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Embolism

An embolism is the lodging of an embolus, a blockage-causing piece of material, inside a blood vessel. The embolus may be a blood clot ( thrombus), a fat globule, a bubble of air or other gas ( gas embolism), or foreign material. An embolism can cause partial or total blockage of blood flow in the affected vessel. Such a blockage (a vascular occlusion) may affect a part of the body distant from where the embolus originated. An embolism in which the embolus is a piece of thrombus is called a thromboembolism. Thrombosis, the process of thrombus formation, often leads to thromboembolism.

An embolism is usually a pathologic event (that is, part of illness or injury). Sometimes it is created intentionally for a therapeutic reason, such as to stop bleeding or to kill a cancerous tumor by stopping its blood supply. Such therapy is called embolization.

Embolism (disambiguation)

Embolism may refer to:

  • Embolism, when an object (the embolus) migrates from one part of the body (through circulation) and causes a blockage (occlusion) of a blood vessel in another part of the body.
    • Embolization is the passage of an embolus within the bloodstream, either pathologically or therapeutically.
  • Embolism in calendars: Intercalation (timekeeping)
  • Embolism (liturgy), a liturgical prayer

Embolism (liturgy)

The embolism in Christian liturgy (from Greek ἐμβολισμός, an interpolation) is a short prayer said or sung after the Lord's Prayer. It functions "like a marginal gloss" upon the final petition of the Lord's Prayer (". . . deliver us from evil"), amplifying and elaborating on "the many implications" of that prayer. In the Roman Rite of Mass, the embolism is followed by the doxology or, in the Tridentine Mass (which does not have that doxology), by the Fraction.

According to the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia, "[t]he embolism may date back to the first centuries, since, under various forms, it is found in all the Occidental and in a great many Oriental, particularly Syrian, Liturgies."

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

embolism

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
pulmonary
▪ They said she had pulmonary embolism and 7 days later, she died.
▪ One patient in the control group died of pulmonary embolism.
▪ Doctors were forced to amputate her right leg, but Jennifer died when a blood clot caused a pulmonary embolism.
▪ He was admitted to the general medical service at Pinderfields General Hospital with a provisional diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.
▪ One patient died because of pulmonary embolism during the postoperative period.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a coronary embolism
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Do our surgical colleagues stop doing total hip replacements for pain because of the incidence of possible fatal embolism?
▪ Doctors were forced to amputate her right leg, but Jennifer died when a blood clot caused a pulmonary embolism.
▪ Feeley, working on an embolism the size of a golf ball, broke into the conversation and started screaming at Marvin.
▪ He was admitted to the general medical service at Pinderfields General Hospital with a provisional diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.
▪ One patient died because of pulmonary embolism during the postoperative period.
▪ One patient in the control group died of pulmonary embolism.
▪ They said she had pulmonary embolism and 7 days later, she died.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Embolism

Embolism \Em"bo*lism\, n. [L. embolismus, from Gr. ? to throw or put in, insert; cf. ? intercalated: cf. F. embolisme. See Emblem.]

  1. Intercalation; the insertion of days, months, or years, in an account of time, to produce regularity; as, the embolism of a lunar month in the Greek year.

  2. Intercalated time.
    --Johnson.

  3. (Med.) The occlusion of a blood vessel by an embolus. Embolism in the brain often produces sudden unconsciousness and paralysis.

Wiktionary

embolism

n. 1 (context pathology English) An obstruction or occlusion of an artery by an embolus, that is by a blood clot, air bubble or other matter that has been transported by the blood stream. 2 The insertion or intercalation of days into the calendar in order to correct the error arising from the difference between the civil year and the solar year.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

embolism

late 14c., "intercalation, insertion of days into a calendar," from Old French embolisme "intercalation," from Late Latin embolismus "insertion of days in a calendar to correct errors," from Late Greek embolismos "intercalation," from embolos "insertion, a plug, wedge" (see embolus). Medical sense of "obstruction of a blood vessel" is first recorded in English 1855. Related: embolismic.

WordNet

embolism

  1. n. an insertion into a calendar [syn: intercalation]

  2. occlusion of a blood vessel by an embolus (a loose clot or air bubble or other particle)

Usage examples of "embolism".

Fortunately, such vigorous effort also diminished the likelihood of embolisms forming in the legs.

Microxerography could detect even the smallest embolisms, but such dangers still had to be excised.

Air embolism was a feared complication that at times occurred no matter what one did, but the fact that it occurred so often and at an increasing frequency to Ballantine was always ignored.

If the needle goes a little too far, penetrates the lung, and if an air bubble then happens to be forced into a blood vessel and manages to travel all the way back to the heart without being absorbed, it is possible though extremely unlikely to get a sort of vapor lock in the valves of your heart-air embolism, the doctors call it.

If the needle goes a little too far, penetrates the lung, and if an air bubble then happens to be forced into a blood vessel and manages to travel all the way back to the heart without being absorbed, it is possible though extremely unlikely to get a sort of vapor lock in the valves of your heart - air embolism, the doctors call it.

There's no sense in any of us getting an air embolism after coming this far.

You could end up with an air embolism in your bloodstream that could conceivably kill you.

He swam upward, using strong, even strokes with hands and feet, exhaling in tiny spurts so the expanding gases in his lungs would not rupture the capillaries and force bubbles directly into his bloodstream, causing an air embolism.

That bad not been an experiment but an emergency rescue, and though the subject had been partly paralyzed by an air embolism, he had survived.

Those are such ailments as hardening of the arteries, coronary heart disease, embolisms, and almost all the many forms of cancer-diseases where one or another body mechanism suddenly goes haywire, without any visible cause.

Those are such ailments as hardening of the arteries, coronary heart disease, embolisms, and almost all the many forms of cancerdiseases where one or another body mechanism suddenly goes haywire, without any visible cause.

A fat embolism formed at the site of one of these breaks, passed up into his heart, and then apparently crossed over from one side of his heart to the other through a small congenital hole.

What was more, she could shoot him full of nightmarish narcotics with her built-in hyposprays, or else extend the needles from the fingernails of her other hand and give him a dose of bioengineered glandular secretions that would give him a cerebral embolism, fry his nerve synapses, and stop his heart, all at the same time.

All those Caesareans have, however, increased the mother's risk of death, hemorrhage, infection, pulmonary embolism, and Mendelson's syndrome.

In preliminary tests on human subjects, HGV-5 failed to dissolve clots in either myocardial infarctions or pulmonary embolisms.