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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

nerve

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a blood/nerve/brain/muscle etc cell
▪ No new brain cells are produced after birth.
brain/liver/nerve etc damage
▪ If you drink a lot of alcohol it can cause liver damage.
conquer your nerves/fear
▪ She was determined to conquer her fear of flying.
jar on...nerves
▪ The screaming was starting to jar on my nerves.
nerve cell
nerve centre
▪ the ship’s nerve center
nerve gas (=a poisonous gas used in war to kill or paralyse people)
▪ Troops were exposed to low levels of nerve gas during the conflict.
nerve gas
steady...nerves
▪ Tamar took a deep breath to steady her nerves.
trapped nerve
▪ pain from a trapped nerve
war of nerves
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
facial
▪ Both groups belong to the facial branchial motor nerve.
▪ Still others point to pressure on the facial nerve as it passes through the skull.
▪ The transgene staining is co-localized with the cell bodies of the facial nerve.
▪ The cause is unknown but is thought to involve an inflammation of the facial nerve.
optic
▪ The optic nerves were studied after 2 days.
▪ Frequent measurements of visual fields and acuity are obtained to detect optic nerve damage.
▪ In a, optic nerve sections were prepared as described in Fig. 1.
▪ They receive messages from virtually every nerve in the human body via connections with the optic nerve and spinal cord.
▪ The animals were sacrificed 60min later and optic nerve cell suspensions were prepared as previously described.
▪ A swollen optic nerve found by her optometrist led to the discovery of the tumor.
▪ The cup becomes the retina, and the stalk connecting it to the brain the optic nerve.
▪ Enough of the eye came free to please Magee, though, and he watched as it dangled on the optic nerve.
peripheral
▪ The underlying pathology is a widely distributed inflammatory lesion in peripheral nerves, with adjacent demyelination.
▪ Hypothyroidism may affect equilibrium by its effect on the eighth cranial nerve and on the peripheral nerves.
▪ They are almost entirely produced by damage to peripheral nerves or to roots or to the central nervous system.
▪ This is not only simplistic but it is even ignorant of pain-provoking peripheral nerve fibres now known to exist in man.
▪ Many trophic factors can influence axonal growth and neuronal survival during nervous system development and in the regeneration of peripheral nerves.
▪ Several lines of evidence point to specific components of the peripheral nerve environment that support regeneration.
raw
▪ This attack was repeated again in 1987 in the Federation magazine, for the report had obviously hit a very raw nerve.
▪ The subject of hawkers had touched a raw nerve.
▪ He's just a raw nerve.
▪ Touched on a raw nerve, they can react accordingly.
▪ Our article touched a raw nerve.
▪ Just as the poll tax impost jarred on an historically raw nerve, so will the ban on fox-hunting.
▪ Yet they perhaps unwittingly also touched upon the raw nerve of vital, popular fears.
▪ Had she worried a raw nerve with that remark?
sensitive
▪ Although this memorandum was immediately denounced and repudiated, there is no doubt that it touched some sensitive nerves.
▪ Teeth usually become less sensitive as their nerve and blood supply decreases.
▪ It was easy, therefore, to touch the sensitive nerve of nationalism.
▪ This can throw the spine out of alignment and press on sensitive nerves in your back and legs.
▪ This touched upon a sensitive nerve with regard to confidence in the leadership.
▪ Other issues touch sensitive local nerves.
▪ And not just Ford buyers: Options instantly touched such a sensitive nerve that other makers rushed to promote similar schemes.
sensory
▪ Capsaicin destroys small sensory nerve fibres if it is injected under the skin of newborn rats.
▪ Important in the control of gait is the afferent input of the sensory nerves.
▪ As usual, capsaicin had the effect of destroying small sensory nerve cells.
■ NOUN
cell
▪ This opened the issue of how nerve cells might communicate with each other and eventually led to our now-sophisticated understanding of neurotransmitters.
▪ Those signals are carried from nerve cell to nerve cell by chemical messengers called neurotransmitters.
▪ The Vienna doctors say that D-proline is neurotoxic, which means that it can kill brain and other nerve cells.
▪ The effects of the virus on nerve cells, which control muscle movements, vary significantly.
▪ Is there a gene for each nerve cell?
▪ It increases the firing of some nerve cells, or neurons, while decreasing the firing of others.
▪ In the same way, nerve cells in the spinal cord show activity whenever a particular movement is made by the arm.
▪ The final question was whether the virus entered the bloodstream before it attacked nerve cells.
center
▪ The metro desk is the nerve center of any newsroom.
▪ That is the nerve center, where score is kept on all wing activities.
▪ He has turned out to be the nerve center of the vastly improved defense.
centre
▪ Repairing the midsole, often the nerve centre of the modern shoe, can be more difficult.
▪ The battle bus was not the great nerve centre of the nation which it might have appeared.
▪ It was the nerve centre of the strike operations ....
damage
▪ But please hurry up if you want to avoid the nerve damage and deformity that result from long-term exposure to the germ.
▪ Frequent measurements of visual fields and acuity are obtained to detect optic nerve damage.
▪ In all 16 cases he found nerve damage.
▪ That, he said, suggests better opportunities for diagnosing nerve damage, and better chances for rehabilitating injured patients.
ending
▪ This absence of feeling, I dismissed as damaged nerve endings.
▪ Your nerve endings bristle at the slightest movement.
▪ Neurotransmitters are chemicals that are released at nerve endings and control the signals between nerves and nerves and muscles.
▪ Slightly less obvious but essential to the winding up of the nerve endings is Michael Carr's neglect of his wife.
▪ There is no evidence that the nerve endings near the brain of the fish can transmit pain.
▪ So he hopes to come up with a special X-ray stain binding to human nerve endings.
▪ A cell's true nature is realized when it becomes skin or bone or nerve ending.
fibres
▪ In nervous communication, messages are carried as electrical impulses in nerve fibres.
▪ Capsaicin destroys small sensory nerve fibres if it is injected under the skin of newborn rats.
▪ All nerve fibres and terminals present seemed normal in number and morphology.
▪ The first component in this classical stimulus-response link is specific injury-detecting nerve fibres, the nociceptors.
▪ This is not only simplistic but it is even ignorant of pain-provoking peripheral nerve fibres now known to exist in man.
▪ In flatworms all that exists is a simple network of nerve fibres.
▪ The function of nerve fibres is to transmit coded information from one place to the other.
▪ Even under the microscope, it is hard to detect any structure, because of the bewildering variety of nerve fibres criss-crossing one another.
gas
▪ The nerve gas would only be released if the incorrect code was programmed twice into the computer.
▪ Yep, that Soviet nerve gas, all hooked up to a computerized bomb.
▪ A new form of nerve gas?
▪ And much of the liquid used to simulate nerve gas at the test site was contained by the wooden crates.
▪ The fact was he had broken a Senate tie back in 1983 and voted for the production of nerve gas.
impulse
▪ The breakdown of the insulation layer short-circuits nerve impulses and produces devastating consequences.
▪ First of all, the brain controls many bodily functions, either directly via nerve impulses or indirectly via hormones.
▪ More effective drugs had their origin in the basic research on chemical transmission of nerve impulses described in chapter 4.
▪ This traveling wave of altered electrical potential is called an action potential, more commonly known as a nerve impulse.
▪ The sensation only occurs when the nerve impulse reaches the brain.
▪ Many animals have a single lens used to focus light on to a plate able to convert it into nerve impulses.
▪ To jump over the gap between two cells, a nerve impulse has to be translated from electricity to chemicals and back.
▪ The unlocking of the receptor leads to the creation or suppression of a nerve impulse in the second cell.
motor
▪ This is the normal position of the trigeminal motor nerve.
▪ Both groups belong to the facial branchial motor nerve.
▪ Mutations in pros alter neuronal fates and delay or prevent pioneering of motor nerves during embryogenesis.
▪ Between 9.5-10.5 d.p.c. the retinoic acid-induced ectopic expression of Hox-B1 also appears in the motor nerve associated with r2/3.
▪ The accessory antennal nerves issue from the antennal lobes and are the motor nerves of the antennae.
▪ The movement of fluid in the motor nerve then caused the actual movement.
■ VERB
calm
▪ It was refreshing, and did much to calm her shaken nerves.
▪ A lot of mineralization is needed to create a sedative effect, calm the nerves and promote sound sleep.
▪ Chopra moved between them, calming their fractious nerves.
▪ Norma sat silently in the kitchen of their home, drinking coffee and trying to calm her nerves.
▪ She calms her shattered nerves with the music of top Co Donegal-born singing star Enya.
▪ The presence of a baby calmed his nerves and soothed his spirit, like drawing and painting.
▪ She took a few deep breaths to calm her nerves.
fail
▪ Then, hurrying lest her nerves fail her too, she unbuckled her seat-belt and climbed out.
▪ If the nerve fails to pass on the correct signals, the limb becomes useless.
▪ Only when the cane cracked down across his hand did the boy's nerve fail.
▪ The reason the case did not progress or became involved is right there-your nerve failed you.
▪ Norwich's nerve hasn't failed them and according to their players, it won't.
▪ The solution seemed so grotesque that his nerve almost failed him.
▪ In some cases the optic nerve fails to develop before birth.
▪ She looked at him dumbly, and even McLeish's hardened investigator's nerve failed him.
feel
▪ But I must admit, when I think about Thursday night I feel absolutely sick with nerves.
▪ I could feel each nerve in my body.
▪ Meredith felt as if her nerves were strung on a line.
▪ I could feel those nerves wriggling now like a hive of worms; they were flinching as the wind rode by.
▪ Once more she felt her nerves quivering with apprehension, but when Helen came in she managed to hide her fears.
▪ The silence vibrated with tension, and Polly felt her nerves stretch almost to snapping point.
▪ He felt his nerve breaking and terror began to overtake his mind.
▪ Polly felt her nerves strung out almost to snapping-point.
get
▪ The noise and the smell were getting on his nerves.
▪ You got your nerve to stand there and say that!
▪ Pam loves children but she doesn't like them when they're mobile, it gets on her nerves.
▪ His son got on his nerves all the time.
▪ She's got strong nerves, though.
▪ Angry Dear Angry: We can understand how these kids can get on your nerves.
▪ Funny thing how people can get on each other's nerves down here.
▪ As much as they got on her nerves, still she could not bring herself to talk behind their backs.
hit
▪ This attack was repeated again in 1987 in the Federation magazine, for the report had obviously hit a very raw nerve.
▪ Q: Why has that era hit a nerve with people now?
▪ The charge has hit a nerve, persuading the company to earmark 265 Levantine buildings for special restoration.
▪ Obviously there was a future in this business, they'd hit a nerve somewhere.
▪ It has hit a nerve that is already raw.
hold
▪ It requires holding your nerve, being totally committed and believing absolutely that's what you have got to do.
▪ Will the right hon. Gentleman agree that he should hold his nerve to the twin track of political progress and strong security?
▪ But Becker held his nerve and took the set in just 38 minutes.
▪ Redstar hold their nerve to win.
▪ Hodge held his nerve and the game was level.
keep
▪ This is where it can find a post-Thatcher purpose - and, if it keeps its nerve, votes as well.
▪ He has kept his nerve under very trying circumstances.
▪ She knew she had to keep her nerve.
▪ If he kept his nerve he would squeeze more money out of Bill Coleby.
▪ The Number-One had kept his nerve.
lose
▪ But after forty-eight hours of Berlin the Joyces had lost their nerve.
▪ Pro-student faculty members accused him of losing his nerve.
▪ One person stops and looks at me in a peculiar way. l lose the nerve to ask.
▪ It is one of those moments in a recital that could cause a singer to lose nerve.
▪ Here, she rang again quickly, before she lost her nerve.
▪ Nor had she lost her nerve, as evidenced by her conduct one night when Marian heard a strange noise.
settle
▪ Hignett then scored from the spot before Martijn Reuser settled the nerves of the East Anglian contingent.
▪ Lynn Bollington scored early on to settle the nerves and two Jo Green goals secured the win.
▪ She breathed deeply, trying to settle her nerves.
▪ Her hands had been clammy and her breathing irregular, but a small brandy had helped to settle her nerves.
steady
▪ And he may have taken a drink or two to steady his nerves.
▪ They finally found him in a bar where he had gone to steady his nerves.
▪ That's if the woman ever prays, Isabel reflected, holding on to the random thought to steady her shaky nerves.
▪ He was killing time before his appointment, trying to steady his nerve.
▪ Next, drink the large Scotch to steady the nerves.
▪ Tamar took a deep breath to steady her nerves before she replied.
▪ Twice he nearly lost control and rested, steadying his nerve.
▪ Claudia drew a deep breath and tried to steady her nerves.
strain
▪ Vincent strained every nerve to turn himself into a draughtsman acceptable to the illustrated papers, and the strain showed.
suffer
▪ The plaintiff suffered a trapped nerve after a hernia operation.
▪ They said the children were suffering from exam nerves.
▪ Developed for concert pianists suffering from nerves.
▪ He has no need for motivation and, interestingly, does not suffer from nerves.
test
▪ The next few days would test her nerve to the limit.
▪ Here the wide fairway beckons you seductively towards a second shot which will test your nerve.
▪ Nothing can test a professional's nerve and patience more than long waits between every shot.
▪ Gaveston was playing with him, testing his nerve in this cruel game.
touch
▪ Although this memorandum was immediately denounced and repudiated, there is no doubt that it touched some sensitive nerves.
▪ The theatrical farce touches a nerve.
▪ The death of Phyllis Henley touched these nerves into life.
▪ I had finally touched a nerve.
▪ Our article touched a raw nerve.
▪ The subject of hawkers had touched a raw nerve.
▪ It was easy, therefore, to touch the sensitive nerve of nationalism.
▪ The wide current appeal of such music seems to touch a nerve of communal masochism.
try
▪ Claudia threw herself into the rehearsal for the show, trying to conquer her nerves by sheer will-power.
▪ Norma sat silently in the kitchen of their home, drinking coffee and trying to calm her nerves.
▪ Transport Secretary John MacGregor became the latest Cabinet ministers to try and calm nerves.
▪ He was killing time before his appointment, trying to steady his nerve.
▪ She breathed deeply, trying to settle her nerves.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be a bundle of nerves
▪ Harry was a bundle of nerves the whole time his wife was in the hospital.
▪ Since she lost her job Rosie's been a bundle of nerves.
▪ She was a bundle of nerves.
nerve/muscle fibres
nerves of steel
▪ He had either nerves of steel or brains of custard, because he had fallen asleep during the last flight.
▪ It calls for consummate timing and nerves of steel.
▪ Raccoons these days, they have nerves of steel.
▪ The man had nerves of steel and didn't need anyone's good wishes.
strain every nerve
▪ Vincent strained every nerve to turn himself into a draughtsman acceptable to the illustrated papers, and the strain showed.
touch/hit a raw nerve
▪ Our article touched a raw nerve.
▪ The subject of hawkers had touched a raw nerve.
your courage/will/nerve fails (you)
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ After a three day siege the kidnapper's nerve failed and he gave himself up to the police.
▪ I injured a nerve in my foot playing volleyball.
▪ In a scary situation like that you need someone with plenty of nerve.
▪ It takes a lot of nerve to report a colleague for sexual harassment.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All nerve fibres and terminals present seemed normal in number and morphology.
▪ But too much plaid gets on the nerves.
▪ Chiropractic Practitioners deal with the structural relationships between the nerve tissues and the spinal column.
▪ Finally I got up the nerve to check him into the state treatment center up north.
▪ Hypothyroidism may affect equilibrium by its effect on the eighth cranial nerve and on the peripheral nerves.
▪ The Sporting News recently had the nerve to name Woods the most powerful man in all of sports.
▪ This is not only simplistic but it is even ignorant of pain-provoking peripheral nerve fibres now known to exist in man.
▪ You got a lot of nerve.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be a bundle of nerves
▪ Harry was a bundle of nerves the whole time his wife was in the hospital.
▪ Since she lost her job Rosie's been a bundle of nerves.
▪ She was a bundle of nerves.
nerve/muscle fibres
nerves of steel
▪ He had either nerves of steel or brains of custard, because he had fallen asleep during the last flight.
▪ It calls for consummate timing and nerves of steel.
▪ Raccoons these days, they have nerves of steel.
▪ The man had nerves of steel and didn't need anyone's good wishes.
touch/hit a raw nerve
▪ Our article touched a raw nerve.
▪ The subject of hawkers had touched a raw nerve.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All the way home, pedalling furiously, she had been nerving herself for this confrontation.
▪ Ruth clenched her hands inside her cloak, nerving herself to follow him; but it was Fand who didn't move.
Wikipedia

Nerve (disambiguation)

A nerve is a part of the peripheral nervous system.

Nerve or Nerves may also refer to:

Nerve (magazine)

Nerve is a free magazine published by Catalyst Media (formerly Catalyst Creative Media) in Liverpool, North West England. Combining features on social issues with artist profiles, it runs to 32 pages and is published about three times a year. The magazine has a broadly anti-capitalist stance.

Catalyst was set up by local activist and founding editor Darren Guy in early 2003, with the stated aim of 'promoting grassroots arts and culture on Merseyside'. When Guy moved on in autumn 2005, a co-operative editorial team of Adam Ford, Paul Hunt, Ritchie Hunter and Colin Serjent was brought together.

Nerve (category theory)

In category theory, a discipline within mathematics, the nerve N(C) of a small categoryC is a simplicial set constructed from the objects and morphisms of C. The geometric realization of this simplicial set is a topological space, called the classifying space of the category C. These closely related objects can provide information about some familiar and useful categories using algebraic topology, most often homotopy theory.

Nerve (Francis novel)

Nerve is the second novel by British mystery novelist Dick Francis, published in 1964.

Nerve (2013 film)

Nerve is a 2013 Australian psychological thriller film currently filming directed by Sebastien Guy. It stars Christian Clark and Georgina Haig.

Nerve (Ryan novel)

Nerve is a 2012 young adult techno-thriller by Jeanne Ryan.

Nerve

A nerve is an enclosed, cable-like bundle of axons (nerve fibers, the long and slender projections of neurons) in the peripheral nervous system. A nerve provides a common pathway for the electrochemical nerve impulses that are transmitted along each of the axons to peripheral organs.

In the central nervous system, the analogous structures are known as tracts. Neurons are sometimes called nerve cells, though this term is potentially misleading since many neurons do not form nerves, and nerves also include non-neuronal Schwann cells that coat the axons in myelin.

Each nerve is a cordlike structure containing bundles of axons. Within a nerve, each axon is surrounded by a layer of connective tissue called the endoneurium. The axons are bundled together into groups called fascicles, and each fascicle is wrapped in a layer of connective tissue called the perineurium. Finally, the entire nerve is wrapped in a layer of connective tissue called the epineurium.

Nerve (website)

{{Infobox website | name = Nerve.com | logo = | logocaption = | screenshot = | collapsible = | collapsetext = | caption = | url = | slogan = | commercial = Yes | type = Sex, relationships and culture | registration = | language = English | num_users = | content_license = | programming language = | owner = HowAboutWe | author = Rufus Griscom and Genevieve Field | editor = Peter Smith | launch_date = | revenue = | alexa = | ip = | current_status = | footnotes = }} Nerve or Nerve.com is an American online magazine dedicated to sexual topics, relationships and culture. Founded by Rufus Griscom and Genevieve Field, it publishes articles and photography. It also hosts blogs, forums, and a section for personal advertisements. Nerve's CEO is Sean Mills. Regular and past contributors include Rick Moody, Mary Gaitskill, Lisa Carver, Steve Almond, Neil LaBute, Kevin Keck, and Neal Pollack.

Nerve Media has produced several books, including The Big Bang: Nerve's Guide to the New Sexual Universe, Sex Etiquette, Full Frontal Fiction, The New Nude and Sex Advice From....

Nerve (2016 film)

Nerve is a 2016 American teen techno-thriller adventure film directed by Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman and written by Jessica Sharzer, based on the 2012 novel of the same name. The film stars Emma Roberts, Dave Franco and Juliette Lewis, and revolves around an online objective truth or dare video game, which allows people to enlist as "players" or "watchers" as the game intensifies.

The film premiered at the SVA Theater on July 12, 2016, and was theatrically released on July 27, 2016 by Lionsgate. It received mixed reviews and has grossed over $38 million.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

nerve

nerve \nerve\ (n[~e]rv), n. [OE. nerfe, F. nerf, L. nervus, akin to Gr. ney^ron sinew, nerve; cf. neyra` string, bowstring; perh. akin to E. needle. Cf. Neuralgia.]

  1. (Anat.) One of the whitish and elastic bundles of fibers, with the accompanying tissues, which transmit nervous impulses between nerve centers and various parts of the animal body.

    Note: An ordinary nerve is made up of several bundles of nerve fibers, each bundle inclosed in a special sheath (the perineurium) and all bound together in a connective tissue sheath and framework (the epineurium) containing blood vessels and lymphatics.

  2. A sinew or a tendon.
    --Pope.

  3. Physical force or steadiness; muscular power and control; constitutional vigor.

    he led me on to mightiest deeds, Above the nerve of mortal arm.
    --Milton.

  4. Steadiness and firmness of mind; self-command in personal danger, or under suffering; unshaken courage and endurance; coolness; pluck; resolution.

  5. Audacity; assurance. [Slang]

  6. (Bot.) One of the principal fibrovascular bundles or ribs of a leaf, especially when these extend straight from the base or the midrib of the leaf.

  7. (Zo["o]l.) One of the nervures, or veins, in the wings of insects.

    Nerve cell (Anat.), a neuron, one of the nucleated cells with which nerve fibers are connected; a ganglion cell is one type of nerve cell.

    Nerve fiber (Anat.), one of the fibers of which nerves are made up. These fibers are either medullated or nonmedullated. In both kinds the essential part is the translucent threadlike axis cylinder which is continuous the whole length of the fiber.

    Nerve stretching (Med.), the operation of stretching a nerve in order to remedy diseases such as tetanus, which are supposed to be influenced by the condition of the nerve or its connections.

WordNet

nerve

v. get ready for something difficult or unpleasant [syn: steel]

nerve

  1. n. any bundle of nerve fibers running to various organs and tissues of the body [syn: nervus]

  2. the courage to carry on; "he kept fighting on pure spunk"; "you haven't got the heart for baseball" [syn: heart, mettle, spunk]

  3. impudent aggressiveness; "I couldn't believe her boldness"; "he had the effrontery to question my honesty" [syn: boldness, brass, face, cheek]

Wiktionary

nerve

n. 1 (context zoology English) A bundle of neurons with their connective tissue sheaths, blood vessels and lymphatics. 2 (context nonstandard colloquial English) A neuron. 3 (context botany English) A vein in a leaf; a grain in wood 4 courage, boldness. 5 patience. (rfexample) (rfex: English) 6 stamina, endurance, fortitude. 7 audacity, gall. 8 (context in the plural English) agitation caused by fear, stress or other negative emotion. 9 (context obsolete English) sinew, tendon. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To give courage; ''sometimes with "up".'' 2 (context transitive English) To give strength

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

nerve

late 14c., nerf "sinew, tendon," from Old French nerf and directly from Medieval Latin nervus "nerve," from Latin nervus "sinew, tendon; cord, bowstring," metathesis of pre-Latin *neuros, from PIE *(s)neu- "tendon, sinew" (cognates: Sanskrit snavan- "band, sinew," Armenian neard "sinew," Greek neuron "sinew, tendon," in Galen "nerve"). Sense of "fibers that convey impulses between the brain and the body" is from c.1600.\n

\nSecondary senses developed from meaning "strength, vigor, energy" (c.1600), from the "sinew" sense. Hence figurative sense of "feeling, courage," first attested c.1600; that of "courage, boldness" is from 1809; bad sense "impudence, cheek" is from 1887. Latin nervus also had a figurative sense of "vigor, force, power, strength," as did Greek neuron. From the neurological sense come Nerves "condition of nervousness," attested from 1792; to get on someone's nerves, from 1895. War of nerves "psychological warfare" is from 1915.

nerve

c.1500, "to ornament with threads;" see nerve (n.). Meaning "to give strength or vigor" is from 1749. Related: Nerved; nerving.

Usage examples of "nerve".

The results are abnormally developed brains, delicate forms, sensitive nerves and shortened lives.

Ashurst remarks that while the cutaneous surface of the stump was acutely sensitive to the touch, there was no manifestation of pain evinced upon handling the exposed nerve.

The adrenal medulla can be removed and sympathetic nerves can be cut without fatal results.

As a result, those nerve fibers which secrete acetylcholine are referred to as cholinergic nerves and those which secrete norepinephrine are adrenergic nerves.

That affecting the large nerve supplying the thigh and leg is termed sciatica.

The respiratory center is also connected by afferent nerves with the mucous membrane of the air passages.

In contact with these, but occupying a separate layer, are the ends of small afferent nerve cells.

Here the impression caused by the light stimulus, upon reaching the medulla along an afferent nerve, is deflected to a motor nerve and, without any conscious control of the movements, the muscles of the eyelid receive the necessary impulse to close.

If it were a case of agnosia, the patient would now be seeing what he had always seen, that is to say, there would have been no diminution of his visual powers, his brain would simply have been incapable of recognising a chair wherever there happened to be a chair, in other words, he would continue to react correctly to the luminous stimuli leading to the optic nerve, but, to use simple terms within the grasp of the layman, he would have lost the capacity to know what he knew and, moreover, to express it.

Golden Medical Discovery will be found invaluable as an alterative, blood purifier, and nerve tonic, and should be taken regularly while Dr.

It was also documented that the patient had a total paralysis following his anesthetic complication that involved not only the spinal cord but cranial nerves as well.

So we both alleged a state of utter repletion, and did not solve the mystery of the contents of the cupboard,--not too luxurious, it may be conjectured, and yet kindly offered, so that we felt there was a moist filament of the social instinct running like a nerve through that exsiccated and almost anhydrous organism.

The fact that philosophers, modelers and neurobiologists are actually listening to one another, and that computer people have at last begun to show some respect for biological as well as artefactual brains, clearly makes their analyses an advance over the earlier ones, in which Al enthusiasts tended to run away with preconceived notions of what nerve cells did, and soon cut off all meaningful contact with the biological phenomena which the neurobiologists were studying.

The wall of the arteriole had been abraded by the injury and was not entirely blocked by the clot which embraced the section of nerve fibers and cells tightly.

Yet this problem, to your eyes, I fear, not essentially novel or peculiarly involute, holds for my contemplative faculties an extraordinary fascination, to wit: wherein does the mind, in itself a muscle, escape from the laws of the physical, and wherein and wherefore do the laws of the physical exercise so inexorable a jurisdiction over the processes of the mind, so that a disorder of the visual nerve actually distorts the asomatous and veils the pneumatoscopic?