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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fee

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a booking fee
▪ Ticket agencies may charge a booking fee.
a licence fee (=money you have to pay to get a licence)
▪ The BBC is funded by a licence fee which all television owners have to pay.
a membership fee (also membership dues) (= money you must pay to become a member)
▪ The current annual membership fee is £20.
a subscription fee
▪ If you pay a subscription fee, you can watch matches on the Internet.
advance fee fraud
appearance fee/money (=the money someone is paid to appear somewhere)
▪ He gave his appearance fee to charity.
charge rent/a fee/interest etc
▪ The gallery charges an entrance fee.
command a high fee/wage/price etc
▪ Which graduates command the highest salaries?
flat fee
▪ We charge a flat fee for car hire.
registration fee
▪ The registration fee is $75.
retaining fee (=an amount of money to keep someone working for you)
▪ We had to pay a retaining fee.
transfer fee
user fee
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
annual
▪ Once admitted, the solicitor is required to maintain a practising certificate, for which a substantial annual fee is charged.
▪ A temporary membership fee is $ 5, an annual fee about $ 25.
▪ The annual subscription fee is £8.
▪ Participants must enroll in advance and pay a $ 40 annual membership fee.
▪ In addition, the management company may charge an annual fee of 0.5-1 percent of net asset value.
▪ The account requires a $ 20, 000 initial deposit and a $ 100 annual fee.
▪ Anyone wishing to have an up-to-date statement of the annual fee before accepting a place should write to the Registry.
▪ If you find a fee on your bill, call the toll-free number and ask to have the annual fee waived.
flat
▪ One, for the World Resources Institute, compared ten cities that had pay-to-throw schemes with four others that charged flat fees.
▪ Khare pays Kelly a flat weekly fee for Baltzersen, avoiding disability insurance, benefits and payroll costs.
▪ Girobank charges a flat fee of £5 per draft and Barclays £9.
▪ You can either pay a flat fee for your access or pay per megabyte of traffic coming down your line.
▪ At present, they pay a flat fee for a license.
high
▪ The introduction of higher fees in 1956 did not solve the District's financial problems, only make them manageable.
▪ Charlotte, North Carolina-based First Union earnings rose 21 percent, as higher fees offset sluggish lending profits.
▪ She was just using the fact that I was desperate to hold me up for an outrageously high fee.
▪ Small-business owner Frank Sheftel is saying no to one of the biggest trends in banking: higher fees.
▪ She also condemned the practice of paying men-midwives higher fees than women.
▪ By dealing in dollars you avoid paying high exchange fees or going home with a wad of pesos.
▪ If her program beats me, her broker could use that to command higher fees.
▪ For the past three years, he taught mathematics at Sonoma State University and led protests against higher student fees.
hourly
▪ To ensure complete objectivity there are a growing number of IFAs who do not take commission but who charge an hourly fee.
▪ Mr Bennett, even at his hourly fees still an officer of the court, should be ashamed of himself.
▪ And I will pay you your regular hourly fee plus fifty percent.
▪ It did, however, charge hourly fees that could add up quickly for heavy users.
initial
▪ It charges an initial fee of 1% and a 1% annual fee.
▪ The charges of a 5 percent initial fee, 1.25 percent annual, are standard.
▪ Usually the initial fee payable to the franchisor is between 5 percent and 10 percent of the total investment.
▪ Charges are £270 initial fee, £270 annual charge, and investment dealing at competitive rates.
legal
▪ We will only pay these legal fees if they arise from an accident that is covered under this policy.
▪ One way to stay abreast of the legal fees is to ask for monthly billings.
▪ The paper was rocky, as circulation, distribution, legal fees, arguments were building up.
▪ It also indicates the district spends almost $ 25, 000 on legal fees.
▪ The offer included free removal and no legal fees.
▪ After almost $ 20, 000 in legal fees, though, Frederick Brewing won approval with its catchy label intact.
▪ They pay £1 plus legal fees and move in.
▪ But Aldrich said his $ 100, 000 advance already has been spent on legal fees.
low
▪ A fixed-price offer gives issuers greater certainty and intermediaries lower fees.
▪ The companies offering these services have to provide incentives such as low fees to customers to use the service.
▪ The lower fees he paid, he said, were more than enough to cover these extra costs.
▪ Many businesses besides ours have low entry fees.
▪ Fat and happy, banks saw no point in competing for customers with lower fees or interest rates.
▪ Hotchkis's dinky ad budget translates into low annual fees.
▪ Specialists would be paid a lower fee if they accepted patients without referrals.
monthly
▪ A monthly capitation fee is paid to profit making companies.
▪ The cost is about $ 5, 000, plus a monthly service fee starting at $ 80.
▪ But customers should remember that they could face other charges on top of the interest such as monthly fees.
▪ Most plans include a monthly fee and a certain number of free minutes per month.
▪ There is a monthly fee of £1.50 to cover the administration of your Home Management Account.
▪ Not everyone can afford a computer system at home plus the monthly fees.
▪ Once your overdraft is arranged, the monthly usage fee will be £3 if you overdraw by more than £50.
▪ Typically, a solicitor will offer several magazines for a low weekly or monthly fee.
nominal
▪ Those registered users of Word for Windows requiring the upgrade can obtain it from Microsoft for a nominal fee of £7.75inc.VAT.
▪ All levy a nominal admission fee.
▪ Traditionally, the people's singing has been delegated to a choir which is generally paid a nominal fee.
▪ Under the program, the government sold shares to citizens for a nominal fee to quickly transform state enterprises into private companies.
small
▪ Some will guarantee their members' work for a small fee, usually about 1% of the estimate.
▪ Investors pay a smaller fee for reinvesting larger dividends.
▪ The flying club and bar offers a friendly greeting and place to pay the small landing fee.
▪ You can also buys shares of the fund through discount brokerage Charles Schwab Corp. for a small fee.
▪ The best deal I can do on the airfares is £870 - this includes a small fee for myself for the administration.
▪ Members pay a small fee to participate in some dining programs; others are gratis.
▪ Recorded Delivery Recorded Delivery is available for a small fee for first and second class letters.
▪ The homesteader needed a small filing fee, and a much larger amount of cash to survive until the farm got going.
standard
▪ Fees Search work will be charged for on a standard fee basis.
▪ A standard contingency fee is 33 percent to 40 percent.
▪ It has sought to identify what criteria must be met before any standard fees system could be workable.
▪ Many doctors have a standard scale of fees which they can send you.
▪ Of immediate concern to the profession was the Lord Chancellor's introduction of standard fees for magistrates' court work.
▪ The first of these, standard fees in the magistrates' courts, is to be introduced in January 1993.
▪ A standard fee was then imposed.
■ NOUN
appearance
▪ As an act's appearance fees become higher, the agent may settle for a smaller percentage.
▪ He missed the cut by eight strokes, collected his six-figure appearance fee, and split for a month at home.
▪ Several national organizing committees look at shoe companies and appearance fees as a threat to their authority.
audit
▪ From this perspective, 1993 looks likely to be another year of substantial audit fee cuts.
▪ Grace paid Price Waterhouse $ 7. 2 million in consulting and audit fees last year.
▪ Or consider the meeting to agree the audit fee, when the auditor can hardly wait to get his point across.
▪ Price Waterhouse, it seems, was not just investing in the Prudential by dropping the audit fee by 14%.
▪ None of the companies was reluctant to talk: cutting the audit fee is a popular subject.
▪ Indeed, 29 of the companies paid unchanged audit fees.
contingency
▪ His home, law firm and love life were all sacrificed to the case which was brought on a contingency fee basis.
▪ A standard contingency fee is 33 percent to 40 percent.
▪ It recommended that the prohibition on contingency fees and other forms of incentive should be re-examined.
▪ Voters rejected measures to ban most lawsuits resulting from car accidents, limit shareholder lawsuits and slash lawyers' contingency fees.
▪ A review of contingency fees was undertaken and research on commercial legal expenses insurance was published.
▪ Californians also turned down Proposition 202, a proposal to limit lawyers' contingency fees and encourage early settlement of lawsuits.
▪ The contingency fee usually sorts out the questionable cases to begin with.
▪ A substantial percentage of these lawsuits are brought by attorneys working on a contingency fee basis.
entrance
▪ All except the 25 pence of the £4.25 entrance fee goes to the rider coming second.
▪ Of them, 186 collect an entrance fee.
▪ We not only pay an entrance fee to access these facilities, we also pay a community charge for local amenities.
▪ After a major uproar, that was trashed and replaced with an $ 11 entrance fee.
▪ But the not-so-bright can sometimes secure a place if the parents stump up a large entrance fee.
▪ For example, the entrance fee at Yosemite is now $ 5.
▪ The entrance fee was another 15 dollars but this is nothing to Nikitenko.
▪ Strangers may be politely questioned before paying the $ 16 entrance fee.
entry
▪ There is a £10 entry fee and each participant should raise £50 in sponsorship in order to take part.
▪ Many businesses besides ours have low entry fees.
▪ Five-a-side knockout football competition - charge an entry fee.
▪ Deadline for entries is Thursday, August 28. Entry fee is $ 10, or $ 15 for late entry.
▪ Individuals and groups are welcome and entry fees range from free to £2.
▪ Some felt that the entry fee - on average approximately £300 per yacht - was too much.
▪ Many have entry fees, but several offer $ 100,000 and more to the winner.
▪ Contact the organiser Any runners who are able to raise more than £25 for charity will have to pay the £5.50 entry fee.
income
▪ But this was not just the effect of slower markets and smaller volumes on commission and fee income.
▪ The offices on the mainland also saw their fee income fall, although not to the same extent.
▪ For a small firm of solicitors in a market town, conveyancing has accounted for about half of all fee income.
▪ Regulated fee income arises when a regulated service is provided as a stand alone service.
▪ Total worldwide fee income exceeded £6m. by 1989.
▪ Hays Allen itself registered a 2.7% drop in fee income to £6.8m for the year to 30 April.
▪ A better overall service should be offered with, hopefully, an accompanying increase in fee income.
▪ Corporate finance and privatisation, in particular, did well, increasing fee income by 19% to £16m.
licence
▪ Table 4.2 shows the changes in the licence fee for the whole post-war period.
▪ Well, I live in sheltered accommodation and, believe me, I have to pay the full licence fee.
▪ Not worth the licence fee as Derek says.
▪ An added advantage: you don't have to pay any licence fee for this model because there is no T.V. receiver.
▪ The great thing about only having a licence fee is that you do retain complete editorial control and all the rights.
▪ There was no increase in the licence fee to pay for a 50 percent jump in programme hours.
▪ Phonelink will charge a licence fee for its software, while each unit used will be paid for at a pre-determined rate.
▪ Until the very recent past governments would also set the level of the licence fee.
management
▪ Expect to pay a management fee of up to 15 percent.
▪ It receives millions more in a management fee that is supposed to cover expenses not covered by contracts.
▪ The management fee is 0.75% a year.
▪ Investment management fees rose 20 percent to $ 156 million.
▪ There are no initial charges, only an annual management fee of 1%.
▪ Contracts now run for only one year, and management fees are based on rent collection and compliance with housing codes.
▪ Yet most existing fundholders find they do not have the available money as their management fees are fully committed within their practices.
▪ In addition, Abtrust Fund Managers is to reduce its quarterly management fee to 0.2 percent from 0.25 percent.
membership
▪ And as the lifeboats are run entirely on voluntary contributions and membership fees, the £6 you give to us is vital.
▪ Participants must enroll in advance and pay a $ 40 annual membership fee.
▪ The rest of the cash comes from sponsorship, membership fees, donations and ticket sales.
▪ A health care consumer council would be created and would include anyone over age 16 who paid a $ 10 membership fee.
▪ A temporary membership fee is $ 5, an annual fee about $ 25.
▪ The minimum membership fee is IR10.00 perannum.
▪ Annual membership fees become due either prior to, or on December 31 each year.
registration
▪ Three-fifths of this was spent on travel, tuition fees, exam and registration fees and childcare.
▪ A registration fee of $ is also required.
▪ Business operators were required to pay a $ 25 annual registration fee and city business taxes.
▪ Consultants would pay registration fees and file quarterly reports with the city Ethics Commission.
▪ The registration fee is $ 75, which includes breakfast, lunch, prizes, complimentary beverages and golf.
▪ Find out how much foal registration fees will be and whether or not you need to join any breed society.
▪ The cost of the ceremony will be $ 35, which comes on top of a $ 30 domestic partners registration fee.
school
▪ His benefit package may include the payment of school fees for his children and the continuation of pension arrangements.
▪ There are two golden rules about school fees planning.
▪ This seems to reflect primarily the increasing cost of school fees, combined with rises in the cost of living.
▪ In this very poor country, private school fees are beyond the means of much of the population.
▪ What about the mortgage and the school fees?
▪ Mr Murrell's approach aims to combine a series of investments within a school fees portfolio.
▪ We believe all parents have the right to choice in education - not only those who can afford school fees.
transfer
▪ In that event the players' registrations would be taken over by the League and transfer fees payable to Lytham.
▪ Pearce's request for new terms could have been sparked by transfer fees and wages rocketing in the last 12 months.
▪ Oldham have also cut the transfer fees on three players.
▪ If that happens, multi-million pound transfer fees will instead go to players in the form of higher salaries.
▪ An upper limit was then set on transfer fees.
▪ Meanwhile, Swindon celebrated promotion to the Premier League today by breaking their own club record transfer fee.
▪ Cash Flow: Club expenses include wages, transfer fees and ground rent.
tuition
▪ Three-fifths of this was spent on travel, tuition fees, exam and registration fees and childcare.
▪ Since autumn 1998, full-time undergraduate students have been required to make a means-tested contribution towards tuition fees.
▪ These awards cover the payment of tuition fees only and do not provide a maintenance grant.
▪ In 1995, a third had debt in that range. Tuition fees are one large cause.
▪ Many students will not have to pay tuition fees if their financial situation is below a certain level.
▪ But on the question of private tuition fees they are moving with remarkable alacrity.
user
▪ We never used to pay user fees in the clinics and hospitals.
▪ The debt is to be repaid through Pima County residents' user fees.
▪ The user fees in education and health have been particularly difficult.
▪ Bush also proposed raising $ 75 million with new user fees for hazardous material shippers and owners of pipelines and railroads.
▪ Even user fees charged for private goods have some drawbacks.
▪ Or rule on whether asset sales, user fees, mandates and flashes of congressional ingenuity yet undreamed of violate the Constitution?
▪ Other user fees actually make public systems more progressive.
■ VERB
agree
▪ The Village Association has agreed to pay the fees for two staff members to sit the mini-bus test.
▪ A spokeswoman for the Omaha Visitor and Convention Bureau agrees that the fee was imposed, in part, for the stadium.
▪ Or consider the meeting to agree the audit fee, when the auditor can hardly wait to get his point across.
▪ The contractor negotiates with an insurance company which agrees, for a fee paid by the contractor, to provide the bond.
▪ Some newsagents will agree for a small fee to do a mail drop with the daily or evening papers.
▪ In the event that we can not agree an acceptable revised fee scale then we withdraw from the sale.
▪ Kendall, desperate to sign a striker before Saturday's Premier League kick-off, met Harford after agreeing a £300,000 fee.
charge
▪ In public sector schools in the late 1980s, shortages of government funding were bringing pressures to charge fees.
▪ Some charge an up front fee and others charge fees when investors redeem shares.
▪ And don't forget to charge the fee in your bill of costs.
▪ Several companies are now offering Internet access without charging monthly fees.
▪ One, for the World Resources Institute, compared ten cities that had pay-to-throw schemes with four others that charged flat fees.
▪ The band claimed Ticketmaster was charging excessive service fees and refused to reduce its fees for Pearl Jam concerts.
▪ I charged a fee - two tour-expired instructors.
▪ Lenders typically require a higher down payment and may charge other fees.
collect
▪ The Archive may, in addition, collect a royalty fee for the data owner.
▪ She watched events on a color television set in the cubicle where she sat, collecting fees from her customers.
▪ If the sale is abandoned, they still collect their fee, and their responsibility ends at once.
▪ She never got the chance to collect her fee.
▪ Why, they asked, should these associations collect such large fees for sanctioning a title fight?
▪ However, if they insist on collecting the fee, dump them.
▪ It finally erupted when Mozart asked for permission to stay on for a few days in Vienna to collect some outstanding fees.
▪ Banks, they say, also should be forced to pay damages for previously collecting those fees in states that prohibit them.
cover
▪ A minimum of £60,000 would be needed to cover fees for two children attending public school from age nine to 18.
▪ This second fund is used to cover doctor fees and a host of medical services performed outside of hospitals.
▪ The women, who were on legal aid, were offered an out-of-court settlement which would have barely covered their legal fees.
▪ Private medical insurance normally covers your private hospital fees only - so it's quite different.
▪ There is also cover for legal fees for personal injury suffered in an accident.
▪ In many instances, the income support rates cover the fees.
▪ Each governing body selected will receive £100 to cover the fees, expenses and travelling costs of both coaches.
▪ Compensation packages generally cover education fees.
include
▪ The best deal I can do on the airfares is £870 - this includes a small fee for myself for the administration.
▪ Most plans include a monthly fee and a certain number of free minutes per month.
▪ Steinbock said employees consistently referred only to the money homeowners would receive, not the total loans, which included fees.
▪ This includes a fee of Pounds 12,500, a three-month lease on a van and some working capital.
▪ Ironically the release includes fees for attorneys, water and environmental professionals as income generated for the city.
▪ Unofficial payments made by Swindon included signing-on fees of up to £20,000 and a goalkeeper's £50 bonus for keeping a clean sheet.
▪ The cost of the visit is included within the programme fee.
pay
▪ Sign the document, pay the fee and that's that until the next time.
▪ Until you upgrade it by paying a fee, shareware usually has minimal documentation and no tech support.
▪ Both scientific and commercial biodiversity prospectors should pay fees, as mineral prospectors do.
▪ Businesses and other institutions have to pay a fee for a site license.
▪ Qualified Teachers' Fees A few teachers have still not paid their fees for 1981.
▪ Wednesday was the deadline to apply for the new permanent-residency cards and pay the $ 75 fee.
▪ He has paid £4,000 in fees and has 25 clients seeking loans ranging from £20,000 to £5m.
▪ She says she would use the money to pay legal fees and for charity.
raise
▪ The plan to raise full-cost fees is likely to fail.
▪ It raises its greens fees for golf.
▪ To raise the fees, you know.
▪ In any case, the anxiety about raising tuition fees in Britain is misplaced.
▪ Congress granted the Interior Department authority to raise the fees earlier this year under a three-year program that expires in 1999.
▪ Public schools have raised their fees by an average 7.5 percent this year, the smallest increase for a decade.
▪ BankAmerica claims it has not raised fees or minimum required balances for the past three years.
receive
▪ It was stated Venables received a £500,000 signing-on fee but Venables says the figure was just £50,000.
▪ A dubious reform written in the Senate, Proposition 112 in 1990, barred legislators from receiving speaking fees.
▪ Sometimes the headhunter receives a fee for that advice without even undertaking an executive search.
▪ Only about a dozen other legislators were receiving speaking fees, most totaling $ 10, 000 or less.
▪ He flew to Nice in his private jet, despite having received his performance fee of $ 360,000 in full.
▪ I wanted to make it a law that only those lawyers and attorneys should receive fees who had won their cases.
▪ They received a capitation fee for every pupil - in whatever category - in the school.
▪ Students can not be registered until fees are received in full and fees must have been paid before tutors begin teaching. 6.
reduce
▪ But ride a bike and you could escape all penalties-or be charged a much reduced fee.
▪ They could be purchased cheaply, thus reducing models' fees.
▪ In addition, Abtrust Fund Managers is to reduce its quarterly management fee to 0.2 percent from 0.25 percent.
▪ Ticketmaster to reduce costly service fees.&038;.
▪ Four companies said they had reduced their fees by putting the audit out to tender.
▪ The band claimed Ticketmaster was charging excessive service fees and refused to reduce its fees for Pearl Jam concerts.
▪ First we must reduce the bookseller licence fee from around £40 to £10.
▪ Three Exclusive Links Cards offer reduced fees at several dozen courses in the Northeast.
set
▪ An upper limit was then set on transfer fees.
▪ Regional administrators would negotiate with doctors' groups to set fees to fit the budget.
▪ There is a £195 set up fee and three months early redemption charge.
▪ The formula for setting that fee will be determined later.
▪ Seven years ago, the state set the collective discharger fees at $ 4 million per year.
▪ But hospitals may set outpatient fees at any level they want.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
contingency fee
▪ A review of contingency fees was undertaken and research on commercial legal expenses insurance was published.
▪ A standard contingency fee is 33 percent to 40 percent.
▪ A substantial percentage of these lawsuits are brought by attorneys working on a contingency fee basis.
▪ Californians also turned down Proposition 202, a proposal to limit lawyers' contingency fees and encourage early settlement of lawsuits.
▪ His home, law firm and love life were all sacrificed to the case which was brought on a contingency fee basis.
▪ It recommended that the prohibition on contingency fees and other forms of incentive should be re-examined.
▪ The contingency fee usually sorts out the questionable cases to begin with.
▪ Voters rejected measures to ban most lawsuits resulting from car accidents, limit shareholder lawsuits and slash lawyers' contingency fees.
hourly pay/earnings/fees etc
▪ Average hourly earnings advanced a scant 1 cent in January, reaching $ 12. 06.
▪ It did, however, charge hourly fees that could add up quickly for heavy users.
▪ Mississippi has the lowest income per capita of any state, as well as the lowest hourly earnings for production workers.
▪ Mr Bennett, even at his hourly fees still an officer of the court, should be ashamed of himself.
▪ Within the Paid Employment Arena 3.2 Differential hourly earnings are the most obvious indicator of the patriarchal dividend.
nominal sum/charge/fee etc
▪ A red cotton T-shirt or running vest is available at a nominal charge of £1.00 together with sponsorship forms.
▪ He applied for a grant of land and this was sold to him for a nominal sum.
▪ Homes for the elderly were shut, and formerly nominal charges increased and extended.
▪ It would save money simply to give the pits to the miners for a nominal sum, say £1.
▪ The local agents provide an extensive catalogue of programs available at a nominal charge.
▪ Those registered users of Word for Windows requiring the upgrade can obtain it from Microsoft for a nominal fee of £7.75inc.VAT.
▪ Traditionally, the people's singing has been delegated to a choir which is generally paid a nominal fee.
▪ Under the program, the government sold shares to citizens for a nominal fee to quickly transform state enterprises into private companies.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ An accident on vacation can cost you a lot in medical fees.
▪ Dr Allison charges a fee of $90 for a consultation.
▪ Insurance covered most of the doctor's fees.
▪ Last year IBM paid $12 million in legal fees to a single law firm.
▪ Some actors can ask a fee of around $1000.000 a movie.
▪ The fee for the standard structural survey is £175.
▪ The fee is $50 for a six-week art class.
▪ The doctor I saw charged an £100 fee for an initial consultation.
▪ The entrance fees to the park have gone up by 50%.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Any tickets resold will be subject to a 20% handling fee deducted from monies due.
▪ I understand that our fee will be split equally between both parties.
▪ It also includes dozens of sights that have admission fees.
▪ It also provides money, drawn partially from fees paid by developers, to protect land from urban development.
▪ Total fees and commissions fell to $ 204 million from $ 192 million, as corporate finance and lending fees fell.
▪ You have to spend some proportion of the fee there on the rock.
▪ You may have to pay an arrangement fee to the lender of £200 to £300.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Fee

Fee \Fee\ (f[=e]), n. [OE. fe, feh, feoh, cattle, property, money, fief, AS. feoh cattle, property, money; the senses of ``property, money,'' arising from cattle being used in early times as a medium of exchange or payment, property chiefly consisting of cattle; akin to OS. fehu cattle, property, D. vee cattle, OHG. fihu, fehu, G. vieh, Icel. f[=e] cattle, property, money, Goth. fa['i]hu, L. pecus cattle, pecunia property, money, Skr. pa[,c]u cattle, perh. orig., ``a fastened or tethered animal,'' from a root signifying to bind, and perh. akin to E. fang, fair, a.; cf. OF. fie, flu, feu, fleu, fief, F. fief, from German, of the same origin. the sense fief is due to the French. [root]249. Cf. Feud, Fief, Fellow, Pecuniary.]

  1. property; possession; tenure. ``Laden with rich fee.''
    --Spenser.

    Once did she hold the gorgeous East in fee.
    --Wordsworth.

  2. Reward or compensation for services rendered or to be rendered; especially, payment for professional services, of optional amount, or fixed by custom or laws; charge; pay; perquisite; as, the fees of lawyers and physicians; the fees of office; clerk's fees; sheriff's fees; marriage fees, etc.

    To plead for love deserves more fee than hate.
    --Shak.

  3. (Feud. Law) A right to the use of a superior's land, as a stipend for services to be performed; also, the land so held; a fief.

  4. (Eng. Law) An estate of inheritance supposed to be held either mediately or immediately from the sovereign, and absolutely vested in the owner.

    Note: All the land in England, except the crown land, is of this kind. An absolute fee, or fee simple, is land which a man holds to himself and his heirs forever, who are called tenants in fee simple. In modern writers, by fee is usually meant fee simple. A limited fee may be a qualified or base fee, which ceases with the existence of certain conditions; or a conditional fee, or fee tail, which is limited to particular heirs.
    --Blackstone.

  5. (Amer. Law) An estate of inheritance belonging to the owner, and transmissible to his heirs, absolutely and simply, without condition attached to the tenure.

    Fee estate (Eng. Law), land or tenements held in fee in consideration or some acknowledgment or service rendered to the lord.

    Fee farm (Law), land held of another in fee, in consideration of an annual rent, without homage, fealty, or any other service than that mentioned in the feoffment; an estate in fee simple, subject to a perpetual rent.
    --Blackstone.

    Fee farm rent (Eng. Law), a perpetual rent reserved upon a conveyance in fee simple.

    Fee fund (Scot. Law), certain court dues out of which the clerks and other court officers are paid.

    Fee simple (Law), an absolute fee; a fee without conditions or limits.

    Buy the fee simple of my life for an hour and a quarter.
    --Shak.

    Fee tail (Law), an estate of inheritance, limited and restrained to some particular heirs.
    --Burill.

Fee

Fee \Fee\ (f[=e]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Feed (f[=e]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Feeing.] To reward for services performed, or to be performed; to recompense; to hire or keep in hire; hence, to bribe.

The patient . . . fees the doctor.
--Dryden.

There's not a one of them but in his house I keep a servant feed.
--Shak.

Wikipedia

Fee (disambiguation)

A fee is the price one pays as remuneration for rights or services.

Fee or fée may also refer to:

Fee (band)

Fee was a Christian rock and Contemporary worship music band from Alpharetta, Georgia, United States named for the group's founder and front-man Steve Fee. Fee is most known for their hit single, "All Because of Jesus", which peaked at No. 2 on Billboard's Hot Christian AC Chart, and at No. 4 on the Hot Christian Songs chart.

Fee

A fee is the price one pays as remuneration for rights or services. Fees usually allow for overhead, wages, costs, and markup.

Traditionally, professionals in Great Britain received a fee in contradistinction to a payment, salary, or wage, and would often use guineas rather than pounds as units of account. Under the feudal system, a Knight's fee was what was given to a knight for his service, usually the usage of land.

A contingent fee is an attorney's fee which is reduced or not charged at all if the court case is lost by the attorney.

A service fee, service charge, or surcharge is a fee added to a customer's bill. The purpose of a service charge often depends on the nature of the product and corresponding service provided. Examples of why this fee is charged are: travel time expenses, truck rental fees, liability and workers' compensation insurance fees, and planning fees. UPS and FedEx have recently begun surcharges for fuel.

Restaurants and banquet halls charging service charges in lieu of tips must distribute them to their wait staff in some US states (e.g., Massachusetts, New York, Montana), but in the State of Kentucky may keep them.

A fee may be a flat fee or a variable one, or part of a two-part tariff.

A membership fee is charged as part of a subscription business model.

Fee (surname)

Fee is a surname, usually an anglicized version of the Irish Ó Fiaich. The Chinese surname Fei is sometimes also transliterated as Fee. The French surname Fée, meaning fairy, is another less common source for this name in English.

Notable people with the surname include:

  • Albert Fee (1880–1957), Canadian provincial politician
  • Ben Fee (born 1908), Chinese American writer and labor organizer
  • Douglas Fee (born 1944), Canadian politician and businessman
  • Earl Fee (born 1929), Canadian track and field athlete
  • Francis Fee (born 1934), former Irish cricketer
  • Fra Fee (born 1987), Northern Irish actor
  • Gordon Fee (born 1934), American-Canadian theologian
  • Greg Fee (born 1964), former English footballer
  • Jack Fee (1867–1913), American baseball player
  • James Fee (1949–2006), American photographer
  • James Alger Fee (1888–1959), US federal judge
  • John Fee (1963–2007), Irish nationalist politician
  • John Gregg Fee (1816–1901), American minister, abolitionist, and educator
  • Mary Fee (born 1954), Scottish politician
  • Melinda O. Fee (born 1942), American actress
  • Michale Fee (born 1964), American scientist
  • Raymond Fee (1903–1983), American boxer
  • Thomas Fee (1931–2013), American politician
  • Thomas Arthur Fee (1860-1929), Canadian architect, partner in Parr and Fee
Wiktionary

fee

n. 1 (context feudal law English) A right to the use of a superior's land, as a stipend for services to be performed; also, the land so held; a fief. 2 (context legal English) An inheritable estate in land held of a feudal lord on condition of the performing of certain services. 3 (context legal English) An estate of inheritance in land, either absolute and without limitation to any particular class of heirs (fee simple) or limited to a particular class of heirs (fee tail). 4 (context obsolete English) property; owndom; estate. 5 (context obsolete English) Money paid or bestowed; payment; emolument. 6 (context obsolete English) A prize or reward. Only used in the set phrase "A finder's fee" in Modern English. 7 A monetary payment charged for professional services. vb. To reward for services performed, or to be performed; to recompense; to hire or keep in hire; hence, to bribe.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

fee

Middle English, representing the merger or mutual influence of two words, one from Old English, one from an Old French form of the same Germanic word, and both ultimately from a PIE root meaning "cattle."\n

\nThe Old English word is feoh "livestock, cattle; movable property; possessions in livestock, goods, or money; riches, treasure, wealth; money as a medium of exchange or payment," from Proto-Germanic *fehu- (cognates: Old Saxon fehu, Old High German fihu, German Vieh "cattle," Gothic faihu "money, fortune"). This is from PIE *peku- "cattle" (cognates: Sanskrit pasu, Lithuanian pekus "cattle;" Latin pecu "cattle," pecunia "money, property").\n

\nThe other word is Anglo-French fee, from Old French fieu, a variant of fief "possession, holding, domain; feudal duties, payment" (see fief), which apparently is a Germanic compound in which the first element is cognate with Old English feoh.\n

\nVia Anglo-French come the legal senses "estate in land or tenements held on condition of feudal homage; land, property, possession" (c.1300). Hence fee-simple (late 14c.) "absolute ownership," as opposed to fee-tail (early 15c.) "entailed ownership," inheritance limited to some particular class of heirs (second element from Old French taillir "to cut, to limit").\n

\nThe feudal sense was extended from landholdings to inheritable offices of service to a feudal lord (late 14c.; in Anglo-French late 13c.), for example forester of fe "a forester by heritable right." As these often were offices of profit, the word came to be used for "remuneration for service in office" (late 14c.), hence, "payment for (any kind of) work or services" (late 14c.). From late 14c. as "a sum paid for a privilege" (originally admission to a guild); early 15c. as "money payment or charge exacted for a license, etc."

WordNet

fee

  1. n. a fixed charge for a privilege or for professional services

  2. an interest in land capable of being inherited

fee

v. give a tip or gratuity to in return for a service, beyond the agreed-on compensation; "Remember to tip the waiter"; "fee the steward" [syn: tip, bung]

Usage examples of "fee".

I can assure you I have quite a lot at my disposal all kinds of different spells fee faw fums, mumbo jumbos, abraxas, love potions, he glanced quickly at the queen here and added, though I see you have no need of the last of those, having a very beautiful wife whom you love to distraction.

A plant of Drosera, with the edges of its leaves curled inwards, so as to form a temporary stomach, with the glands of the closely inflected tentacles pouring forth their acid secretion, which dissolves animal matter, afterwards to be absorbed, may be said to feed like an animal.

Some offworld accessor noticed them and offered Earthservice a repro fee, or so I was told.

Two, you take me to Ty and feed me Adeem on a plate with mashed potatoes and I let you live.

Washington Street and indisputably the biggest alienist in the world and certainly the only honest one since he never takes a fee for testifying, and never gives an interview to a newspaper.

Perhaps Anne had paid her fee for some kind of miracle cure for her waiflike, nearly anorexic body.

Just then the marquis came in, saying he would give me my revenge and without answering I went downstairs as if to come back again, but I ran out of the inn, got into my carriage, and drove off, promising a good fee to the postillion if he would put his horses at a gallop.

Six billion mouths to feed on a world with shrinking arable land and resources.

The power of the spell flattened the enormous arachnid, opened its exoskeleton, and a host of smaller spiders leaped upon it to feed.

Chancellor announced that each inceptor would be required to pay the ordinary fee of thirty shillings and a pair of buckskin gloves for each bedel, or, in lieu of gloves, five shillings to be divided among the bedels.

Members were blackballed without refund of fees if they were connected to the slightest public mention, and the enormous fees they paid, as well as our investigative process, thoroughly eliminated reporter spies.

Corpus Christi was founded in 1352 because fees for celebrating masses for the dead were so inflated after the plague that two guilds of Cambridge decided to establish a college whose scholars, as clerics, would be required to pray for their deceased members.

The codicil means that you and I are the last of the entailed line to the fee simple, so that the Mompessons now only hold a base-fee to the property.

As elsewhere in Europe, there was a deep craving to detemporalize the Church and clear the way to God of all the money and fees and donations and oblations that cluttered it.

Barely making a living in his first three years after graduating from one of the night schools that taught law, he took the case, hoping for no more than his fee of one third of the fifty grand Mrs Diep wanted.