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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

streak

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a winning streak (=when you win many competitions one after another)
▪ They came here with a four-game winning streak.
are on a winning streak
▪ The team are on a winning streak.
rebellious streak (=a tendency to rebel)
▪ He’s always had a rebellious streak .
stubborn streak (=a tendency to be stubborn)
▪ I’ve got a very stubborn streak.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
blue
▪ He had a wicked tongue when roused and could talk a blue streak.
▪ I was talking a blue streak.
hot
▪ But Sir Bryan was on a hot streak, inspired by the recovery of his clubs.
▪ Tiffany Ball kept shooting Saturday afternoon on the little backyard court, shooting long after her hot streak had ended.
▪ We've each had our hot streaks, I won't deny: the whammy has changed hands many times.
▪ Simpson and Lehman maintained recent hot streaks, as well.
▪ By the way, Domaine Valette is on a real hot streak.
▪ Estrada continued his hot streak by boating two fish before anyone else.
▪ Petersburg Can Datastream Systems Inc. continue its hot streak?
long
▪ I was a tough kid with a long streak of yellow down my back.
▪ At the same time they ended the longest winning streak in Test history and levelled the series at 1-1.
▪ Some saw it in long luminous streaks, others in huge bright spheres.
▪ A long purple streak spreads across the sky.
▪ Nice to see that it's 13 without defeat in the league - the longest streak I can remember.
▪ The sticky fluid adheres to the bark and runs down in a long streak.
mean
▪ Stories of his mean streak were legion.
▪ He is known for his acerbic wit and his mean streak.
primitive
▪ The ectoderm anterior to the primitive streak forms the neural plate which is slightly indented along the midline.
▪ The simplest two-instrument cell injection technique for both primitive streak stage and for early somite stage embryos will be described.
rebellious
▪ Long hair swept up into a high chignon for classic glamour displays a rebellious streak!.
▪ When the rebellious streak appeared in her life it was tolerated, but it was not tolerated in her literary personality.
▪ Not surprisingly, the rebellious streak in his nature surfaced, and he started to behave with studied rudeness.
▪ However, even at kindergarten his rebellious streak was showing and at the age of five or six he was playing truant.
▪ The edgy, rebellious streak in his character could only be intensified by his somewhat beleaguered isolation in this respect.
▪ Young people with curiosity and a rebellious streak are only too ready to experiment.
strong
▪ There is a strong streak of greenery, both as a policy and as a political style.
▪ Amelia was a good student, but bright as she was, her strong streak of independence did not go unremarked.
▪ Keep an eye out for the sport simulation freaks as well, most have a strong competitive streak.
▪ He was a generous man with strong abrasive streaks and keen hatreds.
▪ From the start there had been a strong streak of elitism in their outlook.
▪ Though a romantic at heart, she had a strong streak of realism.
stubborn
▪ Luckily, I had that stubborn streak to give me the determination to do it.
white
▪ It is white with yellowy-green streaks and mottling, and can be seen in the island's cathedral.
▪ When excited or scared, a white streak appears on the sides, extending backwards from the pectoral fins.
▪ As I opened the door, a white streak flashed past my ankles and vanished around the first turn of the spiral.
▪ The dark-bellied brent goose is small, neat and sooty black, with white neck streaks and a white stern.
▪ Then she lay down on her sunbed again, leaving white streaks of suncream on the young man's back.
▪ A white streak of gas burst over my left hand.
▪ With the white streak down the middle, he looked a little like a badger.
winning
▪ Mark Farrelly's winning streak in the 125 series began at Desertmartin when he won the second race.
▪ Is this the start of a winning streak for Destefani and his in-line powered Strega?
▪ It was Charlton who stopped a winning streak at the end of last season which cost Leicester automatic promotion.
▪ This winning streak caught a lot of chess players by surprise.
▪ Clear as day - I was on a winning streak, I'd hit a seam.
▪ Heaven help us if they ever get on a winning streak.
▪ The Cottesloe is on a winning streak because it also has Uncle Vanya, with a host of fine performances.
▪ Is a bank justified in taking the risk that the future dealing style of a firm may show a winning streak?
■ VERB
break
▪ Tokyo broke a three-day losing streak as the bargain hunters picked up blue chips and tech stocks, writes Ken Hijino.
continue
▪ Estrada continued his hot streak by boating two fish before anyone else.
▪ Petersburg Can Datastream Systems Inc. continue its hot streak?
end
▪ They ended their eight-game losing streak Sunday, in part because of defensive tackle Jerry Ball.
▪ At the same time they ended the longest winning streak in Test history and levelled the series at 1-1.
▪ The 49ers, who ended a three-game losing streak in domes, are 6-6 indoors since 1993...
▪ It ended a winning streak of 16 Tests and an unbeaten sequence of 18.
▪ The Vikings thus ended their losing streak at four games, while sending the Raiders tumbling to their third consecutive loss.
▪ Application Apply bronzer evenly and don't go over the same area twice or you will end up with streaks.
▪ The dizziness that ended his streak of consecutive starts for the Celtics will keep him out at least two more games.
extend
▪ The defeat extended West Indies losing streak to seven Tests, their worst to date.
▪ The Sixers extended their winning streak to six games.
▪ The other is Sandy Alomar, who is not really extending any mathematical streak but is continuing his season-long march of excellence.
▪ Can the firm extend a winning streak for a hundred years, without losing its high credit rating?
leave
▪ The doll shoots across the floor, into a pile of carved stone, leaving a dark streak in the dust.
▪ If it leaves a brown streak, then it is probably jet.
▪ Then she lay down on her sunbed again, leaving white streaks of suncream on the young man's back.
▪ It left a streak of mud right down his cheek.
snap
▪ Previously 0-7-3 against Boston, the Sharks improved their record to 2-3 this season and snapped a two-game losing streak.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a winning streak
▪ Can the firm extend a winning streak for a hundred years, without losing its high credit rating?
▪ Clear as day - I was on a winning streak, I'd hit a seam.
▪ Is this the start of a winning streak for Destefani and his in-line powered Strega?
▪ It was Charlton who stopped a winning streak at the end of last season which cost Leicester automatic promotion.
▪ Modern-day pirates have been on a winning streak.
▪ Planting the seeds for a winning streak, right?
▪ The victorious get to dream about a winning streak before being pummeled again the week after.
▪ We still have four games left and we can still put together a winning streak.
talk a blue streak
▪ He had a wicked tongue when roused and could talk a blue streak.
▪ I was talking a blue streak.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "What have you been doing?'' asked his mother, pointing at the streaks of dried mud on his arms and legs.
▪ a streak of bad luck
▪ a stubborn streak
▪ Her hair was brown, with streaks of gold.
▪ Karen's dress had a big streak of red wine down the front.
▪ My father has a streak of heroism in him that I admire.
▪ Nancy dyes her hair to hide the gray streaks.
▪ She had a mean streak that she didn't bother to hide.
▪ The District Attorney argued that Johnson has a violent streak and is a danger to society.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Amelia was a good student, but bright as she was, her strong streak of independence did not go unremarked.
▪ Many people have condemned Herod as a cruel man and certainly he showed a cruel streak, especially towards his own family.
▪ Only the Iron Virgin seemed to harbor a romantic streak.
▪ Suddenly it flew - a streak of brilliant yellow.
▪ The storm moved west in blue-white rattling streaks.
▪ The three women were wreaking havoc with their guns that fired streaks of light.
▪ There is obviously an ambitious streak in me but I do realise that I am still very young and inexperienced.
▪ There were gray streaks in her hair.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
face
▪ Tears streaking down her face, she acknowledged the irony of it.
▪ She looked at Adam and saw the mark of the spear between his eyes; blood had flowed, streaking his face.
sky
▪ The comets that streaked the skies and scared the ancients were powered by Fenna's breath.
▪ Morning came bright and clear with a pale dawn streaking the skies.
▪ The planes came streaking across the sky over Tempe with all the world watching.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I caught a glimpse of a man streaking away into the shadows.
▪ The evening sky was streaked red and orange.
▪ Two aircraft streaked across the sky.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A sleek cat streaked across the top of the wall and was gone.
▪ He crawls out, his face streaked with oil, and dries himself with a rag.
▪ His face and uniform were streaked with red.
▪ I remember it as if I were still standing there, streaked with blood and dust and tears, talking to her.
▪ My own shirt was streaked with perspiration stains from the same walk.
▪ Soon we are streaked with sweat and mud.
▪ The comets that streaked the skies and scared the ancients were powered by Fenna's breath.
▪ The fog flickered around him, streaking like lightning low to the ground, or mute cannon fire.
Wikipedia

Streak

Streak or streaking may refer to:

  • Streaking, running naked in a public place
  • Streaking (microbiology), a method of purifying micro-organisms
  • Streak (mineralogy), the color left by a mineral dragged across a rough surface
  • Streak (moth), in the family Geometridae
  • Streak (film), a 2008 film
  • Winning streak (sports), consecutive wins in sport or gambling
    • Losing streak (sports)
    • The Streak (wrestling), a run of victories for The Undertaker at WrestleMania
  • Iron man (sports streak), an athlete of unusual physical endurance
  • Dell Streak, tablet computer by Dell
  • Streak camera, device to measure short optical pulses
  • " The Streak", a 1974 record by Ray Stevens
  • Archenteron, an indentation on a blastula
  • Heath Streak, former Zimbabwe cricket team captain
  • Streak late 1940s single engine civilian aircraft
  • Streak (company) is a private American company founded in 2011 and based in San Francisco, California
  • Streak (zoology) is a group of tigers. → see List of collective names for a group of animals

Streak (film)

Streak is a 2008 American coming-of-age short film directed by Demi Moore, written by Kelly Fremon and Allan Loeb, and starring Brittany Snow and Rumer Willis. The film was actress Demi Moore's first film. The plot focuses on a young woman stuck in a life she no longer wants with gym-rat friends and obsessive behavior. To break free, she reaches for fun in an interesting form of expression.

Streak (moth)

The streak (Chesias legatella) is a moth of the family Geometridae. It is found in northern and western Europe and north Africa. It is common in Britain, but local and confined to the north in Ireland.

The species is quite variable, the forewings being buff or brown, but is always easily identified by the bold whitish apical streak which gives it its common name. The hindwings are pale grey or buff. The wingspan is . The moth flies, usually at dusk, in September and October and is sometimes attracted to light.

The larva usually feeds on broom but has been recorded on yellow bush lupin. The species overwinters as an egg.

  1. The flight season refers to the British Isles. This may vary in other parts of the range.

Streak (mineralogy)

The streak (also called "powder color") of a mineral is the color of the powder produced when it is dragged across an un-weathered surface. Unlike the apparent color of a mineral, which for most minerals can vary considerably, the trail of finely ground powder generally has a more consistent characteristic color, and is thus an important diagnostic tool in mineral identification. If no streak seems to be made, the mineral's streak is said to be white or colorless. Streak is particularly important as a diagnostic for opaque and colored materials. It is less useful for silicate minerals, most of which have a white streak or are too hard to powder easily.

The apparent color of a mineral can vary widely because of trace impurities or a disturbed macroscopic crystal structure. Small amounts of an impurity that strongly absorbs a particular wavelength can radically change the wavelengths of light that are reflected by the specimen, and thus change the apparent color. However, when the specimen is dragged to produce a streak, it is broken into randomly oriented microscopic crystals, and small impurities do not greatly affect the absorption of light.

The surface across which the mineral is dragged is called a "streak plate," and is generally made of unglazed porcelain tile. In the absence of a streak plate, the unglazed underside of a porcelain bowl or vase or the back of a glazed tile will work. Sometimes a streak is more easily or accurately described by comparing it with the "streak" made by another streak plate.

Because the trail left behind results from the mineral being crushed into powder, a streak can only be made of minerals softer than the streak plate, around 7 on the Mohs scale of mineral hardness. In case of harder minerals, the color of the powder can be determined by filing or crushing with a hammer a small sample, which is then usually rubbed on a streak plate. Most minerals that are harder have an unhelpful white streak.

Some minerals leave a streak similar to their natural color, such as cinnabar and lazurite. Other minerals leave surprising colors, such as fluorite, which always has a white streak, although it can appear in purple, blue, yellow, or green crystals. Hematite, which is black in appearance, leaves a red streak which accounts for its name, which comes from the Greek word "haima," meaning "blood." Galena, which can be similar in appearance to hematite, is easily distinguished by its gray streak.

Streak (company)

Streak is the developer of an eponymous customer relationship management platform for Gmail. Streak was founded by Aleem Mawani and Omar Ismail and is a graduate of the Y Combinator seed accelerator. The company has received $1.9 million in venture capital from investors including Battery Ventures, Crunchfund, Floodgate, Michael Birch, Chris Sacca, and David Tish. Streak is also the developer of SecureGmail, open-source Google Chrome extension that allows users to encrypt Gmail messages.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Streak

Streak \Streak\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Streaked; p. pr. & vb. n. Streaking.]

  1. To form streaks or stripes in or on; to stripe; to variegate with lines of a different color, or of different colors.

    A mule . . . streaked and dappled with white and black.
    --Sandys.

    Now streaked and glowing with the morning red.
    --Prior.

  2. With it as an object: To run swiftly. [Colloq.]

Streak

Streak \Streak\, v. t. [Cf. Stretch, Streek.] To stretch; to extend; hence, to lay out, as a dead body.

Streak

Streak \Streak\, n. [OE. streke; akin to D. streek a line, stroke, G. strich, AS. strica, Sw. strek, Dan. streg, Goth. stricks, and E. strike, stroke. See Strike, Stroke, n., and cf. Strake.]

  1. A line or long mark of a different color from the ground; a stripe; a vein.

    What mean those colored streaks in heaven?
    --Milton.

  2. (Shipbuilding) A strake.

  3. (Min.) The fine powder or mark yielded by a mineral when scratched or rubbed against a harder surface, the color of which is sometimes a distinguishing character.

  4. The rung or round of a ladder. [Obs.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

streak

Old English strica "line of motion, stroke of a pen" (related to strican "pass over lightly"), from Proto-Germanic *strikon- (cognates: Middle Dutch streke, Dutch streek, Middle Low German streke "a stroke, line," Old High German, German strich, Gothic striks "a stroke, line"), from PIE root *streig- "to stroke, rub, press" (see strigil; also strike (v.), stroke (v.)). Sense of "long, thin mark" is first found 1560s. Meaning "a temporary run (of luck)" is from 1843.

streak

1768, "to go quickly, to rush, run at full speed," respelling (probably by association with streak (v.1)) of streek "to go quickly" (late 14c.), originally "to stretch oneself" (mid-13c.), a northern Middle English variant of stretch (v.). Related: Streaked; streaking.

streak

"make streaks on" (transitive), 1590s, from streak (n.). Intransitive sense of "become streaked" is from 1870. Related: Streaked; streaking.

Wiktionary

streak

n. An irregular line left from smearing or motion. vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To have or obtain streaks. 2 (context intransitive slang English) To run naked in public. (qualifier: Contrast ''flash''.) 3 (context transitive English) To create streaks. 4 (context transitive English) To move very swiftly. 5 (context obsolete UK Scotland English) To stretch; to extend; hence, to lay out, as a dead body.

WordNet

streak

  1. n. an unbroken series of events; "had a streak of bad luck"; "Nicklaus had a run of birdies" [syn: run]

  2. a distinctive characteristic; "he has a stubborn streak"; "a streak of wildness"

  3. a marking of a different color or texture from the background [syn: stripe]

  4. a sudden flash (as of lightning)

  5. v. move quickly in a straight line; "The plane streaked across the sky"

  6. run naked in a public place

  7. mark with spots or blotches of different color or shades of color as if stained [syn: mottle, blotch]

Usage examples of "streak".

Her ship immediately looped out of formation and streaked down toward the accretion disc.

He streaked acrost that log like it was a quarter-track, with the bark and splinters flying from under his hoofs, and if one foot had slipped a inch, it would of been Sally bar the door.

More freighters, with streaks of rust on their sides where they had lain aground for tens of years.

There was a hopeful feeling that if Ambrosia was lucky, Ireta would continue the streak.

But by then she had jumped out of the ambulance and was streaking toward the parking lot.

From which position she was ideally placed to see Rollo race from the trees in a long, low streak and launch himself in an arching parabola from the top of the bank.

The Lab had barked and danced excitedly at the appearance of company while Ansel had streaked into the living room to hide beneath the couch and peer out suspiciously.

In such instances, the beautifying tinges of romance, that streak and flush the horizon, neither fade into the grayness of fact, nor die into the darkness of neglect, but now broaden and deepen into the blue of meridian assurance, now clarify and ascend into the starlight of faith and mystery.

A red beard streaked with darker red frothed between the two blacknesses, and a set of beautiless features, beaklike nose, small cold eyes of a yellowish, weaselish tinge.

The trees at Tse Bonito Park were yellow, the roadsides were streaked with the purple of the last surviving October asters, and overhead the sky was the dark, blank blue.

His streaked beard bristled like a mange-ridden fox brush as he gave his disgruntled contradiction.

She knows most of the patterns, and even that the most beautiful is South African, smoky mauve-toned Expressionist streaks suggesting a sunset landscape of great and alien beauty.

Before the Saint Gaudens statue Soames Forsyte sat on his overcoat, with the marble screen to his back, enjoying the seclusion and a streak of sunlight passaging between the cypresses.

Hal had expected but was broken up with hillocks, undulating grassy glades and streaks of dark green forest that seemed to follow the courses of the many small rivers that crisscrossed the littoral as they meandered down to the sea.

The blind white head flung back and battered the wounds, and the body in its torment rose clear of the red and gray waves till we saw a pair of quivering shoulders streaked with weed and rough with shells, but as white in the clear spaces as the hairless, maneless, blind, toothless head.