.
have/keep your beady eye(s) on sb/sth
have/keep your eye on sb
▪ As I told you, I have my eyes on a very different sort of market.
▪ He kept his eyes on Ezra, surveying him.
▪ He kept his eyes on his father, who had betrayed him.
▪ His face had grown serious, and he kept his eyes on the road.
▪ I kept my eyes on it the whole time, he wrote.
▪ It was not only Percy Makepeace who kept his eyes on Hilary.
▪ Mulcahey kept his eyes on the circles that widened out from the pebbles he dropped into the water.
▪ We have to keep our eyes on the sandy path.
have/keep your finger on the pulse (of sth)
have/know all the answers
▪ Anyone can claim to have all the answers.
▪ But I don't have all the answers.
▪ He was a modest and unassuming man who never gave the impression that he knew all the answers.
▪ In the current situation many issues as yet remain unresolved and we do not have all the answers.
▪ We are supposed to have all the answers.
▪ Will that have all the answers?
have/lead a charmed life
▪ But since its premier issue in January 1993, Wired has led a charmed life.
▪ By his own admission he has led a charmed life.
▪ It's been too easy for us; we've led charmed lives till now.
▪ No wonder that she and Charles felt that they led a charmed life, that the times were on their side.
have/make common cause (with/against sb)
have/take a breather
▪ A party of skylarks were taking a breather from their incessant high-rise singing to indulge in an early-morning splashing.
▪ Gilts, after four days of rising quotations, softened an eighth as the pound took a breather.
▪ He was not digging at all now but taking a breather, evidently.
▪ Main picture: The female takes a breather.
▪ Regroup and take a breather at midday.
▪ Take your skis off and have a breather.
▪ When the last Demon's dead, take a breather before the celebrations start.
have/take a butcher's
have/take a gander at sth
▪ Take a gander at this letter I just got from Janet.
▪ Ye take a gander at the engines.
have/take a slash
▪ A bill that would have slashed child support payments for most divorced fathers failed in the state Assembly.
▪ A swarthy fellow with ringlets was taking a slash at her with a heavy cutlass.
▪ And some London pubs have slashed their prices from £1.70 a pint to less than a pound.
▪ Last year, Hayworth supported welfare-reform legislation that would have slashed federal spending by $ 66 billion over five years.
▪ The telecommunications giant joined a growing number of employers in growth industries that have slashed payrolls even as their profits soared.
▪ To woo customers, carpet stores have slashed prices, which cut into the bottom line of carpet manufacturers.
▪ We have slashed soot and dust emissions by nearly 90 percent.
▪ You have slashed costs and created an extensive new marketing campaign.
have/take a squint at sth
have/take pride of place
▪ A runaway hamster called Sophie takes pride of place where the school rat once roamed.
▪ A Tudor Doll's House takes pride of place in a fine collection of houses and period dolls.
▪ Are they to take pride of place, as they should in ballets worthy of the name?
▪ At Maastricht next month, political, economic and monetary union will take pride of place.
▪ Glass would have pride of place, she said.
▪ The statue takes pride of place at Gerrards Cross station.
▪ There, pit latrines inside homes take pride of place, their arched entrances lavishly embellished with stone carvings.
▪ These were retrieved and now take pride of place in the library.
have/tan sb's hide
have/throw a fit
▪ Mom's going to have a fit when she sees what you've done.
▪ But it was clear to all that the then Massachusetts governor would have fit snugly into the capital cocoon.
▪ He started to have fits and he suffered permanent damage.
▪ He would have fit in perfectly back in 1956, the last time they had a Subway Series.
▪ I have fitted the 31/10.15 tyres to 15 x 7 rims.
▪ It would definitely not have fitted those of Marthe and myself.
▪ She continued to have fits and suffered serious and permanent brain damage.
▪ The 2-year-old threw fits, but not just the normal toddler tantrums.
▪ There must be hundreds, maybe thousands, of sea anglers who have fitted a Decca-receiving navigator to their own boat.
having said that
▪ Of course he deserves prison. Having said that, I don't think any good will come of locking him up forever.
▪ Anyway, having said that Wilko would be nuts to buy another Midfielder of any sort.
▪ But having said that, it's a sport that anybody can play.
▪ But having said that, it was wonderful and I wouldn't have missed that trip for anything.
▪ But having said that, there's nothing I particularly wanted to show or to hide.
▪ But having said that, this is a big game for us.
▪ But having said that, you have to close sites and obviously that does lead to hardship.
▪ I was unhappy with myself for having said that.
▪ Marx is oft-quoted as having said that people make history, but not under conditions of their own choosing.
he/she had a good innings
hold/have sb in the palm of your hand
▪ She's got the whole committee in the palm of her hand.
if I had my way
▪ If I had my way, there'd be a baseball game every day of the year.
▪ Well, I would ban them too if I had my way.
it's a dirty job, but someone has to do it
just have to do sth
▪ I just have to get somewhere soon to sleep.
▪ My uncle said that now we ha-ha just have to do this.
▪ She would just have to get out and walk.
▪ Sometimes you just have to tell people what s best for them.
▪ That's the trouble with doing all these films and tellies - you just have to remember a little bit for a short take.
▪ We just have to do some more throat swabs.
▪ You can have it right back if you want it, you just have to ask.
▪ You don't just have to listen to stories.
justice has been done/served
▪ He can continue to appeal, or go to some other level, until he feels justice has been done.
▪ He has successfully persuaded the crowd that justice has been done.
▪ Mr Townsend says he feels justice has been done.
▪ Mrs Alliss' solicitor says justice has been done.
keep/have one eye/half an eye on sb/sth
keep/have sb on a leash
let sb have it
▪ Mrs. Kramer really let him have it for spilling the paint.
▪ As for the Cub players they came out on the steps of their dugout and really let me have it.
▪ Do report recurring faults to the developers; that's why they let you have it free.
▪ He says that you just let them have it!
▪ I let him have it to get rid of him.
▪ Instead of saying no, they let the kids have it.
▪ Netscape hooked millions of web surfers on Navigator by letting them have it for free.
▪ They suggested she borrow the money until such time as they could let her have it.
▪ We should have let them have it.
live/lead/have the life of Riley
▪ I hear that all the older boys are driving big expensive cars and living the life of Riley.
more sth than you've had hot dinners
no more does/has/will etc sb
▪ In practice, this situation will arise only very rarely if a regime of symptom control and no more has been adopted.
▪ Men appear to be no more willing to support women in their traditional roles than women are to assume them.
no sooner had/did ... than
no sooner/hardly had ... than
▪ Alas, no sooner had he started than he realised it was no longer what he wanted.
▪ But no sooner had Miriam gone than Harry suddenly returned looking more cheerful than one might have expected.
▪ No sooner had he gone than one of the cameramen approached.
▪ No sooner had it begun than the rain seemed to end.
not have a bad word to say about/against sb
not have a bean
not have a clue (where/why/how etc)
▪ After nine years of marriage to her I did not have a clue myself.
not have a dog's chance
not have a hair out of place
▪ He sat at his desk, not a hair out of place, and turning a pencil over in his hand.
▪ He seemed stern and austere and never had a hair out of place.
▪ Joel never has a hair out of place.
not have a leg to stand on
▪ If you didn't sign a contract, you won't have a leg to stand on.
not have a pot to piss in
not have a prayer (of doing sth)
▪ The Seahawks don't have a prayer of winning the Superbowl.
▪ Boxing White Hopes like Cooney do not have a prayer of toppling Tyson.
not have a snowball's chance in hell
not have a stitch on
not have much to say for yourself
not have much up top
not have the faintest idea
▪ I don't have the faintest idea what you're talking about.
not have the first idea about sth
not have the foggiest (idea)
▪ I don't have the foggiest idea what his address is.
▪ Before I go on, some of you may not have the foggiest what a fanzine is.
not have the heart to do something
▪ I didn't have the heart to tell my daughter we couldn't keep the puppy.
not have the remotest idea/interest/intention etc
not have two pennies/halfpennies/beans to rub together
not stand/have a cat in hell's chance (of doing sth)
only have eyes for sb
▪ Mark only had eyes for his wife.
only have yourself to thank (for sth)
sb can't have it both ways
sb could have sworn (that) ...
▪ All of which is very curious we could have sworn Colin Milburn went to good old Greencroft comprehensive.
▪ Athelstan could have sworn he was acting as if there was some one else there.
▪ Corbett could have sworn that momentarily he glimpsed another figure, shadow-like, but fled on.
▪ He could have sworn the pile of letters had been deeper, that there had been many more.
▪ No, he recalled other sightings, so real you could have sworn they were alive ... until they vanished.
▪ She could have sworn the light had been yellow - pure yellow.
▪ The friar could have sworn that Sir John was singing a hymn or a song under his breath.
▪ The Myrcans looked on with what he could have sworn was approval.
sb doesn't have much meat on him/her
sb has arrived
sb has decided to honour us with their presence
sb has learned their lesson
sb has paid their debt to society
▪ After 20 years in jail, Murray feels he has paid his debt to society.
sb has their own life to lead
sb has to pinch themselves
sb only has himself/herself to blame
sb's chickens have come home to roost
sb/sth has yet to do sth
▪ Deion has yet to figure out how to throw to himself.
▪ Harland & Wolff has yet to show a profit, but the future looks good.
▪ His work retained a pronounced individuality and originality that has yet to be properly acknowledged.
▪ However, he said he has yet to consider his circumstances.
▪ However, the site this year has yet to be determined.
▪ If there is a success formula in that it has yet to be demonstrated.
▪ The savagery of our retaliation against the virus has yet to be played out.
▪ Whether it allows the exercise of force to be more controlled and effective has yet to be seen.
shut/close the stable door after the horse has bolted
some people have all the luck
▪ It costs a fortune to buy a Porsche - some people have all the luck.
sth has much/little/nothing to recommend it
▪ The hotel has little except price to recommend it.
▪ An alternative approach-optical fibre - has much to recommend it.
▪ As such, it has much to recommend it.
▪ But in terms of an effective solution the voting method has little to recommend it.
▪ In principle this format has much to recommend it, but in this case the practice has not been successful.
▪ It is plain that, in the long run, the gentle art of compromise has much to recommend it.
▪ Nevertheless, the principle of chisel ploughing has much to recommend it in the right conditions.
▪ Such a way of proceeding has much to recommend it, but scant progress has been made in that direction.
▪ This cooperative family decision-making has much to recommend it.
sth has sb's name on it
▪ If a washer has a brand name on it, make sure that the smooth side comes into contact with the seating.
▪ They say if it has your name on it ... But who can write on a virus?
sth/sb has their uses
take/have a leak
▪ Billy got off his lounge chair now, went into the bathroom and took a leak.
▪ Cully goes off to take a leak.
▪ I'd gone behind the set to take a leak and I heard this sound like snapping wood.
▪ I thought it was a damn silly place to park if some one wanted to take a leak in the bushes.
▪ She locked herself into a cubicle and took a leak.
▪ Tank owners are required to have leak detection equipment installed by December 1993.
▪ Well, rumors have leaked out.
take/have/play no part in sth
▪ Herrera, personally, took no part in this mild form of political persecution.
▪ Johnny played no part in this world.
▪ Of course, Laura took no part in such a major business decision; the empire builder was Bernard.
▪ Schuster insists his political connections played no part in the choice.
▪ The mostly white jurors who actually sat in the jury room, insisted that race had played no part in their decision.
▪ The very act of imagining Gods exempt from suffering ensures that humans take no part in the deity.
▪ They are evaluated and yet play no part in defining the criteria, determining the methods, or controlling the process.
▪ This is not to say that economic imperatives play no part in penal developments.
the bird has flown
the penny (has) dropped
▪ At this point the penny dropped.
▪ I was about to ask Jack who it was, when the penny dropped.
▪ Suddenly the penny dropped, and Meredith knew why he'd been prowling about the airport like an angry lion.
▪ Then the penny dropped and he realised that the man had meant a fan- bearer.
walls have ears
what has sb done with sth?
▪ So what has Renault done with the latest version of its supermini?
what have you got to say for yourself?
who would have dreamt that ...?
who would have thought?
▪ But who would have thought that a humble human could do these calculations?
▪ That's the only bait I didn't have but, who would have thought that with ice about?
▪ The girl was carrying a latchkey; she let herself into the cabin. ... who would have thought of that?
▪ Yet who would have thought I would talk to myself in this way in these notes? he wrote.
will/would have none of sth
▪ But Kaptan would have none of it.
▪ Kronecker would have none of this.
▪ Pott would have none of it and, with the aid of his old friend Nourse, successfully set it himself.
▪ Stark would have none of that.
▪ Surprised and shocked, the Soviet government would have none of it.
▪ The world was going crazy and, or so it seemed, Trumptonshire would have none of it.
you can't have it both ways
▪ It's either me or her. You can't have it both ways!
you could have fooled me
▪ "Look, we're doing our best to fix it." "Well, you could have fooled me."
you had me worried
▪ You really had me worried - I thought you didn't like the present.
you have no idea (how/what etc)
you have to hand it to sb
▪ You have to hand it to her. She's really made a success of that company.
you have to laugh
you only have to read/look at/listen to etc sth
you should have seen/heard sth
you would have thought (that)
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I must have left my wallet at home.
▪ She had lived in Peru for 30 years.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(have a) late/early night
(have) a mountain to climb
(have) egg on your face
▪ If we think they are easy meat we will end up with egg on our faces.
▪ Meanwhile, Hutcheson observed that in 1995 all the chip forecasters had varying degrees of egg on their face.
▪ People like me, who believed the firing squad had been assembled, were left with egg on our faces.
(have) patience
▪ First, be kind to yourself, so you will have patience.
▪ You have to have patience on the defensive end.
(have) sb's blood on your hands
▪ But I already have too much blood on my hands.
▪ Dad with blood on his hands.
▪ He hated to see her with blood on her hands.
▪ I want him to know he has my son's blood on his hands.
▪ Republicans spent eight years trying to prove President Clinton had blood on his hands.
▪ There's blood on my hands, mine or hers I don't know.
▪ There was blood on his hands and I thought he'd had an accident.
(have/drop) a word in sb's ear
▪ A word in the ear of the Weatherfield constabulary.
▪ His resolve ends when again he wakes at dawn with prophetic words in his ears.
▪ If I were you I'd drop a quiet word in her ear before it's too late.
▪ Mixed blessings' A word in your ear.
... and what have you
▪ The shelves were crammed with books, documents, and what have you.
Do you have a problem with that?
▪ "You're going to wear that dress?" "Do you have a problem with that?"
Houston, we have a problem
I have it on good authority
▪ I have it on good authority that the school board wants to fire the principal.
I might have known/guessed etc
▪ All those years I might have known her!
▪ Although I might have known you'd arrive just as drinks were being ordered!
▪ Dear little Papa, as I might have known!
▪ If you'd had a big fat bottom I might have guessed.
▪ It was nothing I might have guessed.
▪ Of course, I might have known that you'd have some clever way of dealing with everything, though.
▪ Ooh! I might have known it!
▪ Some years before, I might have guessed Bond's enigmatic presence in the scene.
I'll have sb's guts for garters
I/we don't have all day
▪ Hurry up, we don't have all day!
▪ But Sally does not have all day here.
a must-have/must-see/must-read etc
afford/have/enjoy the luxury of sth
▪ Defenders have the luxury of double-teaming Riley.
▪ In the criminal trial, the prosecution did not have the luxury of depositions.
▪ Is this what women became if afforded the luxury of turned tables?
▪ The human species can no longer afford the luxury of such long double-takes or the leisurely changes of heart of entrenched scientists.
▪ They couldn't afford the luxury of open-market values.
▪ They did have the luxury of hit and run.
▪ We do not have the luxury of thinking our problems will miraculously be solved by better times ahead.
▪ When I painted it was for myself, I could afford the luxury of spending two years on a painting.
as luck would have it
▪ As luck would have it, it rained the next day and the game was canceled.
▪ As luck would have it, there were two seats left on the last flight.
▪ This was the first time I had ever seen a panda, and as luck would have it, I had my camera with me.
▪ But, as luck would have it, for them anyway, no buses ran on Sunday.
▪ But, as luck would have it, I didn't have an opportunity to follow up my intention at the time.
▪ Somewhere in the Great Hall, as luck would have it, were two managing directors from Salomon Brothers.
▪ This particular shoe, as luck would have it, is a flip-flop.
be having a thin time (of it)
be of/have no fixed abode/address
▪ Both were said to be of no fixed abode, although they originate from the Old Swan district of Liverpool.
▪ I was of no fixed abode, but I'd finished my time so they still let me go.
every cloud has a silver lining
every dog has its/his day
everyone has their price
get/have a good press
▪ Because officials are so anxious to get good press, there is often tremendous pressure on the government press agent.
▪ Even Quayle is getting better press than me.
▪ Even testosterone, so often blamed for aggressive behavior in men, is getting better press.
▪ For now Harriet's keener on seeing chess get a better press.
get/have a look-in
▪ Powys & Jones have real promise but can't get a look-in.
▪ Torque-steer wouldn't get a look-in.
▪ When it comes to the 3,000 metres steeplechase, no other country gets a look-in.
get/have cold feet
▪ They later got cold feet and canceled the order.
▪ But the prince got cold feet and failed to turn up.
▪ He and his neighbors bought a fire truck to protect their area, but the neighbors got cold feet.
▪ He gets cold feet and phones his bank manager asking him to stop the cheque.
▪ I began to get cold feet, but these other two guys were totally positive and they were absolutely right.
▪ Juicy, tender and sinfully rich, I immodestly enjoyed every one when my companion got cold feet.
▪ Some are said to be getting cold feet.
▪ Unfortunately he, the lover, had got cold feet at the last minute.
▪ We are all tired, and have cold feet and hands.
get/have the worst of it
▪ I should not have exasperated him for I always have the worst of it.
get/have wind of sth
▪ By February the local press had got wind of the affair.
▪ Certainly the last thing she wanted was for Max to get wind of it all.
▪ First it needs to boost its efforts to get wind of military-useful technology at an early stage.
▪ If she were to get wind of this.
▪ So, if she gets wind of Der Vampyr and wants to do it, you can believe it will get done.
▪ The extension director and the Wyoming dean of agriculture finally got wind of what I was up to.
▪ The notion of compulsion met a storm of controversy when mental health charities first got wind of the government's thoughts.
▪ When Johnny misbehaves, parents get wind of it by e-mail before he gets home.
get/have your (own) way
▪ Monica's so spoiled - she always gets her own way.
▪ Basilio still gets his way in the end because he marries his daughter to money.
▪ For two and a half years, the company can have its way.
▪ Our genes will take care of that, anyway, and it is natural to let them have their way.
▪ She mostly managed to get her own way with him.
▪ She remembered those days when they had played together as children, too, he always getting his own way.
▪ They both push you and have their own ways of motivating you.
▪ Under the genial exterior lay a considerable vanity, and a desire to have his own way.
▪ When some one or something stops them from getting their own way, their frustration can build up to explosion point.
get/have/keep your foot in the door
give sb/have a heart attack
▪ Doctors at Leicester Royal Infirmary are to assess the benefits of giving magnesium to heart attack victims immediately after an attack.
▪ I will surely give some one a heart attack ... I have varicose veins in my legs.
▪ That ought to give Francois a heart attack.
had best
▪ They had best be careful.
▪ All due, of course, to the fact that she had bested Travis McKenna.
▪ But pitchers had best take note as well.
▪ If so, we had best listen closely, since we will not get another chance.
▪ Meanwhile we had best prepare the way by showing that a medicine beyond verbal shamanism is an aching need.
▪ Perhaps we had best ask ourselves why our political institutions function as they do.
▪ Poets like Woodhouse had best go back to their jobs.
▪ The concept of differentiation is a key theme of our work, and we had best discuss it as the book unfolds.
had better
▪ I'd better not go out tonight; I'm really tired.
▪ You'd better phone Julie to say you'll be late.
▪ After what he has now said about a referendum, he had better watch out.
▪ Any organisation dismissing that vision as science-fiction had better look out.
▪ But Walter is a poor shade of what we have had better done.
▪ He thought he had better reread that part of the book.
▪ I did not want to go, but Dana said we had better do as they asked.
▪ I realized I had better hustle him out of there before he was asked about his acting career.
▪ In April 1911, he seemingly had better luck.
▪ They told Weary that he and Billy had better find somebody to surrender to.
have (a) thin/thick skin
▪ Some people have thick skins, others have thin ones and are more easily hurt.
have (sexual) relations (with sb)
▪ How have relations between fellow workers changed in the flexible workplace?
have a (good) head for figures/facts/business etc
have a (good) nose for sth
▪ He must have a nose for money better than any hound for any fox.
▪ I have a nose for one thing.
have a (good) root round
have a (good) run for your money
have a ball
▪ The kids had a ball building sandcastles.
▪ A playground and playhouse keep the tots happy while the teenagers have a ball with a whole host of absorbing activities.
▪ Besides, to be really crass about it, the publicity people are going to have a ball with this.
▪ Have dinner, have a ball, then spend the night, provided you have reservations.
▪ He and I just have a ball.
▪ No matter where you go, what your interests, if you are into celebrating, you can have a ball.
▪ We have a ball in my bag.
have a bash (at sth)
▪ Maybe nothing at all, but for the love of a good woman he was at least prepared to have a bash.
▪ The women all have bashed in noses and black eyes and the men have scars.
▪ There's something to have a bash at while you're relaxing over the Christmas hols!
have a bee in your bonnet (about sth)
have a bone to pick with sb
have a bun in the oven
▪ Do I look like I have a bun in the oven?
have a care!
have a checkered history/career/past etc
have a chip on your shoulder
▪ The Doyle kid has had a chip on his shoulder ever since his mom and dad divorced.
▪ In some cases folks are just mad and have a chip on their shoulder.
have a cow
▪ Pat had a cow because you didn't tell her about the party.
have a down on sb
have a falling-out (with sb)
have a familiar ring
▪ Some findings will have a familiar ring in the West.
▪ The terrors which Mr Cash expresses about our future in the community have a familiar ring about them.
▪ These and other questions have a familiar ring because versions of these same questions are posted in various places on the walls.
have a field day
▪ Politicians and the media have had a field day with the incident.
▪ Any bacteria that may be in the food will have a field day and grow.
▪ In such situations, information biases have a field day....
▪ The court was agog and the journalists continued to scribble away, knowing they were about to have a field day.
▪ The slippery, deceptive Mr Clinton will have a field day.
▪ The tabloid newspapers would have a field day.
▪ They'd have a field day.
▪ Well, the crackpots will have a field day with these revelations, Holmes!
have a finger in every pie/ in many pies
have a flick through sth
▪ Go on, have a flick through.
▪ Marie's left a load of mags behind, so I pick one up and have a flick through it.
▪ Sometimes I'd have a flick through.
have a flutter
▪ I'm not a heavy gambler, but I like to have a flutter from time to time.
▪ I had a little flutter on the Grand National and won £5.
▪ Journos are invited to have a flutter with the cash.
▪ She should never have fluttered the way she did.
have a foot in both camps
have a frog in your throat
have a go
▪ David kept saying she should simply not have gone up there ... but how could she not have gone, being Harriet?
▪ He says that when burning oak powder it's possible that a spark could have gone astray.
▪ Maybe he should have gone to work for a firm.
▪ Mrs James will certainly have gone home, but Gerard will still be up until after the last guest has gone.
▪ Presidential families have gone to great lengths before to preserve the privacy of their personal correspondence.
▪ Since then, scientists have gone back to the lab and improved it.
▪ So stay with me and have a go.
▪ The finish could have gone either way.
have a good one
▪ "I'm off to work." Alright, have a good one."
▪ And you have a good one.
have a good thing going
▪ They've got a good thing going with that little business of theirs.
have a good/fine/thick etc head of hair
have a habit of doing sth
▪ Be careful not to annoy the boss. He has a habit of losing his temper.
▪ My teenage daughter has a habit of leaving home without her house key.
▪ We shouldn't rule out a Democrat victory yet. These things have a habit of changing just when you least expect it.
▪ Arizonans have a habit of embracing wealthy businessmen with virtually no elective experience.
▪ Here, the guards have a habit of touching the women.
▪ I have a habit of filling small sketchbooks with hour or day-long sequences of watercolours.
▪ I have a habit of turning it off as soon as I hear the first commercial.
▪ Low-confidence people have a habit of trying to accomplish the impossible.-Praise yourself when you do something well.
▪ Myths have a habit of ignoring the truth.
▪ Things have a habit of disappearing there.
▪ Things he predicts have a habit of coming true.
have a hand in sth
▪ Thorpe has had a hand in restoring the 21 houses.
▪ They also agreed that the participants themselves should have a hand in deciding what they would discuss.
have a hard time
▪ A lot of people are having a hard time making ends meet.
▪ Anyone calling the 202 area code this weekend had a hard time getting through.
▪ I'm still having a hard time getting the company to pay me.
▪ I tried to find the house but I had such a hard time, I decided to give up.
▪ Premature babies have a hard time even under the best of circumstances.
▪ By contrast, books such as Randi's have a hard time finding enthusiastic editors.
▪ Cynics will have a hard time taking this seriously.
▪ Even the birds have a hard time of it, and you and Mr..
▪ He may have a hard time persuading lawmakers.
▪ I have a hard time eating meals when I should.
▪ The innovation of Private Eye ensured that deference, if not quite dead, would henceforth have a hard time.
▪ We have a hard time pulling off one conference.
▪ Your boy have a hard time getting it across?
have a heart!
▪ Have a heart! I'll never get all that done.
have a high/low/good/bad etc opinion of sb/sth
▪ All I can say to that is that I have a higher opinion of your judgement than he has.
▪ He did not, in any case, have a high opinion of Santayana - an animus which Santayana reciprocated towards Eliot.
▪ Politicians generally have a low opinion of the press, just as the press generally has a low opinion of lawmakers.
▪ She does not seem to have a high opinion of married life.
have a horror of sth
▪ I had long had a horror of alcohol.
▪ I have a horror of supermarkets.
▪ It showed itself to have a horror of socialism already in the nineteenth century.
have a hot temper
have a job doing sth/have a job to do sth
have a knack of doing sth
▪ Children have a knack of choosing the most inconvenient or embarrassing times for their Socratic dialogues.
▪ I have spent years using buses, and seem to have a knack of sitting next to some very odd people.
have a knock-on effect (on sth)
▪ Aid can have a knock-on effect in neighbouring countries which are also in great need.
▪ First, proposed increases in energy and payroll taxes could have a knock-on effect on wage demands and prices.
▪ It will cost hundreds of thousands of pounds, and may have a knock-on effect.
▪ Persecuting Nonconformists could have a knock-on effect in a community, hitting those who were loyal to the established Church.
▪ There are inevitable disruptions to deliveries such as vehicle breakdowns which have knock-on effects to delivery schedules.
▪ This will have a knock-on effect throughout the economy, and will drive up interest rates generally.
have a lot going for you
▪ With her brains and good looks, she certainly has a lot going for her.
▪ Human travel agents, paper guidebooks and newspaper ads still have a lot going for them.
have a lot of/no time for sb/sth
▪ Quite honestly I don't have a lot of time for any of them.
have a lot on
▪ He says he'll try and see you as soon as possible, but he has a lot going on this afternoon.
have a lot on your mind
▪ I'm sorry I wasn't paying attention, I have a lot on my mind at the moment.
▪ Since the divorce, Linda's had a lot on her mind.
▪ Stacy didn't go to the party on Saturday because she had a lot on her mind.
have a lot on your plate
▪ Don't bother your mother -- she's got a lot on her plate at the moment.
▪ Harris has a lot on his plate at the moment. Why don't we give the project to Melinda?
▪ Susan's had a lot on her plate recently, what with the car accident and everything.
have a lot/enough on your plate
▪ Beckham may have enough on his plate attempting to recapture his early-season form without being burdened with any extra responsibilities.
have a memory like a sieve
▪ You'd better remind him about the party - he's got a memory like a sieve!
have a mind of your own
▪ But Mansell has a mind of his own, and he was adamant he would make racing his career.
▪ Joey's only two, but he has a mind of his own.
▪ My hair seems to have a mind of its own today.
▪ She's a woman with a mind of her own, who says what she thinks.
▪ I have a mind of my own.
▪ They have minds of their own and will form their own views on what is put before them.
have a moan (about sth)
have a nice day!
have a nose around
have a one-track mind
▪ That guy has a one-track mind.
have a part to play (in sth)
▪ All of us have a part to play.
▪ But literacy and the written word do have a part to play.
▪ However, the latter have a part to play from the period of nursery rhymes and finger and other basic-activity games.
▪ Look and Say does have a part to play.
▪ Might farm schools have a part to play?
▪ Models can be useful and have a part to play, if built on a sound theoretical basis.
▪ Now I think that the woman lawyer has been foregrounded as if the law actually does have a part to play.
▪ Now, many of the other items are also sound and have a part to play but they could be improved upon.
have a perfect right to do sth
▪ You have a perfect right to say "no" if you don't want to do it.
▪ They have a perfect right to object to it.
have a quick temper
have a quiet word (with sb)
▪ When all they needed to do was lift up the phone and have a quiet word.
have a right to be angry/concerned/suspicious etc
have a screw loose
▪ "Fernando can be really weird sometimes." "Yeah, he's got a screw loose, no question."
have a short memory
▪ Bring any player back and he does not perform and people have short memories.
▪ Manufacturers have short memories, you know.
▪ Other strategies might be more forgiving and have shorter memories.
have a short temper/fuse
▪ Girls today sure have short fuses.
▪ Mrs Popple had long been known to have a short temper.
have a skinful
have a smattering of sth
have a sneaking feeling/suspicion/admiration
have a sniff around/round
▪ A dozen cemetery companies have sniffed around Hollywood Memorial and then walked away.
have a soft spot for sb
▪ Although I have a soft spot for him after his super-game Hennessy win, he does not appeal greatly as 7-2 favourite.
▪ I do have a soft spot for Britain's best-selling car, the Ford Fiesta.
▪ The reason why I have a soft spot for this notebook, he wrote.
have a stake in sth
▪ And the more you borrow, the more the bank will have a stake in your success.
▪ Both countries have a stake in using the World Trade Organization and in not allowing trade disputes to poison bilateral relations.
▪ Dow Jones and Intel also have stakes in Sohu.
▪ Many have a stake in the present system.
▪ Pharmaceuticals and health-products firms, which have a stake in Medicaid and Medicare reforms, $ 1. 3 million.
▪ The decisions will be made at the appropriate level by those who have a stake in them.
▪ They reasoned that, if neither main party won a commanding majority, both would have a stake in negotiating rather than fighting.
▪ We want all our people to share in growing prosperity and to have a stake in the country's future.
have a strong stomach
▪ It's a very violent film. You'll need a strong stomach to sit through it.
▪ You have to have a strong stomach to invest in today's bond market.
have a sure hold/footing
have a sweet tooth
▪ Danny's always had a sweet tooth.
▪ If you have a sweet tooth, it is much better to make them part of a meal.
have a swollen head/be swollen-headed
have a taste (of sth)
▪ And there were plenty left over for everyone else to have a taste, too.
▪ But the speculators have tasted blood and could yet force a devaluation of the franc.
▪ I guess you have a taste for the exotic though I was not exotic.
▪ I have tasted moose meat, though.
▪ I have tasted Vegemite and wretched.
▪ Now, people have tasted store food and they like it better, because it has sugar and salt in it.
▪ One taster remarked that it reminded him of what macaroni and cheese must have tasted like before Kraft.
▪ Since I came, I have tasted all I have been asked to.
have a temperature
▪ For example, a beaker of water may have a temperature of 50°C but it does not have heat.
▪ If you are feeling unwell, have a temperature or an infection, withdraw.
▪ Scaled to size. dinosaurs would have temperatures reaching from 38.5 to 40.6°C. which would imply severe heat stress.
▪ There was no improvement; she continued to have a temperature.
have a thick skin
▪ Some people have thick skins, others have thin ones and are more easily hurt.
have a thing about sb/sth
▪ Judith has a thing about people chewing gum.
▪ But, in this country, we used to have a thing about self-sufficiency.
have a think
▪ Amelia, absorbed with her projects, must have thought it a momentary phenomenon.
▪ Consensus like this means people have thought about this issue.
▪ His features were regular, rather ordinary, though some might well have thought him handsome.
▪ Maybe somebody should have thought to ask the whale.
▪ Only a sentimental, middle-class idiot would have thought of it.
▪ This in turn enables Janssen's customers to start production or synthesis sooner than they might have thought possible.
▪ Was that a thing anyone would have thought?
▪ You'd have thought that re-creating it on stage would have the same effect on a modern-day director.
have a tinkle
have a trick of doing sth
▪ But the agents have tricks of their own.
have a turn
▪ As we have seen, both the market and public policy have turned against work.
▪ At some point Solveig must have turned out the light.
▪ Even Sandie looks as if she might have turned the corner.
▪ He says that they could have turned the company around. he feels they've been treated in a shabby way.
▪ In a structural sense we have turned our model on its side.
▪ In recent weeks, even his friends seemed to have turned against him.
▪ Logic machines have turned out to be poor at dealing with images and making analogies.
▪ This day with me, here, you have turned back to face your past.
have a vague idea/feeling/recollection etc (that)
▪ I can remember nothing of them, but I have a vague feeling of having been well cared for.
have a way of doing sth
▪ Don't worry too much. These problems usually have a way of working out.
▪ And we have ways of making sure that the escapade of that silly young man at Southend gets widely reported.
▪ But the Washington Wizards have a way of bringing out the best in their opponents.
▪ Evenings like this have a way of going on!
▪ If history has taught us anything about imaginary customers, it is that they have a way of doing unexpected things.
▪ So do Humpbacks have ways of expressing the same request for the repetition of a pleasurable sonic experience?
▪ The powerful have a way of establishing contracts that suit them.
▪ Things like this have a way of surprising you.
▪ Yet things have a way of evening ut, and I paid a heavy price for my hypocrisy.
have a way with sb/sth
▪ David seemed to have a way with children.
have a whack at sth
have a whale of a time
have a whip-round
▪ It's Sally's birthday tomorrow. We'd better have a whip-round so we can get her a present.
have a word
▪ Before I went, though, I managed to have a word on the side with the lass.
▪ Better have a word with her about the domestic arrangements.
▪ Eventually the managing director was forced to have a word with him.
▪ I really came to have a word with Charles Julian.
▪ I wanted to have a word with you about Yorick.
▪ The cruise industry would love to have a word with you.
▪ You know, they have words, you read them?-Smartass, he said.
have a/no future
▪ All school systems are going to have to make similar innovative arrangements if school-to-work programs are to have a future.
▪ And Bosnia might have a future.
▪ Broadly-based companies without differentiated products have no future, he says.
▪ But those ideologies now have no future except in the history books.
▪ If I take on an artist, for example, I need to think they will have a future.
▪ Nick Ellis, London Does the human race have a future longer than its past?
have a/some/no etc bearing on sth
▪ And that it might have some bearing on what has happened now.
▪ But the facts of the past seemed to have no bearing on the facts of the present.
▪ It has come to have a bearing on the larger questions of civilized survival.
▪ Party political factors, professionalism and the dispositions of key personalities all usually have some bearing on internal management structures.
▪ The availability of security may, however, have a bearing on whether or not a particular loan will be granted.
▪ The observations on immortality in Chapter Thirteen may be seen to have some bearing on this.
▪ The outside influences have no bearing on what you can do for your basketball team....
▪ This year's form will have a bearing on all future claims.
have access to a car/a computer etc
▪ It is seen as an effective means of business communication where relevant staff have access to a computer network.
have an ace up your sleeve
have an axe to grind
have an easy time (of it)
▪ She hasn't had an easy time of it since Jack left.
▪ Hu did not have an easy time of it at first.
have an eye/a good eye for sth
▪ Greene has an eye for detail.
▪ Confidence men always have an eye for extra exits.
▪ She says women have an eye for minutiae, they see the curtain hasn't been drawn or the untied shoelace.
▪ They also have an eye for a catchy phrase.
have an idea (that)
▪ But whenever I have an idea, I need to act on it as soon as possible.
▪ I have an idea of her.
▪ Now that we have an idea how hyperinflation gets started we can look at the causes of run-of-the-mill inflation.
▪ Some have ideas for lyrical language.
▪ This is because I have ideas.
▪ We can have ideas of things we have not experienced.
▪ We need to have an idea of what perceptions we are triggering. 141 selling Selling is one stage further than communication.
▪ We write the first two chapters together so we have an idea of the characters.
have an off day
▪ His work isn't usually this bad - he must have had an off day.
▪ They must now get a result against free scoring Glenavon next Saturday and hope Bangor have an off day at Comrades.
▪ You will have off days when you are tired or a bit under the weather.
have another card up your sleeve
have ants in your pants
have been around
▪ I've been around the block a few times, and I think I know when someone's trying to cheat me.
▪ When you've been around as long as I have you realize some things aren't worth getting upset about.
▪ Armies are the main conventional weapon and have been around for over five millennia in various forms.
▪ Demos have been around as long as computer games.
▪ Most of them have been around a lot longer.
▪ Neural networks used for robotics and control applications have been around for a relatively long time.
▪ Some have been around a long time, others are of more recent origins.
▪ The usual suspects are labor unions, which have been around for a century.
▪ They have been around, practically unchanged, for at least 200 million years.
▪ Though I must have been around just at that time, I think.
have big ideas/plans
▪ Waller has big plans for her retirement.
▪ I have big plans for Selina.
▪ They have big plans for their life together.
have designs on sb
have designs on sth
▪ Several developers have designs on the two-acre beachfront property.
have everything
▪ He wants his friends to have everything.
▪ I have everything that others packed on to trains, starving in camps, tortured, gassed, bludgeoned and shot do not.
▪ I want to have everything ready in good time.
▪ If he could have that, Kingsley believed, he could have everything.
▪ Insurers have everything to gain by supporting clinical trials.
▪ It is important to check this list ahead of time so that you have everything ready to complete the demonstration.
▪ It seemed they could have everything merely because they were boys, they would not have to sacrifice anything for anything else.
▪ Still, you can't have everything.
have everything going for you
▪ Barry had everything going for him -- charm, looks, intelligence, but still he was unemployed.
▪ Dan seemed to have everything going for him in college.
▪ She was bright and pretty and had everything going for her.
▪ It seems to have everything going for it.
▪ The events have everything going for them.
have eyes bigger than your belly
have eyes in the back of your head
▪ When you're looking after a two year old, you need to have eyes in the back of your head.
▪ You need to have eyes in the back of your head to be a teacher.
have eyes like a hawk
▪ My mother had eyes like a hawk.
have eyes like a hawk
have first call on sth
have fixed ideas/opinions
have fond memories of sth/sb
▪ He ought to have fond memories of the place.
▪ I have fond memories of Sussex-playing pool and, much more to the point, the excellent discussions on science.
▪ She would have been pleased that the youngsters who come and go will have fond memories of their day in hospital.
have friends in high places
▪ Bowen had friends in high places, and managed to raise large sums of money from the Carnegie and Rockefeller Foundations.
▪ He won't lose his job -- he has plenty of friends in high places.
▪ I just happened to have friends in high places, who could arrange things like meetings with the mayor.
▪ The Achym family had friends in high places, including the powerful Lord Burghley, and were allowed to return.
▪ But Tony and his colleagues have friends in high places.
▪ We have friends in high places, they said.
have green fingers
▪ He had green fingers, my grandfather. He could grow anything.
▪ The flower show season is upon us, and whether you have a green thumb or not, you should take a look at your garden.
▪ Tonight these dames were going to have greener fingers than Percy Thrower.
▪ You really do have green fingers.
have had a bellyful of sb/sth
have had a few (too many)
▪ Ralph Nader may have had a few, but then again far, far too few to mention.
have had enough (of sth)
▪ I'd had enough of the neighbors' noise, so I called the police.
▪ But I think perhaps you have had enough lessons for one night.
▪ By Saturday, both parties appeared to have had enough.
▪ Eat what is on offer and enjoy it without guilt, but stop when you have had enough.
▪ If you have had enough, stop eating.
▪ Male speaker People have had enough of crime in rural areas.
▪ My guess is that many of you have had enough of life before modernity.
▪ Others, if they have had enough attention, will simply start to struggle and then leap down or move away.
▪ Whatever the explanation, many people in Hong Kong have had enough.
have had more than your fair share of sth
▪ Tim's had more than his fair share of bad luck this year.
have had one too many
▪ Ron looked like he'd had one too many.
have had your chips
▪ Is not this subject wholly appropriate for the Minister, because his Government have had their chips?
have had your fill of sth
have half a mind to do sth
▪ I have half a mind to just go home.
▪ I have half a mind to tell her what I really think of her.
▪ I have half a mind to make you take this right back.
have half a mind to do sth
▪ I have half a mind to make you take this right back.
have high/great hopes for sb/sth
have issues (with sb/sth)
have it in mind
▪ I didn't have it in mind to go looking for a four-piece group.
▪ I still have it in mind that barbers take Mondays off.
have it made in the shade
have it your (own) way
▪ But remember that this Last Best Place can disappear if corporate colonizers and their lackeys in Congress have it their way.
▪ Well, have it your own way.
have its/your moments
▪ The Saints had their moments, but they still lost.
▪ Because, Ishmael says, all men have their moments of greatness.
▪ But I can assure you I have my moments.
▪ Even a railway journey with a missed connection can have its moments.
▪ Those observations made, it should be said that the Herioter did have his moments in the lineout.
▪ Yet, the show does have its moments.
have kittens
have legs
▪ You had to have legs like Marlene Dietrich to triumph over that get-up.
have money to burn
▪ Adventure expeditions are growing in popularity, particularly among older Americans with money to burn.
▪ Every time I see her she's wearing something new. She must have money to burn.
▪ People who buy expensive cars have money to burn, and they want you to know it.
▪ Unless you've got money to burn, these expensive guitars are not the instruments to get you started.
have more than one string to your bow
have nine lives
▪ The Michael Steins of this world have nine lives.
have no ambition to do sth
have no business doing sth/have no business to do sth
have no interest in doing sth
▪ I have no interest in continuing this conversation.
▪ He seemed to have no interest in doing anything.
▪ I have no interest in hating white people.
▪ I have no interest in high-tech commercial videos at all these days.
▪ I have no interest in the psychological interpretation of my sitters, I want to convey their physical appearance.
▪ Nor could they understand a young, good-looking man who appeared to have no interest in girls.
▪ Pound seems to have no interest in that.
▪ That is, leaders have no interest in proving themselves, but an abiding interest in expressing themselves.
▪ You might have no interest in building a fancy themed site or even learning anything about creating Web pages.
have no need of sth
▪ Gentlemen, we have no need of discretion to protect the life of Simon Cormack any more.
▪ I thought of leaving it to you, Cynthia, but you have no need of it.
▪ More straightforwardly, however, capitalism and technology have no need of religion.
▪ On Siporax, it is claimed, the bacteria have no need of this and get on with the important job.
▪ The rest of us find paracetamol an effective analgesic with no important side effects and have no need of an antidote.
▪ They appear to have no need of an anemone and usually ignore any placed in the aquarium with them.
▪ You have no need of a certificate.
have no parallel/be without parallel
have no place
▪ Exploitation and oppression will be concepts of history which have no place in the description of contemporary social reality.
▪ Honesty, decency, good will have no place in this business of selling or murdering an image.
▪ In a holy community Noyes thought that exclusiveness, jealousy, and quarreling should have no place.
▪ Personal opinion or preferences and speculative imaginings have no place in science.
▪ Religious celebrations have no place in public schools, although teaching about religion is acceptable.
▪ Some believe that values can not be taught apart from religion and therefore have no place in public schools.
▪ Some would argue that these enterprises have no place in a capitalist system, and should therefore be privatised as soon as possible.
▪ Therefore, the right of national self-determination could have no place in the party programme.
have no problem (in) doing sth
have no right to do sth
▪ You have no right to tell me what I can and can't do!
▪ But we have no right to force collection of child support for the kids.
▪ But you have no right to come in here meddling with my things.
▪ Finally, the relatives of patients have no right to make decisions on the patient's behalf.
▪ I have no right to be saying anything that goes against Church teaching.
▪ I have no right to intrude on their lives.
▪ The states have no rights to any money.
▪ You have no right to be here.
have no stomach for a fight/task etc
▪ They proved to have no stomach for a fight with only Steve Regeling showing any semblance of spirit.
have no use for sb/sth
▪ My company has no use for workers who are not motivated.
▪ Am I right in assuming that you have no use for it?
▪ For example, the business may be sold to some one else who decides they have no use for the present management.
▪ I have no use for second-hand books and unfashionable clothes and bits of ornament.
have no wish to do sth
▪ I have no wish to offend anybody.
▪ And believe me, I have no wish to keep score.
▪ I emphasize that I have no wish to come across here as the skunk at the process improvement garden party.
▪ I have no wish to attribute motives, but clearly finance intervenes.
▪ I have no wish to caddie for Brian Harley.
▪ I have no wish to change my nature over this matter and become a crusading journalist.
▪ I have no wish to create a posing pilots' paradise.
▪ I have no wish to get angry with my own invention, the so-named Miller.
▪ Mrs Hardman has grown used to her independence, and I have no wish to curtail her freedom.
have nothing against sb/sth
▪ I have nothing against Jack personally, I just don't like his line of work.
▪ Atari and Psion, like most companies, have nothing against enthusiasts making one or two copies for personal back-ups.
▪ I have nothing against Mr Jack Neighbours, who sadly, I understand, was killed in the war.
▪ I have nothing against the Arabs ... They are the same as us.
▪ I have nothing against the Arabs.
▪ I have nothing against these resorts, but my own shortlist of best resorts would not include any of them.
▪ I have nothing against thorns and prickles so long as you can admire them from a safe distance.
▪ Now I want this distinctly understood, that I have nothing against Cleveland.
have nothing on sb
▪ Another time she seemed to have nothing on under a grass skirt as she danced on a mirrored floor.
▪ He realized she must have nothing on.
▪ She seemed to have nothing on underneath, which made the wheel in my stomach behave in an entirely crazy fashion.
▪ When it comes to conniving, deceptive control freaks, ex-boyfriends have nothing on record companies.
▪ Where that girl is concerned I have nothing on my conscience.
have one foot in the grave
▪ She sounded like she had one foot in the grave.
have other/bigger fish to fry
▪ I can't deal with this now - I've got other fish to fry.
have oversight of sth
have possibilities
▪ This place has a lot of possibilities, but it will need some work.
have rough edges
▪ The play still has a few rough edges, but by next week it should be all right.
have sb on a string
▪ Lester claims to have several women on a string.
have sb over a barrel
▪ The actor has the studio over a barrel - if they want to keep him, they have to pay him more money.
▪ You have them over a barrel on this issue, with all the right on your side.
have sb's ear
▪ He used to boast to his friends that he often had the President's ear.
have sb's number
▪ You can tell Cara has his number. She knows exactly how to handle him when he's mad.
have sb/sth at your feet
▪ I have lain at his feet.
have sb/sth in mind (for sth)
▪ But they're not saying if they have Bosnia in mind.
▪ Did she have Mr Gonzalez in mind?
▪ I have particularly in mind community nurseries and similar support.
▪ I still have it in mind that barbers take Mondays off.
▪ Socrates could not have had in mind the moral compromise peculiar to a nation like our own.
▪ Those seven heads, with their seven mouths and seven tongues, have other things in mind.
▪ What they both must have had in mind was a different future for Ameliaone much more lucrative than her past.
▪ You have to keep in mind the trains here are descending from the Continental Divide and move quickly and quietly.
have second thoughts
▪ Couples contemplating divorce often have second thoughts when they realize how it will affect their children.
▪ It was obvious that the company was having second thoughts about the whole project.
▪ But now, with the raft travelling more slowly than I had planned, I began to have second thoughts.
▪ But then various men on the race committee and some male members of the National Aeronautic Association began to have second thoughts.
▪ I hope Darlington Transport have second thoughts on the matter.
▪ Keep him laughing and he might have second thoughts about eating you!
▪ Perhaps Mr Harrison would have second thoughts if he walked in our neck of the woods.
▪ Somewhere between second helpings I began to have second thoughts.
▪ Such incidents might have caused Sir Bernard to have second thoughts about the system; but he defends it with passion.
▪ Then, before she could have second thoughts, she picked up the telephone and dialled his number.
have several irons in the fire
have something of sth
▪ At last I have something of Father's.
▪ Clearly a stranger had emptied it, hence obviously they thought she might have something of interest in it.
▪ It seems you already have something of the greater power.
▪ The gardens have something of interest to offer throughout the year.
▪ They must each have something of reality about them.
▪ We have something of value to offer you, but you in return have something to offer us.
▪ William Right-well, then we have something of an impasse.
▪ You really do have something of Zbigniew in you.
have something up your sleeve
▪ Don't worry. He still has a few tricks up his sleeve.
have stars in your eyes
have sth (all) to herself
▪ She had the house to herself while her parents were gone.
▪ Helen used to have the house to herself.
▪ How could she have done this to herself?
have sth (all) to himself
▪ Jerry wanted to have the company all to himself.
▪ But he might just as well have been talking to himself.
▪ Did Mr Oakley mean he was going to have a room to himself?
▪ I wanted Seve to have the stage to himself - he'd earned it.
▪ If he can't have you all to himself, he won't want you at all.
▪ She had hoped Travis would have kept it to himself.
have sth (all) to myself
▪ I had a whole lane in the swimming pool to myself.
▪ I didn't have Mum to myself because all the others were around.
▪ I get home and I have no time to myself.
▪ I have a duty to myself and to my reader to express what follows with truth and dignity.
▪ I have an office to myself.
▪ I have been re-transformed to myself and this civilised gloom.
▪ I have said to myself that that is wrong.
▪ I must have been jealous of her life away from me, and wished to have her entirely to myself.
▪ The bedroom upstairs is all ready for my brother, and I'd prefer to have that floor to myself anyway.
have sth (all) to yourself
▪ Do you feel like you don't have any time to yourself?
have sth against sb/sth
▪ I have nothing against people making lots of money.
have sth at your/their etc fingertips
have sth coming out (of) your ears
have sth in common (with sb)
have sth in common (with sth)
▪ All these companies have one thing in common: they deal in small, inexpensive consumer items.
▪ The smaller boats actually have more in common with sailboards than with the huge yachts usually seen in marinas.
have sth in your pocket
▪ It looks like the team has a chance at the Aloha Bowl firmly in their pocket.
▪ After all, we have Vargas in our pocket.
▪ Shoppers will have more in their pockets and it will not cost companies vast sums to borrow for expansion.
▪ You have money in your pocket, a cheque-book on you and one or two credit cards as well.
have sth off pat
▪ Like most politicians he had all his answers off pat, but he didn't have anything particularly new or interesting to say.
▪ She only had to repeat the lines once or twice, and she'd have them down pat.
have sth on
have sth on the brain
▪ It's unbelievable - you have sex on the brain 24 hours a day!
▪ You always have food on the brain.
▪ But the festering problem may have effects on the brain, just as it can elsewhere in the body.
▪ Must have maggots on the brain.
have sth on your side/sth is on your side
have sth ready
have sth to your credit
have sth to your name
have sth under your belt
▪ Once you've had a few lessons under your belt, you're ready to buy your own ski equipment.
▪ It's difficult to get matches under your belt when you're like that.
have sth/sb on your hands
▪ It is still instinctively held that those involved in engineering science should be useful handymen and will have oil on their hands.
▪ The Khedive is starting to realize that he might have trouble on his hands.
▪ They submitted lest they kill him; his death from the fast would have been on their hands.
have sticky fingers
have teeth
▪ Critics of the law say it has no teeth and will not prevent violent crime.
▪ Because after the Anna Climbie case, the social services wanted to show it does have teeth.
▪ Frankly, I'd rather have teeth extracted than sit through either again.
▪ Is it only a paper tiger, or does it really have teeth?
▪ It is important that it should also have teeth.
▪ The episode illustrates beyond doubt that the majority voting rules of the Treaty of Rome have teeth.
▪ The movement will have teeth to back its arguments.
▪ What can have teeth, of course, even if it is concealed by a friendly smile, is aid.
have the courage of your (own) convictions
▪ Larry displayed the courage of his convictions by saying no to his supervisor.
have the floor
▪ The Senator from Wyoming has the floor.
have the gall to do sth
▪ Congress actually had the gall to vote for a pay raise for themselves.
▪ I can't believe he had the gall to ask you for money.
▪ Ruth was always on the phone and yet she had the gall to tell me off for making one call.
have the goodness to do sth
▪ But I hope to learn these soon if anybody will have the goodness to bear with me.
have the last laugh
▪ Boy did he have the last laugh.
▪ Holding a rolling pin and determined to have the last laugh.
▪ Yet women drivers have the last laugh.
have the makings of sth
▪ We've got the makings of a winning team.
have the patience of Job
have the right idea
▪ The new superintendent has the right idea about attacking illiteracy, but the wrong method.
▪ Mrs Donaldson, in last month's letters page, certainly seems to have the right idea.
▪ The young lads have the right idea.
have the sniffles
have the whip hand
▪ With the advent of term limits in the state Legislature, Orange County will have the whip hand.
have the wit to do sth
▪ Thankfully, Reid had the wit to see what was wrong with the plan.
have the world at your feet
have the/a ring of sth
▪ Lies by their nature have the ring of truth.
▪ Some stories have a ring of truth, if a little exaggerated: They do fit the known biography.
▪ Thinkers, like the aforementioned, gained status because they suggest answers that have the ring of truth.
have two left feet
have two left feet
have visions of sth
▪ I have visions of some of these poor women who work all day long exposed to such seductive sounds becoming hypnotised.
▪ I think of it with loathing and dread; have visions of designing the no-need-to-clear-mask and then return to reality.
have worms
have you got a minute?
have your back to/against the wall
have your cake and eat it
▪ First, is it an ethical investment policy to encourage people to try to have their cake and eat it?
▪ It appears the Ministry men can have their cake and eat it ... but only if we let them.
▪ It seems as though the council wants to have its cake and eat it.
▪ That way he could have his cake and eat it too.
▪ The benefits of standardization are coupled with the capacity to respond to change-a way to have your cake and eat it too.
▪ They don't imagine they can have their cake and eat it too.
▪ You can't have your cake and eat it.
▪ You can have your cake and eat it; the only trouble is, you get fat.
have your eye on sth
▪ Rodrigues has his eye on the major leagues.
▪ We have our eyes on a nice little house near the beach.
▪ A few years more and white men will be all around you. they have their eyes on this land.
▪ As I told you, I have my eyes on a very different sort of market.
▪ He must have his eyes on a Ryder Cup spot.
have your hands full
▪ Diane has her hands full with housekeeping chores and a new baby.
▪ I'm sorry I can't help you -- I have my hands full right now.
▪ The Mexican government had its hands full fighting a war on three fronts.
▪ You must have your hands full with all this work to do and the children to look after.
▪ And Brooks would have his hands full.
▪ And you can bet we have our hands full.
▪ I know I am going to have my hands full when his session is over.
▪ So it looks as if the doctors and Osteopaths will continue to have their hands full.
▪ So when the shutdown finally ends, the agency will have its hands full.
▪ Steinbach will have his hands full with a pitching staff fresh out of the box.
▪ The parents and teachers of many of these youngsters have their hands full enough just looking after them.
▪ You guys have your hands full.
have your hands/fingers in the till
have your head in the clouds
have your head screwed on (straight/right)
▪ Cloughie probably gets closest to it - not he himself but the No. 9 seems to have his head screwed on.
▪ She seemed to have her head screwed on right, even if she was a girl.
have your heart/sights set on sth
▪ Teng is thought to have her sights set on the Board of Supervisors' presidency.
▪ But do the public have their sights set on an Urbanizer?
▪ If you have your hearts set on a joint endowment, you have two alternatives to cashing in the present one.
▪ Many of the Keishinkai parents have their hearts set on Keio.
▪ Movie sniper Jude Law and Rachel Weisz are covered in mud but still have their sights set on desire.
have your limits
▪ I have my limits. You will not use that kind of nasty language in my class.
▪ Alternatively it was seen by some as a warning to the opposition that the process of democratization would have its limits.
▪ But those official data sources have their limits.
▪ Denial does have its limits, though, whiteout being one of them.
▪ Even saints, it seems, have their limits.
▪ In a broader context, however, these variations have their limits.
▪ Joey is just kidding, but even I have my limits.
have your name in lights
have your nose in a book/magazine/newspaper
have your nose/snout in the trough
have your say
▪ At a public meeting yesterday, environmentalists were finally permitted to have their say about the future of the ancient forest.
▪ You've had your say -- now let someone else speak.
▪ But emotions don't like that; they love to have their say.
▪ Our advantage, however, was that we allowed the public to have their say on possible changes before proposals were published.
▪ Probably the best thing about his show was that he let people have their say.
▪ Talk too much, and not let others have their say.
▪ Tennis World would like you to have your say on the issue.
▪ The voters are entitled to have their say on Maastricht and should be given it.
▪ Whatever Kureishi may claim, minorities and special-interest groups have their say in his work.
▪ When the company finally makes a small offer to the widow, her lawyer will have his say, too.
have your work cut out (for you)
▪ Election monitors will have their work cut out.
▪ So you have your work cut out for you.
▪ The home team has not beaten the Scarlets for some dozen matches and should still have their work cut out to win.
▪ They have their work cut out adapting themselves to it, and it to themselves.
▪ They have their work cut out for them.
▪ We have our work cut out for us.
▪ Whoever takes on the trout farm will have their work cut out.
have/be nothing to do with sb/sth
▪ But that smell might very well have nothing to do with it.
▪ Finally, he was publicly warned and barred from communion, and the people advised to have nothing to do with him.
▪ General Smuts will have nothing to do with you.
▪ He was nothing to do with her and Alan.
▪ I have nothing to do with the motel.
▪ These are things to be proud of, but they have nothing to do with rank or class.
▪ We have nothing to do with each other.
have/exchange words (with sb)
▪ He and Kemp pound down the stairway, exchanging words.
▪ I have words before my eyes, as you might imagine.
▪ I would hear the women exchange words with Miss Fingerstop.
▪ Linda buried herself in the crowd, exchanging words with this one and that and heading for the bar.
▪ Nurses busily went up and down, sometimes pausing to exchange words and careless laughter.
▪ Sometimes, Britten seems to have written more naturally when he didn't have words to set.
▪ They exchanged words, not all of which appeared to be in jest.
▪ Without it, you have words virtually sprinkled across the page, each project an exercise in speed and frustration.
have/gain the upper hand
▪ Police have gained the upper hand over the drug dealers in the area.
▪ But slowly and surely the followers of Chaos gained the upper hand.
▪ If the two had been introduced simultaneously, the larger one would invariably have the upper hand.
▪ Now White gains the upper hand.
▪ Officials said they might reopen the freeway at 5 p. m. today, perhaps sooner if firefighters gain the upper hand overnight.
▪ The world can only pray that they do not gain the upper hand.
▪ Under the proposed law, she would have the upper hand.
▪ We must destroy them now, while we yet have the upper hand.
▪ When you have a gun you have the upper hand, it makes you feel big, bad.
have/get a corner on sth
▪ Any other old drunk would have got a corner on the fourth page.
have/get butterflies (in your stomach)
have/get sb by the short and curlies
have/get the feeling (that)
▪ As I contemplate the process of separation / individuation I may have feelings and sensations that I can not articulate.
▪ As soon as things are really good, I always have a feeling the rug is about to be pulled out from under me.
▪ But I have feeling in my hand back.
▪ Certainly, younger children show affection and have feelings of liking and disliking.
▪ I have a feeling he will win.
▪ I have a feeling that there is now more of my past life than my future.
▪ I have a feeling we may be wrong about the taxes.
▪ I have a feeling you won't need that radio.
have/get the goods on sb
▪ The two detectives went undercover to get the goods on the Parducci family.
▪ It is get the goods on him.
have/get the hots for sb
▪ I think he's got the hots for you, Elaine.
▪ But my, what a great body - no wonder Luke's got the hots for you.
▪ Well, Big Breakfast's Donna Air seems to have the hots for him.
have/get the measure of sb
▪ Booth and Rowntree were more concerned with getting the measure of poverty than with trying to devise a general theory about it.
▪ He may have the measure of the John Gosden-trained Anshan, running from stall 15.
have/get the measure of sth
▪ Booth and Rowntree were more concerned with getting the measure of poverty than with trying to devise a general theory about it.
▪ He may have the measure of the John Gosden-trained Anshan, running from stall 15.
have/get the shits
have/get/give a feel for sth
▪ Any guilt she many have felt for the loss of her son did not affect her longevity.
▪ Did you get a feel for that with those conversations and the two extremes, the shot-gun versus the follow-up?
▪ He was here to get a feel for the place.
▪ I can get a rhythm, get a feel for the offense.
▪ Playing the game itself is lots of fun, once you get a feel for the actual shot settings.
▪ Rather we get a feeling for the differences in the island societies through encounters with restaurant owners.
▪ Walk around the Tor and on the footpaths of the surrounding levels to get a feel for this legend-full land.
▪ Whenever possible I devoured local newspapers, trying to get a feel for the politics and social conditions of each place.
have/give sb first refusal on sth
have/hold sth in your hot little hand
have/hold/want no truck with sb/sth
▪ But it does lead inevitably to ignorance, for you can not understand what you deliberately chose to have no truck with.
▪ Its radicals, who dominate the leadership, want no truck with Mr Gorbachev.
▪ Then the people who get penalised are the majority who want no truck with him.
▪ We in the Conservative Party have no truck with that style of gutter journalism which we were forced to endure last Sunday.
have/keep both feet on the ground
▪ She's really creative, but she also has her feet firmly on the ground.
▪ So I guess inversely he taught me the need to be prepared and keep both feet on the ground.
have/keep your beady eye(s) on sb/sth
have/keep your eye on sb
▪ As I told you, I have my eyes on a very different sort of market.
▪ He kept his eyes on Ezra, surveying him.
▪ He kept his eyes on his father, who had betrayed him.
▪ His face had grown serious, and he kept his eyes on the road.
▪ I kept my eyes on it the whole time, he wrote.
▪ It was not only Percy Makepeace who kept his eyes on Hilary.
▪ Mulcahey kept his eyes on the circles that widened out from the pebbles he dropped into the water.
▪ We have to keep our eyes on the sandy path.
have/keep your finger on the pulse (of sth)
have/know all the answers
▪ Anyone can claim to have all the answers.
▪ But I don't have all the answers.
▪ He was a modest and unassuming man who never gave the impression that he knew all the answers.
▪ In the current situation many issues as yet remain unresolved and we do not have all the answers.
▪ We are supposed to have all the answers.
▪ Will that have all the answers?
have/lead a charmed life
▪ But since its premier issue in January 1993, Wired has led a charmed life.
▪ By his own admission he has led a charmed life.
▪ It's been too easy for us; we've led charmed lives till now.
▪ No wonder that she and Charles felt that they led a charmed life, that the times were on their side.
have/make common cause (with/against sb)
have/take a breather
▪ A party of skylarks were taking a breather from their incessant high-rise singing to indulge in an early-morning splashing.
▪ Gilts, after four days of rising quotations, softened an eighth as the pound took a breather.
▪ He was not digging at all now but taking a breather, evidently.
▪ Main picture: The female takes a breather.
▪ Regroup and take a breather at midday.
▪ Take your skis off and have a breather.
▪ When the last Demon's dead, take a breather before the celebrations start.
have/take a butcher's
have/take a gander at sth
▪ Take a gander at this letter I just got from Janet.
▪ Ye take a gander at the engines.
have/take a slash
▪ A bill that would have slashed child support payments for most divorced fathers failed in the state Assembly.
▪ A swarthy fellow with ringlets was taking a slash at her with a heavy cutlass.
▪ And some London pubs have slashed their prices from £1.70 a pint to less than a pound.
▪ Last year, Hayworth supported welfare-reform legislation that would have slashed federal spending by $ 66 billion over five years.
▪ The telecommunications giant joined a growing number of employers in growth industries that have slashed payrolls even as their profits soared.
▪ To woo customers, carpet stores have slashed prices, which cut into the bottom line of carpet manufacturers.
▪ We have slashed soot and dust emissions by nearly 90 percent.
▪ You have slashed costs and created an extensive new marketing campaign.
have/take a squint at sth
have/take pride of place
▪ A runaway hamster called Sophie takes pride of place where the school rat once roamed.
▪ A Tudor Doll's House takes pride of place in a fine collection of houses and period dolls.
▪ Are they to take pride of place, as they should in ballets worthy of the name?
▪ At Maastricht next month, political, economic and monetary union will take pride of place.
▪ Glass would have pride of place, she said.
▪ The statue takes pride of place at Gerrards Cross station.
▪ There, pit latrines inside homes take pride of place, their arched entrances lavishly embellished with stone carvings.
▪ These were retrieved and now take pride of place in the library.
have/tan sb's hide
have/throw a fit
▪ Mom's going to have a fit when she sees what you've done.
▪ But it was clear to all that the then Massachusetts governor would have fit snugly into the capital cocoon.
▪ He started to have fits and he suffered permanent damage.
▪ He would have fit in perfectly back in 1956, the last time they had a Subway Series.
▪ I have fitted the 31/10.15 tyres to 15 x 7 rims.
▪ It would definitely not have fitted those of Marthe and myself.
▪ She continued to have fits and suffered serious and permanent brain damage.
▪ The 2-year-old threw fits, but not just the normal toddler tantrums.
▪ There must be hundreds, maybe thousands, of sea anglers who have fitted a Decca-receiving navigator to their own boat.
he/she had a good innings
hold/have sb in the palm of your hand
▪ She's got the whole committee in the palm of her hand.
if I had my way
▪ If I had my way, there'd be a baseball game every day of the year.
▪ Well, I would ban them too if I had my way.
it's a dirty job, but someone has to do it
just have to do sth
▪ I just have to get somewhere soon to sleep.
▪ My uncle said that now we ha-ha just have to do this.
▪ She would just have to get out and walk.
▪ Sometimes you just have to tell people what s best for them.
▪ That's the trouble with doing all these films and tellies - you just have to remember a little bit for a short take.
▪ We just have to do some more throat swabs.
▪ You can have it right back if you want it, you just have to ask.
▪ You don't just have to listen to stories.
justice has been done/served
▪ He can continue to appeal, or go to some other level, until he feels justice has been done.
▪ He has successfully persuaded the crowd that justice has been done.
▪ Mr Townsend says he feels justice has been done.
▪ Mrs Alliss' solicitor says justice has been done.
keep/have one eye/half an eye on sb/sth
keep/have sb on a leash
live/lead/have the life of Riley
▪ I hear that all the older boys are driving big expensive cars and living the life of Riley.
more sth than you've had hot dinners
no more does/has/will etc sb
▪ In practice, this situation will arise only very rarely if a regime of symptom control and no more has been adopted.
▪ Men appear to be no more willing to support women in their traditional roles than women are to assume them.
no sooner had/did ... than
no sooner/hardly had ... than
▪ Alas, no sooner had he started than he realised it was no longer what he wanted.
▪ But no sooner had Miriam gone than Harry suddenly returned looking more cheerful than one might have expected.
▪ No sooner had he gone than one of the cameramen approached.
▪ No sooner had it begun than the rain seemed to end.
not have a bad word to say about/against sb
not have a bean
not have a clue (where/why/how etc)
▪ After nine years of marriage to her I did not have a clue myself.
not have a dog's chance
not have a hair out of place
▪ He sat at his desk, not a hair out of place, and turning a pencil over in his hand.
▪ He seemed stern and austere and never had a hair out of place.
▪ Joel never has a hair out of place.
not have a leg to stand on
▪ If you didn't sign a contract, you won't have a leg to stand on.
not have a prayer (of doing sth)
▪ The Seahawks don't have a prayer of winning the Superbowl.
▪ Boxing White Hopes like Cooney do not have a prayer of toppling Tyson.
not have a snowball's chance in hell
not have a stitch on
not have much up top
not have the faintest idea
▪ I don't have the faintest idea what you're talking about.
not have the first idea about sth
not have the foggiest (idea)
▪ I don't have the foggiest idea what his address is.
▪ Before I go on, some of you may not have the foggiest what a fanzine is.
not have the heart to do something
▪ I didn't have the heart to tell my daughter we couldn't keep the puppy.
not have the remotest idea/interest/intention etc
not stand/have a cat in hell's chance (of doing sth)
only have eyes for sb
▪ Mark only had eyes for his wife.
sb can't have it both ways
sb doesn't have much meat on him/her
sb's chickens have come home to roost
sb/sth has yet to do sth
▪ Deion has yet to figure out how to throw to himself.
▪ Harland & Wolff has yet to show a profit, but the future looks good.
▪ His work retained a pronounced individuality and originality that has yet to be properly acknowledged.
▪ However, he said he has yet to consider his circumstances.
▪ However, the site this year has yet to be determined.
▪ If there is a success formula in that it has yet to be demonstrated.
▪ The savagery of our retaliation against the virus has yet to be played out.
▪ Whether it allows the exercise of force to be more controlled and effective has yet to be seen.
shut/close the stable door after the horse has bolted
some people have all the luck
▪ It costs a fortune to buy a Porsche - some people have all the luck.
sth has sb's name on it
▪ If a washer has a brand name on it, make sure that the smooth side comes into contact with the seating.
▪ They say if it has your name on it ... But who can write on a virus?
sth/sb has their uses
take/have a leak
▪ Billy got off his lounge chair now, went into the bathroom and took a leak.
▪ Cully goes off to take a leak.
▪ I'd gone behind the set to take a leak and I heard this sound like snapping wood.
▪ I thought it was a damn silly place to park if some one wanted to take a leak in the bushes.
▪ She locked herself into a cubicle and took a leak.
▪ Tank owners are required to have leak detection equipment installed by December 1993.
▪ Well, rumors have leaked out.
take/have/play no part in sth
▪ Herrera, personally, took no part in this mild form of political persecution.
▪ Johnny played no part in this world.
▪ Of course, Laura took no part in such a major business decision; the empire builder was Bernard.
▪ Schuster insists his political connections played no part in the choice.
▪ The mostly white jurors who actually sat in the jury room, insisted that race had played no part in their decision.
▪ The very act of imagining Gods exempt from suffering ensures that humans take no part in the deity.
▪ They are evaluated and yet play no part in defining the criteria, determining the methods, or controlling the process.
▪ This is not to say that economic imperatives play no part in penal developments.
the bird has flown
the penny (has) dropped
▪ At this point the penny dropped.
▪ I was about to ask Jack who it was, when the penny dropped.
▪ Suddenly the penny dropped, and Meredith knew why he'd been prowling about the airport like an angry lion.
▪ Then the penny dropped and he realised that the man had meant a fan- bearer.
walls have ears
will/would have none of sth
▪ But Kaptan would have none of it.
▪ Kronecker would have none of this.
▪ Pott would have none of it and, with the aid of his old friend Nourse, successfully set it himself.
▪ Stark would have none of that.
▪ Surprised and shocked, the Soviet government would have none of it.
▪ The world was going crazy and, or so it seemed, Trumptonshire would have none of it.
you can't have it both ways
▪ It's either me or her. You can't have it both ways!
you had me worried
▪ You really had me worried - I thought you didn't like the present.
you have no idea (how/what etc)
you only have to read/look at/listen to etc sth
you should have seen/heard sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Do you have a phone here?'' "Yes sir, we do.''
▪ "Have you got a garden in your new place?'' "Yes, we have.''
Have you ever had pneumonia?
Have you got a pen I could borrow?
Have you got your own computer at home?
Have you had lunch?
▪ Ahmad has five employees under him.
▪ Although she's eighty she has an excellent memory.
▪ Beth has an awful cold.
▪ Can I have a drink of water, please?
▪ Chris has a friend who knows Randy Travis.
▪ Do you have your purse?
▪ Don't worry, I had a shower this morning.
▪ Excuse me, do you have change for a dollar?
▪ He said it was interesting, so I had a look.
▪ Here, I have a map.
▪ Here, Tina, have some popcorn.
▪ How many of your students have a computer?
▪ How many pages does it have?
The Collaborative International Dictionary

have

Have \Have\ (h[a^]v), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Had (h[a^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Having. Indic. present, I have, thou hast, he has; we, ye, they have.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben (imperf. h[ae]fde, p. p. geh[ae]fd); akin to OS. hebbian, D. hebben, OFries. hebba, OHG. hab[=e]n, G. haben, Icel. hafa, Sw. hafva, Dan. have, Goth. haban, and prob. to L. habere, whence F. avoir. Cf. Able, Avoirdupois, Binnacle, Habit.]

  1. To hold in possession or control; to own; as, he has a farm.

  2. To possess, as something which appertains to, is connected with, or affects, one.

    The earth hath bubbles, as the water has.
    --Shak.

    He had a fever late.
    --Keats.

  3. To accept possession of; to take or accept.

    Break thy mind to me in broken English; wilt thou have me?
    --Shak.

  4. To get possession of; to obtain; to get.
    --Shak.

  5. To cause or procure to be; to effect; to exact; to desire; to require.

    I had the church accurately described to me.
    --Sir W. Scott.

    Wouldst thou have me turn traitor also?
    --Ld. Lytton.

  6. To bear, as young; as, she has just had a child.

  7. To hold, regard, or esteem.

    Of them shall I be had in honor.
    --2 Sam. vi. 22.

  8. To cause or force to go; to take. ``The stars have us to bed.''
    --Herbert. ``Have out all men from me.''
    --2 Sam. xiii.

  9. 9. To take or hold (one's self); to proceed promptly; -- used reflexively, often with ellipsis of the pronoun; as, to have after one; to have at one or at a thing, i. e., to aim at one or at a thing; to attack; to have with a companion.
    --Shak.

  10. To be under necessity or obligation; to be compelled; followed by an infinitive.

    Science has, and will long have, to be a divider and a separatist.
    --M. Arnold.

    The laws of philology have to be established by external comparison and induction.
    --Earle.

  11. To understand.

    You have me, have you not?
    --Shak.

  12. To put in an awkward position; to have the advantage of; as, that is where he had him. [Slang]

    Note: Have, as an auxiliary verb, is used with the past participle to form preterit tenses; as, I have loved; I shall have eaten. Originally it was used only with the participle of transitive verbs, and denoted the possession of the object in the state indicated by the participle; as, I have conquered him, I have or hold him in a conquered state; but it has long since lost this independent significance, and is used with the participles both of transitive and intransitive verbs as a device for expressing past time. Had is used, especially in poetry, for would have or should have.

    Myself for such a face had boldly died.
    --Tennyson.

    To have a care, to take care; to be on one's guard.

    To have (a man) out, to engage (one) in a duel.

    To have done (with). See under Do, v. i.

    To have it out, to speak freely; to bring an affair to a conclusion.

    To have on, to wear.

    To have to do with. See under Do, v. t.

    Syn: To possess; to own. See Possess.

have

Have \Have\ (h[a^]v), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Had (h[a^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Having. Indic. present, I have, thou hast, he has; we, ye, they have.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben (imperf. h[ae]fde, p. p. geh[ae]fd); akin to OS. hebbian, D. hebben, OFries. hebba, OHG. hab[=e]n, G. haben, Icel. hafa, Sw. hafva, Dan. have, Goth. haban, and prob. to L. habere, whence F. avoir. Cf. Able, Avoirdupois, Binnacle, Habit.]

  1. To hold in possession or control; to own; as, he has a farm.

  2. To possess, as something which appertains to, is connected with, or affects, one.

    The earth hath bubbles, as the water has.
    --Shak.

    He had a fever late.
    --Keats.

  3. To accept possession of; to take or accept.

    Break thy mind to me in broken English; wilt thou have me?
    --Shak.

  4. To get possession of; to obtain; to get.
    --Shak.

  5. To cause or procure to be; to effect; to exact; to desire; to require.

    I had the church accurately described to me.
    --Sir W. Scott.

    Wouldst thou have me turn traitor also?
    --Ld. Lytton.

  6. To bear, as young; as, she has just had a child.

  7. To hold, regard, or esteem.

    Of them shall I be had in honor.
    --2 Sam. vi. 22.

  8. To cause or force to go; to take. ``The stars have us to bed.''
    --Herbert. ``Have out all men from me.''
    --2 Sam. xiii.

  9. 9. To take or hold (one's self); to proceed promptly; -- used reflexively, often with ellipsis of the pronoun; as, to have after one; to have at one or at a thing, i. e., to aim at one or at a thing; to attack; to have with a companion.
    --Shak.

  10. To be under necessity or obligation; to be compelled; followed by an infinitive.

    Science has, and will long have, to be a divider and a separatist.
    --M. Arnold.

    The laws of philology have to be established by external comparison and induction.
    --Earle.

  11. To understand.

    You have me, have you not?
    --Shak.

  12. To put in an awkward position; to have the advantage of; as, that is where he had him. [Slang]

    Note: Have, as an auxiliary verb, is used with the past participle to form preterit tenses; as, I have loved; I shall have eaten. Originally it was used only with the participle of transitive verbs, and denoted the possession of the object in the state indicated by the participle; as, I have conquered him, I have or hold him in a conquered state; but it has long since lost this independent significance, and is used with the participles both of transitive and intransitive verbs as a device for expressing past time. Had is used, especially in poetry, for would have or should have.

    Myself for such a face had boldly died.
    --Tennyson.

    To have a care, to take care; to be on one's guard.

    To have (a man) out, to engage (one) in a duel.

    To have done (with). See under Do, v. i.

    To have it out, to speak freely; to bring an affair to a conclusion.

    To have on, to wear.

    To have to do with. See under Do, v. t.

    Syn: To possess; to own. See Possess.

Wiktionary

have

alt. 1 (context transitive English) To possess, own, hold. 2 (context transitive English) To be related in some way to (with the object identifying the relationship). 3 (context transitive English) To partake of a particular substance (especially a food or drink) or action. 4 (context auxiliary verb, taking a past participle English) Used in forming the http://en.wikipedi

  1. org/wiki/Perfect%20aspect and the past perfect aspect. 5 (context auxiliary verb, taking a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infinitive English) must. 6 (context transitive English) To give birth to. 7 (context transitive English) To engage in sexual intercourse with. 8 (context transitive English) To accept as a romantic partner. 9 (''transitive with bare infinitive'') To cause to, by a command, request or invitation. 10 (''transitive with adjective or adjective-phrase complement'') To cause to be. 11 (''transitive with bare infinitive'') To be affected by an occurrence. (Used in supplying a topic that is not a verb argument.) 12 (''transitive with adjective or adjective-phrase complement'') To depict as being. 13 Used as interrogative auxiliary verb with a following pronoun to form tag questions. (For further discussion, see "Usage notes" below) 14 (context British slang English) To defeat in a fight; take. 15 (context Irish English) To be able to speak a language. 16 To feel or be (especially painfully) aware of. 17 To be afflicted with, to suffer from, to experience something negative 18 To trick, to deceive 19 (context transitive often with present participle English) To allow. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To possess, own, hold. 2 (context transitive English) To be related in some way to (with the object identifying the relationship). 3 (context transitive English) To partake of a particular substance (especially a food or drink) or action. 4 (context auxiliary verb, taking a past participle English) Used in forming the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perfect%20aspect and the past perfect aspect. 5 (context auxiliary verb, taking a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infinitive English) must. 6 (context transitive English) To give birth to. 7 (context transitive English) To engage in sexual intercourse with. 8 (context transitive English) To accept as a romantic partner. 9 (''transitive with bare infinitive'') To cause to, by a command, request or invitation. 10 (''transitive with adjective or adjective-phrase complement'') To cause to be. 11 (''transitive with bare infinitive'') To be affected by an occurrence. (Used in supplying a topic that is not a verb argument.) 12 (''transitive with adjective or adjective-phrase complement'') To depict as being. 13 Used as interrogative auxiliary verb with a following pronoun to form tag questions. (For further discussion, see "Usage notes" below) 14 (context British slang English) To defeat in a fight; take. 15 (context Irish English) To be able to speak a language. 16 To feel or be (especially painfully) aware of. 17 To be afflicted with, to suffer from, to experience something negative 18 To trick, to deceive 19 (context transitive often with present participle English) To allow.

WordNet

have

  1. n. a person who possesses great material wealth [syn: rich person, wealthy person]

  2. [also: has, had]

have

  1. v. have or possess, either in a concrete or an abstract sense; "She has $1,000 in the bank"; "He has got two beautiful daughters"; "She holds a Master's degree from Harvard" [syn: have got, hold]

  2. have as a feature; "This restaurant features the most famous chefs in France" [syn: feature] [ant: miss]

  3. of mental or physical states or experiences; "get an idea"; "experience vertigo"; "get nauseous"; "undergo a strange sensation"; "The chemical undergoes a sudden change"; "The fluid undergoes shear"; "receive injuries"; "have a feeling" [syn: experience, receive, get, undergo]

  4. have ownership or possession of; "He owns three houses in Florida"; "How many cars does she have?" [syn: own, possess]

  5. cause to move; cause to be in a certain position or condition; "He got his squad on the ball"; "This let me in for a big surprise"; "He got a girl into trouble" [syn: get, let]

  6. serve oneself to, or consume regularly; "Have another bowl of chicken soup!"; "I don't take sugar in my coffee" [syn: consume, ingest, take in, take] [ant: abstain]

  7. have a personal or business relationship with someone; "have a postdoc"; "have an assistant"; "have a lover"

  8. organize or be responsible for; "hold a reception"; "have, throw, or make a party"; "give a course" [syn: hold, throw, make, give]

  9. have left; "I have two years left"; "I don't have any money left"; "They have two more years before they retire"

  10. be confronted with; "What do we have here?"; "Now we have a fine mess"

  11. undergo; "The stocks had a fast run-up" [syn: experience]

  12. suffer from; be ill with; "She has arthritis"

  13. cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner; "The ads induced me to buy a VCR"; "My children finally got me to buy a computer"; "My wife made me buy a new sofa" [syn: induce, stimulate, cause, get, make]

  14. receive willingly something given or offered; "The only girl who would have him was the miller's daughter"; "I won't have this dog in my house!"; "Please accept my present" [syn: accept, take] [ant: refuse]

  15. get something; come into possession of; "receive payment"; "receive a gift"; "receive letters from the front" [syn: receive]

  16. undergo (as of injuries and illnesses); "She suffered a fracture in the accident"; "He had an insulin shock after eating three candy bars"; "She got a bruise on her leg"; "He got his arm broken in the scuffle" [syn: suffer, sustain, get]

  17. achieve a point or goal; "Nicklaus had a 70"; "The Brazilian team got 4 goals"; "She made 29 points that day" [syn: get, make]

  18. give birth (to a newborn); "My wife had twins yesterday!" [syn: give birth, deliver, bear, birth]

  19. have sex with; archaic use; "He had taken this woman when she was most vulnerable" [syn: take]

  20. [also: has, had]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

have

Old English habban "to own, possess; be subject to, experience," from Proto-Germanic *haben- (cognates: Old Norse hafa, Old Saxon hebbjan, Old Frisian habba, German haben, Gothic haban "to have"), from PIE *kap- "to grasp" (see capable). Not related to Latin habere, despite similarity in form and sense; the Latin cognate is capere "seize." Old English second person singular present hæfst, third person singular present hæfð became Middle English hast, hath, while Old English -bb- became -v- in have. The past participle had developed from Old English gehæfd.\n

\nSense of "possess, have at one's disposal" (I have a book) is a shift from older languages, where the thing possessed was made the subject and the possessor took the dative case (as in Latin est mihi liber "I have a book," literally "there is to me a book"). Used as an auxiliary in Old English, too (especially to form present perfect tense); the word has taken on more functions over time; Modern English he had better would have been Old English him (dative) wære betere. To have to for "must" (1570s) is from sense of "possess as a duty or thing to be done" (Old English). Phrase have a nice day as a salutation after a commercial transaction attested by 1970, American English. Phrase have (noun), will (verb) is from 1954, originally from comedian Bob Hope, in the form Have tux, will travel; Hope described this as typical of vaudevillians' ads in "Variety," indicating a willingness to perform anywhere, any time.

Wikipedia

Have

Have or having may refer to:

  • the concept of ownership
  • any concept of possession; see Possession (disambiguation)
  • an English "verb" used:
    • to denote linguistic possession in a broad sense
    • as an auxiliary verb; see English auxiliaries and contractions
    • in constructions such as have something done; see
  • Having (album), a 2006 album by the band Trespassers William
  • Having (SQL), a clause in the SQL programming language
  • Having (inlet), Rügen island, German

Usage examples of "have".

He had learned her opinions on the subject of Aberrancy over the weeks they had spent together, and while he did not agree with much of what she said, it had enough validity to make him think.

Q Factor Aberrants has not previously been observed to lead to aberrancy in the offspring of such alliances, since the aberrant factors do not appear to be inherited to any significant extent.

Weavers had been responsible for the practice of killing Aberrant children for more than a hundred years.

Mishani would never have believed it possible - not only that Lucia had been allowed to reach eight harvests of age in the first place, but also that the Empress was foolish enough to think the high families would allow an Aberrant to rule Saramyr.

Kaiku had always been stubborn and wilful, but to be an Aberrant was surely indefensible?

The Empress might have enough support among the nobles to keep a precarious hold on her throne, but she had made no overtures to the common folk, and they were solidly opposed to the idea of an Aberrant ruler.

A shadow seemed to settle on his heart as he thought of the Aberrant lady they had met in Axekami.

In their aberration they believed it was worth their while to break all the barriers of perception, even if they had to become trees to do that.

And because of the aberration of the Dutch and Belgians for neutrality there had been no staff consultations by which the defenders could pool their plans and resources to the best advantage.

For the mind and the passion of Hitler - all the aberrations that possessed his feverish brain - had roots that lay deep in German experience and thought.

He may have thought I was just as involved in the plan to evacuate our people to the Abesse as Mother was.

I dreamed that night that she had married a professional gambler, who cut her throat in the course of the first six months because the dear child refused to aid and abet his nefarious schemes.

Bal had lent Barrie to us, and without a woman to aid and abet him, it seemed to me that he was powerless.

Most of all I trust to the generosity of the Hathors, who have abetted me so openly thus far.

Clearly you have aided and abetted a traitor to escape justice, and you will be remanded.