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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fare

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bus fare (=the money you pay for a bus journey)
▪ Can you lend me 50p for my bus fare?
a cab fare (=the money you pay to travel in a cab)
▪ My Dad gave me the money for my cab fare.
a discount fare
▪ The bus company offers discount fares to pensioners.
a fare increase
▪ The airline instituted a 10% fare increase.
a rail fare
▪ Rail fares are to increase by up to 9.4%.
a taxi fare
▪ She couldn't afford the £18 taxi fare.
a train fare
▪ How much is the train fare to Derby?
bill of fare
concessionary fares
▪ a concessionary fares scheme for pensioners
open-jaw fare
wholesome food/fare/meal etc
▪ well-balanced wholesome meals
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
cheap
▪ The current cheapest airline fare is the £249 Apex special which must be booked in advance.
▪ During an air-fare war, you may get the cheapest fare by taking advantage of this offer.
▪ This, however, rather missed the point, since even cheap fares serve little purpose if there are no trains.
▪ Be aware, however, that some airlines do not grant the senior discount on their cheapest promotional fares.
▪ If one can spread a core cost over a larger operation one can offer cheaper fares.
▪ The cheapest restricted fare was $ 198.
▪ The Christmas New Year holiday an even cheaper promotional fare.
▪ The cheapest restricted fare: $ 528.
concessionary
▪ Local people and regular travellers would also retain their concessionary fares on the crossing.
▪ He said that last year the local authority spent £1.35m. on concessionary fares and would spend the same this year.
▪ Pass revival: Langbaurgh Council is set to reintroduce a concessionary fares scheme for pensioners and the disabled from July 1.
▪ Proper concessionary fare schemes will be developed in every area.
▪ Assisting people in rural areas by making concessionary fares on local public transport widely available.
▪ It's because Middlesbrough Council can not afford to increase the subsidy for concessionary fares from £1.35m.
▪ The 1883 Cheap Trains Act made concessionary fares for workers general and compulsory.
▪ The concessionary fares scheme in London will continue.
full
▪ Children 2-11 years inclusive not sharing with two full fare passengers: reduction 25%.
▪ Louis today would have faced an unrestricted full fare coach price of $ 1, 586.
▪ The full excess fare had to be paid.
▪ One-way full fares are $ 139 second class, $ 199 first class.
▪ Scheduled Apex return fare £127, 14 days advance booking, maximum stay three months, full economy fare £163.
high
▪ He hopes to drum up the support of sympathetic congressmen who blame the law for high fares.
▪ More than two-thirds were businessmen who travel on tight schedules and pay high fares.
▪ What would you predict that the consequences of such intensive regulation would be? High fares.
▪ Airlines experiment with the highest possible fares over the weekend.
▪ Will operator charges by Railtrack be reflected in higher fares and possible loss of patronage resulting from cross price elasticity?
▪ If so, are we passengers willing to pay substantially higher fares so that the airlines can continuously purchase new aircraft?
▪ Sometimes migrant trains were seen travelling eastward, despite the higher fares, just as packed as those going west.
▪ Employees may, however, face problems of increased travelling time or higher fares.
low
▪ Virgin subsequently filed its own, even lower fare to New York.
▪ The lowest possible restricted fare was $ 198.&038;.
▪ What Britain needs is serious government investment in public transport infrastructure-and lower fares.
▪ I would like the lowest possible senior fare between X city and X city.
▪ With each call, the CalPIRG callers asked for the lowest possible air fare on a specific route for a specific date.
▪ Many wait till the last minute, hoping that the airline will hold a sale and lower fares.
▪ The lowest fare is £309 midweek, low season.
▪ Q: Where can I find information on the lowest commercial air fares?
special
▪ It was hoped that special through fares from Bristol and Exeter would also be available but this has proved impossible.
▪ Unlike special fare sales, the senior fares are available in most markets, albeit on a limited basis.
standard
▪ Twigs, leaves and grass are standard fare.
▪ The plot is pretty standard family escapist fare.
▪ Concessions only apply to standard fares and not to fares that have already been discounted.
▪ Potato salad and baked beans are standard fare at most delis.
▪ The standard return fare between Darlington and York would rise from £18.80 to £26.32.
▪ I said, miming standard television sit-com fare.
▪ All in all, standard fare.
▪ Ticket prices are to be 25 percent to 50 percent below standard coach fares.
traditional
▪ The farm at the site operates a rare breeds centre and also has a tea room with traditional fare.
▪ More discerning diners can sample such traditional Biltmore fare as gulf shrimp and crab claws on ice.
▪ Good traditional fare and seafood dishes.
▪ Lively in flavor but quick to prepare, this chicken dish gives a new spin to the traditional grilled fare.
▪ More traditional fare can be found at the Plaka taverna just across the road.
▪ We ordered the fish and chips, expecting marvelous things from this traditional ale house fare.
▪ This deliciously light and quick-to-prepare dinner party menu makes a welcome change from the richer, traditional fare of the season.
typical
▪ Spice and fruit breads, similar to hot cross buns, were typical Elizabethan Lenten fare.
▪ It does not make for your typical comic fare.
unrestricted
▪ An unrestricted scheduled fare is ideal, but is not of course the most economical means of travel.
▪ Louis today would have faced an unrestricted full fare coach price of $ 1, 586.
▪ Delta Air Lines Inc. would charge $ 449 for the same trip under recently published unrestricted coach fares.
■ NOUN
air
▪ With each call, the CalPIRG callers asked for the lowest possible air fare on a specific route for a specific date.
▪ The service also can book air fare, ground transportation, lift tickets and more.
▪ For £35 10s 0d he offered a return air fare and a camping holiday in the Corsican sunshine.
▪ International air fare is not included.
▪ Head whirling, she went into a travel agency and enquired the air fare to Toronto.
▪ Seattle was 3,500 miles away, and we couldn't afford the air fare.
▪ Port taxes and air fare are extra.
bus
▪ A computer is the only way he could weigh up the effect of the bus fare factor.
▪ Through his twice weekly plasma sales, Willingham has helped Scheard and others buy clothes and food or pay bus fare.
▪ Their bus fares are paid, but I suspect that they walked.
▪ She will come to Indianapolis later, as Soon as there is money enough to pay for bus fare.
▪ She would walk, in lashing rain, a howling wind, rather than pay a bus fare.
▪ She could not afford the bus fare to see a doctor, much less his fee.
▪ Unable to afford bus fares, she walked to interviews.
cab
▪ The cab fare was thirty-three dollars.
▪ By network standards, that is cab fare.
▪ This girl, this young woman, coming here and asking for the loan of a shilling for a cab fare.
increase
▪ In particular, fare increases appear to lead to high losses of passengers, particularly at off-peak periods.
rail
▪ That's eighty-five pounds less my rail fare.
▪ Present rail fare concessions will be retained.
▪ Finally here is one comparison of a rail fare and a car fare.
▪ We regret that we are unable to provide this rail fare facility for clients booking within one week of departure. 6.
▪ This type of package is sometimes offered in conjunction with cheap rail fares and bus vouchers.
▪ The passengers felt bad enough earlier when they were hit by a regional rail fare rise of more than five percent.
return
▪ Standard return fare per person £56 - £62.
▪ The fare you pay is a flat rate £25 - a fraction of the normal return fare!
▪ Bargain five-day return fare for two adults in a car from £84.
▪ Refreshments on most trains. Return fares from £4.80.
▪ Scheduled Apex return fare £127, 14 days advance booking, maximum stay three months, full economy fare £163.
▪ He was broke, stranded, and penniless, and pleaded with Mum to send him his return fare money.
▪ The standard return fare between Darlington and York would rise from £18.80 to £26.32.
taxi
▪ It usually covers the cost of accommodation, breakfast, a main meal and return taxi fare from airport to hotel.
▪ Shortly after midnight, Josie handed Lucy her taxi fare and told her to scram.
▪ Don't be afraid occasionally to challenge claims for taxi fares and expensive meals.
▪ He still faces four charges of dodging taxi fares of between eleven and 50 pounds.
train
▪ Finally run out of money and had to borrow train fare from Chamonix to Geneva.
▪ Tlere was also that uncertainty about the train fare.
▪ He reported back faithfully to Theo, who had provided his train fare.
▪ Round-trip train fare was about $ 3. 50, admission $ 7. 50.
■ VERB
offer
▪ For £35 10s 0d he offered a return air fare and a camping holiday in the Corsican sunshine.
▪ A set number of seats may be offered at several fares on the same flight.
▪ If one can spread a core cost over a larger operation one can offer cheaper fares.
▪ This type of package is sometimes offered in conjunction with cheap rail fares and bus vouchers.
▪ The airlines will continue to offer more expensive fares for busy executives who need to keep their options open.
pay
▪ Cars stack up behind every bus, while passengers queue to pay their fares.
▪ More than two-thirds were businessmen who travel on tight schedules and pay high fares.
▪ More would have gone if there had been money to pay for their fares.
▪ Through his twice weekly plasma sales, Willingham has helped Scheard and others buy clothes and food or pay bus fare.
▪ An impatient mob broke down the doors, took possession of the station, and commandeered the trains without paying their fares.
▪ She will come to Indianapolis later, as Soon as there is money enough to pay for bus fare.
▪ She would have to pay her own air fare, of course.
▪ If so, are we passengers willing to pay substantially higher fares so that the airlines can continuously purchase new aircraft?
raise
▪ Both of these carriers raised their base fares 10 percent and are collecting the windfall on tickets currently being sold.
▪ A lack of funds was the explanation used by a majority of the Council for voting to raise bus fares.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
second-class ticket/fare/compartment/cabin etc
▪ I wanted two second-class tickets to Coimbra.
tax/fare dodger
▪ And he identified poll tax dodgers as part of the problem.
▪ And the trawl for tax dodgers also threw up other misdemeanours.
▪ On March 6 pay bonuses were announced for all soldiers and an amnesty was declared for deserters and draft dodgers.
▪ Read in studio Police have begun a campaign against car tax dodgers.
▪ The government, it seems, is counting heavily on getting money from tax dodgers.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A one-week stay in Majorca costs $779 including air fare.
▪ Children will be thrilled to find such simple fare as macaroni and cheese on the menu.
▪ Goose, duck, and turkey are typical holiday fare in the Netherlands.
▪ How much is the train fare from Toronto to Montreal?
▪ I had to walk home because I didn't have enough money for the fare.
▪ The fare is cheaper on Saturdays and Sundays.
▪ The biggest fare increases were on the Kansas City to Minneapolis line.
▪ The Elephant and Castle is known for its traditional English fare.
▪ The movie is suitable family fare.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Finally run out of money and had to borrow train fare from Chamonix to Geneva.
▪ I said, miming standard television sit-com fare.
▪ Lindsey Inn, offers an assortment of hearty fare and seafood dishes in a comfortable atmosphere.
▪ Room, air fare and one show ticket: $ 400 to $ 470, also two nights.
▪ The fare laid before Botha last night was hardly epicurean.
▪ The full excess fare had to be paid.
▪ The only possible response from the independents would be to also reduce their fares but without the cross-funding safety net.
▪ The specials, publicized only on the Internet and good for weekend getaways, are far lower than any other fares.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
badly
▪ During the Salazar dictatorship Madeira fared badly, particularly after the revolt in the island in 1931.
▪ Compared with other nutritious foods, they fared badly.
▪ The party fared badly at the election in April last year, and Craxi's name has appeared regularly in the inquiries.
▪ Sangster has also fared badly through his involvement with Classic Thoroughbreds, a more recent venture.
▪ Ethnic minority groupings, squatters and welfare rights workers, for example, usually fare badly in comparison with statusquo middle-class groups.
better
▪ It can be seen that, whilst all regions reflected the higher national unemployment rate, some regions fared better than others.
▪ Studies show that older people fare better when they are able to continue their lives as independently as possible.
▪ There is no reason to believe that diabetic patients fare better and they may do less well.
▪ Dance based on ethnic themes fared better.
▪ The Nationalists fared better in their foreign dealings.
▪ If managing diversity comes to be viewed as a business issue rather than an ethical one, minorities might actually fare better.
▪ The six men plus Brown who took the farmhouse fared better.
▪ The new power brokers on the political scene have not fared better either.
poorly
▪ They rarely publish their arguments in the technical literature; when they do, the arguments usually fare poorly.
▪ The state also fared poorly in the teen birth rate category.
▪ This prompted two Republican candidates who are faring poorly to invite Mr Weicker back to the party; he refused.
well
▪ Gloucestershire have not been faring well in the Benson and Hedges Cup.
▪ Even in cities which generally fared well in the face of federal budget cuts, the impacts in these areas were significant.
▪ One explanation is that the Conservatives have not fared well in local elections.
▪ Not faring well, but resting.
▪ First, there is the demand that individual animals have a life that fares well, all considered.
▪ Will it be said that animals raised on close confinement systems, for example, do not fare well, all considered?
▪ After two years of chemotherapy treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia, Jessica is faring well.
■ NOUN
bus
▪ He was trying to save bus fares so he could buy a new bike.
▪ The Sisters soon realised that many of the patients could not afford the bus or train fare every week.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Although here, too, Chicago had fared better than many older cities, unemployment remained a serious, seemingly intractable problem.
▪ Even in cities which generally fared well in the face of federal budget cuts, the impacts in these areas were significant.
▪ First, there is the demand that individual animals have a life that fares well, all considered.
▪ I always enjoyed walking the full length of the street to check how the other shops were faring.
▪ I do consider myself a storyteller... and yet I am concerned that education is faring so badly.
▪ In the major terminal breeds, the Charolais fares worst with up to 17.3 percent of difficult calvings in some herds.
▪ Yeb isn't faring much better.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Fare

Fare \Fare\ (f[^a]r), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Fared; p. pr. & vb. n. Faring.] [AS. faran to travel, fare; akin to OS., Goth., & OHG. faran to travel, go, D. varen, G. fahren, OFries., Icel., & Sw. fara, Dan. fare, Gr. ????? a way through, ??????? a ferry, strait, ???????? to convey, ?????????? to go, march, ????? beyond, on the other side, ????? to pass through, L. peritus experienced, portus port, Skr. par to bring over. [root]78. Cf. Chaffer, Emporium, Far, Ferry, Ford, Peril, Port a harbor, Pore, n.]

  1. To go; to pass; to journey; to travel.

    So on he fares, and to the border comes Of Eden.
    --Milton.

  2. To be in any state, or pass through any experience, good or bad; to be attended with any circummstances or train of events, fortunate or unfortunate; as, he fared well, or ill.

    So fares the stag among the enraged hounds.
    --Denham.

    I bid you most heartily well to fare.
    --Robynson (More's Utopia).

    So fared the knight between two foes.
    --Hudibras.

  3. To be treated or entertained at table, or with bodily or social comforts; to live.

    There was a certain rich man which . . . fared sumptuously every day.
    --Luke xvi. 19.

  4. To happen well, or ill; -- used impersonally; as, we shall see how it will fare with him.

    So fares it when with truth falsehood contends.
    --Milton.

  5. To behave; to conduct one's self. [Obs.]

    She ferde [fared] as she would die.
    --Chaucer.

Fare

Fare \Fare\, n. [AS. faru journey, fr. faran. See Fare, v.]

  1. A journey; a passage. [Obs.]

    That nought might stay his fare.
    --Spenser.

  2. The price of passage or going; the sum paid or due for conveying a person by land or water; as, the fare for crossing a river; the fare in a coach or by railway.

  3. Ado; bustle; business. [Obs.]

    The warder chid and made fare.
    --Chaucer.

  4. Condition or state of things; fortune; hap; cheer.

    What fare? what news abroad ?
    --Shak.

  5. Food; provisions for the table; entertainment; as, coarse fare; delicious fare. ``Philosophic fare.''
    --Dryden.

  6. The person or persons conveyed in a vehicle; as, a full fare of passengers.
    --A. Drummond.

  7. The catch of fish on a fishing vessel. Bill of fare. See under Bill. Fare indicator or Fare register, a device for recording the number of passengers on a street car, etc. Fare wicket.

    1. A gate or turnstile at the entrance of toll bridges, exhibition grounds, etc., for registering the number of persons passing it.

    2. An opening in the door of a street car for purchasing tickets of the driver or passing fares to the conductor.
      --Knight.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

fare

Old English fær "journey, road, passage, expedition," from strong neuter of faran "to journey" (see fare (v.)); merged with faru "journey, expedition, companions, baggage," strong fem. of faran. Original sense is obsolete, except in compounds (wayfarer, sea-faring, etc.) Meaning "food provided" is c.1200 (Old English also had the word in the sense "means of subsistence"); that of "conveyance" appears in Scottish early 15c. and led to sense of "payment for passage" (1510s). Meaning "person conveyed in a vehicle" is from 1560s.

fare

Old English faran "to journey, set forth, go, travel, wander, make one's way," also "be, happen, exist; be in a particular condition," from Proto-Germanic *faran "to go" (cognates: Old Saxon, Old High German, Gothic faran, Old Norse and Old Frisian fara, Dutch varen, German fahren), from PIE *por- "going, passage," from root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over" (see port (n.1)). Related: Fared; faring.

Wikipedia

Fare

A fare is the fee paid by a passenger for use of a public transport system: rail, bus, taxi, etc. In the case of air transport, the term airfare is often used.

Fare structure is the system set up to determine how much is to be paid by various passengers using a transit vehicle at any given time.

A linked trip is a trip from the origin to the destination on the transit system. Even if a passenger must make several transfers during a journey, the trip is counted as one linked trip on the system.

Fare (disambiguation)

A fare is the fee paid by a passenger allowing them to make use of a public transport system.

Fare or FARE may also refer to:

Wiktionary

fare

Etymology 1 n. 1 (label en obsolete) a going; journey; travel; voyage; course; passage 2 money paid for a transport ticket. 3 A paying passenger, especially in a taxi. 4 food and drink. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (context intransitive archaic English) To go, travel. 2 (context intransitive English) To get along, succeed (well or badly); to be in any state, or pass through any experience, good or bad; to be attended with any circumstances or train of events.

WordNet

fare

  1. n. an agenda of things to do; "they worked rapidly down the menu of reports" [syn: menu]

  2. the sum charged for riding in a public conveyance [syn: transportation]

  3. a paying (taxi) passenger

  4. the food and drink that are regularly consumed

fare

  1. v. proceed or get along; "How is she doing in her new job?"; "How are you making out in graduate school?"; "He's come a long way" [syn: do, make out, come, get along]

  2. eat well

Usage examples of "fare".

Ye say, it shall soon pass over and we shall fare afield And reap the wheat with the war-sword and winnow in the shield.

Leaving them to their task, Alec and Micum went off to see how the real Thero was faring.

Tiin traced his ancestory back through an entirely male line for a thousand generations to Ramszak himself but he fared no better than his illustrious but defeated ancestor.

Giovane ancora ed avvenente della persona, il principe prevenuto della reputazione meritamente stabilita delle venete bellezze, non mancava di certo prurito, di certo desiderio di voler fare una conquista.

And thus with joy, and hope well to fare, Arcite anon unto his inn doth fare.

And with Ben Aboo himself he had fared no better, for the Basha was provoked to anger with him when he heard from Katrina of the good money that he had been casting away in pity for the poor.

The three Corticellis unaccustomed to good fare and wine, ate like a troop, and began to get intoxicated.

Her charming conversation combined with her beauty gradually drew me under her charm, and as the drink began to exercise its influence over me, I proposed a turn in one of the dark walks, expressing a hope that I should fare better than Lord Pembroke.

If the Earthservice picked up the tab for his fare to Epiphany, only to find that his bequest was of little or no value, would the bureaucracy be willing to unpocket for a ticket home?

The backyard fared little better, home to a kiln, a crucible furnace, an annealing oven, and three or four incomplete sets of bocce balls that made interesting dents in the garden of weeds.

I wish the reader would prepare himself an object lesson as to how little life can be supported on for any length of time, by procuring a piece of corn bread the size of an ordinary brickbat, and a thin slice of pork, and then imagine how he would fare, with that as his sole daily ration, for long hungry weeks and months.

Drop in for a seasonal menu, which features hearty winter rib-grippers such as veal osso bucco with creamy roast garlic mushroom polenta and braised greens or somewhat lighter warm-weather fare such as cumin-crusted ahi tuna with beluga lentils, roasted vegetables, and red wine sauce.

There I will return your fare money to you, and have you deposited on the beach like a bucketful of kitchen slops.

The dragon turned his nose up at the fare, but nevertheless he shook himself free of the snow and buzzed over to the pack to select a few morsels.

Zach had not fared much better than most surgeons with holes in the retro hepatic vena cava, and it drove him crazy.