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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

net

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
gross/net expenditure (=the total amount a company spends before/after any tax or costs have been taken away)
▪ Spending on research and development represents 13% of our gross expenditure.
landing net
mosquito net
net earnings (=after tax has been paid)
▪ The company’s net earnings have fallen over the last two years.
net exporter of fuel (=it exports more fuel than it imports)
▪ With the expanded production of North Sea oil and gas, the UK has become a net exporter of fuel.
net gain
▪ The Democratic Party needed a net gain of only 20 votes.
net income (=income after you have paid tax)
▪ He was left with a net income of just £80 per week.
net profit (=after tax and costs are paid)
▪ The company made a net profit of $10.5 million.
safety net
▪ State support should provide a safety net for the very poor.
the net result (=the final result)
▪ The net result of fewer officers on the street was rising crime.
velvet/net/lace etc curtains (=made of velvet, net etc)
wire netting
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
empty
▪ Apanage deftly drew the bottle away from the empty net and inserted a magical cork into its neck.
▪ Two minutes after the interval good work by McAvennie allowed McStay to round Paul Mathers and shoot into an empty net.
▪ His teasing cross tempted Paul Robinson off his line and left an empty net for Dwight Yorke to stoop and head in.
▪ Butler's shot into an empty net was consolation for an earlier effort that struck the bar.
fishing
▪ I had a fishing net with me and carefully fished it out.
▪ Others die from entanglement in fishing nets.
▪ Nobody suspected that a significant proportion of the small population was being caught and killed each year in fishing nets.
▪ As the particles catch Lucifer's magnetic field, it is extended into space like a fishing net caught by the tide.
▪ Speed boats and fishing nets also need to be kept out of the area.
neural
▪ For neural nets and genetic algorithms, it is not so much fallible as crude.
▪ Abstract ideas became focused as he pulled together previous work on neural nets.
▪ Any learning neural net explores a space in which each state is described by a large set of simple parameters.
▪ One could conclude that neural nets love to do pattern classification.
▪ Training sets are typically large, for any kind of neural net.
▪ Subsequent Analysis: The 34 test results showed several close calls by operators that were unquestionably classified by the neural net.
▪ I am grateful to Teresa Ludermir who introduced me to it, and to logical neural nets.
▪ Unlike less sophisticated Al, neural nets do not require that elaborate rule structures be specified in advance.
semantic
▪ Detecting patterns in a large, complex semantic net is difficult to do without the aid of computer programs.
▪ The semantic net of remedial was expanding and expanding.
▪ In the bottom-up approach the paragraphs are first collected, and the semantic net is built as the paragraphs are indexed.
▪ Rough notes may be entered and do not need to be attached to the semantic net.
▪ To build and maintain a semantic net, indexing of paragraphs and semantic net construction go hand-in-hand.
▪ The purpose of the semantic net is to give people an overview of or handle on the content of the text.
▪ A semantic net lends itself to graphic display, and its meaning tends to be intuitively, if not formally, clear.
▪ The role of the semantic net is being explored in this new environment.
social
▪ They are a fundamental part of the social safety net and have kept the poverty rate among the elderly relatively low.
▪ In a time when there was no social safety net, a fourth of all workers were unemployed.
▪ The focus of the so-called reform is to decentralize social safety net programs, transferring money and jurisdiction to the 50 states.
wide
▪ One possibility seems to be that s.61 was intended to cast a wider net of liability than s.62.
▪ They subsequently directed their personnel officials to cast a wider net when searching for potential employees.
▪ The Contempt of Court Act 1991 spreads a wider net over everyone who reports or handles news.
▪ The network has to cast a wide net for this talent.
▪ A wide net helps to prevent this happening and also allows the fish to turn round if they want to.
▪ Man and algae sealed in the capsule divorced themselves from the wide net woven by the rest of life.
■ NOUN
drift
▪ The decision coincided with reports that at least four Cornish skippers had recently bought drift nets of up to four miles long.
▪ Sea World freed three gray whales in 1988 which had been tangled in drift nets.
▪ For many years the use of drift nets on the high seas has been banned altogether.
▪ In 1988 Sea World freed three gray whales that had become tangled in drift nets.
▪ He rejected claims by environmentalists that drift nets led to overfishing.
effect
▪ The net effect of these measures has been to give greater autonomy to the central government.
▪ The net effect is thus to balance and harmonize the energy flow.
▪ If both good and bad effects apply to the whole body, the net effect can still be good for the body.
gain
▪ By 1989, there were 3,000 -a net gain of 1,200 in office functions, retailing and small firms in nursery workshops.
income
▪ Are your monthly credit payments more than 15-20 percent of your net income, excluding rent or mortgage?
▪ So the recent fall in house-moving business would have cut gross income by about a fifth and net income by much more.
▪ Also, some people do deals on the net income.
▪ Over the period 1979-1987, the average total net income of this group rose by 31%.
landing
▪ My chair and everything apart from the rod, landing net and loaf, are left up the bank.
▪ As the trout began to tire, I fumbled for the landing net.
▪ They got their rods and landing nets together and set off for home.
▪ Then I fetch my rod, landing net, loaf and rod-rest.
▪ Use a large landing net, somewhat larger than the size of fish you hope to catch.
▪ You need only one landing net, one keepnet, one set of scales, etc. if you fish close to each other.
loss
▪ Receipts were down from £1,406 to £863 and a net loss of £160 on the year was returned.
mosquito
▪ There are two entrances both with mosquito nets.
▪ A mosquito net was providentially suspended above the bed; the creek was certain to be thick with insects when night fell.
▪ There are also two inner pockets and a mosquito net in each door.
▪ No breath of air stirred the Collector's mosquito net.
▪ To protect people from being bitten they must be educated and persuaded to use insect repellents and mosquito nets.
▪ I lay under my mosquito net and waited.
▪ Both inner doors have mosquito nets at each end and the headroom inside the tent is excellent.
▪ Apparently no one ever thought of using mosquito nets.
profit
▪ Your net profit is 5 percent on sales.
▪ The amount that is left after the retailer has paid his overheads is called net profit.
▪ The group had a net profit margin of 30% last year.
▪ Between 1979 and 1982 there was a reduction in farm net profit of almost 44%.
result
▪ Furthermore, simple measurements of sediment at a point represent only the net result of all the processes going on upstream.
▪ The net result is the concentration of effective power in the hands of the government.
▪ The net result is that, however one mixes the energy cake, carbon dioxide emissions go on increasing.
▪ The net result of Honderich's weakness as an historian of ideas is that his book slips into confusion.
▪ The net result is that the total energy return is less than the input.
safety
▪ The big entitlement programs should be privatized, he says, leaving only a low safety net for the indigent.
▪ The Endangered Species Act is a safety net that comes into play when other environmental and conservation laws have failed.
▪ Two-wheel drive gives better stability and traction in all conditions, but just as importantly is a powerful psychological safety net.
▪ However, States said the new program is providing a better safety net for the drought-plagued wheat growers of the Great Plains.
▪ The material researchers provide makes a great safety net.
▪ They are a fundamental part of the social safety net and have kept the poverty rate among the elderly relatively low.
▪ It now looks as if that safety net is never going to be needed.
▪ Two factors form a reliable safety net for the F-22 program: The Air Force really, really wants it.
worth
▪ In most economies the bulk of net worth is attributable to the personal sector, i.e. private individuals.
■ VERB
buy
▪ The decision coincided with reports that at least four Cornish skippers had recently bought drift nets of up to four miles long.
▪ Then you would make enough to buy nylon nets.
cast
▪ But this festival casts its net beyond the musical world.
▪ They subsequently directed their personnel officials to cast a wider net when searching for potential employees.
▪ One possibility seems to be that s.61 was intended to cast a wider net of liability than s.62.
▪ The network has to cast a wide net for this talent.
▪ It is clearly possible that we are not casting our net sufficiently wide.
▪ I cast my net wide enough to find parents who vary from house cleaner to fashion designer to electrician to corporate manager.
catch
▪ Burglary - where it's reckoned that a only tiny proportion are ever caught - nets £590 million.
▪ The symbolism was extended to the gorge itself Blondin had literally caught it in his net.
▪ This is because most of the fish is caught in double nets by the motor boats and ships.
▪ I catch them in my net.
▪ Every one that hits the net ought to be caught - provided the net has been set properly.
▪ The actual death toll is much greater because thousands more turtles are caught in fishing nets and suffocate.
▪ Abraham is caught in Ephron's net.
▪ Built circa 1880, bits drop off the outside and have to be caught in a wire net hung over the door.
fish
▪ The actual death toll is much greater because thousands more turtles are caught in fishing nets and suffocate.
▪ These are floats, blown from bottle glass, and used to hold up fishing nets.
▪ There were many anchored wooden boats with large outboard motors, but strangely, there were few fishing nets.
▪ I thought about my brother, when I broke that fishing net.
▪ The harbour porpoise is vulnerable to drowning in fishing nets.
▪ His dock was strewn with beer cans, oil drums, fishing nets.
pay
▪ Its fixed-interest bond pays 11.50 percent net provided the money is tied up for at least 12 months.. Key move on cards.
▪ But the ability to pay for safety nets is just one of the social effects of having an educated population.
▪ Term accounts are no longer offered by the society, but the share account is now paying only 1.88 p.c. net.
provide
▪ It can provide a safety net for children in danger as well as for those who have socially or emotionally lost their way.
▪ However, States said the new program is providing a better safety net for the drought-plagued wheat growers of the Great Plains.
▪ The government's starting point with regard to block funding was that they would not provide a safety net.
set
▪ It is easiest if the man carrying the stake walks behind the net and the man setting the net walks in front of it.
▪ All around us small fishing boats were wheeling and stopping as they set and retrieved nets.
▪ These men and women work through the night, hauling in the fish, then setting out their nets again.
slip
▪ Graham, on the other hand, had nearly slipped through the net.
▪ No one knows how many have slipped through the net.
▪ Even with the former region's history of testing in primaries, children continue to slip through the net.
▪ Alan Garcia, Fujimori's predecessor, slipped the net.
▪ Her foot slipped suddenly through the net.
▪ This one slipped through the net.
▪ Paul Merton slipped through the net.
▪ Several other counties are already regretting that he slipped through the net.
spread
▪ Conversation was desultory for we were all exhausted though Mandeville declared that tomorrow he would spread his net.
▪ It was argued in Chapter 2 that the criminal law ought to spread its net wider where the potential harm is greater.
▪ The Contempt of Court Act 1991 spreads a wider net over everyone who reports or handles news.
▪ Furse spread his net wide, but it did not sink deep.
surf
▪ We give them quizzes on Britain and allow them to surf the net.
use
▪ As the Rattlesnake beat across the seas, Huxley trawled for specimens of sea creatures using an improvised net.
▪ A rarely used volleyball net stood lonely in the dirt and weeds.
▪ Only 12 types of links were used in the semantic net that supported the final draft of the Hypertext book.
▪ A February 1989 Fortune article reported that Ford, for example, was using neural nets to spot faulty paint finishes.
▪ Apparently no one ever thought of using mosquito nets.
▪ Coracles using nets were banned from the Wye in the twenties.
▪ Wilfrid followed this up by teaching the people how to use nets.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Net/Internet/Web surfer
▪ Netscape hooked millions of web surfers on Navigator by letting them have it for free.
▪ Online newspapers: Web surfers are showing strong interest in online news.
▪ Relatively few sites are so compelling that Web surfers make it a point to visit every day.
cast your net (far and) wide
▪ I cast my net wide enough to find parents who vary from house cleaner to fashion designer to electrician to corporate manager.
▪ We cast our net wider and in a different direction.
crawl the Net/web
slip through the net
▪ Even with the former region's history of testing in primaries, children continue to slip through the net.
▪ Graham, on the other hand, had nearly slipped through the net.
▪ In a child-centred class of 30 children it is easy for some to slip through the net and learn nothing.
▪ No one knows how many have slipped through the net.
▪ Paul Merton slipped through the net.
▪ Several other counties are already regretting that he slipped through the net.
▪ This one slipped through the net.
surf the Net/Internet
▪ A recent survey shows that about half of all users surf the Net from their homes.
▪ At the other end of the spectrum is the so-called Internet appliance, the very low-cost device for just surfing the Net.
▪ It was the year of spinoffs, surging financial markets and surfing the Net.
▪ So a user could be surfing the Net at warp speed while talking on the phone.
▪ Surveys show millions of workers use their office computers to play games, surf the Net or worse.
▪ That means you can surf the Net and talk on the phone at the same time over one line.
▪ We give them quizzes on Britain and allow them to surf the net.
▪ Who spends an inordinate number of work hours surfing the Internet?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a fishing net
▪ The bride wore a veil made of ivory net.
▪ The puck went straight into the net.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ By the production line stand basketball nets and ping-pong tables for use during breaks.
▪ Clips for fixing and joining the nets are available from some cage and netting manufacturers.
▪ Humpback whales have even been seen to weave a snare of air-bubbles - a bubble net.
▪ If intervention remains, it should be reduced to the original concept of a safety net for use in extreme emergencies.
▪ It swipes the underside of the net.
▪ Mosquito netting: inner door flaps can be unzipped independently from the net.
▪ Nicholas Branch has unpublished state documents, polygraph reports, Dictabelt recordings from the police radio net on November 22.
▪ The fishermen will have to use turtle excluder devices in their nets, which allow turtles to escape before they drown.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
so
▪ These would spend a larger proportion of their incomes and so net savings would be reduced.
■ NOUN
asset
▪ Unit trusts are permitted to operate a spread as wide as 15 percent of the net asset value of the fund.
▪ It is the price of the bonds that determines the net asset value of bond funds.
▪ Launch costs are capped at 3.5 percent, giving a net asset value after launch of 96.5 percent of gross proceeds.
▪ This may be particularly important in service industries where there may be limited net asset backing.
▪ It continues to place strong emphasis on tight cost controls and has seen net assets rise 14% to £26.9m.
▪ A pro-forma statement of the combined companies' net assets was £294m.
▪ Prices based on a multiple of earnings tend to require more detailed and thorough completion accounts than net asset value based prices.
▪ Stock analysts have written down the bank's net asset value by a correspondingly precise sum.
benefit
▪ Ultimately the net benefits from insider dealing must equal the net losses.
▪ This study finds evidence for net benefits for all the member states.
▪ There would be no net benefit to training.
cash
▪ In other words, it is the rate that equates future net cash flows to the initial investment outlay.
▪ Total inflows minus total outflows results in the predicted net cash gain or loss during the month.
▪ The Wetherby, Yorkshire company now has £600,000 net cash.
▪ National Medical generated $ 193 million in net cash from operations in 1994.
▪ It was easily affordable: the rights issue last year strengthened the finances and left year end net cash of £77m.
▪ After starting last year with net debt of £6.3m, it now has net cash of almost £4m.
▪ The problem with a high-tech start-up is that you have a net cash outflow.
▪ Despite the costs of launching Carlton Television, the company still has a strong balance sheet, with net cash of £50.3m.
curtain
▪ He walked to the chair and looked through the grubby net curtain.
▪ In all of them hang net curtains.
▪ He walked to the window and gazed down through the net curtains.
▪ Neighbours had watched discreetly through parted net curtains.
▪ The net curtains were planets of watery growth.
▪ Outside, the once-respectable semis have crooked To Let signs and greying net curtains.
▪ A net curtain stirs at the window, diffusing the sharpness of the outside world.
▪ Beyond the window, a screen whose net curtains looked poised to fall, Karen heard voices.
earnings
▪ In most cases the imputation system ensures that nil and net earnings are the same.
▪ It had net earnings of $ 2. 2 million on sales of $ 32. 3 million last year.
▪ Its reported net earnings are therefore lower than the reported nil earnings of firm A even though its taxable earnings are the same.
▪ Safilo reported net earnings of 312 billion lire in the first nine months of 1995, up 25 percent from 1994.
▪ Farr calculated the contribution of workers to economic growth by estimating the future net earnings of labourers dying at different ages.
effect
▪ The net effect of superimposing habituation on imprinting would be to displace the preference away from the familiar.
▪ In both these cases, the net effect upon equilibrium price will be zero; price will not change.
▪ The net effect of the application of the liberal model for developing work with the unemployed is thus somewhat muted and minimal.
▪ The net effect is to paralyze the organization in the present.
▪ But the net effect has been to leave exactly the same number dependent upon means-tested assistance.
▪ Ultimately, the net effect of the Bettelheim uproar was-not much.
▪ The net effect of strategy 2 is to exchange dollars for 1 at the end of the year.
▪ The net effect of all these changes is hard to estimate.
exporter
▪ Areas with the highest levels of unemployment are likely to be net exporters of population.
▪ Hence the country with the lower p will be a net exporter of manufactured products.
gain
▪ A closed system is a system in which there is no net gain or loss of matter in the system.
▪ Between 1989 and 1991, large companies with 500 or more employees contributed a net gain of only 122, 000 jobs.
▪ Society would make a net gain by producing more films.
▪ Florida had a net gain of 127, 180, followed by California with about 61, 000.
▪ In the 1990s, the South had a net gain of 326,000 adult blacks from the rest of the country.
▪ But the Democratic Party needs a net gain of only 20 seats.
▪ There is a net gain to both countries equivalent to areas 2 + 4.
▪ You pay taxes on your share of the net gains achieved by the fund manager.
importer
▪ They expect to be net importers of a variety of items - varying from computers to television programming.
income
▪ I would point out how much better pensioners have done under this Government than under our predecessor in terms of pensioners' net incomes.
▪ That produced net income of $ 126 million, or 37 cents a share.
▪ Very few professional men then could expect a net income of £2,000 a year by the age of forty.
▪ Taking the charge more slowly increases net income and makes a company look more profitable.
▪ Its net income rose to $ 525m from $ 434m a year ago.
▪ This procedure, known as the capitalization of costs, also increases net income.
▪ The conventional view of poverty is based solely on the distribution of net incomes.
▪ An increase in the net income of the wage-earners is therefore assured.
increase
▪ In a system that encodes information in terms of patterns of activity information processing could be going on without a net increase in metabolism.
▪ Florida and California had the highest net increase of immigrants resettling from one state to another.
▪ In short, the outcome is allocatively inefficient: a rearrangement of resources would produce a net increase in the satisfaction of wants.
▪ With those operations closing, it is not expected to result in a net increase in permanent jobs.
▪ A two-thirds vote would only be required if changes result in a net increase in taxes.
interest
▪ It had net interest income of $ 3. 05 million in the 1994 period.
▪ The net interest charge increased significantly in the second half of the year, reflecting the year's cash outflow.
▪ It received net interest and dividends in the 1990 fiscal year that accounted for more than 20% of its operating profits.
investment
▪ So long as demand stays at 1,000 units, no net investment will take place.
▪ The Accelerator Theory relates net investment to the rate of change of output.
▪ Notice here that although demand has risen from year 2 to year 3, net investment has remained the same.
▪ Or there's cash flow, the difference between cash income minus net investment, which averages £15,700.
▪ Economic earnings are therefore equal to reported earnings plus new external funds less net investment.
loss
▪ Ultimately the net benefits from insider dealing must equal the net losses.
▪ But the New York-based company continued its string of yearly losses, ending 1995 with a net loss of $ 124 million.
▪ Thus there is no net loss or gain over the period of time.
▪ Even so-called liberation movements nearly always resulted in net losses for women.
▪ It had a net loss of $ 5. 3 million, or 14 cents a share.
proceeds
▪ CrossCom says that it plans to use the net proceeds for new product development and for working capital.
▪ Foundation treasurer Alan Wilson said net proceeds are about $ 182, 000, with about 11, 000 pairs to sell.
▪ The net proceeds will be used to buy capital equipment, fund leasehold improvements and facilities expansion, and for working capital.
▪ It said it will use the net proceeds to acquire long-life natural gas reserves and exploit development opportunities.
▪ Immediately after issue the amount attributable to an instrument within non-equity shareholders' funds should be the net proceeds of the issue.
▪ The net proceeds from the issue of equity shares and warrants for equity shares should be credited directly to shareholders' funds.
▪ Immediately after issue, debt should be stated at the amount of the net proceeds. 25.
profit
▪ Fujitsu says it expects to break even in 1993-94, with zero net profit.
▪ That product line now produces over 20 percent of our net profits.
▪ The balance of the profit and loss account represents the net profit or loss for the accounting period.
▪ For the first nine months of 1991 net profits rose 3 percent to £857m and turnover rose 3 percent to £1545m.
▪ Nestle posted 1994 net profit of 2. 94 billion francs, before items.
▪ Analysts reckon the company's net profit probably halved last year, to around 500 billion lire.
▪ The preliminary figures were below many analysts' predictions of 125 billion in net profit.
receipt
▪ In particular, it is recognised that agents may use some assets as a buffer-stock against unforeseen changes in net receipts.
result
▪ The net result is that the lack of that information results in the application being delayed for many months.
▪ The net result would probably be active combat that could end in a draw.
▪ The net result of these antagonistic effects was that no significant change in soluble calcium was observed.
▪ The net result of war making by way of symbols is to widen the actual gap between luxury and poverty.
▪ The net result, say some officials, is that foreign money has frequently ended up fertilising or irrigating opium fields.
▪ The net result of this change is that return on sales will increase to 11. 9 percent.
▪ The net result is that fewer drugs adapted to the needs of the poor are in development.
▪ Yet the net result of his pages of lists is to create a curious abundance-effect.
sale
▪ Therefore there was a net sale of 5.4 billion of new gilts to the private sector.
▪ Fourthquarter 1995 net sales, Digital Link said, were about $ 10 million, in line with year-earlier levels.
▪ Business machines accounted for 81.3 percent of net sales as demand for cameras and other optical products slipped, it said.
▪ Case had 1994 net sales of $ 4. 3 billion.
▪ Excluding the mergers, net sales for 1995 rose 28 % to $ 928 million.
▪ Posted net sales of $ 246 million in 1996.
worth
▪ It has net worth of £430 million and net debt of £325 million.
▪ Associates was well-financed, when the firm had a negative net worth.
▪ My net worth dropped to zero.
▪ In 1994, after the killings, his net worth was $ 11 million.
▪ You now make $ 85, 000, and you have a net worth.
▪ A more sophisticated way of assessing federal debt would be to try to compute our net worth by subtracting debt from assets.
▪ His net worth was estimated at $ 11 million only four years ago at the time of his divorce.
▪ Forbes has declined to release such forms or to declare his net worth.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Foreign investors were net buyers, though some were waiting for a market drop to allow bargain-hunting.
▪ It is the price of the bonds that determines the net asset value of bond funds.
▪ Orange is expected to break even in net income terms by 1998.
▪ Ronson told bankers that the March 31 accounts would show net assets had fallen to £135 million compared with £585 million previously.
▪ That account tells us the amount of net payments over receipts compared with the budgeted figures.
III.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
fish
▪ A total of 144 anglers netted 462 fish.
goal
▪ Craighton added a fifth for Chatteris and Dave Lee netted a consolation goal for the Shrimpers four minutes from time.
▪ Leading scorer Tommy Mooney netted his eleventh goal of the campaign on 38 minutes.
▪ Matthias Sammer netted both goals in the second half to keep Dortmund in third place.
▪ Wegerle also netted the third goal, in the final minute, from an obviously offside position.
▪ Don Goodman, later to be transferred for £1 million to Sunderland, netted the only goal.
▪ He netted 9 goals for United.
mosquito
▪ Finally I took the mosquito netting from a nail out the barn.
▪ Uncle Michael on a metal bed, cocooned in a fold of army blanket under mosquito netting, drawing ragged breaths.
profit
▪ Another deal made while he was still in office helped net a handsome profit for his wife, Honey.
▪ In the first half, net profit more than doubled to 1. 86 billion francs.
▪ In financial terms, net parental profit has never been so negative.
safety
▪ If the top leaders fail, there's no safety net, no recourse.
▪ Trapeze artists, firefighters and high-rise building workers rely on safety nets for protection.
▪ The unbending insistence on fiscal retrenchment, whatever the impact on countries with non-existent social safety nets, should be rethought.
▪ But, where can investors now find safety nets?
▪ The law career had been my safety net for many years by then.
www
▪ Call 791-2263 for information, or see their website at www. pfu. net / upstairs.
■ VERB
expect
▪ Action against the trusts alone is expected to net the Treasury £ 500m.
▪ The event, expected to net more than $ 1 million, was sponsored by the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee.
▪ She said she had expected to net $ 10, 000 from the $ 1 million drug scheme.
▪ He is expected to net £ 6m.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Net/Internet/Web surfer
▪ Netscape hooked millions of web surfers on Navigator by letting them have it for free.
▪ Online newspapers: Web surfers are showing strong interest in online news.
▪ Relatively few sites are so compelling that Web surfers make it a point to visit every day.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ An undercover drug sweep netted 22 suspects in one evening.
▪ Donna got a raise in February, but she's still only netting $19,000 a year.
▪ For the first three months of 1990, Starcorp netted $547 million.
▪ Measure A netted only 58 percent of the vote.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A few folks probably got buzzed and the sale netted $ 125.
▪ But town have netted only around half that in sales.
▪ The event, expected to net more than $ 1 million, was sponsored by the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee.
▪ The lake is commercially netted by licensed fishermen.
Wikipedia

Net (mathematics)

In mathematics, more specifically in general topology and related branches, a net or Moore–Smith sequence is a generalization of the notion of a sequence. In essence, a sequence is a function with domain the natural numbers, and in the context of topology, the codomain of this function is usually any topological space. However, in the context of topology, sequences do not fully encode all information about a function between topological spaces. In particular, the following two conditions are not equivalent in general for a map f between topological spaces X and Y:

  1. The map f is continuous (in the topological sense)
  2. Given any point x in X, and any sequence in X converging to x, the composition of f with this sequence converges to f(x) (continuous in the sequential sense)

It is true, however, that condition 1 implies condition 2. The difficulty encountered when attempting to prove that condition 2 implies condition 1 lies in the fact that topological spaces are, in general, not first-countable. If the first-countability axiom were imposed on the topological spaces in question, the two above conditions would be equivalent. In particular, the two conditions are equivalent for metric spaces.

The purpose of the concept of a net, first introduced by E. H. Moore and H. L. Smith in 1922, is to generalize the notion of a sequence so as to confirm the equivalence of the conditions (with "sequence" being replaced by "net" in condition 2). In particular, rather than being defined on a countable linearly ordered set, a net is defined on an arbitrary directed set. In particular, this allows theorems similar to that asserting the equivalence of condition 1 and condition 2, to hold in the context of topological spaces that do not necessarily have a countable or linearly ordered neighbourhood basis around a point. Therefore, while sequences do not encode sufficient information about functions between topological spaces, nets do because collections of open sets in topological spaces are much like directed sets in behaviour. The term "net" was coined by Kelley.

Nets are one of the many tools used in topology to generalize certain concepts that may only be general enough in the context of metric spaces. A related notion, that of the filter, was developed in 1937 by Henri Cartan.

NET

NET may refer to:

Net (magazine)

net is a monthly print magazine that publishes content on web development and design. Founded in 1994, the magazine is published in the UK by Future plc. It is widely recognized as the premiere print publication for web designers. The magazine can be purchased from most major book retailers, including the American Barnes & Noble.

The magazine was initially aimed at the general Internet user, but has adapted into a title aimed at professional and novice web designers; a significant proportion of its readers are full-time web developers. Its sister publication, the web design-focused Creative Bloq blog, is estimated to receive over 9 million monthly readers according to analytics firm SimilarWeb.

The company, and its parent Future plc, are also known for their annual The Net Awards, which is an awards body recognizing outstanding achievements in the web development industry.

Net (polyhedron)

In geometry the net of a polyhedron is an arrangement of edge-joined polygons in the plane which can be folded (along edges) to become the faces of the polyhedron. Polyhedral nets are a useful aid to the study of polyhedra and solid geometry in general, as they allow for physical models of polyhedra to be constructed from material such as thin cardboard.

An early instance of polyhedral nets appears in the works of Albrecht Dürer.

NET (telecommunications)

NET is the largest cable television operator in Latin America. The company's Net service (cable TV) had around 5.4 million subscribers as of Q2 2012. Net also operates the broadband internet service Net Vírtua, with 4.9 million subscribers as of Q2 2012 and telephone over cable (under the Net Fone via Embratel name) with more than 2.5 million subscribers.

Net (Chinese constellation)

The Net mansion is one of the Twenty-eight mansions of the Chinese constellations. It is one of the western mansions of the White Tiger.

Net (textile)

Net or netting is any textile in which the yarns are fused, looped or knotted at their intersections, resulting in a fabric with open spaces between the yarns. Net has many uses, and come in different varieties. Depending on the type of yarn or filament that is used to make up the textile, its characteristics can vary from durable to not durable.

Net (device)

A net, in its primary meaning, comprises fibers woven in a grid-like structure. It blocks the passage of large items, while letting small items and fluids pass. It requires less material than something sheet-like, and provides a degree of transparency. Examples include cargo nets, fishing nets, butterfly nets, cricket nets, bird netting or nets used in sporting goals in games such as soccer, basketball, Bossaball and ice hockey. A net also separates opponents in various net sports such as volleyball, tennis, badminton, and table tennis, where the ball or shuttlecock must go over the net to remain in play. Nets have been in use since primitive times, and the weaving of nets may be a precedent to basket weaving.

The adjectives reticulated and retiary both mean "net-like". Animal species such as the reticulated giraffe and reticulated python have net-like body markings. When a hole is ripped in a net, there are actually fewer holes in it than before the net was ripped.

Most of the other meanings of the term arise by analogy with the use above, see net.

Nét

Net (economics)

A net ( British English: nett) value is the resultant amount after accounting for the sum or difference of two or more variables.

In economics, it is frequently used to imply the remaining value after accounting for a specific, commonly understood deduction. In these cases it is contrasted with the term gross, which refers to the pre-deduction value. For example, net income is the total income of a company after deducting its expenses—commonly known as profit—or the total income of an individual after deducting his or her income tax. Profit may be broken down further into pre-taxed or gross profit and profit after taxes or net profit. Similarly, an individual's net worth the difference between their assets (what they own) and their liabilities (what they owe to others).

Similarly, net investment in physical capital such as machinery equals gross (total) investment minus the dollar amount of replacement investment that offsets depreciation of pre-existing machinery, thus giving the change in the amount of machinery available for use. Likewise, net national product equals gross national product minus depreciation.

Wiktionary

net

Etymology 1 n. 1 A mesh of string, cord or rope. 2 A device made from such mesh, used for catching fish, butterflies, etc. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To catch by means of a net. 2 (context transitive figuratively English) To catch in a trap, or by stratagem. 3 To enclose or cover with a net. 4 (context transitive football English) To score (a goal). 5 (context tennis English) To hit the ball into the net. Etymology 2

  1. 1 (context obsolete English) good, desirable; clean, decent, clear. 2 Free from extraneous substances; pure; unadulterated; neat. 3 Remaining after expenses or deductions. 4 final; end. adv. after expenses or deductions alt. 1 (context obsolete English) good, desirable; clean, decent, clear. 2 Free from extraneous substances; pure; unadulterated; neat. 3 Remaining after expenses or deductions. 4 final; end. n. The amount remaining after expenses are deducted; profit. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To receive as profit. 2 (context transitive English) To yield as profit for. 3 To fully hedge a position.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

net

Neat \Neat\, a. [Compar. Neater; superl. Neatest.] [OE. nett, F. nett, fr. L. nitidus, fr. nitere to shine. Cf. Nitid, Net, a., Natty.]

  1. Free from that which soils, defiles, or disorders; clean; cleanly; tidy.

    If you were to see her, you would wonder what poor body it was that was so surprisingly neat and clean.
    --Law.

  2. Free from what is unbecoming, inappropriate, or tawdry; simple and becoming; pleasing with simplicity; tasteful; chaste; as, a neat style; a neat dress.

  3. Free from admixture or adulteration; good of its kind; as, neat brandy; to drink one's vodka neat. Hence: (Chem.) Pure; undiluted; as, dissolved in neat acetone. ``Our old wine neat.''
    --Chapman.

  4. Excellent in character, skill, or performance, etc.; nice; finished; adroit; as, a neat design; a neat thief.

  5. With all deductions or allowances made; net.

    Note: [In this sense usually written net. See Net, a., 3.]

    neat line (Civil Engin.), a line to which work is to be built or formed.

    Neat work, work built or formed to neat lines.

    Syn: Nice; pure; cleanly; tidy; trim; spruce.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

net

Old English net "netting, network, spider web, mesh used for capturing," also figuratively, "moral or mental snare or trap," from Proto-Germanic *natjan (cognates: Old Saxon net, Old Norse, Dutch net, Swedish nät, Old High German nezzi, German Netz, Gothic nati "net"), originally "something knotted," from PIE *ned- "to twist, knot" (cognates: Sanskrit nahyati "binds, ties," Latin nodus "knot," Old Irish nascim "I bind, oblige").

net

"remaining after deductions," 1510s, from earlier sense of "trim, elegant, clean, neat" (c.1300), from Old French net "clean, pure," from Latin nitere "to shine, look bright, glitter" (see neat). Meaning influenced by Italian netto "remaining after deductions." As a noun, 1910.

net

"to gain as a net sum," 1758, from net (adj.). Related: Netted; netting.

net

"to capture in a net," early 15c., from net (n.). Related: Netted; netting.

WordNet

net

  1. adj. remaining after all deductions; "net profit" [syn: nett] [ant: gross]

  2. conclusive in a process or progression; "the final answer"; "a last resort"; "the net result" [syn: final, last]

  3. [also: netting, netted]

net

  1. v. make as a net profit; "The company cleared $1 million" [syn: sack, sack up, clear]

  2. yield as a net profit; "This sale netted me $1 million" [syn: clear]

  3. construct or form a web, as if by weaving [syn: web]

  4. catch with a net; "net a fish" [syn: nett]

  5. [also: netting, netted]

Usage examples of "net".

But thus far there had been no other craft sighted on the waters, although smokes were visible from the many Aliansa village sites and a small group of aborigines was spied netting fish in the shallows.

Among the molluscs and zoophytes, I found in the meshes of the net several species of alcyonarians, echini, hammers, spurs, dials, cerites, and hyalleae.

I picked up one of the aluminium flasks, which was held in place by elastic cargo netting, and started to untwist the cup.

The investigation had netted thousands of potential arrestees on both sides of the Atlantic: men who surfed the net and used their credit cards to buy access to sites where they could download child pornography.

The barricade was a net stretched across the flight deck in front of the island, designed to snag crippled aircraft that, for one reason or another, could not use their arrestor gear.

Commander Arris heard the clear jangle of the radar net alarm as he was dreaming about a fish.

Eustace picked up a net and went to the vat where the artesian water bubbled.

She adjusted her hat, an open velveteen circlet clogged with stiff net veiling, which had been spun askew by the collision with her husband.

His present wealth had also caught an even shrewder financial magician in his net: Gaius Rabirius Postumus, whose thanks for reorganizing the shambles of the Egyptian public accounting system had been to be stripped naked by King Ptolemy Auletes and his Alexandrian minions, and shoved penniless on a ship bound for Rome.

The second trend will be the new classification methods of contents on the Net together with the availability of chips intended to filter offensive information.

Skirting around the lightning net to reach his foe, Kamahl found Talon at the ready, axes swinging in their hypnotic pattern from arm to arm.

There were a few gaps through, for the axial corridors connecting the main cylinder to the nonrotating docking net at each end, shafts for the pipes carrying fluid to and from the fins, and the observation gallery.

That day he had been dreaming of the Baptist as he mended the ripped hemp of the nets, and Simon had insisted he tell him all about the wild man of Bethabara.

It was put outside the ship, netted, separately beaconed, with a copy of the relevant contract, because the cargo holds were converted to hold the passengers.

On learning her husband had been so unfortunate while their neighbours had been successful, she suspected the nets were bewitched, and therefore procured consecrated water wherewith to sprinkle them.