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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Lance

Lance \Lance\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Lanced; p. pr. & vb. n. Lancing.]

  1. To pierce with a lance, or with any similar weapon.

    Seized the due victim, and with fury lanced Her back.
    --Dryden.

  2. To open with a lancet; to pierce; as, to lance a vein or an abscess.

  3. To throw in the manner of a lance. See Lanch.

Lance

Lance \Lance\ (l[a^]ns), n. [OE. lance, F. lance, fr. L. lancea; cf. Gr. lo`gchh. Cf. Launch.]

  1. A weapon of war, consisting of a long shaft or handle and a steel blade or head; a spear carried by horsemen, and often decorated with a small flag; also, a spear or harpoon used by whalers and fishermen.

    A braver soldier never couched lance.
    --Shak.

  2. A soldier armed with a lance; a lancer.

  3. (Founding) A small iron rod which suspends the core of the mold in casting a shell.

  4. (Mil.) An instrument which conveys the charge of a piece of ordnance and forces it home.

  5. (Pyrotech.) One of the small paper cases filled with combustible composition, which mark the outlines of a figure.

  6. (Med.) A lancet.

    Free lance, in the Middle Ages, and subsequently, a knight or roving soldier, who was free to engage for any state or commander that purchased his services; hence, a person who assails institutions or opinions on his own responsibility without regard to party lines or deference to authority. See also freelance, n. and a., and freelancer.

    Lance bucket (Cavalry), a socket attached to a saddle or stirrup strap, in which to rest the but of a lance.

    Lance corporal, same as Lancepesade.

    Lance knight, a lansquenet.
    --B. Jonson.

    Lance snake (Zo["o]l.), the fer-de-lance.

    Stink-fire lance (Mil.), a kind of fuse filled with a composition which burns with a suffocating odor; -- used in the counter operations of miners.

    To break a lance, to engage in a tilt or contest.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

lance

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
lance corporal
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Men and horses went down like ninepins before them, in a tangle of waving limbs, flailing hooves and broken lances.
▪ The lance is represented by a nerve which has every likeness to the shape of that instrument.
▪ The impact of this slavering beast on an enemy formation is just as effective as that of a Knight with a lance.
▪ The two settled their lances, rode at each other, and the pagan knight was slain.
▪ Then he thrust his lance into the vulnerable spot and killed the warrior.
▪ They are armoured in shining silver and armed with white lances with diamond-hard tips which glitter like stars.
▪ Undesirable removal of lubricants may occur in machinery and hazards may arise in the use of steam lances.
II.verb
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A doctor carefully lanced the boil.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Even in my mind I found it extremely unwieldy trying to lance one - let alone 100,000 - from a charging steed.
▪ He was then lanced with a spear before his trial got under way, by the order of Emperor Maximilian.
▪ I wince myself, lanced with regret at the foolish vanity that led me to mention this prospect.
▪ Owners ask why abscesses can not be lanced early to help relieve pressure.
▪ Salina arrived at the clinic with a grossly swollen foot which had to be lanced on the spot.
▪ Then his arm was bathed and the wound was lanced with a knife and bathed again.
Wikipedia

Lancé

Lancé is a commune in the Loir-et-Cher department of central France.

Lance (comic strip)

Lance was an American comic strip notable as one of the last of the full-page strips. Created and self-syndicated by artist Warren Tufts, it ran from the mid- to late 1950s

Lance (disambiguation)

A lance is a pole weapon based on the spear. The word may also refer to:

Łańce

Łańce is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Kornowac, within Racibórz County, Silesian Voivodeship, in southern Poland. It lies approximately north-east of Kornowac, east of Racibórz, and west of the regional capital Katowice.

The village has a population of 520.

Wiktionary

lance

n. 1 A weapon of war, consisting of a long shaft or handle and a steel blade or head; a spear carried by horsemen. 2 A wooden spear, sometimes hollow, used in jousting or tilting, designed to shatter on impact with the opposing knight’s armour. 3 (context fishing English) A spear or harpoon used by whalers and fishermen. 4 (context military English) A soldier armed with a lance; a lancer. 5 (context military English) An instrument which conveys the charge of a piece of ordnance and forces it home. 6 (context founding English) A small iron rod which suspends the core of the mold in casting a shell. 7 (context pyrotechnics English) One of the small paper cases filled with combustible composition, which mark the outlines of a figure. 8 (context medicine English) A lancet. vb. 1 To pierce with a lance, or with any similar weapon. 2 To open with a lancet; to pierce; as, to lance a vein or an abscess. 3 To throw in the manner of a lance; to lanch.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

lance

late 13c. (late 12c. as a surname), from Old French lance (12c.), from Latin lancea "light spear, Spanish lance" (Italian lancia, Spanish lanza), possibly of Celt-Iberian origin. The French word spread into Germanic (German Lanze, Middle Dutch lanse, Dutch lans, Danish landse). Lance corporal (1786) is from obsolete lancepesade "officer of lowest rank" (1570s), from Old Italian lancia spezzata "old soldier," literally "broken lance."

lance

"to pierce with a lance," c.1300, from Old French lancier, from Late Latin lanceare "wield a lance; pierce with a lance," from lancea (see lance (n.)). The surgical sense (properly with reference to a lancet) is from late 15c. Related: Lanced; lancing.\n

WordNet

lance

  1. v. move quickly, as if by cutting one's way; "Planes lanced towards the shore"

  2. pierce with a lance, as in a knights' fight

  3. open by piercing with a lancet; "lance a boil"

lance

  1. n. a long pointed rod used as a weapon [syn: spear, shaft]

  2. an implement with a shaft and barbed point used for catching fish [syn: spear, gig, fizgig, fishgig]

  3. a surgical knife with a pointed double-edged blade; used for punctures and small incisions [syn: lancet]

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "lance".

Lance Dixon of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center made a pivotal observation in this regard that was further amplified by Wolfgang Lerche of CERN, Vafa at Harvard, and Nicholas Warner, then of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The heart and facial features were clearly outlined with bright red achiote and the entire figure was torn with lance marks.

Thenceforward they may fight as it pleases them, ahorse, or afoot, with lance, with sword, or with dagger, but to the vanquished no mercy will be shown.

I had a good idea that whatever lecturing there was to do on the subject of Will sitting in the woods listening to medieval music, Lance and Jennifer had already covered that day I saw them in the arboretum with him.

His lance was done for, until he could either give the head of it back to a good armorer or find an appropriate hickory sapling.

He had a tolerably large escort: two hundred Hebrian arquebusiers and swordsmen and eighty heavy cavalry armed with lances and paired matchlock pistols.

In competition they wrestled and leaped and threw the tomahawk, lance or atlatl dart.

He closed on Atrides, spear stabbing his shield right on the boss but the bronze could not drive through, so back he drew to his ranks, dodging death, glancing left and right, fearing a lance would graze his flesh.

The choicest tapestries which the looms of Arras could furnish draped the walls, whereon the battles of Judas Maccabaeus were set forth, with the Jewish warriors in plate of proof, with crest and lance and banderole, as the naive artists of the day were wont to depict them.

Line after line, and rank after rank, they choked the neck of the valley with a long vista of tossing pennons, twinkling lances, waving plumes and streaming banderoles, while the curvets and gambades of the chargers lent a constant motion and shimmer to the glittering, many-colored mass.

I told the surgeon the history of the fever and begged him to lance the abscess, which he did, and for four days the opening discharged an almost incredible amount of matter.

In a nightmare far more terrifying and real than either of the others, Jaryd saw the town assailed by mounted bandits with scarred, begrimed faces, wearing leather jerkins and brandishing huge, curved blades, lances, and clubs.

Major Hinrichsen, commanded by Captain Wedelmann and executed by Lieutenants Asch and Brack, while Lance Corporals Kowalski and Stamm were responsible for organization.

The boy had a bubo on his back, and Kivrin lanced it while Roche and the mother held him.

Knights of Nimmr met five Knights of the Sepulcher and another in which he was pitted against a single antagonist, but his only contest with the lance was to be in the grand finale when a hundred Fronters faced a hundred Backers, since, whereas, before his encounter with Malud he had been considered hopeless with sword and buckler now Prince Gobred looked to him to win many points with these, his lance work being held but mediocre.