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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

air

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a road/rail/air crash
▪ There will be an investigation into the cause of the air crash.
a sense/air of finality
▪ The word ‘retirement’ has a terrible air of finality about it.
air ambulance
air brakes
air chief marshal
air commodore
air conditioner
air conditioning
air force
air freight...sea freight
▪ We’ll send your personal belongings by air freight and your furniture by sea freight.
air freshener
air guitar
air hostess
air kiss
air lock
air marshal
air pocket
air pollution
▪ Air pollution can cause breathing problems for some people.
air pump
air quote
air rage
air raid
air rifle
air speed (=the speed of a plane in relation to the air around it)
air strike
air terminal
air traffic control
air traffic controller
air transport
▪ The air transport industry is presently going through a period of change.
air travel
▪ There has been a major increase in air travel during the last twenty years.
air vent
▪ a blocked air vent
air vice-marshal
air your grievances (=tell people you think you have been treated unfairly)
▪ These committees act as a forum for various groups to air their grievances.
air/aerial combat (=fighting in the air)
▪ 30 enemy aircraft were destroyed in aerial combat.
air/environmental/water etc pollutants
▪ New regulations will reduce hazardous air pollutants.
airing cupboard
air/sense of menace
▪ There was a sense of menace as the sky grew darker.
air/water purifier
an air of excitement (=a general feeling of excitement among a group of people)
▪ There was a real air of excitement before the game.
an air of mystery (=something that seems mysterious)
▪ There was an air of mystery about him.
an air raid (=when bombs are dropped from planes)
▪ His parents were killed in an air raid.
an air/bomb attack (=an attack from a plane using bombs)
▪ Malta was under heavy air attack.
an airing cupboardBritish English (= a warm cupboard for sheets and towels)
an airline/plane/air ticket
▪ You can pick up your airline tickets at the check-in desk.
an air/rail disaster (=an air or rail accident)
▪ The crash was the worst rail disaster in Pakistan’s history.
blast of...air
▪ A blast of cold air swept through the hut.
breathe some air/the air
▪ It was wonderful to be outside and breathe some fresh air.
breathe some air/the air
▪ It was wonderful to be outside and breathe some fresh air.
bus/train/air/cab fare
▪ Air fares have shot up by 20%.
by air/sea/land/road/rail etc
▪ All supplies are transported by air.
chill in the air
▪ There was a slight chill in the air.
chilly wind/breeze/air etc
compressed air
▪ The miners used rock drills and compressed air to drive through hard rock.
disappear into thin air (=completely)
▪ The money he made has disappeared into thin air.
gasp for air/breath
▪ Brendan climbed slowly, gasping for breath.
have an air of authorityapproving (= look like you have authority, in a way that makes people obey you)
▪ The commander had an unmistakeable air of authority.
hot air
▪ The theory was dismissed as a lot of hot air.
humid air/climate etc
mountain air
▪ a walk in the clear mountain air
open to the sky/air/elements
▪ Many of the tombs had been robbed and left open to the sky.
polluted air/water/rivers etc
▪ The project’s aim is to clean up polluted land.
puff of smoke/wind/air/steam etc
▪ The dragon disappeared in a puff of smoke.
rush of air/wind/water
▪ She felt a cold rush of air as she wound down her window.
sea air
send sth by post/sea/air etc
▪ Monday is the last day to send cards by post to arrive by Christmas.
serve in the army/air force/navy etc
▪ He returned to Greece to serve in the army.
the air/water temperature
▪ The water temperature should be between 60 and 65°F.
the night air
▪ The night air was scented with pine wood.
the sea air (=the air close to the sea)
▪ He breathed in the fresh sea air.
throwing...into the air
▪ The bomb exploded, throwing bricks and debris into the air.
travel by train/car/air etc
▪ Emily hated travelling by train.
vanished into thin air (=suddenly disappeared in a very mysterious way)
▪ She seemed to have just vanished into thin air.
water/air quality
▪ Scientists took samples to test the water quality.
water/air/beer etc pump (=for moving water, air etc)
water/air/oil etc filter
▪ a pond filter
waved...in the air
▪ He waved a hand in the air to attract her attention.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
clean
▪ The measured seasonal variations of peroxide and ozone in clean air at Cape Grim during the experiment are contrasted in Fig. 4.
▪ Environmentalists have spread the alarm about clean air and water.
▪ There was that sudden, breathtaking chill of cold, clean air as you walked into the dome.
▪ In hot weather, clean air conditioner filters.
▪ Such procedures should aim to ensure efficient operation and the provision of fresh, clean air.
▪ This was part of it: his new life would mean a slower pace, cleaner air, getting into shape.
▪ Her hair flew out behind her, and the clean air struck her face.
▪ When Abudah had made his way through this slimy cavern he emerged upon a mountain top in the clean air.
clear
▪ In the clear night air the sound of battle at the nearest of the gates was clearly audible.
▪ The truck was grinding up the steep, dark road while I looked up to the stars in the clear alpine air.
▪ Reaching starts are normally best managed with a timed approach. Clear air is nearly always of paramount importance.
▪ Their voices rose, pure and distinct in the clear air as they laughed and shouted to each other.
▪ Starboard gybe is obviously safer than port, and clear air is vital.
▪ No hunting, shooting or fishing for them, but walking and gardening and breathing in the clear air.
▪ He found the clear air and sparkling waters the perfect pick-me-up.
▪ People's voices, exchanging Christmas greetings echoed on the clear air.
cold
▪ Everyone else had gone back out into the cold night air, except her three companions and the proprietor.
▪ The snow felt good crunching under my boots, and the cold air invigorated me.
▪ He stared mournfully at the bright strip which appeared to float in the cold air over the small table.
▪ We were breathing fogs in the cold night air.
▪ When the door opened a great smell of sweat and leather and stale cigar smoke rushed into the cold night air.
▪ We gaze until the cold air makes our shivering unstoppable.
▪ Convector models work by drawing in cold air which is then warmed in a convection-chamber.
▪ The first truly cold air he has felt since arriving.
cool
▪ She felt a fleeting distant surprise as the cool night air whispered over her skin.
▪ The leaves were radiant in the light, and the cool, sweet air touched the skin, exhilarating and chilly.
▪ It dries flaky in the cool air of the cab.
▪ As I step out the door, inhaling the cool air, I smell lightness and relief.
▪ Feel the warm air as you breathe out and the cooler air as you breathe in.
▪ The hot gas is pumped to a coil in the indoor unit where cooler indoor air is blown across the hot coils.
▪ Damian Flint strode out into the cool night air.
▪ With my hands I could still feel cool air coming in along almost all the cracks.
free
▪ Nothing can be finer for honest books than to stand unashamed and free to the air.
▪ Passengers flying to Rio from other cities for the cruise will receive free round-trip economy air fare.
▪ She dangled in free air, then was put down.
▪ Try to find the maximum range of the device in free air.
fresh
▪ We need a breath of fresh air in school inspections.
▪ In the fresh air I light my first cigar of the day, and break the match before I drop it.
▪ They like open situations where fresh air can move through and circulate freely.
▪ Rated R.. Waiting to Exhale A breath of fresh air.
▪ You get virtually 1 8 no fresh air, nothing, you're just in the cells.
▪ Remove excess hair around the ear canal, as this tend to collect wax and restrict fresh air.
▪ This not being the case I have benefited much from the peace and quiet and from the fresh air.
▪ She's a breath of fresh air for those stupid Lintons.
hot
▪ It burst out of the tunnel in a gale of hot air and shuddered to a halt.
▪ The campaign for a deregulated electric utility industry, like a balloon, is filled with a lot of hot air.
▪ As the hand was held on the blazing ring, the stench of burning flesh was clearly noticeable in the hot air.
▪ Wyatt breathed in the hot humid air.
▪ But nothing could have prepared me for the hydraulic blast of hot air that came as I stepped out.
▪ As the hot cooking air was sucked through the window, the little kitchen grew cooler.
▪ Yet the whole magazine is like this, an expensive, well-meaning, worthless blast of hot air.
▪ Now that frenzied chorus of hot air is being used to try to whip up a hurricane designed to alter public opinion.
open
▪ Keep to work and sanity and open air - to the cheerful and the matter of fact side of things.
▪ An 1874 picture by one Dudley P.. Flanders shows a circus performing in the open air in Tucson.
▪ The two of them were sitting at a table in the open air.
▪ It disperses rapidly in open air where levels are low.
▪ Spend as much time as possible in the open air.
▪ There were two more open airs during the week and somewhere in between all this activity the children had homework to complete.
▪ Stepping high in the light gravity and brandishing the bag before her, she ploughed her way out into the open air.
▪ After the singing of another hymn the congregation adjourned to the open air for the unveiling of the Memorial stones.
thin
▪ The beginner normally learns combination techniques by performing them against thin air.
▪ One thing Galarraga should consider before he makes the move: The thin air in Denver has been good to him.
▪ The interior was gloomy; tobacco smoke hung motionless in the thin air.
▪ He was nestling within thin air and cinders.
▪ Ran through the thin black air until she couldn't breathe.
▪ The juice landed on the floor like a red bubbly snake, a bad omen suddenly materializing out of thin air.
▪ Victor and his kidnappers had disappeared into thin air.
▪ He found rhymes irresistible, and produced them out of thin air, just for the fun of it.
warm
▪ Black-headed gulls circled, spiralling skywards in a current of warm air.
▪ Buffalo were tethered and breathed warm air into the night.
▪ Jane's skin dried almost immediately in the warm, dusty air.
▪ They stood there in a gush of warm air.
▪ Her window was open and warm fresh air blew in her face and made her hair stream out behind.
▪ The pollution is worst during winter, when thermal inversions trap the warmer polluted air above the city.
▪ The weight of the glider and the woman slowed him down, but he could feel the warm air currents.
▪ The warm summer air was clear, and the smoke could be clearly seen billowing straight up.
■ NOUN
attack
▪ Coming in the midst of a presidential campaign, the air attack has generated the inevitable political rhetoric, bombast and pressure.
▪ The air attack occurred in August 1988 during a campaign against the Kurdish separatist movement.
▪ He also underlines further the riskiness of the Yamamoto plan, pointing to the high vulnerability of carriers to air attack.
▪ There were no trains and the roads were under constant air attack.
▪ This was the possibility of a sneak enemy air attack on Tokyo, the capital of the Empire.
▪ Meanwhile, the air attacks continue.
▪ He will need to sell his candidacy and meet the Democratic air attack with regularly televised speeches from the Senate floor.
balloon
▪ The steel rope had to be used because a normal tight rope wouldn't keep taut between two unpredictable hot air balloons.
▪ Read in studio A rather unusual hot air balloon has completed its maiden voyage.
▪ Vologsky might as well try to take off and escape in a hot air balloon.
▪ Is it not yet another of the Secretary of State's hot air balloons?
▪ Read in studio Five hundred homes had their power supplies cut when a hot air balloon collided with high voltage cables.
▪ Read in studio A world record has been set for tight rope walking between two hot air balloons.
base
▪ Fresh air bases were set up in Bank Mine and a team of brave and dedicated doctors went underground to assist.
▪ Then I went to work at the Alameda naval air base, as a machinist's helper.
▪ He had first caught sight of her riding in a ploughed field beyond the barbed wire perimeter of the air base.
▪ Clinton said as rain pounded down at the air base, where he landed.
conditioner
▪ An air conditioner to maintain normal room temperature is advisable.
▪ Bringing me glasses of cold nectar is what they would do, and cranking up the air conditioner.
▪ They returned with a huge roll of green baize which was then gently placed on top of the groaning air conditioner.
▪ In hot weather, clean air conditioner filters.
▪ An air conditioner or at least a fan...
▪ For one thing, the air conditioner in my hotel room is a bit balky.
▪ Back inside his room, he turned on the overhead fan and the air conditioner.
▪ Outside, over the low monotonous drone of the air conditioner, she could hear the mating call of a cricket.
conditioning
▪ The air conditioning was not yet in place.
▪ Television broadcasting was to be reduced, as were air conditioning, street lighting and floodlit sports events.
▪ Ask for the facts on electric air conditioning.
▪ They incorporated all the Mark 3 features of air conditioning, insulation and good riding.
▪ The products will be used in refrigeration systems in the food industry and in large air conditioning systems.
▪ In all stores adequate ventilation should be provided as an aid to temperature control with mechanical air conditioning if needed.
▪ The auto model costs £33,620 and gets air conditioning and a leather-trimmed cabin.
▪ However, air conditioning is standard and there is electric adjustment for mirrors, windows and seats.
crash
▪ He lost his only son Jay, 26, in an air crash and his first wife Connie drowned in Antigua.
▪ However, San Diego has only experienced one major air crash in its history.
▪ It is now 33 years since the last major air crash in Ayrshire and we must pray that there is never another.
▪ At the same time, the number of infants killed in commercial air crashes is extremely low.
▪ There have been three elections since 1988 when General Zia ul Haq died in an unexplained air crash.
▪ One ambulanceman compared the carnage to an air crash.
fare
▪ Perhaps he was going to touch me for the air fare home.
▪ Not included: international air fare and port taxes.
▪ With each call, the CalPIRG callers asked for the lowest possible air fare on a specific route for a specific date.
▪ The service also can book air fare, ground transportation, lift tickets and more.
▪ Cost: From $ 599 per person, double occupancy; not included is air fare to Miami.
▪ Head whirling, she went into a travel agency and enquired the air fare to Toronto.
▪ Q: Where can I find information on the lowest commercial air fares?
force
▪ The procession was one of sombre colours, khaki and air force blue predominating.
▪ The air force general leading the mutineers refused to give up control of the base even as the seige of Makati ended.
▪ The church is full of exquisite works of craftmanship which have been donated by individuals and by air forces.
▪ The installed heron is already banking away on invisible air forces, away from the mayhem.
▪ Meanwhile the air force continued bombing Tiger positions on the peninsula.
▪ Mrs Major emerged from the plane at Andrews air force base looking pale and drawn.
hostess
▪ Beryl was an air hostess belonging to a rival airline he had met at the John F. Kennedy Airport.
▪ Finally, I offered to become an air hostess to pay my way, and this time, received an immediate reply.
▪ As she might have expected, it was almost empty, except for an air hostess sitting on the toilet, smoking.
▪ Carl looked up and saw the young air hostess staring at them.
▪ When Kylie returns as an air hostess for Spinning, the world suddenly seems perfect again.
▪ She told Nigel proudly that Alison could have been anything she wanted, even an air hostess.
▪ We are not told how these risks compare with, say, working as an air hostess, or as a policewoman.
▪ But he is found by the air hostess and bustled on board.
night
▪ In the clear night air the sound of battle at the nearest of the gates was clearly audible.
▪ The night air helped my wits.
▪ She felt a fleeting distant surprise as the cool night air whispered over her skin.
▪ We were breathing fogs in the cold night air.
▪ She shivered in the hostile, cold night air.
▪ The ambulance was already gone, but patrol cars were still there, radios squawking in the night air.
▪ The night air was fresh, washed by the storm into a cool clarity.
▪ Induk said, exhaling, dispersing my ashes like pollen into the night air.
pollution
▪ He said the buses would cut air pollution and reduce sheep deaths from accidents with cars.
▪ Similar human error surfaces in other air pollution disasters such as at Seveso and Bhopal.
▪ A scientist does experi merits, and no experiment I have ever done proves that air pollution is hurting those trees.
▪ By last year the crisis had reached such proportions that Southern California introduced radical new regulations to control air pollution.
▪ In addition to air pollution concerns, the opponents don't want the courts raised above ground.
▪ It is not unusual to find that countries adopt the best parts of both strategies in order to tackle air pollution problems.
▪ Cars and industry in El Paso contribute to the air pollution, of course.
power
▪ Government air power has prevented the rebels from attacking N'Djamena directly.
▪ Robert sat nearby doing a term paper on the history of air power.
▪ Or does the environment lend itself to the air power and precision-guided missiles of a Steve Forbes?
▪ But the escalating crisis may now force Western leaders to use military air power to protect relief efforts.
▪ Strategic air power had all but won the Second World War.
▪ Billing was quick to see the military significance of air power, and this gave purpose to an otherwise chaotic life.
quality
▪ In water quality and air quality, Texas has the worst record of any big state.
▪ It also changed the monitoring period for ozone to better reflect actual air quality.
▪ At one extreme lies the Soviet Union which has over 100 national air quality standards and few emission standards.
▪ He responded with courage and knocked back the load of special interests trying to weaken efforts to improve air quality.
▪ Studies of air quality show that pollutants like car exhaust fumes can add to their suffering, especially during hot weather.
▪ The maker of air quality detectors is expected to appoint Steward Somers chief financial officer.
▪ The emission charge may have to be continually adjusted until the air quality which society deems acceptable has been achieved.
▪ The air quality impact of conversion from oil to gas-coal is examined.
raid
▪ Then the anti-aircraft guns opened up, firing into the air against an imagined air raid.
▪ There were occasional air raids on Calcutta.
▪ In 1916, a special committee produced its recommendations for the precautions to be taken in the event of an air raid.
▪ During grammar school, I faint every time we have an air raid drill.
▪ Equipment was possibly used to trigger air raid sirens during the Second World War.
▪ The United States reacted to the air raids by ordering an aircraft carrier to the gulf.
▪ The success of their final run depended on a diversionary air raid.
▪ A strict blackout was imposed in Pyongyang, and the populace was crowded into underground shelters as air raid sirens wailed.
sea
▪ After the stale fug in the tiny cabin, she gulped down the clean sea air, the car window wide open.
▪ He gave me to understand that the bamboo beetle would soon be killed off by the sea air.
▪ Hunger and a need for sea air drove Ruth down to the Puerto de Pollensa.
▪ Nothing ever really dried out now that it was so thoroughly impregnated by salt sea air.
▪ Near the coast also the sea air reduces the cold of late winter and spring.
▪ A few days of sea air would not hurt them.
▪ Swore the sea air was doing his health good.
▪ That was back when our unofficial city aroma was strong coffee and sea air, not urine.
strike
▪ The effects of the artillery bombardment and the air strikes had been devastating.
▪ When we decided we had them pinned down, they called in an air strike.
▪ If air strikes are launched, what will become of them?
▪ There were many choices available, including continued air strikes, further ground attacks and increased special warfare actions.
▪ The streets of Baghdad functioned as normal Saturday, but people expressed fear of more air strikes.
▪ They called in air strikes all around us.
▪ We finally rescued our wounded, and, with the artillery still pounding, we called in for an air strike.
▪ Normally, an air strike, for all of its apparent fury, accomplished little or nothing.
temperature
▪ The snow may crust at night, due to outward radiation, even thought the air temperature remains well above freezing point.
▪ It is calculated using rainfall averages and monthly mean surface and air temperatures.
▪ June Brilliant sun, warm seas, pleasant air temperatures, warm nights.
▪ The outside air temperature was above minimum, but I switched on the engine anti-ice anyway, just to be sure.
▪ Similar air temperatures are observed today in geographically equivalent temperate high latitudes.
▪ The water in the aquarium will quickly equal the ambient air temperature.
▪ Once air temperatures have fallen well below freezing point, frozen spray accumulates along the shore.
▪ The outside air temperature gauge proved very accurate - immediately we entered the red we started to collect ice.
time
▪ Cable companies stopped selling air time.
▪ The dark side gets plenty of air time as it is.
▪ Cylinder pressure, air time remaining at current depth, and remaining no-stop time are continuously updated.
▪ The air time is sold by broadcast bottom feeders who could care less about anything beyond profit margins.
▪ If the remaining air time is less than the no-stop time required, the cylinder content display flashes air time.
▪ To qualify for air time, volunteers for a particular candidate would have to collect a certain number of voter signatures.
▪ That means minimum air time, but maximum ground time.
traffic
▪ We've got air traffic on to it.
▪ And the air traffic controllers and pilots on board asked for autographs.
▪ They included warning local air traffic control and having hundreds of gallons of water and pumps standing by in case of accident.
▪ Denver said, waiting for air traffic controllers to confirm they could trace his signal.
▪ I would have needed an air traffic control centre to keep track of where everyone was at any given moment.
▪ The center handling air traffic in Washington and Oregon, near Auburn, Wash., was operating on backup power.
▪ She could see a highwire directly overhead, above that, air traffic, and beyond--.
▪ The Federal Aviation Administration is also notified to ensure that there is no conflict with civilian air traffic, she said.
transport
▪ Shipping, air transport, telephone and telegraph generally follow these routes.
▪ Suddenly, it was three years later and he was being carried off an Army Medical Corps Hercules air transport.
▪ For the more serious cases, there was air transport direct to base hospital, possibly hundreds of miles to the rear.
▪ Partly Competitive/Partly Regulated Industries Examples of this kind of industry are oil, aerospace, and air transport.
▪ The burgeoning air transport industry is presenting huge opportunities for enterprise.
▪ Its basic objective was to stimulate the regularity and safety of international air transport.
▪ On 14 December 1987 the Council adopted a further Regulation applying the competition rules to international air transport between community airports.
travel
▪ The major increase was in air travel.
▪ No effort was spared to make air travel seem like ocean voyaging or traveling by train.
▪ So was Laker's concept of cheap but regular air travel.
▪ Most forecasts suggest that air travel will continue to grow at a little over 5 percent a year.
▪ Once, this was difficult to cross; then, railways spanned it; now, air travel virtually ignores it.
▪ Because of this, air travel to deal with the social aspects of human interactions will be more frequent.
▪ The new offering, called the AAsset Card, will allow charges other than air travel.
■ VERB
breathe
▪ Stretcher-bearers pushed past Jack as he stood blinking at the top of the tunnel, breathing the damp air.
▪ I like to go walking in the woods just to breathe the air.
▪ Whales, like all mammals, breathe air and give milk.
▪ I breathe, sucking air while circling left.
▪ The bichir and other primitive freshwater fish have a pouch opening from the gut to enable them to breathe air.
▪ Residents of the two cities breathe the same polluted air.
▪ No hunting, shooting or fishing for them, but walking and gardening and breathing in the clear air.
▪ We all breathe the same air.
fill
▪ In the evening they can take on a luminous glow and fill the air with perfume.
▪ A cacophony of violins, clarinets and trumpets fills the air.
▪ I took a few paces towards her, filling the air with the sweet music of my song.
▪ But there is another way to make it float, which is to fill it with hot air.
▪ The smell of couscous and other grain which filled the air constantly reminded me of my own situation.
▪ Our cassoulets arrive in porcelain pots, filling the air with a wonderful aroma.
▪ I knew from the thick fragrance that filled the air that it was Mrs. Constantine.
▪ As the wait grew longer and the day nearer, expectation filled the air.
float
▪ He stared mournfully at the bright strip which appeared to float in the cold air over the small table.
▪ The question floats there in the air.
▪ It's just floating there in the air!
▪ They floated, their internal air chambers were dry, and they retained their strength.
▪ And he's never happier than when he's falling flying, floating through the air.
▪ Scarlet fever, mumps, chicken pox, and whooping cough floated in the air.
▪ She felt as though she was floating on air.
▪ Such a person lived and, in a sense floated on the air, without a solid foundation.
fly
▪ A piece of scalp flew yards through the air.
▪ First a student hit the stick and it flew up in the air.
▪ I managed to roll clear just as it flew off into the air, never to be seen again.
▪ First, there was the Gorilla, flying through the air on a rope suspended from the ceiling before the game started.
▪ For once he allowed the cork to fly high into the air.
▪ Streamers flew through the air, revellers contorted to the music.
▪ First, Hermes' winged sandals, for flying through the air.
gasp
▪ But with an hour gone and Ulster 25-24 ahead, Saracens were gasping for air in this Heineken Cup match.
▪ But the poor paunchy guy had been stuffed into a jumpsuit from which he seemed to gasp for air.
▪ Once back outside in the Berlin night, Harry gasped for air.
▪ I gasped air and saw the bright crimson of my skinned knuckles.
▪ The instructor must have heard my screams as I felt myself being dragged out as I gasped for air.
▪ And suddenly he needed those jewels the way a drowning man gasps for air.
▪ She was gasping for air, then her throat seized closed and she fainted.
▪ Soon they were both holding their stomachs, gasping for air.
hang
▪ The stink of hops hanging in the air, wafted over from Wandsworth breweries.
▪ He let those comments hang in the air for a moment, and we drove on quietly.
▪ The rest is a dark drift of smouldering purple, hanging in the air like smoke from a pyre of burning shoe-gazers.
▪ It yelled, and within five minutes, I saw four other ravens hanging in the air above me.
▪ Row after row of different artifacts, with mystical banners hanging in the still air.
▪ Everywhere an unspoken question seemed to hang heavily in the air: Would we have been better off without Home Rule?
▪ Smell it hanging in the air, Feel it on everything you touch.
pollute
▪ Cigarette smokers pollute the air for other people but take no account of this in deciding how much to smoke.
▪ Residents of the two cities breathe the same polluted air.
▪ Short-term measurements were carried out in the drivers' breathing zones by drawing polluted air through a charcoal tube during unloading.
▪ Paints traditionally were made with volatile organic compounds, which can pollute indoor and outdoor air.
throw
▪ We shall not be throwing everything into the air and rewriting systems that already work satisfactorily.
▪ The elaborate nets thrown out by air proved far too porous to trap major enemy units.
▪ It shows a small girl with her arms thrown up in the air.
▪ That car was thrown into the air and landed on the next car in line, killing Waltrick.
▪ A single shoe is thrown into the air.
▪ The same blast threw me in the air.
▪ Before Mungo and Emily could focus on it, Vic made as if to throw it into the air.
▪ I saw them amid showers of the brilliant, multicolored dust that was thrown into the air.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a breath of air/wind
▪ Scarcely a breath of air disturbed the stillness of the day.
▪ It had been a very cold but bright morning, without a breath of wind.
▪ Not a breath of air disturbs the tranquil spectacle.
▪ Ramsey presumably leant out for a breath of air.
▪ The moon was hidden under a veil of clouds, and there was not a breath of wind.
▪ There was complete silence and not even a breath of wind disturbed the peace.
▪ There was not a breath of wind blowing, and not a leaf or blade of grass stirred.
▪ There was scarcely a breath of wind.
a breath of fresh air
▪ I'm going outside for a breath of fresh air.
▪ Moving to this big apartment was like a breath of fresh air.
▪ As I say, we must introduce a breath of fresh air into the inspection system.
▪ Comes to corner of the street for a breath of fresh air.
▪ His condition is fine and he went out for a breath of fresh air.
▪ Lawrence has proved a master of communication and a breath of fresh air to North-East sportswriters.
▪ Steve Forbes is a breath of fresh air to the process.
▪ Undoubtedly to the disappointment of the leakers, Inman came through the whole affair like a breath of fresh air.
▪ We need a breath of fresh air in school inspections.
▪ You really want to turn around and get a breath of fresh air.
a martyred look/expression/air etc
▪ He did not reply, but got into the car glumly, with a martyred air.
a nip in the air
air/sea power
▪ The outcome will be decided by air power.
▪ But the escalating crisis may now force Western leaders to use military air power to protect relief efforts.
▪ For Mahan sea power was critical, for Mackinder a particular land mass.
▪ Government air power has prevented the rebels from attacking N'Djamena directly.
▪ Robert sat nearby doing a term paper on the history of air power.
▪ Strategic air power had all but won the Second World War.
▪ The cheapest and simplest method will be the air powered sponge filter.
▪ The most difficult strategic question was whether sea power was any longer the foundation upon which the Three Pillars could continue to stand.
assume a manner/air/expression etc
▪ No wonder the technique assumed an air of planet-wide importance.
▪ Oliver assumed an expression of extreme penitence.
▪ The only thing she could do was to assume an air of indifference.
be gulping for air
▪ I am gulping for air, and sobbing.
be walking on air
▪ On my first day, I earned $190, and I was walking on air.
▪ Martha felt that she was walking on air and when she entered the kitchen, Annie looked up.
▪ She felt as though she was walking on air.
castles in the air
▪ Hugh Bawn's high-tech castles in the air.
▪ That, says McKinsey, is because they spend money where it is needed rather than on grand castles in the air.
clear the air
▪ I think it's about time you called her to clear the air.
▪ In an attempt to clear the air, Mills has planned a meeting with employees to discuss the issue.
▪ The White House hopes that the investigation will clear the air.
▪ Allen, to clear the air, decided to host a debate for three thousand people at Bethel.
▪ But he thinks, in present circumstances, that a straight forward test provides the best way of clearing the air.
▪ He even met with the Anti-Defamation League to try and clear the air of misunderstandings.
▪ It would be good to clear the air, but she hoped it would hold off until after the party.
▪ Offer to talk then and there to clear the air.
▪ Secondly, until you clear the air with this person, you will continue to feel uncomfortable.
▪ The Minister is mumbling - I hope that he will get up and clear the air.
▪ To help clear the air, Mills is expected to meet with PacTel staffers in two weeks to discuss the issue.
cleave the air/darkness etc
disappear/vanish into thin air
▪ As happened during and after the first war of independence, the money has disappeared into thin air.
▪ It was almost as if he'd vanished into thin air.
▪ Maybe each and every one of them had vanished into thin air.
▪ The Cheshire cat is an odd character and he causes confusion when he literally disappears into thin air.
▪ The money which has suddenly and mysteriously become available simply vanishes into thin air as Ruggiero Miletti magically reappears.
▪ Victor and his kidnappers had disappeared into thin air.
▪ Yet he seemed to disappear into thin air.
▪ You can tell these mysterious trails were not made yesterday, because of the way they seem to disappear into thin air.
fresh air
Fresh air isn't necessarily better for you, but it will certainly make you feel better.
▪ I'm just going outside for a breath of fresh air.
▪ I leave the window open at night to get some fresh air.
▪ Let's go outside and get some fresh air.
▪ Open the window and let's get some fresh air in here!
▪ By then I had stepped outside to get some fresh air, away from the stifling smoke and heat of the temple.
▪ Feeling in dire need of fresh air, Ellie went outside into the grounds.
▪ Filmer could go in and out of the Westin without a sniff of fresh air, and probably had.
▪ He bad to sit in his beret and coat, for she needed fresh air.
▪ He talked about fresh air and fresh starts.
▪ Remove excess hair around the ear canal, as this tend to collect wax and restrict fresh air.
▪ Too diluted by the fresh air.
▪ Undoubtedly to the disappointment of the leakers, Inman came through the whole affair like a breath of fresh air.
keep several/too many etc balls in the air
leave sth hanging in the air
out of thin air
▪ He found rhymes irresistible, and produced them out of thin air, just for the fun of it.
▪ Ray picks a number out of thin air -- generally below wholesale -- and the deal is done.
▪ The juice landed on the floor like a red bubbly snake, a bad omen suddenly materializing out of thin air.
pluck sth out of the air
punch the air
▪ A small cheer emerged from behind and I punched the air with delight.
▪ Balvinder jumped up and down, punched the air, then promptly confronted the man with whom he had made the bet.
▪ Caballeros punched the air with the exultation of victory.
▪ I felt marvellous and punched the air.
▪ Men's fists punched the air, brandishing flagons of beer.
▪ Sharpe saw the blossoming smoke a fraction before the sound punched the air.
▪ Then he plunged in, and when he saw he was correct, punched the air with a raised left hand.
▪ When we left the meeting, I should have been punching the air with joy.
road-rage/air-rage etc
television/sports/fresh-air etc fiend
the open air
▪ An 1874 picture by one Dudley P.. Flanders shows a circus performing in the open air in Tucson.
▪ Discomfort in the open air was far preferable to him.
▪ For example in the open air or where a temporary problem necessitates urgent remedy.
▪ Generally the passengers camped and sat out in the open air.
▪ It sometimes comes on in the open air.
▪ Some continued to preach in the open air, in streets or in the fields.
▪ The two of them were sitting at a table in the open air.
▪ The world, her world, no longer accommodated pleasure parties in the open air.
water-borne/sea-borne/air-borne etc
wind/air/water resistance
▪ A 3-phase 15° step-angle variable-reluctance motor has a rated phase current 01 2.0A and a phase winding resistance of 5.0 ohms.
▪ A car that squats low meets less wind resistance.
▪ If you want to lower the wind resistance on a car body how low do you want to get it?
▪ Naturally the water resistance was less, but modern tanning processes have improved leathers considerably.
▪ The actual path taken by the orbiter is complex and designed to minimize the effect of air resistance on the craft.
▪ This holds precisely because all objects fall at the same speed under gravity. Air resistance is being ignored here.
with your nose in the air
▪ She just walked past with her nose in the air.
▪ Standing with their noses in the air.
you could cut the atmosphere/air/tension with a knife
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
air pollution
▪ Alex stood shivering in the cold, damp air.
▪ Cars are a major cause of air pollution.
▪ Could you turn on the air?
▪ the clean air of the countryside
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But gecko feet work in ionised air, which would cancel out the electrostatic effect.
▪ Gobbets of ice sliced through the air.
▪ He was uncoordinated, moving his arms through the air and pointing at nothing in particular.
▪ I say they curved through the air by 25 centimetres.
▪ Ice can crack off into the engine air intakes and cause them to shut down.
▪ Jennifer better make sure an air bag is handy.
▪ The weight of the air on top of the paper held it down with so much pressure that the stick broke.
▪ To his disappointment, Bessie and Edgebone were already sitting there enjoying the night air.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
ad
▪ He has aired radio ads in Iowa, whose caucuses are a mere three years away.
▪ So far, only Black Entertainment Television has accepted and aired the 60-second ads.
▪ But as they viciously attacked one another, Feingold aired clever and humorous ads that won wide acclaim.
commercial
▪ Nor is an anti-abortion candidate who aired graphic television commercials with footage of dismembered fetuses.
▪ The station repeatedly aired a commercial for the tape.
▪ Clinton has already staged dry-runs in 20 media markets, airing three 30-second television commercials last June at a cost of.
complaint
▪ Tired of this paternalistic and oppressive regime, Beida students aired their complaints over several evenings in mid-December.
grievance
▪ The journalists can ask their questions direct and can also air any grievances or problems in an informal atmosphere.
▪ This meeting was to air grievances and ease our transition into the future.
opinion
▪ And she used her limited telephone privileges to air her opinions live on a local radio talk show.
show
▪ The show will air at 11 p. m. Monday through Thursday.
▪ For years marginal radio stations paid the rent with late-night or Sunday-morning preacher shows, which they aired for cash up front.
▪ Interviews done in the week after the shows aired found dramatic increases in awareness and understanding of medical issues surrounding both topics.
television
▪ Nor is an anti-abortion candidate who aired graphic television commercials with footage of dismembered fetuses.
▪ Her story was aired on national crime-fighter television shows.
▪ Clinton has already staged dry-runs in 20 media markets, airing three 30-second television commercials last June at a cost of.
view
▪ Cabinet meetings were something to be got through, not the place where views were to be aired and decisions reached.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a breath of air/wind
▪ Scarcely a breath of air disturbed the stillness of the day.
▪ It had been a very cold but bright morning, without a breath of wind.
▪ Not a breath of air disturbs the tranquil spectacle.
▪ Ramsey presumably leant out for a breath of air.
▪ The moon was hidden under a veil of clouds, and there was not a breath of wind.
▪ There was complete silence and not even a breath of wind disturbed the peace.
▪ There was not a breath of wind blowing, and not a leaf or blade of grass stirred.
▪ There was scarcely a breath of wind.
a breath of fresh air
▪ I'm going outside for a breath of fresh air.
▪ Moving to this big apartment was like a breath of fresh air.
▪ As I say, we must introduce a breath of fresh air into the inspection system.
▪ Comes to corner of the street for a breath of fresh air.
▪ His condition is fine and he went out for a breath of fresh air.
▪ Lawrence has proved a master of communication and a breath of fresh air to North-East sportswriters.
▪ Steve Forbes is a breath of fresh air to the process.
▪ Undoubtedly to the disappointment of the leakers, Inman came through the whole affair like a breath of fresh air.
▪ We need a breath of fresh air in school inspections.
▪ You really want to turn around and get a breath of fresh air.
a martyred look/expression/air etc
▪ He did not reply, but got into the car glumly, with a martyred air.
a nip in the air
air/sea power
▪ The outcome will be decided by air power.
▪ But the escalating crisis may now force Western leaders to use military air power to protect relief efforts.
▪ For Mahan sea power was critical, for Mackinder a particular land mass.
▪ Government air power has prevented the rebels from attacking N'Djamena directly.
▪ Robert sat nearby doing a term paper on the history of air power.
▪ Strategic air power had all but won the Second World War.
▪ The cheapest and simplest method will be the air powered sponge filter.
▪ The most difficult strategic question was whether sea power was any longer the foundation upon which the Three Pillars could continue to stand.
castles in the air
▪ Hugh Bawn's high-tech castles in the air.
▪ That, says McKinsey, is because they spend money where it is needed rather than on grand castles in the air.
disappear/vanish into thin air
▪ As happened during and after the first war of independence, the money has disappeared into thin air.
▪ It was almost as if he'd vanished into thin air.
▪ Maybe each and every one of them had vanished into thin air.
▪ The Cheshire cat is an odd character and he causes confusion when he literally disappears into thin air.
▪ The money which has suddenly and mysteriously become available simply vanishes into thin air as Ruggiero Miletti magically reappears.
▪ Victor and his kidnappers had disappeared into thin air.
▪ Yet he seemed to disappear into thin air.
▪ You can tell these mysterious trails were not made yesterday, because of the way they seem to disappear into thin air.
fresh air
Fresh air isn't necessarily better for you, but it will certainly make you feel better.
▪ I'm just going outside for a breath of fresh air.
▪ I leave the window open at night to get some fresh air.
▪ Let's go outside and get some fresh air.
▪ Open the window and let's get some fresh air in here!
▪ By then I had stepped outside to get some fresh air, away from the stifling smoke and heat of the temple.
▪ Feeling in dire need of fresh air, Ellie went outside into the grounds.
▪ Filmer could go in and out of the Westin without a sniff of fresh air, and probably had.
▪ He bad to sit in his beret and coat, for she needed fresh air.
▪ He talked about fresh air and fresh starts.
▪ Remove excess hair around the ear canal, as this tend to collect wax and restrict fresh air.
▪ Too diluted by the fresh air.
▪ Undoubtedly to the disappointment of the leakers, Inman came through the whole affair like a breath of fresh air.
keep several/too many etc balls in the air
out of thin air
▪ He found rhymes irresistible, and produced them out of thin air, just for the fun of it.
▪ Ray picks a number out of thin air -- generally below wholesale -- and the deal is done.
▪ The juice landed on the floor like a red bubbly snake, a bad omen suddenly materializing out of thin air.
road-rage/air-rage etc
television/sports/fresh-air etc fiend
the open air
▪ An 1874 picture by one Dudley P.. Flanders shows a circus performing in the open air in Tucson.
▪ Discomfort in the open air was far preferable to him.
▪ For example in the open air or where a temporary problem necessitates urgent remedy.
▪ Generally the passengers camped and sat out in the open air.
▪ It sometimes comes on in the open air.
▪ Some continued to preach in the open air, in streets or in the fields.
▪ The two of them were sitting at a table in the open air.
▪ The world, her world, no longer accommodated pleasure parties in the open air.
water-borne/sea-borne/air-borne etc
wind/air/water resistance
▪ A 3-phase 15° step-angle variable-reluctance motor has a rated phase current 01 2.0A and a phase winding resistance of 5.0 ohms.
▪ A car that squats low meets less wind resistance.
▪ If you want to lower the wind resistance on a car body how low do you want to get it?
▪ Naturally the water resistance was less, but modern tanning processes have improved leathers considerably.
▪ The actual path taken by the orbiter is complex and designed to minimize the effect of air resistance on the craft.
▪ This holds precisely because all objects fall at the same speed under gravity. Air resistance is being ignored here.
with your nose in the air
▪ She just walked past with her nose in the air.
▪ Standing with their noses in the air.
you could cut the atmosphere/air/tension with a knife
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I hung the blankets on the clothesline to air them out.
▪ Stahl's report is scheduled to air tonight after the news.
▪ The newsconference will be aired live at 7 p.m.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Concerns that were aired by many transit executives last month were just a big bureaucratic misunderstanding, says Rep.
▪ He talked about events in the Middle Ages as if they'd happened-yesterday and been fully aired on the nine o'clock news.
▪ It had probably been the only one aired and ready for the unexpected guest this morning.
▪ So far, only Black Entertainment Television has accepted and aired the 60-second ads.
▪ The music that's finally being aired, fifty years on.
▪ Voters deserve an opportunity to hear unpleasant alternatives fully debated and aired.
Wikipedia

Air (classical element)

Air (also sometimes called Wind) is often seen as a universal power or pure substance. Its fundamental importance to life can be seen in words such as aspire, inspire, perspire and spirit, all derived from the Latinspirare.

Air (music)

An air (; also ayr, ayre in French) is various song-like vocal or instrumental compositions, and can also be applied to the interchangeable melodies of folk songs and ballads. It is a variant of the musical song form often referred to (in opera, cantata and oratorio) as aria.

Air (singer)

AIR is a name under which Kōji Kurumatani (車谷浩司) releases his songs. He started AIR two months after SPIRAL LIFE broke up in April 1996. His work is noted for lyrics that take on social issues and politics, and can be classified as alternative rock.

Air (disambiguation)

Air is the name given to the Earth's atmosphere.

Air may also refer to:

Air (Agua de Annique album)

Air is the debut album of the band Agua de Annique formed by the former The Gathering vocalist Anneke van Giersbergen. The album is a pop/rock oriented album and was released in 2007. Anneke van Giersbergen also plays piano on the album.

Air (comics)

Air was an ongoing comic book series published by DC Comics as part of the Vertigo imprint. It was created by writer G. Willow Wilson and artist M. K. Perker.

Air (French band)

Air is a music duo from Versailles, France, consisting of Nicolas Godin and Jean-Benoît Dunckel.

Air's debut EP, Premiers Symptômes, was followed by the critically acclaimed album Moon Safari, the re-release of Premiers Symptômes, The Virgin Suicides score, and subsequently albums 10 000 Hz Legend, Everybody Hertz, Talkie Walkie, Pocket Symphony, Love 2 and Le voyage dans la lune.

Air (free jazz trio)

Air was a Chicago-based free jazz trio founded in 1971 by saxophone player, Henry Threadgill, double bassist, Fred Hopkins, and drummer, Steve McCall. They combined radical free improvisation with a strong sense of tune and equal emphasis on each instrument in the group.

They began when Threadgill was asked by Columbia College in Chicago, Illinois, to arrange a number of Scott Joplin songs. Joplin was so strongly associated with piano that the musicians enjoyed the challenge of performing his trademark songs without piano. They opted to play them as rags and as a basis for jazz improvisation.

The group recorded twelve albums, among them Air Lore from 1979 on the Arista/Novus label of Arista Records, which is a recording of improvisations over more Scott Joplin songs as well as selections by Jelly Roll Morton and a Henry Threadgill original. It remains a classic. Other albums of note are Air Time from 1977, and 80° Below '82 from 1982. The Penguin Guide to Jazz included Air Song and Air Time in its suggested "Core Collection."

Air broke up and reformed several times, and after McCall's death Andrew Cyrille performed as part of the trio. They released two CDs with drummer, Pheeroan Aklaff, as "New Air" (on Black Saint).

Air (visual novel)

Air is a Japanese adult visual novel developed by Key released on September 8, 2000 for Windows PCs. Key later released versions of Air without the erotic content, and the game was ported to the Dreamcast, PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable. The story follows the life of Yukito Kunisaki, a traveling showman searching for the "girl in the sky". He arrives in a quiet, seaside town where he meets three girls, one of whom is the key to the end of his journey.

The gameplay in Air follows a branching plot line which offers pre-determined scenarios with courses of interaction, and focuses on the appeal of the three female main characters by the player character. The game is divided into three segments—Dream, Summer, and Air—which serve as different phases in the overall story. The title of the game reflects the prominent themes of the air, skies, and use of wings throughout gameplay. The game ranked as the best-selling PC game sold in Japan for the time of its release, and charted in the national top 50 several more times afterwards. Air has sold over 300,000 units across several platforms.

Following the game's release, Air made several transitions into other media. A manga by Yukimaru Katsura was serialized in Kadokawa Shoten's Comptiq, and later published into two volumes. Comic anthologies and art books were also published, as were audio dramas and several albums of music. Kyoto Animation produced a 13-episode anime television series and a two-episode anime mini-series in 2005, and Toei Animation produced an anime film in 2005. The anime adaptations are licensed by Funimation who released them in North America.

Air (1971 album)

Air was an American jazz rock band. Their self-titled debut album was released in 1971 on Embryo Records (Cat. SD 733). The four core band members were Tom Coppola ( Hammond organ), John Siegler (bass), Mark Rosengarden (drums), and Googie Coppola (piano, vocals). The album also featured Randy Brecker on trumpet, Michael Brecker on saxophone, Barry Rogers on trombone, David Earle Johnson on congas and timbales, Robert Kogel on guitar, Bob Rosengarden on vibes, plus Jan Hammer and Herbie Mann on percussion. Herbie Mann was also the producer.

AIR (nightclub)

AIR was a 2,000 capacity superclub located in Digbeth, Birmingham in England. AIR originally started out life as a spray shop for buses, when in 2000 the building was bought by Godskitchen and converted into a club, originally named CODE. In 2003, CODE had a complete refit and was renamed AIR, with an extra room of music being added to the two already in use. The club features state-of-the-art lighting and sound systems and in addition to Saturday nights Godskitchen AIR has hosted parties by Helter Skelter, Babooshka, Polysexual, Raveology, Hardcore Til I Die & Atomic Jam.

AIR is situated in an area of Digbeth synonymous with club culture, the "Custard Factory Quarter", named after the nearby Custard Factory, a centre for music and arts. Adjacent to the Custard Factory is the HMV Institute (formerly the Digbeth Institute), the original home of Godskitchen.

The 20-year lease contract originally taken out by Angel Music Group still remains in place but since 6 May 2012 the club has remained closed due to the slow demise of the Godskitchen brand caused mainly by a lack of direction and leadership and the high costs imposed by the Custard Factory landlords making it far cheaper to keep the doors closed than to open them.

Godskitchen has since moved to several different venues including the HMV Institute (its original home prior to Code opening in 2000), The Rainbow Warehouse textile factory and Boxxed in search of a new home for its brand and loyal fanbase

Category:Nightclubs in Birmingham, West Midlands

Air (novel)

Air, also known as Air: Or, Have Not Have, is a 2005 novel by Geoff Ryman. It won the British Science Fiction Association Award, the James Tiptree, Jr. Award, and the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and was on the short list for the Philip K. Dick Award in 2004, the Nebula Award in 2005, and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award in 2006.

Ryman initially wrote a short story for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction entitled "Have Not Have", which was included in the April 2001 edition (later reprinted in the June 2014 issue of Clarkesworld Magazine). This was expanded into a novel initially titled Air: Or, Have Not Have, and renamed to just Air in all editions since the first.

Air (2005 film)

Air is a 2005 Japanese anime drama film directed by Osamu Dezaki and written by Makoto Nakamura based on the visual novel Air by Key. Originally, the film was set for a release date in autumn 2004, but was delayed; the film finally premiered in Japanese theaters on February 5, 2005. The film, animated by Toei Animation, is a reinterpretation of the original Air storyline which centers on the story arc of the female lead Misuzu Kamio. Yukito Kunisaki arrives in the town of Kami for a chance to earn money at the summer festival and meets Misuzu on his first day in town. They soon become friends and a story one thousand years old begins to unfold.

Before going to DVD, a thirty-minute sample of the film was streamed online by Animate between June 2 and June 16, 2005 two weeks later. The film was later sold on DVD and released in three editions: the Collector's Edition, the Special Edition, and the Regular Edition on August 5, 2005. The Air film was licensed for English language distribution by ADV Films and was released on December 11, 2007. The license of the film was transferred to Funimation in July 2008 who will continue to release the film in North America. To commemorate the release of the Clannad film, Animate streamed the Air film on their website which was split into three parts.

AIR (program)

AIR (Automated Image Registration) is a program suite for volume-based image registration constructed by Roger P. Woods from UCLA School of Medicine. It reads and writes Analyze volume files and can work with 4x4 transformation matrices stored in its own file format with the filename extension .air.

It is especially designed for neuroimaging applications and has primarily been used in research-oriented functional neuroimaging with brain scans from positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance scanners.

The suite provides a number of programs for image registration with different transformation models, such as rigid-body, affine and nonlinear warping. For example, for affine transformation the registration from one brain scan to another may be found with the alignlinear program and written to the special air-file that stores the transformation matrix. The transformation may be inverted with the invert_air program and the volume may finally be resliced and interpolated with the reslice program.

Air (Maillol)

Air is a lead or bronze sculpture, by Aristide Maillol.

He modeled Dina Vierny in plaster in 1938, and casts were made after his death. It is an edition of six. Examples are located at the Kröller-Müller Museum, Yale University Art Gallery, Jardin des Tuileries, J. Paul Getty Museum, Norton Simon Museum, and Kimbell Art Museum.

Air (painting)

Air ...is a painting created by Flemish painter Jan van Kessel (1626-1679) and was painted around the year 1647. It is a part of the permanent collection at the Flint Institute of Arts.

Air (Tyson Ritter song)

"Air" is a song by American singer-songwriter Tyson Ritter of the rock band The All-American Rejects, released as a solo song on November 5, 2013.

Air (2015 film)

Air is an American post-apocalyptic film produced by Skybound Entertainment. It was directed by Christian Cantamessa. The film stars Norman Reedus, Djimon Hounsou, and Sandrine Holt. It was released on August 14, 2015 in the United States.

Air (Cecil Taylor album)

Air is an album by Cecil Taylor recorded for the Candid label in October 1960. The album features performances by Taylor with Archie Shepp, Buell Neidlinger, Denis Charles and Sunny Murray on alternate takes of material released on The World of Cecil Taylor (1960). The Allmusic review by Brian Olewnick states "One can only imagine what the reaction of the average jazz fan was in 1960 when this session was recorded. This is a wonderful document from early in Taylor's career, when he was midway between modernist approaches to standard material and his own radical experiments that would come to full fruition a few years hence... A classic recording that belongs in anyone's collection".

Air (Stargate Universe)

"Air" is the three-part opening episode of the military science fiction television series Stargate Universe. The first two parts aired on Syfy in the United States on October 2, 2009, while the third part aired on October 9. In Canada, SPACE aired the first two in tandem with Syfy. Sky1 broadcast the first two parts on October 6, and the third on October 13, whilst Sci Fi Australia aired the two-parter on October 9, and the third part on October 16. "Air" was written by series creators Robert C. Cooper and Brad Wright, and was directed by Andy Mikita.

In the episode a group of evacuees from Icarus Base, an offworld human outpost that fell under attack end up on the Destiny, an Ancient starship located several billion light-years from Earth. Their first problems involve the ship's failing life support system, where the new crew are tasked to fix it. The episode features some of the well known characters from Stargate SG-1, a previous series in the Stargate franchise. Parts of the third part are filmed on location in White Sands, New Mexico, which doubles as a desert planet. The first two parts were given generally positive reviews, mainly commending the cast and the style of the episode. The premiere was seen by over 2.3 million Americans, and was considered a ratings success in Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Air

Air \Air\ ([^a]r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Aired ([^a]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Airing.] [See Air, n., and cf. A[eum]rate.]

  1. To expose to the air for the purpose of cooling, refreshing, or purifying; to ventilate; as, to air a room.

    It were good wisdom . . . that the jail were aired.
    --Bacon.

    Were you but riding forth to air yourself.
    --Shak.

  2. To expose for the sake of public notice; to display ostentatiously; as, to air one's opinion.

    Airing a snowy hand and signet gem.
    --Tennyson.

  3. To expose to heat, for the purpose of expelling dampness, or of warming; as, to air linen; to air liquors.

Air

Air \Air\ ([^a]r), n. [OE. air, eir, F. air, L. a["e]r, fr. Gr. 'ah`r, air, mist, for 'a[digamma]hr, fr. root 'a[digamma] to blow, breathe, probably akin to E. wind. In sense 10 the French has taking a meaning fr. It. aria atmosphere, air, fr. the same Latin word; and in senses 11, 12, 13 the French meaning is either fr. L. aria, or due to confusion with F. aire, in an older sense of origin, descent. Cf. A["e]ry, Debonair, Malaria, Wind.]

  1. The fluid which we breathe, and which surrounds the earth; the atmosphere. It is invisible, inodorous, insipid, transparent, compressible, elastic, and ponderable.

    Note: By the ancient philosophers, air was regarded as an element; but modern science has shown that it is essentially a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen, with a small amount of carbon dioxide, the average proportions being, by volume: oxygen, 20.96 per cent.; nitrogen, 79.00 per cent.; carbon dioxide, 0.04 per cent. These proportions are subject to a very slight variability. Air also always contains some vapor of water.

  2. Symbolically: Something unsubstantial, light, or volatile. ``Charm ache with air.''
    --Shak.

    He was still all air and fire. [Air and fire being the finer and quicker elements as opposed to earth and water.]
    --Macaulay .

  3. A particular state of the atmosphere, as respects heat, cold, moisture, etc., or as affecting the sensations; as, a smoky air, a damp air, the morning air, etc.

  4. Any a["e]riform body; a gas; as, oxygen was formerly called vital air. [Obs.]

  5. Air in motion; a light breeze; a gentle wind.

    Let vernal airs through trembling osiers play.
    --Pope.

  6. Odoriferous or contaminated air.

  7. That which surrounds and influences.

    The keen, the wholesome air of poverty.
    --Wordsworth.

  8. Utterance abroad; publicity; vent.

    You gave it air before me.
    --Dryden.

  9. Intelligence; information. [Obs.]
    --Bacon.

  10. (Mus.)

    1. A musical idea, or motive, rhythmically developed in consecutive single tones, so as to form a symmetrical and balanced whole, which may be sung by a single voice to the stanzas of a hymn or song, or even to plain prose, or played upon an instrument; a melody; a tune; an aria.

    2. In harmonized chorals, psalmody, part songs, etc., the part which bears the tune or melody -- in modern harmony usually the upper part -- is sometimes called the air.

  11. The peculiar look, appearance, and bearing of a person; mien; demeanor; as, the air of a youth; a heavy air; a lofty air. ``His very air.''
    --Shak.

  12. Peculiar appearance; apparent character; semblance; manner; style. It was communicated with the air of a secret. --Pope. 12. pl. An artificial or affected manner; show of pride or vanity; haughtiness; as, it is said of a person, he puts on airs. --Thackeray. 14. (Paint.)

    1. The representation or reproduction of the effect of the atmospheric medium through which every object in nature is viewed.
      --New Am. Cyc.

    2. Carriage; attitude; action; movement; as, the head of that portrait has a good air. --Fairholt. 15. (Man.) The artificial motion or carriage of a horse. Note: Air is much used adjectively or as the first part of a compound term. In most cases it might be written indifferently, as a separate limiting word, or as the first element of the compound term, with or without the hyphen; as, air bladder, air-bladder, or airbladder; air cell, air-cell, or aircell; air-pump, or airpump. Air balloon. See Balloon. Air bath.

      1. An apparatus for the application of air to the body.

      2. An arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature. Air castle. See Castle in the air, under Castle. Air compressor, a machine for compressing air to be used as a motive power. Air crossing, a passage for air in a mine. Air cushion, an air-tight cushion which can be inflated; also, a device for arresting motion without shock by confined air. Air fountain, a contrivance for producing a jet of water by the force of compressed air. Air furnace, a furnace which depends on a natural draft and not on blast. Air line, a straight line; a bee line. Hence Air-line, adj.; as, air-line road. Air lock (Hydr. Engin.), an intermediate chamber between the outer air and the compressed-air chamber of a pneumatic caisson. --Knight. Air port (Nav.), a scuttle or porthole in a ship to admit air. Air spring, a spring in which the elasticity of air is utilized. Air thermometer, a form of thermometer in which the contraction and expansion of air is made to measure changes of temperature. Air threads, gossamer. Air trap, a contrivance for shutting off foul air or gas from drains, sewers, etc.; a stench trap. Air trunk, a pipe or shaft for conducting foul or heated air from a room. Air valve, a valve to regulate the admission or egress of air; esp. a valve which opens inwardly in a steam boiler and allows air to enter. Air way, a passage for a current of air; as the air way of an air pump; an air way in a mine. In the air.

        1. Prevalent without traceable origin or authority, as rumors.

        2. Not in a fixed or stable position; unsettled.

    3. (Mil.) Unsupported and liable to be turned or taken in flank; as, the army had its wing in the air.

      on the air, currently transmitting; live; -- used of radio and television broadcasts, to indicate that the images and sounds being picked up by cameras and microphones are being broadcast at the present moment.

      Note: In call-in programs where individuals outside a radio or television studio have telephoned into the station, when their voice is being directly broadcast, the host of the program commonly states ``You're on the air.'' as a warning that the conversation is not private.

      To take air, to be divulged; to be made public.

      To take the air, to go abroad; to walk or ride out.

Wiktionary

air

n. 1 (context uncountable historical astrology alchemy science English) The atmospheric substance above the surface of the earth which animals breathe, formerly considered to be a single substance, one of the four basic elements of ancient philosophy and one of the five basic elements of several Eastern traditions. 2 (context uncountable physics meteorology English) That substance, now understood as the mixture of gases comprising the earth's atmosphere. 3 (context usually with the English) The apparently open space above the ground; the mass of this substance around the earth. 4 A breeze; a gentle wind. 5 A feeling or sense. 6 A sense of poise, graciousness, or quality. 7 (context usually plural English) pretentious; snobby; pretence that one is better than others. vb. 1 To bring (something) into contact with the air, so as to freshen or dry it. 2 To let fresh air into a room or a building, to ventilate. 3 To discuss varying viewpoints on a given topic. 4 To broadcast, as with a television show.

WordNet

air

  1. v. expose to fresh air; "aerate your old sneakers" [syn: air out, aerate]

  2. be broadcast; "This show will air Saturdays at 2 P.M."

  3. broadcast over the airwaves, as in radio or television; "We cannot air this X-rated song" [syn: send, broadcast, beam, transmit]

  4. make public; "She aired her opinions on welfare" [syn: publicize, publicise, bare]

  5. expose to warm or heated air, so as to dry; "Air linen"

  6. expose to cool or cold air so as to cool or freshen; "air the old winter clothes"; "air out the smoke-filled rooms" [syn: vent, ventilate, air out]

air

adj. relating to or characteristic of or occurring in the air; "air war"; "air safety"; "air travel" [syn: air(a)] [ant: land(a), sea(a)]

air

  1. n. a mixture of gases (especially oxygen) required for breathing; the stuff that the wind consists of; "air pollution"; "a smell of chemicals in the air"; "open a window and let in some air"; "I need some fresh air"

  2. travel via aircraft; "air travel involves too much waiting in airports"; "if you've time to spare go by air" [syn: air travel, aviation]

  3. the region above the ground; "her hand stopped in mid air"; "he threw the ball into the air"

  4. medium for radio and television broadcasting; "the program was on the air from 9 til midnight"; "the president used the airwaves to take his message to the people" [syn: airwave]

  5. a slight wind (usually refreshing); "the breeze was cooled by the lake"; "as he waited he could feel the air on his neck" [syn: breeze, zephyr, gentle wind]

  6. a distinctive but intangible quality surrounding a person or thing; "an air of mystery"; "the house had a neglected air"; "an atmosphere of defeat pervaded the candidate's headquarters"; "the place had an aura of romance" [syn: aura, atmosphere]

  7. the mass of air surrounding the Earth; "there was great heat as the comet entered the atmosphere"; "it was exposed to the air" [syn: atmosphere]

  8. a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence; "she was humming an air from Beethoven" [syn: tune, melody, strain, melodic line, line, melodic phrase]

  9. once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles)

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

air

"to expose to open air," 1520s, from air (n.1). Figurative sense of "to expose, make public" is from 1610s of objects, 1862 of opinions, grievances, etc. Meaning "to broadcast" (originally on radio) is from 1933. Related: Aired; airing.

air

c.1300, "invisible gases that make up the atmosphere," from Old French air "atmosphere, breeze, weather" (12c.), from Latin aerem (nominative aer) "air, lower atmosphere, sky," from Greek aer (genitive aeros) "air" (related to aenai "to blow, breathe"), which is of unknown origin, possibly from a base *awer- and thus related to aeirein "to raise" and arteria "windpipe, artery" (see aorta) on notion of "lifting, that which rises." In Homer mostly "thick air, mist;" later "air" as one of the four elements.\n

\nWords for "air" in Indo-European languages tend to be associated with wind, brightness, sky. In English, air replaced native lyft, luft (see loft (n.)). To be in the air "in general awareness" is from 1875; up in the air "uncertain, doubtful" is from 1752. To build castles in the air is from 1590s (in 17c. English had airmonger "one preoccupied with visionary projects"). Broadcasting sense (as in on the air) first recorded 1927. To give (someone) the air "dismiss" is from 1900. Air pollution is attested by 1870.

air

1590s, "manner, appearance" (as in an air of mystery); 1650s, "assumed manner, affected appearance" (especially in phrase put on airs, 1781), from French air "look, appearance, mien, bearing, tone" (Old French aire "reality, essence, nature, descent, extraction," 12c.; compare debonair), from Latin ager "place, field" (see acre) on notion of "place of origin."\n

\nBut some French sources connect this Old French word with the source of air (n.1), and it also is possible these senses in English developed from or were influenced by air (n.1); compare sense development of atmosphere and Latin spiritus "breath, breeze," also "high spirit, pride," and the extended senses of anima.

air

"melody, tune," 1580s, from Italian aria (see aria).

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "air".

At any rate she had a jesting air, and the bystanders noticed that she pronounced the words of her abjuration with a smile.

Val died, his gardens were abloom with chrysanthemums, the air golden, the oaks in his yard sculpted against a hard blue sky.

A mosquito bite, a cut, or the slightest abrasion, serves for lodgment of the poison with which the air seems to be filled.

Conal now sat on its sculpted door, and absently traced a slender finger along an air intake, glowering at the envelope.

Their theory is confirmed by the cases in which two mixed substances occupy a greater space than either singly, especially a space equal to the conjoined extent of each: for, as they point out, in an absolute interpenetration the infusion of the one into the other would leave the occupied space exactly what it was before and, where the space occupied is not increased by the juxtaposition, they explain that some expulsion of air has made room for the incoming substance.

The evening air had cooled considerably, and Ace sat hunched close to the campfire.

She ached to be outside in the fresh air, to be dressed in her oldest jeans, turning over spades full of soft loamy earth, feeling the excitement and pleasure of siting the bulbs, of allowing her imagination to paint for her the colourful picture they would make in the spring, in their uniform beds set among lawn pathways and bordered by a long deep border of old-fashioned perennial plants.

The panic backed up into his throat, leaving an acidy taste in his mouth and a lump obstructing his air.

In the commons Sir Robert Peel threw himself, acrimoniously, and with all his energy, into this controversy, and used all the exploded arguments of the protectionists with the air of one who for the first time urged them upon the house.

Then, for the first time, I felt acutely the coolness, motion, and dampness of the surrounding air.

In the strategic confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union, the adequacy of air defences was a vital issue.

Although I had much ado to refrain from laughing at the vexation and disappointment which appeared on all their faces, I succeeded in preserving my serious air.

She pulled her shawl closer around her against the chilly air and returned to the adobe house.

Fortune had made an actor of him, and he looked wretched enough, while I, the adventurer, had a prosperous air.

Sure that the sigh of Ammon came from air within the adytum beneath, Ravion had gone to the temple and burned a special preparation.