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Crossword clues for face

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
face
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cliff face (=a steep surface or side of a cliff)
▪ Some climbers were scrambling up the steep cliff face.
a grin on sb’s face
▪ He looked at Sarah, a big grin on his face.
a smile spreads across sb’s face (=they smile)
▪ A faint smile spread across her face.
a task faces sb
▪ Given the nature of the task facing us, three days might not be enough.
as plain as day/the nose on your face (=very clear)
be awaiting/facing trial
▪ Its managing director is awaiting trial on corruption charges.
be faced with a choice
▪ He was faced with a difficult choice.
blank face/look/expression/eyes
▪ Zoe looked at me with a blank expression.
cupped...face
▪ He cupped her face in his hands and kissed her.
experience/face discrimination
▪ Government figures suggest that ethnic minorities face discrimination looking for jobs.
face a ban
▪ He faced a four-year ban after failing a drugs test.
face a battle
▪ Paul faces a frantic battle to be fit for the match in November.
face a bill (=have a lot to pay on a bill)
▪ They were facing a mounting legal bill.
face a bleak/grim etc future
▪ Many pensioners face a bleak future.
face a challenge (=have to deal with one)
▪ The company still faces some challenges.
face a crisis
▪ Many families are facing a debt crisis.
face a deficit
▪ The party is facing a deficit of £1.3million for this year, so it must find ways of cutting its costs.
face a dilemma/be faced with a dilemma
▪ Women may still be faced with the dilemma of choosing between jobs and families.
face a dilemma/be faced with a dilemma
▪ Women may still be faced with the dilemma of choosing between jobs and families.
face a nation
▪ There are many problems facing our nation.
face a penalty
▪ He faces a maximum penalty of 10 years’ imprisonment.
face a problem
▪ Terrorism is possibly the most important problem facing western countries.
face a risk
▪ The dominant male faces the risk that adult males from the group will attack him.
face a sentence (=be likely to receive a sentence)
▪ He faces a long prison sentence if he is caught.
face a shortage (=be likely to suffer a shortage)
▪ The refugees face desperate shortages of food and water.
face a threat (=likely to be affected by something)
▪ The factory is facing the threat of closure.
face an accusation (=have an accusation made about you)
▪ The police faced accusations of using excessive force.
face an issue (=accept that an issue exists and deal with it)
▪ Politicians seem to be reluctant to face the issue.
face an obstacle (=have to deal with an obstacle)
▪ The investigation has faced numerous obstacles.
face an opponent
▪ The team were facing their final opponent of the season.
face an ordeal
▪ He faced the ordeal of caring for his dying wife.
face card
face charges (=have been charged with a crime)
▪ A farmer is facing charges of cruelty and neglect.
face competition (from sb)
▪ Website designers face increasing competition.
face cream
face criticism
▪ He has often faced criticism in the local press.
face danger
▪ Today’s police officers face danger every day.
face defeat (=be likely to be defeated)
▪ In May 1945 Germany faced defeat at the hands of the Allies.
face delays (=be likely to experience them)
▪ Commuters face long delays as a result of the rail strikes.
face difficulties
▪ The hotel’s owners were facing financial difficulties.
face down (=with his face towards the ground)
▪ Ken fell asleep face down on the couch.
face downwards (=with the front of the body on the floor)
▪ The body was lying face downwards .
face execution (=be due to be killed)
▪ He is facing execution after being found guilty of murdering three women.
face extinction (=be likely to stop existing soon)
▪ The red squirrel faces extinction in England and Wales unless conservation measures are taken.
face hardship (=will be affected by a difficult or painful situation)
▪ One in four families in Britain is facing financial hardship.
face (in) a direction
▪ The men were facing the direction from which they expected the attack.
face legal action
▪ The council demanded that we remove the posters, or face legal action.
face opposition (=experience opposition that has to be dealt with)
▪ The proposal faced opposition from road safety campaigners.
face pack
face powder
face prosecution
▪ The owners of a golf course are facing prosecution for blocking footpaths.
face reality (=accept it)
▪ It's painful, but you have to face reality.
face redundancy
▪ Up to 300 leather factory workers are facing redundancy.
face ruin
▪ Many shopkeepers are facing ruin.
face saver
face the prospect (of sth)
▪ Now they face the prospect of unemployment.
face time
▪ Here we reward performance, not face time.
face value (=the value printed on something)
▪ The tickets are selling for far more than their face value.
face value
▪ You shouldn’t always take his remarks at face value.
face/suffer the consequences (=accept the bad results of something you have done)
▪ He broke the law, and he will have to face the consequences.
face/tackle/meet sth head-on
▪ The police are trying to tackle car crime head-on.
facing famine
▪ A million people are facing famine.
facing/looking/spreading etc outwards
▪ Stand with your elbows pointing outwards.
fix...face (=put on make-up)
▪ Hold on. Let me just fix my face before we go out.
forgets a face (=forgets who someone is)
▪ He’s someone who never forgets a face.
foxy face
▪ a foxy face
freckled face/skin
full face
▪ In portraits, chiefs were invariably shown full face.
full figure/face/breasts etc
▪ clothes for the fuller figure
have a smile on your face/lips
▪ They all had broad smiles on their faces.
have an expression on your face
▪ He had a very serious expression on his face.
impassive face
▪ Her impassive face showed no reaction at all.
in the face of adversity
▪ his courage in the face of adversity
in the face of competition (=in a situation where you are competing to be successful)
▪ They won the contract in the face of tough competition.
keep a straight face
▪ I found it very difficult to keep a straight face.
kick sb in the stomach/face/shin etc
▪ There was a scuffle and he kicked me in the stomach.
laugh till you cry/laugh till the tears run down your face
▪ He leaned back in his chair and laughed till the tears ran down his face.
lose face (=stop having as much respect from other people)
▪ A settlement was reached in which neither side lost face.
meet/face your nemesis
▪ In the final he will meet his old nemesis, Roger Federer.
powdering...face
▪ She was powdering her face.
rock face
sallow face/skin/complexion
▪ a woman with dark hair and a sallow complexion
sb breaks into a smile/sb’s face breaks into a smile (=they suddenly smile)
▪ Anna’s face broke into a smile at the prospect of a guest.
sb's face is dark/red/purple with rage
▪ His face went purple with rage.
sb's face is twisted/contorted with rage
▪ Mike's usually calm face was contorted with rage.
smack in the mouth/face/gob
▪ Talk like that and I’ll give you a smack in the mouth.
smash sb’s face/head in (=hit someone hard in the face or head)
▪ I’ll smash his head in if he comes here again!
smug expression/look/face/smile etc
▪ ‘I knew I’d win,’ she said with a smug smile.
sour look/face/smile etc
▪ Eliza was tall and thin, with a rather sour face.
stand/face trial (=be judged in a court of law)
▪ Doctors said he was unfit to stand trial.
straight to his face (=speaking directly to him)
▪ I told him straight to his face what I thought of him.
tears run/roll/stream down sb’s face
▪ Oliver laughed until tears ran down his face.
the expression on sb’s face
▪ I could tell by the expression on her face that she was angry.
the face of a clock/the clock face (=the front part that you look at)
▪ I couldn’t see the clock face from where I was sitting.
the face of a clock/the clock face (=the front part that you look at)
▪ I couldn’t see the clock face from where I was sitting.
the opposite/facing page
▪ See the diagram on the opposite page.
troubled face/eyes/look
turn sth to face sth/sb
▪ Could you turn your chairs to face this way?
upturned face
▪ He smiled down into her upturned face.
vanish without (a) trace/vanish off the face of the earth (=disappear so that no sign remains)
▪ The youngster vanished without a trace one day and has never been found.
with a pained expression on his face
▪ He sat stiffly, with a pained expression on his face.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
brave
▪ She may have put a brave face on it.
▪ Whether in denial or putting on a brave face, the delegates professed to be unperturbed by those numbers.
▪ Newspaper staff put on a brave face.
▪ No one said a word all of us were consciously putting on a brave face.
▪ Her brave and beaming face was duplicated on the reversed covers.
▪ In 1982, despite all our attempts at putting on a brave collective face, we knew we would lose.
▪ He was shattered, though he put on a brave face.
▪ Leaving the court the families all tried to put on a brave face.
dark
▪ It would have filled the count's dark face with fury and suspicion.
▪ Even at that distance, I could see that his mood was dark, his face tense.
▪ Focusing resentfully on the dark, angular face, her heart had flipped over suddenly in her chest.
▪ Her dark, pretty face glittered there in front of me.
▪ He was tall, with a thin dark face and cool white hands.
▪ In the fading light of the patio, Yolanda can not make out the expression on the dark face.
▪ Benjamin, with his long, dark face, kindly eyes and lawyer's stoop.
▪ Reverend Stamina Jones was a tall, stately, white-haired man with clear eyes in an extremely dark round face.
familiar
▪ He voiced their torment at knowing their children would be medically examined without consent and without any familiar face being present.
▪ It therefore seems that he ascribes this voice to a visually familiar face.
▪ It's always nice to see a friendly familiar face.
▪ He had shunned the opposition, reshuffled his government with familiar faces and retained the prime minister many wanted out.
▪ But this could soon be the more familiar face of coal production in Gloucestershire.
▪ One by one the familiar names and faces of the independence period were passing from the political picture.
▪ Social needs are met with familiar faces attending each week and consultations with the same nurses and doctors.
▪ He turned the volume up as loud as it would go and stared at the familiar faces on the screen.
human
▪ If successful, it will produce a deeper understanding of the human face recognition system.
▪ What he fails to do is to put a human face on these processes.
▪ A mountain that weirdly echoes the shape not of the human face but of a human artefact!
▪ Food brought me back to the human face.
▪ It was very far from being a human face.
▪ They become bogeymen, earthly Aliens, and -- despite the fake human faces they develop -- very easy to spot.
▪ To show Christopher the human face of the dreaded development.
▪ Whether a capitalist or socialist approach to development is adopted, it must be development with a human face.
pale
▪ She had a lovely pale oval madonna face with blue eyes and her hair was light-brown.
▪ Her blue eyes are eerily pale, her face pretty and concentrated.
▪ She has a modest expression and a pale sweet face.
▪ Her thick dark hair was swept up in spiraling tiers above a too-thin pale face.
▪ Her lips were swollen against her pale face and the sight of her distress seemed to infuriate him more.
▪ Her appearance had changed since her illness, but there was a strange beauty in her pale face.
▪ Nick's pale face glimmered as he looked up at her.
▪ Not that pale faces are making a comeback.
pretty
▪ He was always a horrid little boy for all his pretty face, and now he's a horrid man.
▪ He could be suckered in by a soft story or a pretty face.
▪ And his pretty face hasn't changed in all that time.
▪ Her dark, pretty face glittered there in front of me.
▪ Pity to cut such a pretty face but she'd asked for it.
▪ Her hair was parted in the middle and drawn back from a round, pretty face.
▪ A young pretty face and an invitation, and he succumbed.
▪ Tis not a feeling of yesterday, to be effaced by the first pretty face which crosses my path.
red
▪ Theda was therefore acutely conscious of one gentleman, rather stout and red of face.
▪ McBride spluttered, yelled, got red in the face.
▪ Mrs Medlock was a large woman, with a very red face and bright black eyes.
▪ He paused, his red face turned toward the blank television set.
▪ She was not a beautiful woman, being tall and thin, with black hair and eyes and a very red face.
▪ He was short, with a red face and a redder nose.
▪ He went very red in the face.
▪ Around the bar, the sweating, red and white faces of the male tourists turn upwards in salacious worship.
straight
▪ How can you say that and keep a straight face?
▪ Kemp is straining to maintain a straight face.
▪ I keep a straight face and the composure of a chemist dispensing a prescription.
▪ We start with safe conversation and straight faces.
▪ The plot is one that you can hardly repeat with a straight face.
▪ Despite the problem of trying to maintain a straight face, there are distinct advantages to being on Cube's team.
white
▪ The ambulance doors closed out the white face of my recently acquired 17-year-old husband.
▪ Immediately upon their entrance, they were washed by a shoal of white faces gazing at them from behind cold masks.
▪ A clutch of long white Friday evening faces confronted me.
▪ He saw their white faces and felt their cold hands.
▪ His white face was spiteful, threatening and suggestive.
▪ He's got long fair hair and a little white face too.
▪ When she came to, she was in a chair and Jack was all white in the face, looking at her.
■ VERB
bury
▪ Then she struggled up, burying her face in his hand and her own.
▪ With a sob, Theda flung her arms about his neck and buried her face in his shoulder.
▪ Suddenly he raced across the stage and buried his face behind the curtain.
▪ Then with a groan, he buried his face in her neck and began stroking her thighs.
▪ She buried her face in his neck and felt the warmth of his skin against her face.
▪ With a choked sob she brought the bear closer until she had buried her face in it.
change
▪ Ambush marketing has changed the face of sport and sport sponsorship.
▪ Following the Civil War came the period of rapid railroad develop-ment that changed the face of Kansas for ever.
▪ Version 3.0 and the further improved 3.1 version of Microsoft Windows have changed the face of modern Personal Computing.
▪ By doing so, they say they hope to change not only the face of Downtown housing, but the whole economy.
▪ A decade of merger-mania has changed the face of Los Angeles.
▪ But their ancestors had changed the face of California earth.
▪ Like stepping out of your skin, like changing your face.
cross
▪ A bitter smile crossed his face as his eyes ranged over the top men in the giant corporation.
▪ Some sort of unpleasant thought crossed her face.
▪ Nate Cocello allowed a knowing smile to cross his face at what he knew would be the natural reactions of line managers.
▪ A cynical smile crossed his face, hidden behind the lip of the beer glass.
▪ When the doctor saw me sitting beside the boy a puzzled look crossed his face.
▪ A sly grin crossed his face as he thought of an alternative billet in which to spend what remained of the night.
▪ I sat down by the side of Blyth, careful not to let my shadow cross his face.
▪ No flicker of guilt crossed his face, no softening.
fall
▪ She stepped back, shivering slightly when fitzAlan's hand fell away from her face.
▪ As the youth smoked a cigarette, shadows fell across his face.
▪ Then he reached out and drew the hair back from where it had fallen across her face.
▪ But once the ball tips, the game falls flat on its face faster than a top-ranked team after a first-round upset.
▪ How stupid to fall on your face.
▪ As we were going out to the car Babe slipped and fell flat on her face.
fly
▪ She left her head where it was, and glimpsed the satisfaction that flew across Luke's face.
▪ But strong biological determinism flies in the face of experience.
▪ The decades since Malthus's time have seen progress of a kind that flies in the face of everything he foresaw.
▪ And all my frustration was flying in their faces.
▪ I find this hard to believe since it flies in the face of all the principles of wrestling.
▪ Neill triumphantly flies in the face of a long line of buffoon kings on film.
▪ When she was ecstatic, and she was often ecstatic, ecstasy flew from her face like the sun from a mirror.
▪ Whatever the riddle is called, it flies in the face of 3, 000 years of logical philosophy.
lie
▪ It's fantastic, John, there she is, a new person, lying on her face, sound asleep.
▪ I unlocked the door and went in and lay face down on the bed.
▪ Douglas went down to the cells to talk to Marco, who was lying face down on the narrow cot.
▪ A man lay face down, feet toward the center, head away from it.
▪ Now he could see that it was lying face down.
▪ Side by side, the two men lay face down in the grass, feet toward the rear of the pale car.
▪ She lay watching his face as he tried to concentrate on the complexities of the novel.
▪ The view while lying face down, shielding our eyes from the sun with our hands, was superb.
pull
▪ And she pulled a face back at him.
▪ He told me that the oxygen mask had pulled away from my face some, and that I was probably just blacking out.
▪ Without meaning to, he pulled a face.
▪ She pulled a face at the speaker.
▪ He likes me to smile at the camera, so twice I pulled shocking faces.
▪ Her hair was pulled back from her face and tied in a bun.
▪ I wear sweats and my hair is pulled from my face with a rubber band.
▪ At the end, she pulls her face into a lion.
save
▪ I had to do this to save face for my father.
▪ The only person that didn't was Fish, who had to save face and went on claiming it was true.
▪ Determined to save face, I kept devouring everything set before me.
▪ We may accept them, to oblige: to save another's face.
▪ By agreeing to the staged confrontation, Barnett would save face while permitting Meredith to register.
▪ There was an awkward silence which Maidstone might have broken with some amiable remark to save Sandison's face.
▪ As a result of the turmoil, Frank resigned in order to save face.
slap
▪ The door to Joe's house closed suddenly and Nina felt as though she had been slapped in the face.
▪ Vasili shook her shoulders violently then slapped her across the face.
▪ It was like somebody slapped me across my face.
▪ That hurt him almost as much as when I slapped his face for not letting me escape.
▪ When the Chicago creature got Cyd Charisse, I slapped my face for haute le monde to see.
▪ It made me want to slap his face.
▪ Clarisa turned and slapped her face.
smile
▪ People were whispering about me behind my back - smiling to my face of course - but whispering behind my back.
▪ Instead, the smiling face of the popular 49-year-old Gov.
▪ He's smiling out of a rugged face, with thick black eyebrows and curling hair.
▪ He is also a deeply private person whose kindly, smiling face could fool you.
▪ Rage rarely visits that open, smiling face but Massimo was volcanic.
▪ The world of successful entrepreneurs is full of smiling faces and confident attitudes.
▪ He was tall and strong with a big, smiling face.
▪ He is outspoken, witty, occasionally vulgar, and when he smiles his whole face lights up.
turn
▪ Mrs Simpson turned her face and looked out of the window.
▪ We turned our faces glum to reaffirm the forced nature of this trip.
▪ I lay back and turned my face to it.
▪ She turned a terrified face to them.
▪ From the contemplation of this inescapable judgment he turned his face resolutely away.
▪ Eventually, he turns his face to the wall and encounters the photograph of the coroner from Philadelphia, Gold.
▪ She turned her face to him and smiled, feeling pain as she moved her head.
▪ They were all the same, those men, turning away their heavy faces and failing to acknowledge my greetings.
wipe
▪ When they spilled over, she did not wipe them from her face.
▪ Charles and Clarissa made thankful noises, drank a little champagne, and metaphorically wiped their faces.
▪ The man took a handkerchief from his suit pocket and wiped his face.
▪ I wipe my face on my sleeve.
▪ She stood up straight, wiped at her face and seemed alarmed to find it veiled.
▪ I wiped my face with a handkerchief and thought about Barbara Porter.
▪ Fakhru smiled and wiped his whole sweating face on his pyjama front, which he lifted with two hands.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(have) egg on your face
▪ If we think they are easy meat we will end up with egg on our faces.
▪ Meanwhile, Hutcheson observed that in 1995 all the chip forecasters had varying degrees of egg on their face.
▪ People like me, who believed the firing squad had been assembled, were left with egg on our faces.
a face like thunder
▪ She stood there with hands on her hips, glaring with a face like thunder.
a slap in the face
▪ Gwynn considered the salary they were offering a slap in the face.
▪ And make no mistake: He considers the Padres' offer a slap in the face -- even mimicking such a blow.
▪ Barnes's decision therefore came as somewhat of a slap in the face to these well rehearsed points.
▪ But choosing that particular moment to do it was a rebuff as callous and shocking as a slap in the face.
▪ It is a slap in the face and an insult.
argue/talk etc till you're blue in the face
be staring sb in the face
▪ Defeat was staring us in the face.
▪ The answer had been staring him in the face for months.
▪ The solution is staring you in the face.
▪ He thought he was staring death in the face.
▪ It is staring us in the face.
▪ With only three games to save themselves, Coventry are staring relegation in the face.
blood rushes to sb's face/cheeks
blow up in sb's face
▪ It was kind of funny watching the presentation blow up in Harry's face.
▪ Kristin knew that if anyone found out, the whole thing could blow up in her face.
▪ Auditors some-times miss big potential problems that blow up in the face of bondholders.
▪ But I also fear that this encryption stuff is so powerful it could blow up in my face.
▪ Having opted for a formation that he thought would beat Leicester, David O Leary saw it blow up in his face.
▪ Liable blow up in their faces.
▪ Not only could be, but would be, and the whole thing would blow up in my face.
▪ Nothing of its kind had ever been done before, and it could have blown up in his face.
▪ When the clothes iron blows up in your face.
bring a smile to sb's lips/face
▪ He and Stapleton can associate to their hearts' content and that's something to bring a smile to his face.
▪ It brought a smile to her lips.
▪ Nothing was more likely to bring a smile to his face than being told he was talked about.
▪ She invented a hundred little things to make him happy, to bring a smile to his face.
▪ The thought brought a smile to his face.
▪ Their screams of horror and cries for mercy only brought a smile to my face.
▪ We thank him profusely, and manage to bring a smile to his face.
bury your face/head etc (in sth)
▪ Jessamy buried her face against her husband's shoulder.
▪ She gripped his hands, his shirt, burying her face in his chest, hiding and laughing at her own reaction.
▪ She returned to her chair and sank down into it burying her face in her hands.
▪ Suddenly he raced across the stage and buried his face behind the curtain.
▪ Then with a groan, he buried his face in her neck and began stroking her thighs.
▪ You will notice phrases like crocodile tears, the elephant never forgets, and the ostrich burying its head in the sand.
bury your face/head in your hands
capitalism/communism/socialism etc with a human face
compose your face/features/thoughts
▪ He held out his hand to his junior master and composed his face into a solemn expression of trust.
▪ I compose my face into a smile.
▪ I tried to compose my features into a combination of nonchalance and justification.
▪ They had composed their faces, but their eyes sparkled and their mouths yearned to smile.
▪ When asked a question do not rush at your answer but give yourself a second or two to compose your thoughts.
cross sb's face
▪ A look of horror crossed Ken's face.
cut off your nose to spite your face
▪ If you love him, ask him to stay. Otherwise you'll be cutting off your nose to spite your face.
fall flat on your/sth's face
▪ She fell flat on her face getting out of the car.
▪ The last time I wore high-heeled shoes I fell flat on my face outside a restaurant.
▪ As we were going out to the car Babe slipped and fell flat on her face.
▪ At last, after several near misses, I fall flat on my face.
▪ Because if you don't a fresh ambition or optimistic plan will fall flat on its face.
▪ But once the ball tips, the game falls flat on its face faster than a top-ranked team after a first-round upset.
▪ It is also a nation waiting for her to fall flat on her face.
▪ Writers strive for a universal experience distilled from personal memories and tend to fall flat on their faces.
▪ Yet there are certain composers who fall flat on their face unless the adrenalin really start to flow.
feed your face
fill yourself (up)/fill your face
fly in the face of sth
▪ Eysenck's claim flies in the face of all the evidence.
▪ Anita Roddick has made a virtue of flying in the face of business convention.
▪ Award-winning entertainment that flies in the face of gravity lands in Tucson for two nights only.
▪ But strong biological determinism flies in the face of experience.
▪ I find this hard to believe since it flies in the face of all the principles of wrestling.
▪ It flies in the face of commitments made at the Earth Summit to reduce consumption.
▪ Neill triumphantly flies in the face of a long line of buffoon kings on film.
▪ This flies in the face of the cautious nature of the Bush administration.
▪ Whatever the riddle is called, it flies in the face of 3, 000 years of logical philosophy.
have sth/be written all over your face
horsey face/smell etc
▪ They gave off a pungent, horsey smell, as if freshly cut.
kick sb's head/face/teeth in
▪ But they would kick your head in if you spilt their pint just the same.
▪ It goes with some people wanting to kick my head in.
▪ Lou and Van burst into tears and Hamburglar kicks their heads in.
▪ So they are all there, kicking our teeth in.
laugh in sb's face
▪ I confronted my daughter, but she just laughed in my face.
▪ He mocks death, laughs in its face, and others of his ilk laugh in a chorus all around him.
▪ If she warned Ace what her father expected of him he'd laugh in her face.
▪ If some one had told her what was going to happen she would have laughed in their face.
▪ Instead, have fun with our great £25,000 series of slump-busting contests and laugh in the face of Lamont.
▪ Ryan laughed in my face, which is what I expected.
▪ The next time you hear a native-born athlete complain about adversity, remember Livan Hernandez and laugh in his face.
▪ This is the last in our great £25,000 series of slump-busting contests to help you laugh in the face of Lamont.
▪ When I was four, I told my sister about the Creation, and she laughed in my face.
let's face it/let's be honest
Let's face it, Scott. We're not as young as we used to be.
long face
▪ A long face, hangdog, sad-sack, and dusty hair, reddish brown.
▪ Do they really physically raise a sardonic eyebrow, and make a long face, or only metaphorically?
▪ He was in his early thirties with dark skin and a long face from which protruded a sharp, aquiline nose.
▪ His long face, punctuated by a pencil mustache, is a place of jowls, creases and inflammation.
▪ His eyes were wide-set, and his long face was fair-skinned: seen from certain angles it had an almost feminine prettiness.
▪ Never-ending telly, Mum's long face, and a turkey dinner that nobody wanted to eat, not even Henry.
▪ Their faces slipped through her mind, round faces and long faces, thin, fat, smiling, sombre.
▪ Worst of all, his long face was more contorted than ever in the fury of self-pity.
mobile mouth/face/features
▪ He finds a woman in black lace, with piercing eyes and a mobile face.
▪ I finally found Martin Clunes, the most mobile mouth in show business, lurking behind a large moustache.
▪ They did not show emotions as plainly as more mobile faces did.
not just a pretty face
purple with rage/purple in the face etc
put a human face on sth
▪ What he fails to do is to put a human face on these processes.
put on a brave face/front
▪ He was shattered, though he put on a brave face.
▪ I suppose parents have to put on a brave face.
▪ Leaving the court the families all tried to put on a brave face.
▪ Meanwhile, Llandundo put on a brave face yesterday and struggled to get back to normal after last week's devastating floods.
▪ Newspaper staff put on a brave face.
▪ No one said a word all of us were consciously putting on a brave face.
▪ Whether in denial or putting on a brave face, the delegates professed to be unperturbed by those numbers.
save face
▪ As a result of the turmoil, Frank resigned in order to save face.
▪ Bosnia would survive as a constitutional fiction, allowing the world to save face.
▪ By agreeing to the staged confrontation, Barnett would save face while permitting Meredith to register.
▪ Determined to save face, I kept devouring everything set before me.
▪ I had to do this to save face for my father.
▪ The important thing now was to let him save face.
▪ The only person that didn't was Fish, who had to save face and went on claiming it was true.
say sth to sb's face
▪ I'd never say it to her face, but her hair looks terrible.
▪ Never write anything in an e-mail that you wouldn't say to the person's face.
▪ If you had anything to say, you said it to their face.
▪ It is, may I suggest, much easier to say goodbye to a face than to a wooden box.
sb will be laughing on the other side of their face
screw up your eyes/face
▪ Blake screwed up his eyes, trying to peer through the fog.
▪ He screwed up his eyes against the light and Jurnet saw the gipsy in him.
▪ He screwed up his eyes and put his hands over his ears.
▪ He screwed up his face as the hot water from the kitchen tap scalded his hand.
▪ He screwed up his face at the appalling stench but made no move to draw back.
▪ She screwed up her face and whispered: you're so revoltingly fat you disgusting baboon.
scrunch up your face/eyes
▪ They scrunch up their faces, peering into the haze.
show your face
▪ It was a dangerous place for a non-Italian to show his face.
▪ At this palace, as at the other, servility shows its face and performs its tricks.
▪ How's he gon na show his face?
▪ Not a weed dared to show its face.
▪ Old Harker never shows his face.
▪ She couldn't understand how he dared to show his face after what he had done to Mr Potter.
▪ So you must show your face at their door, bloody and bloodthirsty and raving.
▪ Then one by one the other four women find a reason to show their faces.
▪ Wherever I showed my face, a thousand other faces immediately collected around it.
shut your mouth/face/trap!
slam the door in sb's face
straight face
▪ Despite the problem of trying to maintain a straight face, there are distinct advantages to being on Cube's team.
▪ For the first hundred yards we keep straight faces.
▪ How can you say that and keep a straight face?
▪ I try and keep a straight face, but I can't help grinning at myself.
▪ It was very difficult to keep a straight face.
▪ Kemp is straining to maintain a straight face.
▪ The old trick of keeping a straight face was failing him these days.
▪ We start with safe conversation and straight faces.
take sth at face value
▪ The newspapers have taken this propaganda at face value, without questioning it.
▪ And he no longer took things at face value.
▪ Because Kate, for all her faults real and imagined, was the only person ever to take him at face value.
▪ But now, a hundred years on, certain factions persist in taking it at face value.
the colour/blood drains from sb's face/cheeks
the set of sb's face/jaw/shoulders etc
▪ He hated the set of different faces glaring up at him night after night.
▪ Her husband's brow furrowed as he noted the set of her face.
▪ Something in the set of his shoulders suggested that his pursuers were not far behind.
throw sth (back) in sb's face
▪ It was no fun having my own words thrown back at me by my kids.
▪ A lot of their love would be rebuffed or thrown back in their faces.
▪ My love - my name thrown back in my face.
▪ Nobody was throwing anything in their faces.
▪ This would be thrown back in his face later by North Koreaand sooner than anyone guessed.
upside the head/face etc
▪ He needed a slap upside the head.
wipe sth off the face of the earth/wipe sth off the map
wipe the smile/grin off sb's face
▪ I'd like to wipe that stupid grin off your face.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I could see the children's happy faces.
▪ Jodi has such a pretty face.
▪ One of the faces of the cube has a line across it.
▪ One of the victims had scratches all over his face.
▪ The cliff face was starting to crumble into the sea.
▪ There were many unsuccessful attempts to climb the North Face of Mount Everest.
▪ We climbed the north face of Mount Rainier.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Breeze looked up, meaning to expostulate, but was silenced by what she saw in her sister's face.
▪ His face was a mask, friendly, but in an impersonal way.
▪ His face was like wax and his eyes stared like a doll's.
▪ I kissed her face, which was moist and feverish.
▪ I want to see dozens and dozens of strange faces.
▪ It's weird, but when she's asleep she looks real young, even though her face is all puffy.
▪ She is one of the many faces of poverty; she is one of the many faces of the welfare system.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
challenge
▪ If the previous chapter of this Report is taken seriously, however, there is a challenge which faces us all.
▪ However, the biggest challenge we face today is a willingness by some in the entertainment industry to produce whatever sells.
▪ We are all out of date in relation to the challenges that we face in our work. 2.
▪ The challenge they faced was more complex.
▪ The challenge facing large organizations of all types is to reduce the time among these three stages.
▪ But the biggest challenge many entrepreneurs face is the temptation to go off-track.
▪ Breaking out of that isolation may be one of the greatest challenges now facing our imagination.
▪ There is a challenge facing the church.
charge
▪ Former justice minister Tzahi Hanegbi faces indictment on corruption charges.
▪ He now faces charges of having abused his power while in office.
▪ Car drivers are likely to find themselves facing a daily charge of £5 to enter the capital from late next year.
▪ Flynn will not face criminal charges in the case, the sources said.
▪ He may now face the criminal charge of assault.
▪ The younger boy faces a similar charge in the juvenile criminal justice system.
▪ But properties in bands C-H would face higher charges.
▪ He faces charges stemming from accusations made by several trainees.
choice
▪ The judge's decision can not be over-turned, and it leaves Exxon facing some unappealing choices.
▪ Even knowledgeable thrift presidents felt they faced a choice be-tween rape and slow suicide.
▪ Leapor is faced with a choice between her job and her poetry.
▪ He also faces a choice of methods.
▪ This often applies where a patient is faced by alternative choices.
▪ Anyone concerned with selecting a class book for teaching a language will face a wide choice of texts.
competition
▪ The offer will face scrutiny under competition rules.
▪ As the new version of Navigator goes on sale Friday, Netscape is facing the toughest competition of its young life.
▪ But there's one area where she faces no competition.
▪ The planned deregulation has bred concern that Petron will face stiffer competition and an erosion of its 42 percent market share.
▪ Will those relying on the home market, particularly in the public sector, be ready to face the new competition?
▪ The company was facing stiff competition and losing market share.
▪ Most sectors face aggressive competition, rapidly changing customer needs and fashions, and further technical change.
▪ The company will face stiff competition from financial service and technology companies in the growing field of electronic commerce.
consequence
▪ But he claimed they were well aware they were breaking the law and were prepared to face the consequences.
▪ They are facing the consequences of having allowed, and encouraged, the entry of a new class of member.
▪ Otherwise Congress would have to face the consequences of automatic across-the-board cuts under the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings budget deficit reduction law.
▪ This was her final act of spite, to take the piece and leave Paige to face the consequences.
▪ He would have to face the consequences of his actions.
▪ Could Eddie have run out of that corner deliberately because he couldn't face the consequences of his gambling?
▪ As far as sin is concerned, we must bin it or face the consequences.
country
▪ Campaigners argue that poor countries faced with a health emergency have a right under international trade legislation to buy generic drugs.
▪ The country faces a pivotal presidential election in June in which the choice is quite simply to go forward or regress.
▪ Other Western countries face the same problem of natural monopoly in these industries.
▪ Other countries have had to face up to that problem.
▪ The country must face this epidemic as a unified society.
▪ This country faces an enormous crisis which stretches wider and deeper than the recession.
▪ Since all countries will face the same implicit prices, differences in relative production can be predicted from factor endowments.
crisis
▪ The issues we are facing in the present crisis of faith touch on what I call the Square One Principle.
▪ Bob Dole faced a crisis in 1972.
▪ The Third World faces an energy crisis even without the problems posed by global warming.
▪ This country faces an enormous crisis which stretches wider and deeper than the recession.
▪ Social Security is not facing a crisis.
▪ And just as well, because yesterday's press was perhaps the worst a prime minister has faced since the Suez crisis.
▪ Some opponents of the tax cut also argue that California faces a long-term budget crisis.
danger
▪ The Safety Centre features full size mock-ups of nearly every danger a child could face including house fires and high speed trains.
▪ The women there said Tuesday they acknowledge the danger they face every day.
▪ The outrage eagerly orchestrated by the newspaper did not focus in a serious way on the needs and dangers facing rape survivors.
▪ Embark on a journey through time, reliving the dangers and excitement that faced smugglers in times past.
▪ The trouble is they've never had to face anything like the dangers you face.
▪ Mourning also helps us to see the dangers facing our planet.
▪ The only financial bonus for the dangers they face is an environmental allowance of £1.14p a day.
difficulty
▪ What this discussion reveals is the difficulty that the consumer faces in making a rational decision when it comes to sport.
▪ The novels of Charles Dickens contain moving descriptions of the terrible difficulties people faced during this time.
▪ These were somewhat unrealistic proposals in the light of the existing staffing and resource difficulties already facing the mental health service.
▪ Irwin compared Davis' experiences on parole to his own studies into the difficulties that convicts face when they are freed.
▪ Some of the main difficulties faced by new care assistants are discussed below.
▪ The difficulty faced by Bovis was that Braehead had various cross claims.
dilemma
▪ This was the dilemma facing the producers of the film Apollo 13.
▪ Think, for example, of the dilemma that Dave faced when he replaced George at the low-performing brokerage.
▪ The following user describes the dilemma that faced his parents: Well, she was devastated and me dad.
▪ This is the dilemma she faces.
▪ It is also typical of the dilemma facing the new regime.
▪ What Clinton did with the veterans' budget illustrates the dilemma the White House faces with many politically sensitive constituencies.
▪ They bring into focus the dilemmas facing anthropologists who do research in their home territory.
▪ Finally, conflict highlights a painful dilemma facing managers who chair meetings.
fact
▪ She had to face the fact that she still missed him.
▪ It was anguishing to face the fact that, all other options tried, reconciliation still did not occur.
▪ If you are facing the facts in your relationship or that of some one close to you, be encouraged.
▪ He was very soon to be forced to face the fact that things had moved on since 1939.
▪ Thus, those who are committed to caring for and working with old people have first to face two facts.
▪ To some, killing is a way of life, whether you want to face that fact or not.
▪ He admired Machiavelli for recognizing that sometimes our ends are mutually exclusive and for facing that fact unblinkingly.
future
▪ But as she lapped up the five-star treatment on the champagne Concorde flight, angry pensioners were facing a bleak future.
▪ Kevin Smith, still recuperating from a ruptured Achilles' tendon, faces a future very much in doubt.
▪ His marriage has broken up, he rarely sees his teenage daughter and he faces a bleak future.
▪ Lefors, founded in 1900 as the Gray County seat, long has faced an uncertain future.
▪ They also warn that some leading hospitals may face an uncertain future if they lose patients to outside bidders.
▪ Exports to the United States faced an uncertain future because of the rise in costs.
▪ Not only is he facing an uncertain future, he is being forced to behave in an uncharacteristic fashion every day.
▪ As we consider the dream of Jacob we find a man who stood alone and facing an uncertain future.
issue
▪ The issues we are facing in the present crisis of faith touch on what I call the Square One Principle.
▪ The Republican senator established the task force to help build consensus and draft legislation on issues facing rural areas of the state.
▪ As with so many of the environmental issues that face us now, every little helps.
▪ Relocation is one of the big issues facing the San Francisco Housing Authority.
▪ That is ultimately the issue facing Britain.
▪ The teaching checklist 3 in the Appendix epitomizes some of the issues he faces.
▪ This Summit meeting was supposed to solve critical issues facing the Lakers and Houston Rockets.
music
▪ Constance knew the time had come to face the music and speak to Nora.
▪ Now she can face the music.
▪ We gently persuaded them to do the right thing and come back to face the music.
▪ It was hard to believe that it was almost time to face the music.
▪ I had to face the music, I had to face myself.
▪ Read in studio Still to come on Central News, facing the music.
▪ It was not just Diana who had to face the music but her parents as well.
▪ They can't tell us how to live and not face the music when their own conduct is questioned.
opposition
▪ Voice over However that party is facing strong opposition from people living in nearby Wavenden.
▪ But they face opposition from a lobbying powerhouse of credit card companies, banks, auto companies and retail chains.
▪ Despite appearances, it does not face popular opposition to reform itself.
▪ That bill, approved Wednesday afternoon on a 64-32 vote, still faces significant opposition in the House and from President Clinton.
▪ Union leaders warned that the group's attempt to cut jobs could face stiff opposition.
▪ Gramm faces token opposition in the Republican primary scheduled for March 12.
▪ The Government faces opposition from its backbenches on the question of quality.
▪ The reforms will have to be passed by the national conference where they will face considerable opposition.
pressure
▪ As the most expensive section of the labour force, middle-aged workers have faced very severe pressures to terminate their employment.
▪ But it was clear he would face mounting pressure to intervene from not only congressional leaders but travelers.
▪ Many fishermen have done well in recent years but they now face great pressure on the fish stocks.
▪ And I knew it was a diversity facing pressures of unprecedented scale.
▪ Mr Lamont declared the Tories stuck to their election pledges but he faces immense pressure to balance the books.
▪ Hospitals industrywide have been facing pressures from insurers to cut costs amid declining patient stays.
▪ State-owned enterprises are believed to face pressures to select profit-reducing choices where, for example, price rises are politically sensitive.
▪ He faces mounting public pressure to resign.
problem
▪ We now have another citizens charter that addresses the direct problems faced by the people of this country.
▪ That attitude is the biggest problem facing the government agency responsible for ferreting out discrimination.
▪ She also had been able to put her feelings on hold as she concentrated on the problems facing her.
▪ Censorship is hardly the worst problem facing Hong Kong filmmakers.
▪ But there were many problems to be faced.
▪ Perhaps another way to under-stand the problem we face is to take a simple example.
▪ One of the problems they face, however, is that hotels have a relatively long pay-back period.
▪ Two other big problems facing the organisers are crowd and traffic control.
prospect
▪ Britain faced the prospect of a winter without food and without energy, at the mercy of powerful unions and ineffective employers.
▪ But now they face eviction and the prospect of unemployment.
▪ Some face the prospect of living on the margins for years because of U.S. visa limits and backlogs.
▪ If the Bill is outvoted, we are faced with dire prospects.
▪ But I could not face the prospect of this task.
▪ With only 9,000 tickets allocated to the county, many are faced with the prospect of watching the big match on television.
▪ Pleasant though he was, Amelie couldn't face the prospect of making small talk with him and Madame.
question
▪ Four cabinet members were facing questions last night about their part in the fiasco.
▪ He faced questions from 17 organisations all keen to exploit, inconsistencies in the department's published evidence.
▪ Instead of a warm and fuzzy public relations tour during campaign season, she now faces endless questions about supposed hanky-panky.
▪ As we face the issues and questions which are before each of us now, do we know why we believe?
▪ McInerney faces these questions through Patrick, who is the most recent of a line of self-deprecating McInerney narrators.
▪ Ultimately, politicians will have to face the questions raised and deal with them.
▪ However, we are then faced with the question of what we are to understand by autonomy.
sea
▪ It seemed as if she was facing a sea of glittering gowns.
▪ The other side faced the open sea.
▪ Brighton Marina, luxury 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apartments facing sea and boats.
▪ She pointed him to a bridge table set up to face the sea.
▪ She faced out to sea and saw nothing but the impression of Fernando's tortured features before her misty eyes.
▪ He turned to face the sea.
▪ One stands naked facing front with her arms raised around her head which turns to face the sea.
▪ Sepulchers face the sea, as on the mainland, but on this tiny island death seems everywhere.
situation
▪ Mr Davies, in his letter to staff, says the council is facing a serious financial situation.
▪ When faced with similar situations in the future, why not give yourself prior warning by asking the following question?
▪ Years of army training had taught him to be cautious when faced with an unknown situation.
▪ None of these young States faced a simple situation.
▪ A distillery that wanted to launch a new brand of whisky would face this situation.
▪ Like all sheep farmers, Peter Capener in Staffordshire faced this situation ... until he installed two 3W infra-red heaters.
▪ When faced with a certain situation in wartime, they simply called on extraordinary resources.
task
▪ It is difficult to remember the scale of the task facing us then.
▪ But they illustrate the second key task facing public schools: how to increase the academic content and standards for all students.
▪ That is the task facing us.
▪ Grappling with the many varied problems of the nineteenth century, it tackled innumerable tasks and faced innumerable obstacles.
▪ That's the biggest and most urgent task facing the restorers, a company from Hay on Wye.
▪ He radiated quiet enthusiasm about the task facing him on any large steel-framed building.
▪ But ensuring it does is one of the most important tasks facing Mr Major in the aftermath of his election victory.
▪ One of the tasks facing all freshmen is to figure out ways to counter this loneliness.
threat
▪ Whalers face the threat of government reprisals should they start a commercial hunt which has been banned since 1985.
▪ We face no imminent threat, but we do have an enemy.
▪ They themselves face the threat of social unrest over the coming factory closures.
▪ Its cold-blooded use by cops facing no threat to themselves is plainly inhumane.
▪ Never before were they faced with the threat of losing substantial numbers of accounts.
▪ Augustine says some of those patients may be facing collection agency threats.
▪ The 45 grammar schools among them face the additional threat of comprehensive reorganisation, or closure.
truth
▪ If we had more courage at Goodison in facing up to the truth unpalatable though it may be things might begin to improve.
▪ It was a thing of a different sort to face the truth.
▪ Humane destruction is not easy to face, but fear of the unknown is often far worse than facing the truth.
▪ Sometimes folks have to face ugly, nasty truths about themselves.
▪ Suddenly, she felt lighter of heart, ready to face the truth she had long denied herself.
▪ The long incubation period means that no Third World country has yet faced the full truth of what is to come.
▪ In his view Fraser had delayed because he didn't want to face the truth.
■ VERB
stand
▪ She then stood sombrely facing the memorial while the regimental band played Land of My Fathers.
▪ He stood, facing me on the bed.
▪ As we consider the dream of Jacob we find a man who stood alone and facing an uncertain future.
▪ Primo and the man stand facing the crowd.
▪ They stood facing each other for a moment in silence.
▪ He stood facing the wall where the lizard stains were, rubbing the back of his neck.
▪ Now it was lit luridly in green and the puppet in the white ballet dress was standing upright facing them.
▪ I got up and came into the room and we stood facing each other.
turn
▪ She turned to face the shop window.
▪ He was on the trail of a stag, which turned to face him.
▪ It can not move and shoot in the same turn, except that it can be turned to face its intended target.
▪ But then I turned back, facing the road before us.
▪ He turned to face the ocean.
▪ It is sad that he could not have been turned soas to face his favourite church.
▪ They turned to face us, and the sight of them did nothing for our confidence.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(have) egg on your face
▪ If we think they are easy meat we will end up with egg on our faces.
▪ Meanwhile, Hutcheson observed that in 1995 all the chip forecasters had varying degrees of egg on their face.
▪ People like me, who believed the firing squad had been assembled, were left with egg on our faces.
a face like thunder
▪ She stood there with hands on her hips, glaring with a face like thunder.
a slap in the face
▪ Gwynn considered the salary they were offering a slap in the face.
▪ And make no mistake: He considers the Padres' offer a slap in the face -- even mimicking such a blow.
▪ Barnes's decision therefore came as somewhat of a slap in the face to these well rehearsed points.
▪ But choosing that particular moment to do it was a rebuff as callous and shocking as a slap in the face.
▪ It is a slap in the face and an insult.
argue/talk etc till you're blue in the face
capitalism/communism/socialism etc with a human face
fall flat on your/sth's face
▪ She fell flat on her face getting out of the car.
▪ The last time I wore high-heeled shoes I fell flat on my face outside a restaurant.
▪ As we were going out to the car Babe slipped and fell flat on her face.
▪ At last, after several near misses, I fall flat on my face.
▪ Because if you don't a fresh ambition or optimistic plan will fall flat on its face.
▪ But once the ball tips, the game falls flat on its face faster than a top-ranked team after a first-round upset.
▪ It is also a nation waiting for her to fall flat on her face.
▪ Writers strive for a universal experience distilled from personal memories and tend to fall flat on their faces.
▪ Yet there are certain composers who fall flat on their face unless the adrenalin really start to flow.
horsey face/smell etc
▪ They gave off a pungent, horsey smell, as if freshly cut.
long face
▪ A long face, hangdog, sad-sack, and dusty hair, reddish brown.
▪ Do they really physically raise a sardonic eyebrow, and make a long face, or only metaphorically?
▪ He was in his early thirties with dark skin and a long face from which protruded a sharp, aquiline nose.
▪ His long face, punctuated by a pencil mustache, is a place of jowls, creases and inflammation.
▪ His eyes were wide-set, and his long face was fair-skinned: seen from certain angles it had an almost feminine prettiness.
▪ Never-ending telly, Mum's long face, and a turkey dinner that nobody wanted to eat, not even Henry.
▪ Their faces slipped through her mind, round faces and long faces, thin, fat, smiling, sombre.
▪ Worst of all, his long face was more contorted than ever in the fury of self-pity.
mobile mouth/face/features
▪ He finds a woman in black lace, with piercing eyes and a mobile face.
▪ I finally found Martin Clunes, the most mobile mouth in show business, lurking behind a large moustache.
▪ They did not show emotions as plainly as more mobile faces did.
not just a pretty face
purple with rage/purple in the face etc
put a human face on sth
▪ What he fails to do is to put a human face on these processes.
put on a brave face/front
▪ He was shattered, though he put on a brave face.
▪ I suppose parents have to put on a brave face.
▪ Leaving the court the families all tried to put on a brave face.
▪ Meanwhile, Llandundo put on a brave face yesterday and struggled to get back to normal after last week's devastating floods.
▪ Newspaper staff put on a brave face.
▪ No one said a word all of us were consciously putting on a brave face.
▪ Whether in denial or putting on a brave face, the delegates professed to be unperturbed by those numbers.
straight face
▪ Despite the problem of trying to maintain a straight face, there are distinct advantages to being on Cube's team.
▪ For the first hundred yards we keep straight faces.
▪ How can you say that and keep a straight face?
▪ I try and keep a straight face, but I can't help grinning at myself.
▪ It was very difficult to keep a straight face.
▪ Kemp is straining to maintain a straight face.
▪ The old trick of keeping a straight face was failing him these days.
▪ We start with safe conversation and straight faces.
take sth at face value
▪ The newspapers have taken this propaganda at face value, without questioning it.
▪ And he no longer took things at face value.
▪ Because Kate, for all her faults real and imagined, was the only person ever to take him at face value.
▪ But now, a hundred years on, certain factions persist in taking it at face value.
the set of sb's face/jaw/shoulders etc
▪ He hated the set of different faces glaring up at him night after night.
▪ Her husband's brow furrowed as he noted the set of her face.
▪ Something in the set of his shoulders suggested that his pursuers were not far behind.
upside the head/face etc
▪ He needed a slap upside the head.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Courtney's apartment faces the harbour.
▪ Dean turned to face me.
▪ He was faced with the task of breaking the bad news to the boy's relatives.
▪ If found guilty, Jones could face up to 20 years in jail.
▪ Latin America faces a growing debt problem.
▪ McManus knew he was facing the biggest challenge of his career.
▪ My house faces the bay.
▪ The Jets face the Dolphins in two weeks.
▪ The new administration faces the difficult task of rebuilding the country's economy.
▪ The seat facing mine was empty.
▪ They stood facing each other for a few minutes.
▪ This report highlights some of the problems faced by learners of English.
▪ Today's violence highlights the problems faced by the government here.
▪ UCLA will face North Carolina tonight at Pauley Pavilion.
▪ Weber is facing the biggest challenge of his career.
▪ You're going to have to face her sooner or later.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As at all his power stations, Scott faced the building in a fine Worcestershire brick that has weathered to a lovely pinky-brown.
▪ Bedworth, now 19, is facing charges under the Computer Misuse Act, 1990.
▪ Caught in a green translucent wave were two tiny sea-horses facing in opposite directions, one frolicking, the other melancholy.
▪ Hughes was the second prominent researcher at Georgetown to face problems because of reproductive research.
▪ She stood straight as a wand, facing us.
▪ The crying continued after that, and continues, but now with other parents who face the same kinds of problems.
▪ They served notice that conservative nominees face delay or worse.
▪ We had to sit with our backs to the wall, facing the door.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Face

Face \Face\ (f[=a]s), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Faced; p. pr. & vb. n. Facing.]

  1. To meet in front; to oppose with firmness; to resist, or to meet for the purpose of stopping or opposing; to confront; to encounter; as, to face an enemy in the field of battle.

    I'll face This tempest, and deserve the name of king.
    --Dryden.

  2. To Confront impudently; to bully.

    I will neither be facednor braved.
    --Shak.

  3. To stand opposite to; to stand with the face or front toward; to front upon; as, the apartments of the general faced the park; some of the seats on the train faced backward.

    He gained also with his forces that part of Britain which faces Ireland.
    --Milton.

  4. To cover in front, for ornament, protection, etc.; to put a facing upon; as, a building faced with marble.

  5. To line near the edge, esp. with a different material; as, to face the front of a coat, or the bottom of a dress.

  6. To cover with better, or better appearing, material than the mass consists of, for purpose of deception, as the surface of a box of tea, a barrel of sugar, etc.

  7. (Mach.) To make the surface of (anything) flat or smooth; to dress the face of (a stone, a casting, etc.); esp., in turning, to shape or smooth the flat surface of, as distinguished from the cylindrical surface.

  8. To cause to turn or present a face or front, as in a particular direction.

    To face down, to put down by bold or impudent opposition. ``He faced men down.''
    --Prior.

    To face (a thing) out, to persist boldly or impudently in an assertion or in a line of conduct. ``That thinks with oaths to face the matter out.''
    --Shak.

    to face the music to admit error and accept reprimand or punishment as a consequence for having failed or having done something wrong; to willingly experience an unpleasant situation out of a sense of duty or obligation; as, as soon as he broke the window with the football, Billy knew he would have to face the music.

Face

Face \Face\, v. i.

  1. To carry a false appearance; to play the hypocrite. ``To lie, to face, to forge.''
    --Spenser.

  2. To turn the face; as, to face to the right or left.

    Face about, man; a soldier, and afraid!
    --Dryden.

  3. To present a face or front.

Face

Face \Face\ (f[=a]s), n. [F., from L. facies form, shape, face, perh. from facere to make (see Fact); or perh. orig. meaning appearance, and from a root meaning to shine, and akin to E. fancy. Cf. Facetious.]

  1. The exterior form or appearance of anything; that part which presents itself to the view; especially, the front or upper part or surface; that which particularly offers itself to the view of a spectator.

    A mist . . . watered the whole face of the ground.
    --Gen. ii. 6.

    Lake Leman wooes me with its crystal face.
    --Byron.

  2. That part of a body, having several sides, which may be seen from one point, or which is presented toward a certain direction; one of the bounding planes of a solid; as, a cube has six faces.

  3. (Mach.)

    1. The principal dressed surface of a plate, disk, or pulley; the principal flat surface of a part or object.

    2. That part of the acting surface of a cog in a cog wheel, which projects beyond the pitch line.

    3. The width of a pulley, or the length of a cog from end to end; as, a pulley or cog wheel of ten inches face.

  4. (Print.)

    1. The upper surface, or the character upon the surface, of a type, plate, etc.

    2. The style or cut of a type or font of type.

  5. Outside appearance; surface show; look; external aspect, whether natural, assumed, or acquired.

    To set a face upon their own malignant design.
    --Milton.

    This would produce a new face of things in Europe.
    --Addison.

    We wear a face of joy, because We have been glad of yore.
    --Wordsworth.

  6. That part of the head, esp. of man, in which the eyes, cheeks, nose, and mouth are situated; visage; countenance.

    In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread.
    --Gen. iii. 19.

  7. Cast of features; expression of countenance; look; air; appearance.

    We set the best faceon it we could.
    --Dryden.

  8. (Astrol.) Ten degrees in extent of a sign of the zodiac.
    --Chaucer.

  9. Maintenance of the countenance free from abashment or confusion; confidence; boldness; shamelessness; effrontery.

    This is the man that has the face to charge others with false citations.
    --Tillotson.

  10. Presence; sight; front; as in the phrases, before the face of, in the immediate presence of; in the face of, before, in, or against the front of; as, to fly in the face of danger; to the face of, directly to; from the face of, from the presence of.

  11. Mode of regard, whether favorable or unfavorable; favor or anger; mostly in Scriptural phrases.

    The Lord make his face to shine upon thee.
    --Num. vi. 25.

    My face [favor] will I turn also from them.
    --Ezek. vii. 22.

  12. (Mining) The end or wall of the tunnel, drift, or excavation, at which work is progressing or was last done.

  13. (Com.) The exact amount expressed on a bill, note, bond, or other mercantile paper, without any addition for interest or reduction for discount; most commonly called face value. --McElrath. Note: Face is used either adjectively or as part of a compound; as, face guard or face-guard; face cloth; face plan or face-plan; face hammer. Face ague (Med.), a form of neuralgia, characterized by acute lancinating pains returning at intervals, and by twinges in certain parts of the face, producing convulsive twitches in the corresponding muscles; -- called also tic douloureux. Face card, one of a pack of playing cards on which a human face is represented; the king, queen, or jack. Face cloth, a cloth laid over the face of a corpse. Face guard, a mask with windows for the eyes, worn by workman exposed to great heat, or to flying particles of metal, stone, etc., as in glass works, foundries, etc. Face hammer, a hammer having a flat face. Face joint (Arch.), a joint in the face of a wall or other structure. Face mite (Zo["o]ll.), a small, elongated mite ( Demdex folliculorum), parasitic in the hair follicles of the face. Face mold, the templet or pattern by which carpenters, etc., outline the forms which are to be cut out from boards, sheet metal, etc. Face plate.

    1. (Turning) A plate attached to the spindle of a lathe, to which the work to be turned may be attached.

    2. A covering plate for an object, to receive wear or shock.

    3. A true plane for testing a dressed surface. --Knight. Face wheel. (Mach.)

      1. A crown wheel.

      2. A wheel whose disk face is adapted for grinding and polishing; a lap. face value the value written on a financial instrument; same as face[13]. Also used metaphorically, to mean apparent value; as, to take his statemnet at its face value. Cylinder face (Steam Engine), the flat part of a steam cylinder on which a slide valve moves. Face of an anvil, its flat upper surface. Face of a bastion (Fort.), the part between the salient and the shoulder angle. Face of coal (Mining), the principal cleavage plane, at right angles to the stratification. Face of a gun, the surface of metal at the muzzle. Face of a place (Fort.), the front comprehended between the flanked angles of two neighboring bastions. --Wilhelm. Face of a square (Mil.), one of the sides of a battalion when formed in a square. Face of a watch, clock, compass, card etc., the dial or graduated surface on which a pointer indicates the time of day, point of the compass, etc. Face to face.

        1. In the presence of each other; as, to bring the accuser and the accused face to face.

        2. Without the interposition of any body or substance. ``Now we see through a glass darkly; but then face to face.'' 1
          --Cor. xiii. 12.

      3. With the faces or finished surfaces turned inward or toward one another; vis [`a] vis; -- opposed to back to back.

        To fly in the face of, to defy; to brave; to withstand.

        To make a face, to distort the countenance; to make a grimace; -- often expressing dislike, annoyance, or disagreement.
        --Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
face

c.1300, "the human face, a face; facial appearance or expression; likeness, image," from Old French face "face, countenance, look, appearance" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *facia (source also of Italian faccia), from Latin facies "appearance, form, figure," and secondarily "visage, countenance," which probably is literally "form imposed on something" and related to facere "to make" (see factitious).\n

\nReplaced Old English andwlita "face, countenance" (from root of wlitan "to see, look") and ansyn, ansien, the usual word (from the root of seon "see"). Words for "face" in Indo-European commonly are based on the notion of "appearance, look," and are mostly derivatives from verbs for "to see, look" (as with the Old English words, Greek prosopon, literally "toward-look," Lithuanian veidas, from root *weid- "to see," etc.). But in some cases, as here, the word for "face" means "form, shape." In French, the use of face for "front of the head" was given up 17c. and replaced by visage (older vis), from Latin visus "sight."\n

\nFrom late 14c. as "outward appearance (as contrasted to some other reality);" also from late 14c. as "forward part or front of anything;" also "surface (of the earth or sea), extent (of a city)." Typographical sense of "part of the type which forms the letter" is from 1680s.\n\nWhan she cometh hoom, she raumpeth in my face And crieth 'false coward.' [Chaucer, "Monk's Tale"]\nFace to face is from mid-14c. Face time is attested from 1990. To lose face (1876), is said to be from Chinese tu lien; hence also save face (1915). To show (one's) face "make or put in an appearance" is from mid-14c. (shewen the face). To make a face "change the appearance of the face in disgust, mockery, etc." is from 1560s. Two faces under one hood as a figure of duplicity is attested from mid-15c.\n\nTwo fases in a hode is neuer to tryst.

["Awake lordes," 1460]

face

"confront with assurance; show a bold face," mid-15c., from face (n.). From c.1400 as "deface, disfigure." Meaning "to cover with something in front" is from 1560s; that of "turn the face toward" is from 1630s; meaning "be on the opposite page to" is from 1766. Intransitive sense "to turn the face" (especially in military tactics) is from 1630s. Related: Faced; facing. To face the music (1850, in U.S. Congressional debates) probably is theatrical rather than a reference to cavalry horses.

Wiktionary
face

n. (lb en anatomy) The front part of the head, featuring the eyes, nose, and mouth and the surrounding are

  1. v

  2. 1 (lb en transitive of a person or animal) To position oneself or itself so as to have one's face closest to (something). 2 (lb en transitive of an object) To have its front closest to, or in the direction of (something else). 3 (lb en transitive) To cause (something) to turn or present a face or front, as in a particular direction. 4 (lb en transitive) To deal with (a difficult situation or person).

WordNet
face
  1. n. the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear; "he washed his face"; "I wish I had seen the look on his face when he got the news" [syn: human face]

  2. the expression on a person's face; "a sad expression"; "a look of triumph"; "an angry face" [syn: expression, look, aspect, facial expression]

  3. the general outward appearance of something; "the face of the city is changing"

  4. the act of confronting bravely; "he hated facing the facts"; "he excelled in the face of danger" [syn: facing]

  5. the striking or working surface of an implement

  6. a part of a person that is used to refer to a person; "he looked out at a roomful of faces"; "when he returned to work he met many new faces"

  7. a surface forming part of the outside of an object; "he examined all sides of the crystal"; "dew dripped from the face of the leaf" [syn: side]

  8. the part of an animal corresponding to the human face

  9. the side upon which the use of a thing depends (usually the most prominent surface of an object); "he dealt the cards face down"

  10. a contorted facial expression; "she made a grimace at the prospect" [syn: grimace]

  11. a specific size and style of type within a type family [syn: font, fount, typeface]

  12. status in the eyes of others; "he lost face"

  13. impudent aggressiveness; "I couldn't believe her boldness"; "he had the effrontery to question my honesty" [syn: boldness, nerve, brass, cheek]

  14. a vertical surface of a building or cliff

face
  1. v. deal with (something unpleasant) head on; "You must confront your problems"; "He faced the terrible consequences of his mistakes" [syn: confront, face up] [ant: avoid]

  2. oppose, as in hostility or a competition; "You must confront your opponent"; "Jackson faced Smith in the boxing ring"; "The two enemies finally confronted each other" [syn: confront]

  3. be oriented in a certain direction, often with respect to another reference point; be opposite to; "The house looks north"; "My backyard look onto the pond"; "The building faces the park" [syn: front, look] [ant: back]

  4. be opposite; "the facing page"; "the two sofas face each other"

  5. turn so as to face; turn the face in a certain direction; "Turn and face your partner now"

  6. present somebody with something, usually to accuse or criticize; "We confronted him with the evidence"; "He was faced with all the evidence and could no longer deny his actions"; "An enormous dilemma faces us" [syn: confront, present]

  7. turn so as to expose the face; "face a playing card"

  8. line the edge (of a garment) with a different material; "face the lapels of the jacket"

  9. cover the front or surface of; "The building was faced with beautiful stones"

Wikipedia
Face

The face is a central organ of sense and is also very central in the expression of emotion among humans and among numerous other species. The face is normally found on the anterior ( frontal, rostral) surface of the head of animals or humans, although not all animals have faces. The face is crucial for human identity, and damage such as scarring or developmental deformities have effects stretching beyond those of solely physical inconvenience.

Face (geometry)

In solid geometry, a face is a flat ( planar) surface that forms part of the boundary of a solid object; a three-dimensional solid bounded exclusively by flat faces is a polyhedron.

In more technical treatments of the geometry of polyhedra and higher-dimensional polytopes, the term is also used to mean an element of any dimension of a more general polytope (in any number of dimensions).

Face (professional wrestling)

In professional wrestling, a face (babyface) is a heroic or a "good guy" wrestler, booked (scripted) by the promotion with the aim of being cheered by fans. Faces, traditionally, wrestle within the rules and avoid cheating (in contrast to the heels who use illegal moves and call in additional wrestlers to do their work for them) while behaving positively towards the referee and the audience.

Such characters are also referred to as blue-eyes in British wrestling, and técnicos in lucha libre. The face character is portrayed as a hero relative to the heel wrestlers, who are analogous to villains. Not everything a face wrestler does must be heroic: faces need only to be cheered by the audience to be effective characters. The vast majority of wrestling storylines involving faces place a face against a heel, although more elaborate set-ups (such as two faces being manipulated by a nefarious outside party into fighting) often happen as well.

In the world of lucha libre wrestling, they're generally known for using moves requiring technical skill, particularly aerial maneuvers, and wearing outfits using bright colors with positive associations (such as solid white). This is contrasted with the villainous rudos that are generally known for being brawlers, using physical moves that emphasize brute strength and/or size while often having outfits akin to demons or other nasty characters.

Face (disambiguation)

The face forms a part of the human body: the front of the head.

Face may also refer to:

Face (2004 film)

Face is a 2004 Korean horror film directed by Yoo Sang-gon.

Face (1997 film)

Face (1997) is a British crime drama directed by Antonia Bird and written by Ronan Bennett. It stars Robert Carlyle and Ray Winstone and features the acting debut of singer Damon Albarn.

Face (2009 film)

Face is a 2009 Taiwanese-French film written and directed by Tsai Ming-liang.

Face (mining)

In mining, the face is the surface where the mining work is advancing. In surface mining it is commonly called pit face, in underground mining a common term is mine face.

Accordingly, face equipment is the mining equipment used immediately at the mine face used for removal and near-face transportation of the material: cutting machines, loaders, etc.

Face (2000 film)

is a 2000 Japanese film directed by Junji Sakamoto. At the 24th Japan Academy Prize it won one award and received four other nominations.

Face (novel)

Face by British-Jamaican author and poet Benjamin Zephaniah is a novel published in 1999 about a teenage boy who suffers facial injuries in a joyriding accident. Face has also been adapted as a stage play.

Face (sociological concept)

The term face idiomatically refers to one's own sense of dignity or prestige in social contexts. In the English-speaking world, the expression "To save face" describes the lengths that an individual may go to in order to preserve their established position in society, taking action to ensure that one is not thought badly of by his or her peers. It is a fundamental concept in the fields of sociology, sociolinguistics, semantics, politeness theory, psychology, political science, communication, and face negotiation theory, and translates at least somewhat equivalently into many world languages, both Germanic and otherwise.

Face (a cappella group)

Face are a Boulder, Colorado-based "all-vocal rock band," or a cappella group performing mostly rock music. National appearances and awards include one of the eight original groups on NBC's premiere season of " The Sing-Off" (2009), two-time Runner-Up and two-time National Audience Favorite at the National Finals of Harmony Sweepstakes A Cappella Festival (2005 and 2007), and Runner-Up for Favorite Pop/Rock Group from the Contemporary A Cappella Society's Community Awards (2007). Based in Boulder, Colorado, Face has also garnered numerous local awards including Best Local Band by The Denver Channel's A-List Awards (2013), Best Local Musician by Boulder Weekly's Best of Boulder Awards (2009) and third-place for Best Local Band by The Denver Channel's A-List Awards (2009).

Face (hieroglyph)

The ancient EgyptianFace hieroglyph, Gardiner sign listed no. D2 is a portrayal of the human face, frontal view.

It is an Egyptian language biliteral with the value hr, ḥr. The sign is also an ideogram for 'face', and related words.

Face (album)

Face is the debut album of Of Cabbages and Kings, released by Purge/Sound League in 1988.

Usage examples of "face".

Either come down to us into the meadow yonder, that we may slay you with less labour, or else, which will be the better for you, give up to us the Upmeads thralls who be with you, and then turn your faces and go back to your houses, and abide there till we come and pull you out of them, which may be some while yet.

She whirled, her right hand raised, but before she could use the controlling ring she lay sprawled on the floor, one side of her face ablaze from the blow of a phantom hand.

She was breathing too fast, and her underarms and her face were abloom with heat.

There were several women delegates and Ken made the most of their ablutions until he was distracted by the appearance of Karanja in a neat grey suit, an ingratiating grin on his face and his big ears standing out like sails.

As they reached the broad open space where I had had my first disquieting glimpse of the moonlit water I could see them plainly only a block away--and was horrified by the bestial abnormality of their faces and the doglike sub-humanness of their crouching gait.

He was a loathsome, gorilla-like thing, with abnormally long arms which I could not help calling fore legs, and a face that conjured up thoughts of unspeakable Congo secrets and tom-tom poundings under an eerie moon.

Aspinwall remained where he was, studying closely the Hindoo who confronted him with abnormally impassive face.

In fact, the opening was depressingly familiar, full of protestations of loyalty to both King George and the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, plus a promise that the authors would willingly fight the French, indeed die for their country, but they could not face another day aboard such a hellish ship.

They could never have got aboard in the face of resistance by the whole crew.

In physique he closely resembled the Aliansa, being tall and robust and with a face less humanoid than the aborigines of the Mire and Mountain.

Where his face was not bruised or abraded, his usually milk-pale skin was gray.

Guard Captain arrived, he told me that I could either stay in jail all night and face trial in the morning or I could trust in the judgment of the gods by being in the front ranks of the defenders when Abraxas attacked that evening.

Two officers of the United States navy were walking abreast, unguarded and alone, not looking to the right or left, never frowning, never flinching, while the mob screamed in their ears, shook cocked pistols in their faces, cursed, crowded, and gnashed upon them.

Nicholson mentions a case of ulceration and abscess of the nostrils and face from which maggots were discharged.

I read, and turning my face to the Heavens, thanked God that I was absolved by the dear subject of my crimes.