Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

sense

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a common sense approach
▪ We need a common sense approach to caring for the environment.
a common sense view
▪ Ross took the common sense view that it would be better to stay at home.
a false sense of security (=a feeling of being safe when you are not really safe)
a false sense of security
a feeling/sense of gratitude
▪ She had a sudden feeling of gratitude towards him.
a feeling/sense of guilt (also guilt feelings)
▪ I had a permanent feeling of guilt that I didn't see Mum and Dad as often as I should.
a feeling/sense of nostalgia
▪ Did it give you a sense of nostalgia to see the play on Broadway again?
a feeling/sense of pity
▪ Annie experienced a sudden feeling of pity for the young man.
a keen sense of
▪ As she walked away, Joe felt a keen sense of loss.
a lack of common sense
▪ Leaving the child alone in the car showed a lack of common sense.
a matter of common sense (=something that requires no more than common sense)
▪ Not driving too fast is just a matter of common sense.
a mood/sense of optimism
▪ A mood of optimism prevails in the White House.
a sense of balance
▪ A good sense of balance is always useful when you are sailing.
a sense of direction (=the ability to judge which way you should be going)
▪ Do you have a good sense of direction?
a sense of duty
▪ He was caring for his parents out of a sense of duty rather than love.
a sense of failure
▪ People may feel a sense of failure if they admit they have ended up in a job they hate.
a sense of grievance (=when you feel that you have been treated unfairly)
▪ Anti-Americanism in these countries comes from a deep sense of grievance against the United States.
a sense of harmony (=a feeling of friendship and peace)
▪ There was a quiet sense of harmony between them as they walked along.
a sense of honour
▪ Is he marrying her out of some misplaced sense of honour?
a sense of humour
▪ I'm afraid my dad doesn't have a very good sense of humour.
a sense of joy
▪ I’ll never forget the sense of joy that day.
a sense of loyalty
▪ She had a strong sense of loyalty to her family.
a sense of mastery (=the feeling that you can do something well )
▪ Suggesting an activity that a child can do adds to the child's sense of mastery.
a sense of mystery (=a feeling that something is mysterious)
▪ The garden had hidden corners that gave it a sense of mystery.
a sense of obligation
▪ the sense of obligation that you feel towards your family
a sense of occasion (=a feeling that an event is very special or important)
▪ The music gave the event a real sense of occasion.
a sense of perspective
▪ I felt I needed a break from the relationship in order to keep a sense of perspective.
a sense of pride
▪ I still feel a sense of pride at having been a member of the regiment.
a sense/air of finality
▪ The word ‘retirement’ has a terrible air of finality about it.
a sense/feeling of disappointment
▪ For days he couldn't get over his sense of deep disappointment.
a sense/feeling of doom
▪ Everyone in the business has a feeling of doom at the moment.
a sense/feeling of excitement
▪ He woke up that morning with a feeling of excitement.
a sense/feeling of importance (=a feeling that you are an important person)
▪ Sitting behind the big desk gave her a feeling of importance.
a sense/feeling of panic
▪ She looked out to sea with a rising sense of panic.
a sense/feeling of relief
▪ She was filled with an overwhelming sense of relief.
a sense/feeling of satisfaction
▪ performing such a difficult piece gave her a deep sense of satisfaction.
a sense/feeling of well-being
▪ A good meal promotes a feeling of well-being.
a strong sense of sth
▪ There is a strong sense of community here.
a vague sense/feeling
▪ She had a vague feeling that she had let something important slip away.
acute sense of
▪ Young children have a particularly acute sense of smell.
air/sense of menace
▪ There was a sense of menace as the sky grew darker.
an ounce of common sense (=a very small amount)
▪ Anyone with an ounce of common sense would have realised that was a silly thing to do.
be based on common sense
▪ The job doesn't require much training because it's based on common sense.
common sense dictates sth
▪ Common sense dictates that you should avoid too much sun.
common sense dictates sth (=tells you something very clearly)
▪ Common sense dictates that you should avoid handling wild animals.
common sense prevails (=is strong enough to make you do the sensible thing)
▪ Eventually common sense prevailed and they reached an agreement.
common sense prevails/reason prevails (=a sensible decision is made)
▪ He considered lying, but then common sense prevailed.
common sense suggests sth
▪ People don't always do what common sense suggests.
common sense tells you/me etc sth
▪ Common sense tells me that I should get more sleep.
convey a sense/an impression of sth
▪ The music conveys a senses of sadness and despair.
defy common sense (=not be sensible)
▪ The proposed change in the law defies common sense.
develop a sense/awareness/knowledge of sth
▪ The children are beginning to develop a sense of responsibility.
dress sense
good sense
▪ Mrs Booth showed a lot of good sense.
have a sixth sense
▪ He seemed to have a sixth sense for knowing when his brother was in trouble.
have a warped sense of humour (=think strange and unpleasant things are funny)
▪ You really have a warped sense of humour .
have common sense
▪ Some people are brilliant thinkers, but they have no common sense.
in the figurative sense
▪ He’s my son, in the figurative sense of the word.
literal meaning/sense/interpretation etc
▪ A trade war is not a war in the literal sense.
lose all sense of time/direction/proportion etc
▪ When he was writing, he lost all sense of time.
lulled...into a false sense of security (=made people think they were safe when they were not)
▪ Earthquakes here are rare and this has lulled people into a false sense of security .
makes good sense (=is sensible)
▪ It makes good sense to do some research before buying.
profound sense of
▪ a profound sense of guilt
remote sensing
road sense (=knowledge of how to behave safely near traffic)
▪ Young children don't have any road sense.
sb’s moral sense (=a feeling for what is right and what is wrong)
▪ Children’s moral sense develops over a number of years.
see reason/sense (=realize that you are wrong or doing something stupid)
▪ I just can’t get her to see reason!
sense danger (=feel that there is danger)
▪ The animal lifted its head, sensing danger.
sense of alienation
▪ Unemployment may provoke a sense of alienation from society.
sense of belonging (=a feeling that you are happy and comfortable somewhere)
▪ It’s important to have a sense of belonging .
sense of betrayal
▪ She felt a great sense of betrayal.
sense of decency
▪ Is there no sense of decency left in this country?
sense of destiny
▪ She always had a strong sense of destiny.
sense of detachment
▪ He felt a sense of detachment from what was happening around him.
sense of déjà vu
▪ a strange sense of déjà vu
sense of fair play
▪ This kind of behavior violates many people’s sense of fair play.
sense of foreboding
▪ She waited for news with a grim sense of foreboding.
sense of frustration
▪ People often feel a sense of frustration that they are not being promoted quickly enough.
sense of fulfilment
▪ a deep sense of fulfilment that makes life worthwhile
sense of justice
▪ Children have a strong sense of justice.
sense of loss
▪ the deep sense of loss I felt after my divorce
sense of superiority
▪ his sense of superiority
sense of timing
▪ He told jokes with an exquisite sense of timing.
sense of touch
▪ the sense of touch
sense of vocation
▪ a strong sense of vocation
sense of...injustice
▪ He had developed a deep sense of social injustice.
sense organ
sense sb's presence (=be aware that someone is present without seeing them)
▪ The man sensed his presence at once and turned sharply.
sense the tension
▪ She could sense the tension in the room.
sense/feeling of inferiority
▪ He had a deep-rooted feeling of inferiority.
sense/feeling of unease
▪ As she neared the door, Amy felt a growing sense of unease.
▪ public unease about defence policy
sense/sensory organs (=the eyes, ears, nose, mouth, and skin, used to give us information about the world around us)
▪ Our minds function through the brain, nervous system, and sense organs.
▪ As with the other sensory organs, taste is highly developed in babies at birth.
show common sense
▪ His attitude shows no common sense at all.
simple/plain/basic/sheer common sense (=very obviously sensible)
▪ Locking your doors at night is simple common sense.
sixth sense
▪ He seemed to have a sixth sense for knowing when his brother was in trouble.
sound common sense (=sensible and reliable)
▪ These ideas contained much sound common sense.
use your common sense
▪ If something goes wrong, just use your common sense.
wicked sense of humour
▪ Tara hasn’t lost her wicked sense of humour.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
broad
▪ Political economy in the broadest sense is the study of all these massive problems.
▪ In a broader sense it includes all relatives living together or accepted as a family, including adopted persons.
▪ We encourage experimentation in the broadest sense of the word.
▪ In return, we assume that society is, in the broadest sense, responsible for everyone in it.
▪ This brings us to the last perspective which has influenced us: the study, in the broadest sense, of personality.
▪ All parties in the conflict regard education in its broadest sense as part of an ideological battleground.
▪ Today we could expect to find perhaps a dozen employed; but then, only 14 were retired in the broadest sense.
false
▪ Gone is the wide fast road and its dangerous crossing, where the stripes gave walkers a false sense of security.
▪ We had been lulled into a false sense of security.
▪ An attempt to lull him into a false sense of security.
▪ The entire procedure would give a false sense of security.
▪ The reported wind speeds gave everyone a false sense of security.
▪ But some people think too much emphasis is being put on duration, lulling investors into a false sense of comfort.
▪ Making a close relationship may lead to a false sense of self-sufficiency.
▪ The identification of apparent patterning amongst types and sub-groups of ornamental metalwork can easily induce a false sense of satisfaction.
general
▪ Finally, the price rise was a product of the boom in a more general and fundamental sense.
▪ A general sense of impunity has added greatly to this situation.
▪ In a general sense this is probably always true but it need not be true in a detailed sense.
▪ Do you have enough time and feel a general sense of satisfaction at the end of each day?
▪ To ignore those who live at home is unacceptable; it runs counter to a general sense of social responsibility.
▪ Yet a few rare instances provide us with at least a general sense of the magnitude of this particular organizational cost.
▪ In that general sense Achaemenid Persia was feudal.
▪ Attractively presented product information is also a good public relations vehicle, enhancing the image of the store in a general sense.
good
▪ It is left to the individual's instinct and good sense, which are not always entirely sound.
▪ He struck a countermeasure that made better sense on every level.
▪ Soon we were once again toasting our good sense at booking Christmas week in the Algarve.
▪ But it made no better sense, Johnson quickly added, for the Corps to build the dam instead.
▪ Are you a jolly person; do you have a good sense of humour?
▪ In his zeal, he almost lost his good sense.
▪ This gives us a powerful sense of tradition, in the best sense of the word.
▪ He admired her good sense, and he followed her directions exactly.
great
▪ Anna felt a great sense of relief.
▪ As a black woman, I want to feel a greater sense of control.
▪ A great sense of relief and understanding permeates the air.
▪ All seven groups are great in several senses.
▪ Despite these fluctuations in his status I remember him fondly on his infrequent leaves as some one with a great sense of fun.
▪ This would make great sense, if tied to parental choice.
▪ His legs felt scalded as that thing of his shuddered; he experienced the greatest sense of relief he had ever known.
keen
▪ And Matt Camplisson, a recently retired bus inspector, will also be there with his keen sense of humour.
▪ Alexander, of course, had a keen sense of the value of my commentary.
▪ The most skilled and literate combined the keenest sense of grievance with the ability to articulate their aspirations.
▪ But his good-ore-boy mannerisms hide a keen sense of opportunity.
▪ We feel a keen sense of responsibility for the sick and needy.
▪ Hughes was blessed or cursed by a very keen sense of the social drama of collective life.
▪ But she too had a keen sense of making the best of whatever was given.
▪ They lose their keen sense of smell and direction when the wind picks up like this.
literal
▪ In a literal sense, the management of the school has depended on him or her.
▪ Ray S., who came to see me, was not a carpenter in the literal sense but a millwright.
▪ Having said that, scientists are currently working on an atomic toolkit in the most literal sense.
▪ No. 1 with a bullet, in the most literal sense.
▪ It's twist-and-go in its most literal sense.
▪ Mr Gow made it clear that he was not referring to small men in any literal sense.
▪ It seems that Freemantle was uneasy about poems which even in the most literal sense made the poet look bad.
▪ Backstage there exists a very Boys R Us attitude: espritdecorps in its most literal sense.
moral
▪ Individuals, except in an ultimate moral sense, are unequal. 6.
▪ Are we free to modify Our moral sense by rational reflection and conscious goal-setting or not?
▪ Kant Kant's moral philosophy is sharply opposed to the moral sense approach of Hutcheson and Hume.
▪ She treated her crisis as a literary event; she lost her moral sense, her judgment, her power to distinguish.
▪ One loses one's moral sense when lust becomes dominant.
▪ Only a theory that is completely certain should be allowed to undermine this moral sense.
▪ My moral sense has been dulled by too many years here.
▪ It has taken a long time, and this is only the end in a juridical not a moral or historical sense.
narrow
▪ In the narrow sense, it failed to achieve its specific aims.
▪ In the narrow sense, the battle here is over zoning.
▪ He was never a teacher in a narrow pianistic sense, was never a mere driller of scales.
▪ While in a certain narrow sense this is the case, in many important ways just the opposite is true.
▪ There are important parts of these processes to which this narrow sense is relevant.
▪ In a quite narrow sense they are right.
▪ Lord Reid stated that jurisdiction in a narrow sense meant only that the tribunal be entitled to enter upon the inquiry.
real
▪ In a real economic sense, we are already in surplus.
▪ In a very real sense, though not the sense they were expecting, the kingdom had come in power.
▪ But in a very real sense he was right and they were wrong.
▪ In no real sense does such direct dependence or influence exist.
▪ The only real sense the deal makes is unashamedly commercial.
▪ Censorship is now, in a real sense, polarized along political lines.
▪ Casualness with a real sense of style that made it look great.
strong
▪ There is a strong sense of order and control.
▪ If the individual has a strong will, then there is in place a strong sense of obligation to ones values.
▪ His strong sense of duty made him insist on going, even if the weather was very bad.
▪ Thanks largely to the tradition of the harem and their own recent suppression, Arab women had a strong sense of sisterhood.
▪ As for the case of the welfare-tax protesters Dworkin implies that they have no right in the strong sense to withhold their tax.
▪ A stronger sense of self, based on a combination of external reality and internal ideas, begins to emerge.
▪ As a nation we pride ourselves on our strong sense of sportsmanship and fair play.
▪ Approach them with a positive attitude and a strong sense that change is possible.
true
▪ We are not really operating a gallery in the true sense of the word, with additional stock behind the scenes.
▪ A true sense of mastery of the task at hand.
▪ This is true in the sense that electors want stability and do not much want the higher thought.
▪ Management control therefore, in its true sense, is exercised only rarely.
▪ The scientist is motivated by a passion for what is true and a sense of responsibility towards what is true.
▪ Prisoners passed through the place so fast that it ceased to be a camp in the true sense altogether.
▪ This enhances a true sense of personal integrity and self-worth.
■ NOUN
organ
▪ His/her long muscular tongue lashed and probed the air like a sense organ as if to supplement his/her tiny shrunken eyes.
▪ The subtle energies comprising the instinctive mental patterns automatically produce a body and sense organs to match.
▪ Not through the medium of the brain and nervous system and the ordinary sense organs.
▪ No magnetic sense organ has been identified, but two hypotheses have been put forward.
▪ Probably not, he told himself,. there are no sense organs in the human cortex, after all.
▪ One is that the light-sensitive pigments of the eye could also act as magnetic sense organs.
■ VERB
develop
▪ But developing a sense of this is essential to wellbeing; assertiveness training and learning self-defence can both help.
▪ How can students avoid internalizing these negative messages and develop or preserve their sense of self-worth?
▪ Also, with puberty, children, especially girls, begin to develop their own sense of identity.
▪ As a child balances his blocks, he develops a sense for equivalence.
▪ We can develop a sense of identity by sharing our experiences with others in a process of ongoing interaction.
▪ With this insight and acceptance, children begin to develop a sense of mastery of their feelings.
▪ To achieve the desired balance and harmony, it is essential to develop a sense of personal purpose.
▪ Such explorations enable them to grow in knowledge and to develop a sense of mastery that promotes self-confidence.
feel
▪ He felt an enormous sense of gratification mixed with affection for his two foster parents.
▪ He feels, in a sense, betrayed.
▪ Charles felt an uncomfortable sense of urgency.
▪ Remember to try and feel a sense of grace and well being flow over you as you perform them.
▪ But she felt no sense of hunger.
▪ Lowell felt a niggling sense of betrayal.
▪ You feel that great sense of satisfaction, and that makes everything else go away.
give
▪ Gone is the wide fast road and its dangerous crossing, where the stripes gave walkers a false sense of security.
▪ Spencer and his bandmates never give the sense that they look down on the pop styles they play with.
▪ Secrets give a garden a sense of mystery and magic.
▪ It gives them an everyday sense of purpose.
▪ Only in a secure Britain can we break down barriers and give people a real sense of fair play.
▪ Red and purple salvias blend well to give a sense of harmony in the garden.
▪ She formed a instinctive rapport with many patients, her efforts giving her a real sense of achievement.
▪ To belong to the Communion of Saints gives us a sense of deep communion.
lose
▪ Whenever he buried himself in the ledgers and account books, he lost all sense of time.
▪ Without work, meaningful or not, a man or a woman can lose the precious sense of self-worth.
▪ One loses one's moral sense when lust becomes dominant.
▪ I just lost all sense of direction, of purpose.
▪ We have lost of a sense of great books, for instance.
▪ She would jump off a board and lose all sense of where she was.
▪ His death quite literally shattered the Prince and for a time he lost all sense of purpose.
▪ They lose their keen sense of smell and direction when the wind picks up like this.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an ounce of sense/truth/decency etc
▪ Anyone with an ounce of sense knows that results depend on factors other than staff efficiency. - T. Baines, Oxford.
appeal to sb's better nature/sense of justice etc
give (sb) an impression/a sense/an idea
horse sense
▪ Arthur looked at Flute's cross face and thought longingly of Fred's horse sense at dress rehearsals.
▪ Maud talked with a mixture of pedantry and horse sense that impressed him as singular and forcible.
in (full) possession of your faculties/senses
▪ He's difficult to get along with but still in full possession of his faculties.
knock some sense into sb/into sb's head
▪ Maybe getting arrested will knock some sense into him.
narrow sense/definition
▪ In a quite narrow sense they are right.
▪ In terms of its narrow definition in the Maastricht Treaty, convergence has been surprisingly successful.
▪ In the narrow sense, it failed to achieve its specific aims.
▪ In the narrow sense, the battle here is over zoning.
▪ Mr Alger, using perhaps a narrower definition of technology, put the peak exposure at 55 % of assets.
▪ There are important parts of these processes to which this narrow sense is relevant.
▪ This is the narrowest definition of money.
▪ While in a certain narrow sense this is the case, in many important ways just the opposite is true.
sb's sense of self
▪ He was combative, preferred elegant excesses of language, and had developed a strong, up-front sense of self.
▪ Her sense of time may vanish, and her normal sense of self.
▪ I should know ... Friendships become easier for young women in later adolescence as they develop a clearer sense of self identity.
▪ In contrast, figures outside the high cultural sphere often consciously try to abandon their sense of self.
▪ It is only through a process of dynamic interaction that consciousness is achieved as a sense of self and other.
▪ My therapist tells me I have a problem with boundaries, I have no sense of self.
▪ One week he said I had no sense of self.
▪ You need to go with the community and have a collective sense of self.
sense of community
▪ A sense of community is a source of satisfaction that appeals to many.
▪ Collectively taking care of our elderly provides a sense of community in our otherwise competitive economy.
▪ In turn, that sense of community is what is expected to make New Traditional neighborhoods desirable in this age of isolation.
▪ The results highlighted the attachment people feel to their area and the strong sense of community spirit.
▪ There is an indescribable sense of community here.
▪ These were, first, what human psychic needs does a sense of community arise to satisfy?
▪ To bring about this sense of community, Eliot includes historical and contemporary Londoners of various social classes.
▪ Today's crowded world militates against a sense of community.
sense of proportion
▪ At their best, lawyers have a sense of proportion and a sense of humor.
▪ But it is real enough to demand a sense of proportion and perspective.
▪ But let us keep a sense of proportion.
▪ Buying an airline seemed foolhardy and unnecessarily ostentatious: it affronted his sense of proportion.
▪ My sense of proportion left me; my judgment took on the grotesque exaggerations of a cruel cartoon.
▪ The participants, taken together, represented the power establishment of southern California with an exquisite sense of proportion.
▪ What is probably important here is a sense of proportion, rather than oversimplified either/or decisions.
▪ You should, however, keep a sense of proportion.
sense/spirit of adventure
▪ A secret always buoyed her up, gave her a sense of adventure.
▪ A sense of adventure, perhaps?
▪ Dole can opt for some one out of the blue, making a bold stroke and hoping to demonstrate a spirit of adventure.
▪ It is like they embody the spirit of adventure, that sense of infinite newness.
▪ The atmosphere of the room was so different from any he had ever breathed that self-consciousness vanished in the sense of adventure.
▪ The excitement gradually left them and the boyish sense of adventure seeped slowly away.
▪ The sense of adventure felt by the pioneers of flight still remains with those who carry on the tradition of ballooning today.
▪ We should strive for the same sense of adventure.
take leave of your senses
▪ You challenged him to a fight? Have you taken leave of your senses?
▪ But frequently they appear to have taken leave of their senses when it comes to choosing the right sort of women.
▪ But John had not taken leave of his senses.
▪ Her daughter had taken leave of her senses and her husband was never at home when he was needed.
▪ I know what you're saying and I think you've taken leave of your senses.
▪ She had taken leave of her senses!
▪ Was she taking leave of her senses?
▪ You must have taken leave of your senses! b. You must have left your senses behind! 35a.
talk (some) sense into sb
▪ Someone needs to talk sense into Rob before he gets hurt.
▪ Afterwards, George asked me to come down and see if I could talk some sense into you.
▪ At least it gave him time to try and talk some sense into her.
▪ He had already tried to talk sense into Jotan, and had got nowhere.
▪ Maybe the squabbling sparrows on the next balcony would talk some sense into her before it was too late.
▪ She fervently hoped that Father McCormack would be able to talk some sense into her son.
▪ Take this, and try to talk some sense into your dad if you can.
talk sense/rubbish/nonsense etc
▪ A man talking sense to himself is no madder than a man talking nonsense not to himself.
▪ Don't talk rubbish, girl!
▪ He had already tried to talk sense into Jotan, and had got nowhere.
▪ It was easy to laugh in that snug house, talk nonsense half the night, drink.
▪ People who talk about authentic costume are talking rubbish.
▪ Quinn realized that he was talking nonsense.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I'm using the word "education" in its broadest sense here.
▪ In the dictionary the different senses of each word are marked by numbers.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Although there were cousins in Los Angeles, too, the warm and sometimes overbearing sense of family was gone.
▪ And as he does the room is almost thick with a sense of triumph.
▪ I never had a sense of abundance, of being able to splash out and enjoy myself.
▪ The notion of randomness is especially unclear, in the sense that it has never been defined in any consistent way.
▪ The Western sense of security was shattered.
▪ This was tolerated as long as they did so out of a sense of liberation at being at home, i.e. through choice not force.
▪ Through each sense, children not only react to the world, they also comprehend their world.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
change
▪ From the mid-eighties onwards, I sensed a change in the cultural scene.
▪ He had sensed a change in the air, a salty dampness.
▪ Some women sense a change from the moment of conception and know they are pregnant before they miss a period.
▪ He sensed the change at once and lifted his dark head.
▪ They sensed the change in political mood and were anxious that the Conservatives should not get out of step with the public.
▪ Somewhere ahead of her, Rosa sensed a change in her life.
danger
▪ It was a classic face off, and Bodie sensed danger.
▪ Richard sensed danger before Philippa did.
▪ If you sense danger, act as if you can see danger itself.
▪ If they sense danger, they move on.
▪ Night is when most creatures sense danger.
▪ It senses the danger and almost instantaneously cuts off the power with a speed of reaction which can prevent a tragedy occurring.
▪ She sensed danger for Toby, but didn't know how to avoid it.
fear
▪ He had sensed her fear of yielding to a man's passion and had reined in his desire immediately.
▪ It was like she sensed his sadness and fear and became ten times more zany.
▪ It is Mr Major who seems to sense the fears and hopes of middle Britain.
▪ He bared his teeth and tried not to look afraid; above all, they mustn't sense his fear.
▪ He sensed her fear, read it in her eyes.
mood
▪ The first to sense the new mood was the press, and an Anti-Waste League was founded by Lord Rothermere.
▪ I sensed that the mood was beginning to turn.
▪ After a few minutes, Blanche seemed to sense Dexter's baleful mood, checked her watch and stood up to go.
presence
▪ Once, he had sensed a presence following him on the trail.
▪ It strode through the black rain to the car wreck in the forecourt, sensing the presence of more food.
▪ A microchip in a couch will sense the presence of a sitter and turn the heat up in the room.
▪ From them ... The dragons sense Liessa's presence.
▪ He sensed its presence, glimpsed the dark shape only on the edge of his vision.
▪ Standing in the chill morning air outside the church, I felt could sense their presence.
tension
▪ She could sense the rising tension in the room, almost as oppressive as the scent of all the flowers.
▪ The chil-dren sensed his tension and gave him a wide berth.
▪ She sensed the tensions we were suffering before we finally parted.
▪ I could sense the tension in the court as neighbours sought to give opinions to each other in noisy whispers.
▪ When he finally got there, when he walked through the town, he sensed a tension amongst those who saw him.
▪ Forester sensed a worm of tension, deep in his belly and fighting to get free.
▪ Blanche sensed the tension in his body, the clenched muscles.
▪ Romanov sensed the sort of tension he only felt in the field.
unease
▪ Even at that early age, Celia sensed a strange unease, a tension amongst the grown-ups.
▪ But he sensed an unease beneath the directness.
▪ Clearly, pupils will sense a teacher's unease in presenting poetry to them, and are then likely to respond negatively.
■ VERB
begin
▪ I really began to sense it when David did a Midnight Special show in 1973.
▪ Alvin himself had begun to sense that.
▪ We begin to sense with a keener sensitivity the needs of people around us.
▪ As the journey progressed and the bus whizzed by the stadium, the passenger began to sense a problem.
▪ The Republicans, led by Senator Taft, began to sense they had an election winner here.
seem
▪ Emily seemed to sense this too as she gazed at the uppermost branches.
▪ She seemed to sense his nervousness.
▪ John seemed to sense death approaching.
▪ Suddenly Morthen seemed to sense the watcher.
▪ But what he seemed to be sensing was that the boy was dangerous.
▪ It is Mr Major who seems to sense the fears and hopes of middle Britain.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an ounce of sense/truth/decency etc
▪ Anyone with an ounce of sense knows that results depend on factors other than staff efficiency. - T. Baines, Oxford.
horse sense
▪ Arthur looked at Flute's cross face and thought longingly of Fred's horse sense at dress rehearsals.
▪ Maud talked with a mixture of pedantry and horse sense that impressed him as singular and forcible.
in (full) possession of your faculties/senses
▪ He's difficult to get along with but still in full possession of his faculties.
narrow sense/definition
▪ In a quite narrow sense they are right.
▪ In terms of its narrow definition in the Maastricht Treaty, convergence has been surprisingly successful.
▪ In the narrow sense, it failed to achieve its specific aims.
▪ In the narrow sense, the battle here is over zoning.
▪ Mr Alger, using perhaps a narrower definition of technology, put the peak exposure at 55 % of assets.
▪ There are important parts of these processes to which this narrow sense is relevant.
▪ This is the narrowest definition of money.
▪ While in a certain narrow sense this is the case, in many important ways just the opposite is true.
sb's sense of self
▪ He was combative, preferred elegant excesses of language, and had developed a strong, up-front sense of self.
▪ Her sense of time may vanish, and her normal sense of self.
▪ I should know ... Friendships become easier for young women in later adolescence as they develop a clearer sense of self identity.
▪ In contrast, figures outside the high cultural sphere often consciously try to abandon their sense of self.
▪ It is only through a process of dynamic interaction that consciousness is achieved as a sense of self and other.
▪ My therapist tells me I have a problem with boundaries, I have no sense of self.
▪ One week he said I had no sense of self.
▪ You need to go with the community and have a collective sense of self.
sense of community
▪ A sense of community is a source of satisfaction that appeals to many.
▪ Collectively taking care of our elderly provides a sense of community in our otherwise competitive economy.
▪ In turn, that sense of community is what is expected to make New Traditional neighborhoods desirable in this age of isolation.
▪ The results highlighted the attachment people feel to their area and the strong sense of community spirit.
▪ There is an indescribable sense of community here.
▪ These were, first, what human psychic needs does a sense of community arise to satisfy?
▪ To bring about this sense of community, Eliot includes historical and contemporary Londoners of various social classes.
▪ Today's crowded world militates against a sense of community.
sense of proportion
▪ At their best, lawyers have a sense of proportion and a sense of humor.
▪ But it is real enough to demand a sense of proportion and perspective.
▪ But let us keep a sense of proportion.
▪ Buying an airline seemed foolhardy and unnecessarily ostentatious: it affronted his sense of proportion.
▪ My sense of proportion left me; my judgment took on the grotesque exaggerations of a cruel cartoon.
▪ The participants, taken together, represented the power establishment of southern California with an exquisite sense of proportion.
▪ What is probably important here is a sense of proportion, rather than oversimplified either/or decisions.
▪ You should, however, keep a sense of proportion.
sense/spirit of adventure
▪ A secret always buoyed her up, gave her a sense of adventure.
▪ A sense of adventure, perhaps?
▪ Dole can opt for some one out of the blue, making a bold stroke and hoping to demonstrate a spirit of adventure.
▪ It is like they embody the spirit of adventure, that sense of infinite newness.
▪ The atmosphere of the room was so different from any he had ever breathed that self-consciousness vanished in the sense of adventure.
▪ The excitement gradually left them and the boyish sense of adventure seeped slowly away.
▪ The sense of adventure felt by the pioneers of flight still remains with those who carry on the tradition of ballooning today.
▪ We should strive for the same sense of adventure.
take leave of your senses
▪ You challenged him to a fight? Have you taken leave of your senses?
▪ But frequently they appear to have taken leave of their senses when it comes to choosing the right sort of women.
▪ But John had not taken leave of his senses.
▪ Her daughter had taken leave of her senses and her husband was never at home when he was needed.
▪ I know what you're saying and I think you've taken leave of your senses.
▪ She had taken leave of her senses!
▪ Was she taking leave of her senses?
▪ You must have taken leave of your senses! b. You must have left your senses behind! 35a.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ After a while, I sensed that he was no longer listening.
▪ I wasn't that thrilled with her performance, and I'm sure she sensed it.
▪ She sensed his impatience and tried to hurry.
▪ This new dishwasher senses how many dishes are loaded and sets itself accordingly.
▪ We could sense an unwelcoming atmosphere.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ David sensed the urge to plant his lips on hers immediately and bite into the yielding flesh.
▪ From the mid-eighties onwards, I sensed a change in the cultural scene.
▪ I sensed that she loved her little girl a great deal but was feeling hopelessly lost about how to cope with her.
▪ Once, he had sensed a presence following him on the trail.
▪ There are times you get the impression Bulls coach Phil Jackson is tuned into some cosmic wavelength that only he can sense.
▪ They have sensed, as the layman does not, the damage to established ideas which lurks in these relationships.
▪ When he finally got there, when he walked through the town, he sensed a tension amongst those who saw him.
Wikipedia

Sense (disambiguation)

A sense in biology and psychology, is a physiological method of perception.

Sense may also refer to:

  • Word sense in linguistics, one of the meanings of a word
  • Common sense, what people in common agree as being reasonable or rational
  • Sense (band), a synthpop trio of which Paul K. Joyce was a member in his early career
  • Sense (molecular biology), a reference to the coding strand of the DNA helix
  • Sense (electronics), a technique used in power supplies to produce the correct voltage for a load
  • Sense (programming), a programming environment created by The Open University
  • Sense and reference, an innovation of the German philosopher and mathematician Gottlob Frege
  • Sense (river), a river in Switzerland
  • Sense (The Lightning Seeds album), and the title track
  • Sense (Mr. Children album), 2010
  • Sense (In the Nursery album)
  • HTC Sense, a graphical user interface developed by HTC Corporation for mobile devices
  • Sense Worldwide, a London-based co-creation consultancy

Sense (molecular biology)

In molecular biology and genetics, sense is a concept used to compare the polarity of nucleic acid molecules, such as DNA or RNA, to other nucleic acid molecules. Depending on the context within molecular biology, sense may have slightly different meanings.

Sense (The Lightning Seeds album)

Sense is the second album by English musical group The Lightning Seeds, released in 1992 and produced chiefly by Ian Broudie and Simon Rogers.

Sense (In the Nursery album)

Sense is the fifth album by In the Nursery, released in 1991 through Third Mind Records.

Sense (electronics)

In electronics, sense is a technique used in power supplies to produce the correct voltage for a load. Although simple batteries naturally maintain a steady voltage (except in cases of large internal impedance), a power supply must use a feedback system to make adjustments based on the difference between its intended output and its actual output. If this system is working, the latter will be very close to the former.

Two types of sense are used, depending on where the power supply output is measured. In local sense, the supply simply measures the voltage at its output terminals, where the leads to the load connect. This method has the problem of not accounting for the voltage drop due to resistance of the leads, which is proportional to the amount of current drawn by the load. That is, the supply might be producing the correct voltage at its output terminals, but there will be a lower voltage at the input terminals of the load.

When this might cause a problem, remote sense can be used to force the power supply to counteract the voltage drop by raising the voltage at its output terminals. If successful, it will exactly cancel the drop along the leads, yielding the correct voltage at the input terminals of the load. This is accomplished by using separate "sense leads," connected to the load's input terminals, to measure the output voltage. (Because the sensing function draws only a very small amount of current, there is practically no additional voltage drop due to the sense leads themselves.)

Many power supplies that are equipped with remote sense can cause catastrophic damage to the loads if they turned on while the sense leads are unconnected. To avoid this, some supplies are equipped with auto sense, which will automatically switch between local and remote sensing depending on whether the sense leads are correctly connected.

Sense

A sense is a physiological capacity of organisms that provides data for perception. The senses and their operation, classification, and theory are overlapping topics studied by a variety of fields, most notably neuroscience, cognitive psychology (or cognitive science), and philosophy of perception. The nervous system has a specific sensory system or organ, dedicated to each sense.

Humans have a multitude of senses. Sight ( ophthalmoception), hearing ( audioception), taste ( gustaoception), smell ( olfacoception or olfacception), and touch ( tactioception) are the five traditionally recognized senses. The ability to detect other stimuli beyond those governed by these most broadly recognized senses also exists, and these sensory modalities include temperature ( thermoception), kinesthetic sense ( proprioception), pain ( nociception), balance ( equilibrioception), vibration ( mechanoreception), and various internal stimuli (e.g. the different chemoreceptors for detecting salt and carbon dioxide concentrations in the blood). However, what constitutes a sense is a matter of some debate, leading to difficulties in defining what exactly a distinct sense is, and where the borders between responses to related stimuli lay.

Other animals also have receptors to sense the world around them, with degrees of capability varying greatly between species. Humans have a comparatively weak sense of smell and a stronger sense of sight relative to many other mammals while some animals may lack one or more of the traditional five senses. Some animals may also intake and interpret sensory stimuli in very different ways. Some species of animals are able to sense the world in a way that humans cannot, with some species able to sense electrical and magnetic fields, and detect water pressure and currents.

Sense (river)

The river Sense is a right tributary of the river Saane in Switzerland. It is a border river between the Cantons of Fribourg and Bern. Its source rivers, the Kalte Sense, coming from Mount Gantrisch, and Warme Sense, flowing out of lake Schwarzsee, join at Zollhaus and thus form the origin of the Sense.

The Sense flows through a gorge of 15 km length, which is popular for whitewater sports, but also for swimming and bathing – especially among nudists. Its main tributary is the river Schwarzwasser.

After about 35 km, the Sense joins the Saane river at Laupen, Bern. Because the Sense's water level can rise rapidly during hefty rainstorms, it is dangerous to stay near the river bed in uncertain weather conditions.

Sense (Mr. Children album)

Sense is the fourteenth (officially listed as the sixteenth) studio album by Japanese pop rock band Mr. Children. It was released on December 1, 2010, and the details, such as track list, number of tracks, cover and title of the album, were announced on November 29, 2010. It includes a digital-only single "Fanfare" and no CD single or music videos. "Fanfare" is also the theme for the One Piece film Strong World, released on December 12, 2009, almost one year before the album's release.

The album got number 1 on Oricon Weekly Albums Chart for two consecutive weeks in three albums successively from Home.

Sense (programming)

Sense is an educational programming environment created by The Open University (OU) in the United Kingdom. It uses a drag-and-drop programming environment designed to teach students the fundamentals of computer programming, using different shape and colour "blocks" selected from a palette of available commands, meaning that the student needs no prior experience of programming nor need to learn a syntax. It is based on the Scratch programming language developed by the MIT Media Lab, and uses .sb files like Scratch but the two pieces of software cannot use each other's files.

The Sense programming environment is designed to work in conjunction with the SenseBoard, a specialised piece of hardware which connects to a user's computer via a USB connection. The SenseBoard has different input types such as sensors for infrared, light, sound (microphone), and temperature (thermometer), and outputs such as a motor and light emitting diodes (LEDs).

Sense and the SenseBoard are primarily used as part of the OU's My Digital Life (TU100) module, but is also used to a lesser degree on other modules. Sense was trialed in London schools in late 2012.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Sense

Sense \Sense\, n. [L. sensus, from sentire, sensum, to perceive, to feel, from the same root as E. send; cf. OHG. sin sense, mind, sinnan to go, to journey, G. sinnen to meditate, to think: cf. F. sens. For the change of meaning cf. See, v. t. See Send, and cf. Assent, Consent, Scent, v. t., Sentence, Sentient.]

  1. (Physiol.) A faculty, possessed by animals, of perceiving external objects by means of impressions made upon certain organs (sensory or sense organs) of the body, or of perceiving changes in the condition of the body; as, the senses of sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. See Muscular sense, under Muscular, and Temperature sense, under Temperature.

    Let fancy still my sense in Lethe steep.
    --Shak.

    What surmounts the reach Of human sense I shall delineate.
    --Milton.

    The traitor Sense recalls The soaring soul from rest.
    --Keble.

  2. Perception by the sensory organs of the body; sensation; sensibility; feeling.

    In a living creature, though never so great, the sense and the affects of any one part of the body instantly make a transcursion through the whole.
    --Bacon.

  3. Perception through the intellect; apprehension; recognition; understanding; discernment; appreciation.

    This Basilius, having the quick sense of a lover.
    --Sir P. Sidney.

    High disdain from sense of injured merit.
    --Milton.

  4. Sound perception and reasoning; correct judgment; good mental capacity; understanding; also, that which is sound, true, or reasonable; rational meaning. ``He speaks sense.''
    --Shak.

    He raves; his words are loose As heaps of sand, and scattering wide from sense.
    --Dryden.

  5. That which is felt or is held as a sentiment, view, or opinion; judgment; notion; opinion.

    I speak my private but impartial sense With freedom.
    --Roscommon.

    The municipal council of the city had ceased to speak the sense of the citizens.
    --Macaulay.

  6. Meaning; import; signification; as, the true sense of words or phrases; the sense of a remark.

    So they read in the book in the law of God distinctly, and gave the sense.
    --Neh. viii. 8.

    I think 't was in another sense.
    --Shak.

  7. Moral perception or appreciation.

    Some are so hardened in wickedness as to have no sense of the most friendly offices.
    --L' Estrange.

  8. (Geom.) One of two opposite directions in which a line, surface, or volume, may be supposed to be described by the motion of a point, line, or surface. Common sense, according to Sir W. Hamilton:

    1. ``The complement of those cognitions or convictions which we receive from nature, which all men possess in common, and by which they test the truth of knowledge and the morality of actions.''

    2. ``The faculty of first principles.'' These two are the philosophical significations.

    3. ``Such ordinary complement of intelligence, that,if a person be deficient therein, he is accounted mad or foolish.''

    4. When the substantive is emphasized: ``Native practical intelligence, natural prudence, mother wit, tact in behavior, acuteness in the observation of character, in contrast to habits of acquired learning or of speculation.''

      Moral sense. See under Moral, (a) .

      The inner sense, or The internal sense, capacity of the mind to be aware of its own states; consciousness; reflection. ``This source of ideas every man has wholly in himself, and though it be not sense, as having nothing to do with external objects, yet it is very like it, and might properly enough be called internal sense.''
      --Locke.

      Sense capsule (Anat.), one of the cartilaginous or bony cavities which inclose, more or less completely, the organs of smell, sight, and hearing.

      Sense organ (Physiol.), a specially irritable mechanism by which some one natural force or form of energy is enabled to excite sensory nerves; as the eye, ear, an end bulb or tactile corpuscle, etc.

      Sense organule (Anat.), one of the modified epithelial cells in or near which the fibers of the sensory nerves terminate.

      Syn: Understanding; reason.

      Usage: Sense, Understanding, Reason. Some philosophers have given a technical signification to these terms, which may here be stated. Sense is the mind's acting in the direct cognition either of material objects or of its own mental states. In the first case it is called the outer, in the second the inner, sense. Understanding is the logical faculty, i. e., the power of apprehending under general conceptions, or the power of classifying, arranging, and making deductions. Reason is the power of apprehending those first or fundamental truths or principles which are the conditions of all real and scientific knowledge, and which control the mind in all its processes of investigation and deduction. These distinctions are given, not as established, but simply because they often occur in writers of the present day.

Sense

Sense \Sense\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sensed; p. pr. & vb. n. Sensing.] To perceive by the senses; to recognize. [Obs. or Colloq.]

Is he sure that objects are not otherwise sensed by others than they are by him?
--Glanvill.

WordNet

sense

  1. n. a general conscious awareness; "a sense of security"; "a sense of happiness"; "a sense of danger"; "a sense of self"

  2. the meaning of a word or expression; the way in which a word or expression or situation can be interpreted; "the dictionary gave several senses for the word"; "in the best sense charity is really a duty"; "the signifier is linked to the signified" [syn: signified]

  3. the faculty through which the external world is apprehended; "in the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing" [syn: sensation, sentience, sentiency, sensory faculty]

  4. sound practical judgment; "I can't see the sense in doing it now"; "he hasn't got the sense God gave little green apples"; "fortunately she had the good sense to run away" [syn: common sense, good sense, gumption, horse sense, mother wit]

  5. a natural appreciation or ability; "a keen musical sense"; "a good sense of timing"

sense

  1. v. perceive by a physical sensation, e.g., coming from the skin or muscles; "He felt the wind"; "She felt an object brushing her arm"; "He felt his flesh crawl"; "She felt the heat when she got out of the car" [syn: feel]

  2. detect some circumstance or entity automatically; "This robot can sense the presence of people in the room"; "particle detectors sense ionization"

  3. become aware of not through the senses but instinctively; "I sense his hostility"

  4. comprehend; "I sensed the real meaning of his letter"

Wiktionary

sense

n. 1 (senseid en manner to perceive) Any of the manners by which living beings perceive the physical world: for humans sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste. 2 (senseid en conscious awareness)Perception through the intellect; apprehension; awareness. 3 (senseid en sound judgment)Sound practical or moral judgment. 4 (senseid en meaning or reason)The meaning, reason, or value of something. 5 (senseid en natural ability)A natural appreciation or ability. 6 (senseid en pragmatics term)(context pragmatics English) The way that a referent is presented. 7 (senseid en semantics term)(context semantics English) A single conventional use of a word; one of the entries for a word in a dictionary. 8 (senseid en math: direction of a vector)(context mathematics English) One of two opposite directions in which a vector (especially of motion) may point. See also polarity. 9 (senseid en math: direction of rotation)(context mathematics English) One of two opposite directions of rotation, clockwise versus anti-clockwise. 10 (senseid en biochemistry)(cx biochemistry English) referring to the strand of a nucleic acid that directly specifies the product. vb. 1 To use biological senses: to either smell, watch, taste, hear or feel. 2 To instinctively be aware. 3 To comprehend.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

sense

c.1400, "faculty of perception," also "meaning, import, interpretation" (especially of Holy Scripture), from Old French sens "one of the five senses; meaning; wit, understanding" (12c.) and directly from Latin sensus "perception, feeling, undertaking, meaning," from sentire "perceive, feel, know," probably a figurative use of a literally meaning "to find one's way," or "to go mentally," from PIE root *sent- "to go" (cognates: Old High German sinnan "to go, travel, strive after, have in mind, perceive," German Sinn "sense, mind," Old English sið "way, journey," Old Irish set, Welsh hynt "way"). Application to any one of the external or outward senses (touch, sight, hearing, etc.) in English first recorded 1520s.\n\nA certain negro tribe has a special word for "see;" but only one general word for "hear," "touch," "smell," and "taste." It matters little through which sense I realize that in the dark I have blundered into a pig-sty. In French "sentir" means to smell, to touch, and to feel, all together.

[Erich M. von Hornbostel, "Die Einheit der Sinne" ("The Unity of the Senses"), 1927]

\nMeaning "that which is wise" is from c.1600. Meaning "capacity for perception and appreciation" is from c.1600 (as in sense of humor, attested by 1783, sense of shame, 1640s).

sense

"to perceive by the senses," 1590s, from sense (n.). Meaning "be conscious inwardly of (one's state or condition) is from 1680s. Meaning "perceive (a fact or situation) not by direct perception" is from 1872. Related: Sensed; sensing.

Usage examples of "sense".

Hutchinson has little leisure for much praise of the natural beauty of sky and landscape, but now and then in her work there appears an abiding sense of the pleasantness of the rural world--in her day an implicit feeling rather than an explicit.

The ability to sense pain and discomfort in others, Will realized, was something he had always had and assumed others did as well.

All the while the shaft of phosphorescence from the well was getting brighter and brighter, bringing to the minds of the huddled men, a sense of doom and abnormality which far outraced any image their conscious minds could form.

The Canterbury Tales, so far as they are in verse, have been printed without any abridgement or designed change in the sense.

Her senses abrim, she forgot everything but the feverish need clamoring within her, the need to be filled as never before.

Matter, then, thus brought to order must lose its own nature in the supreme degree unless its baseness is an accidental: if it is base in the sense of being Baseness the Absolute, it could never participate in order, and, if evil in the sense of being Evil the Absolute, it could never participate in good.

The Acceptor probed and touched and caressed this new region of space with its farflung senses.

For all the processes essential to a physical acoustics are accessible to the eye and other senses.

I certainly did not act towards them with a true sense of honesty, but if the reader to whom I confess myself is acquainted with the world and with the spirit of society, I entreat him to think before judging me, and perhaps I may meet with some indulgence at his hands.

In a sense, the serial killers of the 1990s were the spiritual children of the hippies of the sixties, and their common ancestors would be the Viennese Actionists of the fifties.

Kosmos that produced the human brain are being, to some degree, recognized by that brain: in this special sense, they are discoveries, un-coveries, recognitions, anamnesias, recollections, apprehensions of patterns and worldspaces present as potentials but only now being actualized or apprehended in individual cases.

For if it were actually something, that actualized something would not be Matter, or at least not Matter out and out, but merely Matter in the limited sense in which bronze is the matter of the statue.

I said, but with the acuity of any jungle beast, he sensed the weakening of his prey.

I segued into the second movement, that sense of bright expectation replaced by the slow, haunting strains of the Adagio, at once lyrical and sad -- mirroring the turns my own life had taken, the shifting harmonies sounding to me like the raised voices of ghosts, of echoes.

Vaguely sensing a contradiction, he then exempts his own global-theorizing stance from having any adaptive value.