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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

ear

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an ear/eye infection
▪ She was given antibiotics for an ear infection.
cauliflower ear
deaf in one ear
▪ The illness left her deaf in one ear.
ear drops
ear lobe
ear of corn (=the top part of this plant where the seeds grow)
▪ an ear of corn
ear trumpet
fell on unresponsive ears (=was not listened to)
▪ His warning fell on unresponsive ears.
grin from ear to ear (=grin very widely)
grin from ear to ear (=grin very widely)
middle ear
play it by ear
▪ We’ll see what the weather’s like and play it by ear.
strain your ears/eyes (=try very hard to hear or see)
▪ I strained my ears, listening for any sound in the silence of the cave.
sympathetic ear (=someone willing to listen to someone else’s problems)
▪ We hope always to provide a friendly sympathetic ear.
the discerning eye/ear (=someone who can make good judgments about art or music)
to the untutored eye/ear/mind
▪ To the untutored ear, this music sounds as if it might have been written by Beethoven.
whispered in...ear
▪ ‘I’ve missed you,’ he whispered in her ear.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
deaf
▪ How could people turn a blind eye or a deaf ear to the horrors that they suffered?
▪ The race committee turned a deaf ear to the objections of Amelia and the other fliers.
▪ Arguments that some of the skills practised by pupils are obsolete fall on deaf ears, or are heeded only very slowly.
▪ Invitations by Paredes to the various governors to second his plan fell on deaf ears.
▪ In such cases, tests show that only the ear on the side of the blue eye is deaf.
▪ Fine words, but they are falling on increasingly deaf and indifferent ears.
▪ They formulated a programme of demands, but these fell on deaf ears in Petrograd.
▪ But my suggestions fell on deaf ears.
inner
▪ I could not deny what I heard with my inner ear.
▪ Now that Kwong could see, he found redness in the inner ear, a sign of infection.
▪ There are various causes of damage to the inner ear - for example, exposure to loud noise.
▪ Vibrations or sound waves cause the eardrum to vibrate and these vibrations move through the middle ear to the inner ear.
▪ As age increases, the inner ear becomes less sensitive to high frequencies.
▪ In the inner ear they are changed into electrical messages.
▪ The head vein is dotted, the labyrinth of the inner ear is black.
▪ I heard in my inner ear what I wanted to hear and the rest ... well, it went down!
left
▪ In his left ear he wore a small ring.
▪ He wore a blue baseball cap backward and a gold hoop in his left ear.
▪ Then he leaned forward and whispered something into his left ear.
▪ A cherry bomb had blown up near her left ear when she was eight years old.
▪ She dug the nail of her little finger deeply in behind the left ear.
▪ Tilt the head until your left ear is over the left shoulder, then release.
▪ The knot in his tie was somewhere up behind his left ear.
▪ The bloody gash behind his left ear had been cut with a machete.
middle
▪ When the cause of deafness is not solely in the outer and/or middle ear, high frequencies are likely to be affected.
▪ In fact, an ear infection alone can cause sudden severe pain as fluid builds up in the middle ear.
▪ Removal can cause unnecessary complications to the middle and internal ear.
▪ Vibrations or sound waves cause the eardrum to vibrate and these vibrations move through the middle ear to the inner ear.
▪ Mean hearing thresholds are related mainly to the presence or absence of fluid in the middle ear.
▪ Three rats in the low fibre diet group suffered from middle ear infections and were removed from the study.
▪ An inflammation in the middle ear called otitis media can cause temporary or even permanent hearing loss.
▪ Microtympanometry, a sensitive method of diagnosing effusions of the middle ear, could help them in this.
right
▪ Luckily the timely intervention of Trevor Proby's left boot into my right ear quickened everyone's resolve to reach a compromise.
▪ He slammed one callused finger into his right ear.
▪ Her biro was stuck behind her right ear.
▪ Jack settled next to my right ear after giving the cab a brief whirl or two.
▪ He was due to be put down because he did not have the right ears for a show class pedigree corgi.
▪ He lowered the volume inside his right ear and made the few careful steps from his room into the hall.
▪ From her right ear there dangled a long silver cascade of tiny orbs.
▪ Next to her right ear she could hear his breath, a shallow snuffle.
sympathetic
▪ His profession would surely mean that he would listen to my request with a sympathetic ear.
▪ For all of its own bureaucratic strictures, the diplomatic corps had the sympathetic ears that Liang was looking for.
▪ The general wards were packed with acute cases and, although I received a sympathetic ear, no one really wanted to know.
▪ If disaster strikes again, he expects to find a sympathetic ear at the White House.
▪ Our sinister cop is able to exploit that weakness by offering a sympathetic ear.
▪ She offers advice, information and sometimes just a sympathetic ear to worried pet owners of Cleveland.
▪ There had always been a sympathetic ear for her clients, and she longed to pour out all her troubles right away.
▪ I dread having to go through the sympathetic ear act, even when it's merited.
■ NOUN
glue
▪ Adenoidectomy will considerably reduce the overall duration of glue ear.
▪ Finally, parents of children with glue ear should be advised to stop smoking.
▪ Discussion Our previous work and that of others has shown the spontaneous resolution of glue ear in the short term.
▪ Our study shows the long term spontaneous resolution of severe glue ear in children.
▪ They base their recommendations on an analysis of 19 randomised controlled trials that examined the effectiveness of surgical interventions for glue ear.
▪ I recommend that anyone interested in glue ear should read it, but carefully.
▪ Successful treatment of glue ear by attention to underlying allergic disease has been previously reported.
▪ The combined adenoidectomy and ventilation tube groups had the shortest duration of glue ear.
infection
▪ Ears and nose produce a horrible, stinking, green discharge; ear infection with rupture and suppuration.
▪ The single-dose ceftriaxone treatment has not yet been approved for ear infections by the Food and Drug Administration.
▪ The best approach is to use acute remedies as soon as the ear infection starts.
▪ In fact, an ear infection alone can cause sudden severe pain as fluid builds up in the middle ear.
▪ She had an ear infection and she told the doctor, but it was the first I'd heard of it.
▪ A lingering ear infection got him grounded.
▪ Take care to be gentle, since these ear infections are intensely irritating and painful.
▪ Additionally, many people report stomach upsets, ear infections and rashes after coming into contact with the lake water.
lobe
▪ Weapons and other devices hung within his blood-red, high-collared cloak; and a communicator dangled from one ear lobe.
▪ He tugged his ear lobe, our agreed sign for the other to remain silent.
▪ Nicola moved her lips along Richard's neck and nuzzled his ear lobe delicately.
▪ He studied the Gascon's dark effete face and the jewel-encrusted pearl which swung arrogantly from one ear lobe.
■ VERB
believe
▪ Scarcely able to believe his ears, Ramsay listened to this shameful catalogue.
▪ I can not believe my ears.
▪ I couldn't believe my ears but she repeated it: I realized I had not properly understood my own needs.
▪ I could hardly believe my ears.
▪ But she could believe her ears.
▪ But ministry specialists believe that ear tags will be compulsory for all lambs exported for slaughter.
▪ Mr Dixon could hardly believe his ears as Hank poured into them the story of the book and its apparent success.
bend
▪ These professional persuaders will spend an estimated two million pounds to bend the ears of the governing party.
▪ And there she would bend and put an ear to the earth.
▪ I think some of the older managers and tenants have been bending his ear a bit about the problems of setting up catering.
close
▪ Sleep, he heard a voice say, close by his ear.
▪ He tried to close his ears to the plea.
▪ Don't close your ears to the world and don't give up.
▪ I closed my ears and tried to close my mind to what was happening.
▪ She wanted to close her ears to it.
▪ I had lost two teeth, one eye was closed, and an ear torn.
▪ At first, I closed my ears to what I did not want to hear.
▪ A girl couldn't close her eyes and ears to it, but she could keep herself pure.
cover
▪ She slid her hands round her head from covering her ears to covering her eyes.
▪ I tried to cover my ears with them.
▪ Without the hair covering the ears and that shell belt and all he wasn't some one you would stare at.
▪ She knew, and covered her ears with her fists to keep from hearing them come from his mouth.
▪ Pooley covered his ears. 14 Small Dave lay in his hospital bed for some days before the doctors released him.
▪ Then you saw how long his hair was, almost covering his ears, and how clean-shaved looking his face was.
▪ They laughed, stopped playing and covered their ears.
cut
▪ Hair is cut to the ears and the fringe finger ruffled.
▪ Then cut off all the ears and stick them all on a piece of paper.
▪ The man's throat had been cut from ear to ear, soaking his shirt and trousers in blood.
▪ Van Gogh cut off his ear.
▪ Artists wear berets and smocks and cut their ears off.
fall
▪ This wide disposition yielded felicitous effects of colour and tone which always fell pleasingly on the ear.
▪ The modulated, rhythmic braying of that mule fell upon his ears.
▪ But his words fell on unresponsive ears.
▪ Invitations by Paredes to the various governors to second his plan fell on deaf ears.
▪ The house is falling down around our ears.
▪ But my suggestions fell on deaf ears.
▪ As he did so, a fine trickle of sawdust appeared to fall from his ear to the floor.
grin
▪ He was grinning from ear to ear and pointing his finger up to the flies.
hear
▪ The government is appealing to business to pick up the slack, but there are few ears to hear.
▪ She strained her ears but could hear nothing.
▪ Next to her right ear she could hear his breath, a shallow snuffle.
▪ Keeping her ears open, she heard the outer door open, then close.
▪ As we talked, we stopped once in a while and strained our ears to hear.
▪ Then, Shit, meant to reach no farther than the chamber where his ears hear his voice from the inside.
keep
▪ All of you - walk around Pentonville and keep your ears open.
▪ You keep putting your ear to the ground, waiting to hear that Warrior jubilee train.
▪ He kept his ear to the ground and he spent a lot of time in his office after hours.
▪ That means keeping one's ears and eyes open, it means not looking away but acting as a witness.
▪ Prosperity came to Knock, as pilgrims came from far and wide; and Father Cavanagh kept his ears.
▪ The man's head was designed to keep his ears apart.
▪ Cousin Noreen had been keeping her ears wide open as usual, and she told him what she'd managed to find out.
▪ Spit down the back, an epileptic fit, a jostling. Keep your ears open.
lend
▪ Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
▪ He finds time for them, always being prepared to lend a sympathetic ear or give some friendly confidential advice.
listen
▪ I listened with the ear of a novelist.
▪ Help us to listen with your ears.
▪ So the priest would listen, ears agog, eyes agape.
▪ How did their results differ when they listened with one ear and with two?
play
▪ Well, she would play it by ear.
▪ The biggest criticism of Suzuki is going from playing by ear to the note-reading process.
▪ I play by ear I use my loaf I suspect fair play.
▪ At 2, he played the piano by ear.
▪ This was one he would have to play by ear.
▪ So each played it by ear, with resulting policy shifts that often appeared to be not only sudden but incomprehensible.
▪ He heard jazz records at home when very young and played piano by ear.
▪ I had started playing by ear and chutzpah.
prick
▪ Henry pushed his door open a crack, and pricked up his ears.
▪ I pricked my ears up on that one.
▪ He pushed back a long, greasy spike of hair that kept slipping down and pricking his ear.
▪ I pricked up my ears, and sure enough, the sound was getting louder.
▪ The horse, scenting home and supper, pricked his ears and stepped out.
▪ The boy pricked up his ears, because, as it happened, so they were this earth.
▪ Yet it was that touring and the inspired mania of their shows that pricked up the ears at Arista Records.
reach
▪ The rumours must have reached Richard's ears - indeed they may have been primarily intended for him.
▪ You give a passage for loving words to reach loving ears.
▪ Even after the Renaissance and the rebirth of learning had reached these shores ears were still having a rough ride.
▪ But the powerful resonance of a marine mammal exhaling through its blowhole again reaches my ears.
▪ Two microphones, one in each ear of a dummy or human head, pick up the sound reaching the ears.
▪ Then ask them to try to tell you how the sound was produced and how it reached their ears.
▪ The noise they said, wouldn't reach the sow's ears, but South Oxfordshire District Council turned the idea down.
▪ It was a rocket, gone the instant the sound reached our ears.
ring
▪ The noise still rang in his ears.
▪ There was a ringing in his ears.
▪ Lucy's advice rang in her ears.
▪ I ended up with ringing ears.
▪ And with those echoes ringing in my ears I booked up my day - and contemplated my fate.
▪ The triumph of their compromise still rang in their ears.
▪ In the end, the men returned with the praises of the generals ringing in their ears.
▪ Another sign of danger is tinnitus, a condition usually characterized by a ringing in the ear after listening.
strain
▪ We crowded round the table, straining our ears for the magic sounds, while Robert adjusted the cat's whisker.
▪ Tak, said the stone against her straining ear.
▪ She strained her ears but could hear nothing.
▪ As we talked, we stopped once in a while and strained our ears to hear.
▪ She spoke softly, directing her remarks exclusively at Karelius and Moreau, so that the others were obliged to strain their ears.
▪ He stood tensed, straining his ears.
▪ She found she was straining her ears for the musical clang of the town church bells.
▪ He - An alien noise stopped her thoughts mid-flow, and she tensed, straining her ears to recapture the sound.
turn
▪ They may display their feelings by refusing to eat, and turning a deaf ear to anyone who calls their name.
▪ The race committee turned a deaf ear to the objections of Amelia and the other fliers.
▪ Nothing for it. Turn a deaf ear, look the other way.
▪ Thus, year after year, working people turn a deaf ear to union entreaties.
▪ She wouldn't be keeping the Law if she turned a deaf ear to the call or ran away from it.
▪ These horses turn their ears sideways, with the opening facing the ground, deliberately, cutting off auditory input.
whisper
▪ And go away they did, only turning back to snap Koo whispering into my ear.
▪ Sometimes when this is whispered in the ears of those near death, tears roll down their cheeks.
▪ Little Billy began to hear somebody whispering in his ear.
▪ She whispers in my ear and hints at marvelous discoveries.
▪ Hillary whispered in his ear and took his speech out of her pocket.
▪ A couple of Negro characters whispered in my ear about tea.
▪ Several people have been whispering in my ear lately about Michael's drug-taking.
▪ The black suited auctioneer was frowning, while whispering in her ear.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(have/drop) a word in sb's ear
▪ A word in the ear of the Weatherfield constabulary.
▪ His resolve ends when again he wakes at dawn with prophetic words in his ears.
▪ If I were you I'd drop a quiet word in her ear before it's too late.
▪ Mixed blessings' A word in your ear.
a clip round the ear/earhole
▪ You might get a clip round the ear.
be music to your ears
▪ Johnson's decision was music to the ears of the Women's Center directors.
▪ Even the deliberate discords were music to her ears.
▪ It was music to his ears.
▪ That was music to their ears as they counted up to twenty-two explosions.
be wet behind the ears
bend sb's ear
box sb's ears
can't believe your eyes/ears
▪ I couldn't believe my ears when she told me the cheapest flight was $1,100.
clip sb round the ear/earhole
cock an ear/eye
▪ She cocked an eye at Léonie, grunted.
easy on the eye/ear
▪ I like jazz because it's usually easy on the ear.
▪ Above all, it should be as physically comfortable and relaxing as it is easy on the eye.
▪ And frankly, she's pretty easy on the eyes, too.
▪ Garda Garda is a charming old village that is very easy on the eye.
▪ It's all been a bit too easy on the ear and eye.
▪ It was vital that they should be prompt and professional as well as easy on the eye.
▪ Ken Russell's production is certainly easy on the eye, but fans are expecting a bit more than a well-turned ankle.
▪ The layout and print is easy on the eye and the revision passages for dictation becomes increasingly difficult as the book progresses.
▪ This exhibit, Without Sanctuary, is not easy on the eyes.
eye/ear etc drops
▪ And remember - if you're using eye drops for your hay fever, leave your contact lenses out.
▪ Both eye irritation and redness are helped with lubricating eye drops and eye ointments.
▪ Sterile eye drops can be purchased for this purpose.
▪ That was the other thing, it took me a long fight to get my eye drops.
▪ They also have literature on the correct use of things such as eye drops and inhalers.
▪ This has distinct advantages over using eye drops.
fall on deaf ears
▪ As rioting continued, Mayor Warren appealed for calm, but his words fell on deaf ears.
▪ His pleas for mercy fell on deaf ears.
▪ The workers' demand for a wage increase has fallen on deaf ears.
▪ Their requests fell on deaf ears.
▪ Arguments that some of the skills practised by pupils are obsolete fall on deaf ears, or are heeded only very slowly.
▪ But my suggestions fell on deaf ears.
▪ Invitations by Paredes to the various governors to second his plan fell on deaf ears.
▪ Pleas that the couple and their two young children will be homeless and facing financial ruin have fallen on deaf ears.
▪ They formulated a programme of demands, but these fell on deaf ears in Petrograd.
▪ Those words fell on deaf ears.
▪ Until Friday, such complaints appeared to fall on deaf ears at the Treasury.
give sb a thick ear/get a thick ear
half an eye/ear
▪ Allen kept half an eye on the path as he worked.
▪ Always half an ear, half a mind.
▪ Anyone with half an eye could see Susan's antagonism towards her.
▪ He has half an eye on where the gun went.
▪ He told me this and that, but I listened with only half an ear.
▪ Of course, no government with half an eye on re-election would ever legalise anything it didn't have to.
▪ She always had half an eye for him; sometimes I thought she watched him as a tamer does a tiger.
▪ With only half an ear for Grigoriev's response, Rostov stared across the room.
have your ears/nose etc pierced
▪ I am a female, mid-twenties and happen to have my nose pierced with one small silver ring.
keep your eyes/ears open
▪ All of you - walk around Pentonville and keep your ears open.
▪ By then keeping her eyes open was less of an effort.
▪ Go back to bed only when you can no longer keep your eyes Open.
▪ Remembering his duty, he strode briskly up the stairs, keeping his eyes open for any suspicious signs.
▪ Swing the boat south, keep her eyes open.
▪ The basic rules of self-defence are quite simple: keep your eyes open and you can usually avoid trouble.
▪ The daily firings produced by the withering economy offered loopholes of opportunity for a young man who kept his eyes open.
▪ You know how to keep your eyes open and your mouth shut.
lend an ear
make a pig's ear of sth
make a silk purse out of a sow's ear
play sth by ear
▪ As he has no political party that can provide him with practical support, he is forced to play it by ear.
▪ At 2, he played the piano by ear.
▪ But the government is having to play it by ear.
▪ He heard jazz records at home when very young and played piano by ear.
▪ So each played it by ear, with resulting policy shifts that often appeared to be not only sudden but incomprehensible.
▪ Well, she would play it by ear.
prick (up) its ears
prick (up) your ears
▪ Henry pushed his door open a crack, and pricked up his ears.
▪ I pricked my ears up on that one.
▪ I pricked up my ears, and sure enough, the sound was getting louder.
▪ The boy pricked up his ears, because, as it happened, so they were this earth.
▪ The horse, scenting home and supper, pricked his ears and stepped out.
ring in your ears
▪ My father's discouraging words still ring in my ears.
▪ And with those echoes ringing in my ears I booked up my day - and contemplated my fate.
▪ His reply astounded me, and will ring in my ears for eternity.
▪ In the end, the men returned with the praises of the generals ringing in their ears.
▪ Lucy's advice rang in her ears.
▪ The noise still rang in his ears.
▪ The triumph of their compromise still rang in their ears.
▪ The words ring in my ears.
▪ There was a ringing in his ears.
send sb off with a flea in their ear
shut your eyes/ears to sth
▪ We must not shut our ears to the voices of suffering people.
▪ Claudia sank down on to her bed and tried to shut her ears to the sound of him in the next room.
▪ Rincewind tried to shut his ears to the grating voice beside him.
▪ She shut her eyes against it all; shut her eyes to open them again on to the harmless horizon.
▪ She shut her eyes to shut everything out.
▪ She heard the boys hurling abuse at her, shouting to her to stop, but she shut her ears to them.
▪ Sometimes she even managed to shut her ears to the arguments going on around her.
▪ They could not shut their eyes to the ugly and degrading side of wine-drinking and see only the delightful side.
talk sb's ear off
to the untrained eye/ear
▪ But he knew what he was looking at, though to the untrained eye it was just a pile of minuscule fragments.
turn a deaf ear (to sth)
▪ She wouldn't be keeping the Law if she turned a deaf ear to the call or ran away from it.
▪ The race committee turned a deaf ear to the objections of Amelia and the other fliers.
▪ They may display their feelings by refusing to eat, and turning a deaf ear to anyone who calls their name.
▪ Thus, year after year, working people turn a deaf ear to union entreaties.
walls have ears
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Pick up a few ears of corn for dinner tonight.
▪ Stop shouting in my ear!
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And then the day after we got our record contract, I went to Selfridges and had both my ears pierced.
▪ And you never meant it for my ears, that's sure.
▪ Gone her neat bun; her hair hung loose, tucked behind her ears.
▪ Shrugging the collar higher around tingling ears he thought of Carrie.
▪ Simultaneously his ears unblocked and the world again became audible.
▪ The silence seemed to swell in her ears.
▪ Well, she would play it by ear.
Wikipedia

EAR (file format)

EAR (Enterprise Application 'aR'chive) is a file format used by Java EE for packaging one or more modules into a single archive so that the deployment of the various modules onto an application server happens simultaneously and coherently. It also contains XML files called deployment descriptors which describe how to deploy the modules.

Ant, Maven, or Gradle can be used to build EAR files.

Ear (disambiguation)

The ear is the sense organ that detects sound. Ear may also refer to:

  • Ear (botany), the top part of a grain plant, such as wheat
  • Ear (mathematics), a type of polygon vertex
  • Ear (rune), a part of the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc (runic alphabet)

EAR may refer to:

  • E.A.R. (Experimental Audio Research), a project by musician Peter Kember
  • EAR (file format) ("Enterprise ARchive" format), a file format used to package Java programming language applications
  • East African Rift, a tectonic rift zone
  • Economic activity rate, percentage of the population who constitutes the manpower supply of the labor market.
  • Effective annual rate of interest
  • European Agency for Reconstruction, a European Union agency
  • Expired air resuscitation, also known as rescue breathing
  • Export Administration Regulations, a short name for the US Code of Federal Regulations Title 15 chapter VII, subchapter C
  • Kearney Regional Airport FAA & IATA location identifier
  • Estimated Average Requirements for nutritional needs
  • EAR, an acronym for the Greek Left party
  • East Area Rapist, unidentified serial killer and rapist also known as Original Night Stalker
  • eps-Associated RNA element, a motif associated with exopolysaccharide biosynthesis
  • EAR Magazine, a monthly music magazine published 1973–1992

Ear

The ear is the organ of hearing and, in mammals, balance. In mammals, the ear is usually described as having three parts—the outer ear, middle ear and the inner ear. The outer ear consists of the pinna and the ear canal. Since the outer ear is the only visible portion of the ear in most animals, the word "ear" often refers to the external part alone. The middle ear includes the tympanic cavity and the three ossicles. The inner ear sits in the bony labyrinth, and contains structures which are key to several senses: the semicircular canals, which enable balance and eye tracking when moving; the utricle and saccule, which enable balance when stationary; and the cochlea, which enables hearing. The ears of vertebrates are placed somewhat symmetrically on either side of the head, an arrangement that aids sound localisation.

The ear develops from the first pharyngeal pouch and six small swellings that develop in the early embryo called otic placodes, which are derived from ectoderm.

The ear may be affected by disease, including infection and traumatic damage. Diseases of the ear may lead to hearing loss, tinnitus and balance disorders such as vertigo, although many of these conditions may also be affected by damage to the brain or neural pathways leading from the ear.

The ear has been adorned by earrings and other jewellery in numerous cultures for thousands of years, and has been subjected to surgical and cosmetic alterations.

EAR (band)

Experimental Audio Research (commonly shortened to E.A.R. or EAR) is a loose collective of experimental musicians formed around Peter Kember (a.k.a. Sonic Boom), formerly of Spacemen 3. While Spacemen 3 were a relatively traditional rock and roll band with strong experimental leanings, E.A.R. is essentially a free improvisation project, creating instrumental music characterized by lengthy, droning textures and slowly evolving structures.

The line-up often included Sonic Boom ( Spectrum, Spacemen 3), Kevin Martin ( God), Kevin Shields ( My Bloody Valentine), and Eddie Prévost ( AMM). Other collaborators have included Lawrence Chandler of Bowery Electric, Nick Kramer, Delia Derbyshire and Thomas Köner, plus various members of Spectrum, though it is generally considered a Kember solo project. the collective is one of Kember's several post-Spacemen 3 projects, which also include Spectrum, as well albums released under the Sonic Boom moniker.

Ear (botany)

An ear is the grain-bearing tip part of the stem of a cereal plant, such as wheat or maize. It can also refer to "a prominent lobe in some leaves".

The ear is a spike, consisting of a central stem on which grows tightly packed rows of flowers. These develop into fruits containing the edible seeds. In corn, it is protected by leaves called husks.

In some species (including wheat), un ripe ears contribute significantly to photosynthesis, in addition to the leaves lower down the plant.

A parasite known as Anguina tritici (Ear Cockle) specifically affects the ears on wheat and rye by destroying the tissues and stems during growth. With exception to North Africa and West Asia, the parasite has been eradicated in all countries by using the crop rotation system.

Ear (rune)

The Ear rune of the Anglo-Saxon futhorc is a late addition to the alphabet. It is, however, still attested from epigraphical evidence, notably the Thames scramasax, and its introduction thus cannot postdate the 9th century. It is transliterated as ea, and the Anglo-Saxon rune poem glosses it as

ᛠ [ear] byþ egle eorla gehwylcun, / ðonn[e] fæstlice flæsc onginneþ, / hraw colian, hrusan ceosan / blac to gebeddan; bleda gedreosaþ,/ wynna gewitaþ, wera geswicaþ. " [ear] is horrible to every knight, / when the corpse quickly begins to cool / and is laid in the bosom of the dark earth. / Prosperity declines, happiness passes away / and covenants are broken."

Jacob Grimm in his 1835 Teutonic Mythology (ch. 9)attached a deeper significance to the name. He interprets the Old English poem as describing "death personified", connected to the death-bringing god of war, Ares. He notes that the ear rune is simply a Tyr rune with two barbs attached to it and suggests that Tir and Ear, Old High German Zio and Eor, were two names of the same god. He finds the name in the toponym of Eresburg (*Eresberc) in Westphalia, in Latin Mons martis. Grimm thus suggests that the Germans had adopted the name of Greek Ares as an epithet of their god of war, and Eresberc was literally an Areopagus. Grimm further notes that in the Bavarian ( Marcomannic) area, Tuesday (dies Martis) was known as Ertag, Iertag, Irtag, Eritag, Erchtag, Erichtag as opposed to the Swabian and Swiss ( Alemannic) region where the same day is Ziestag as in Anglo-Saxon. Grimm concludes that Ziu was known by the alternative name Eor, derived from Greek Ares, and also as Saxnot among the Saxons, identified as a god of the sword.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

ear

Crossette \Cros*sette"\ (kr?s-s?t`), n. [F., dim. of crosse. See Crosier.] (Arch.)

  1. A return in one of the corners of the architrave of a door or window; -- called also ancon, ear, elbow.

  2. The shoulder of a joggled keystone.

ear

canon \can"on\ (k[a^]n"[u^]n), n. [OE. canon, canoun, AS. canon rule (cf. F. canon, LL. canon, and, for sense 7, F. chanoine, LL. canonicus), fr. L. canon a measuring line, rule, model, fr. Gr. kanw`n rule, rod, fr. ka`nh, ka`nnh, reed. See Cane, and cf. Canonical.]

  1. A law or rule.

    Or that the Everlasting had not fixed His canon 'gainst self-slaughter.
    --Shak.

  2. (Eccl.) A law, or rule of doctrine or discipline, enacted by a council and confirmed by the pope or the sovereign; a decision, regulation, code, or constitution made by ecclesiastical authority.

    Various canons which were made in councils held in the second centry.
    --Hook.

  3. The collection of books received as genuine Holy Scriptures, called the sacred canon, or general rule of moral and religious duty, given by inspiration; the Bible; also, any one of the canonical Scriptures. See Canonical books, under Canonical, a.

  4. In monasteries, a book containing the rules of a religious order.

  5. A catalogue of saints acknowledged and canonized in the Roman Catholic Church.

  6. A member of a cathedral chapter; a person who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church.

  7. (Mus.) A musical composition in which the voices begin one after another, at regular intervals, successively taking up the same subject. It either winds up with a coda (tailpiece), or, as each voice finishes, commences anew, thus forming a perpetual fugue or round. It is the strictest form of imitation. See Imitation.

  8. (Print.) The largest size of type having a specific name; -- so called from having been used for printing the canons of the church.

  9. The part of a bell by which it is suspended; -- called also ear and shank.

    Note: [See Illust. of Bell.]
    --Knight.

  10. (Billiards) See Carom.

    Apostolical canons. See under Apostolical.

    Augustinian canons, Black canons. See under Augustinian.

    Canon capitular, Canon residentiary, a resident member of a cathedral chapter (during a part or the whole of the year).

    Canon law. See under Law.

    Canon of the Mass (R. C. Ch.), that part of the mass, following the Sanctus, which never changes.

    Honorary canon, a canon[6] who neither lived in a monastery, nor kept the canonical hours.

    Minor canon (Ch. of Eng.), one who has been admitted to a chapter, but has not yet received a prebend.

    Regular canon (R. C. Ch.), one who lived in a conventual community and followed the rule of St. Austin; a Black canon.

    Secular canon (R. C. Ch.), one who did not live in a monastery, but kept the hours. [1913 Webster] ||

Wiktionary

ear

init. (context computing English) (initialism of w:Enterprise Archive '''E'''nterprise '''Ar'''chive English) (gloss: A file format used to package Java programming language applications.)

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

ear

"organ of hearing," Old English eare "ear," from Proto-Germanic *auzon- (cognates: Old Norse eyra, Danish øre, Old Frisian are, Old Saxon ore, Middle Dutch ore, Dutch oor, Old High German ora, German Ohr, Gothic auso), from PIE *ous- "ear" (cognates: Greek aus, Latin auris, Lithuanian ausis, Old Church Slavonic ucho, Old Irish au "ear," Avestan usi "the two ears").\n\nþe harde harte of man, þat lat in godis word atte ton ere & vt atte toþir.

[sermon, c.1250]

\nIn music, "capability to learn and reproduce by hearing," 1520s, hence play by ear (1670s). The belief that itching or burning ears means someone is talking about you is mentioned in Pliny's "Natural History" (77 C.E.). Until at least the 1880s, even some medical men still believed piercing the ear lobes improved one's eyesight. Meaning "handle of a pitcher" is mid-15c. (but compare Old English earde "having a handle"). To be wet behind the ears "naive" is from 1902, American English. Phrase walls have ears attested from 1610s. French orielle, Spanish oreja are from Latin auricula (Medieval Latin oricula), diminutive of auris.

ear

"grain part of corn," from Old English ear (West Saxon), æher (Northumbrian) "spike, ear of grain," from Proto-Germanic *ahuz- (cognates: Dutch aar, Old High German ehir, German Ähre, Old Norse ax, Gothic ahs "ear of corn"), from PIE root *ak- "sharp, pointed" (source of Latin acus "chaff, husk of corn," Greek akoste "barley;" see acrid).

WordNet

ear

  1. n. the sense organ for hearing and equilibrium

  2. good hearing; "he had a keen ear"; "a good ear for pitch"

  3. the externally visible cartilaginous structure of the external ear [syn: auricle, pinna]

  4. attention to what is said; "he tried to get her ear"

  5. fruiting spike of a cereal plant especially corn [syn: spike, capitulum]

Usage examples of "ear".

There were several women delegates and Ken made the most of their ablutions until he was distracted by the appearance of Karanja in a neat grey suit, an ingratiating grin on his face and his big ears standing out like sails.

A small area of abrasion or contusion was on the cheek near the right ear, and a prominent dried abrasion was on the lower left side of the neck.

Two officers of the United States navy were walking abreast, unguarded and alone, not looking to the right or left, never frowning, never flinching, while the mob screamed in their ears, shook cocked pistols in their faces, cursed, crowded, and gnashed upon them.

For your willing ear and prospectus of what you might teach us, we will make sure, on your eight-hour shift, that we take all drunks, accidents, gunshots, and abusive hookers away from the House of God and across town to the E.

They are composed of the ears and leaves of the Indian corn, beautifully arranged, and forming as graceful an outline as the acanthus itself.

David and Deborah his manner remained always the same, jestingly ironic, scornfully loquacious, lovingly friendly of a sudden, then for a day, two days, a week utterly silent, while his eyes roved, his ears were acock listening for a step.

My illustrious friend still continuing to sound in my ears the imperious duty to which I was called, of making away with my sinful relations, and quoting many parallel actions out of the Scriptures, and the writings of the holy fathers, of the pleasure the Lord took in such as executed his vengeance on the wicked, I was obliged to acquiesce in his measures, though with certain limitations.

Sancho, that this adventure and those like it are adventures not of insulas but of crossroads, in which nothing is won but a broken head or a missing ear.

After the establishment of these conditions, afferent impulses from the eyes, ears, skin, and other places, under the general direction of the cerebrum, may cause such actions as the balancing of the body, walking, etc.

Pewt dident bring those close back in about 5 minits he wood go up and boot him down to our house and back agen and jest then Mister Purington came into the yard holding Pewt by the ear.

Pewt he had the close and Mister Purington he nocked at the door and he asked for me and when i come to the door he made Pewt give me the close and then he told Pewt to tell me he was sorry for what he had done and Pewt he dident want to say it but Mister Purington most lifted Pewt of the ground by the ear and then Pewt he said he was sorry kind of mad like and Mister Purington lifted him up agen til Pewt he stood on his tip toes and his face was all onesided and his eyes all squinty and then he had to say it over agen polite.

They were maras, a sort of agouti, a little larger than their congeners of tropical countries, regular American rabbits, with long ears, jaws armed on each side with five molars, which distinguish the agouti.

Pass over Aiken and the other silver-torc prisoners, the man Raimo and the woman Sukey, their infantile mental babblings as grating as the efforts of fledgling violinists importuning the ears of a cranky virtuoso.

After giving each of the nine members of the canine scout team a pat on the head or a scratch behind the ears, and an encouraging word or two, Ake helped secure them.

Nocking a second arrow, Alec drew the fletching to his ear and tried again.