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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Mitre

Miter \Mi"ter\, Mitre \Mi"tre\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Miteredor Mitred; p. pr. & vb. n. Miteringor Mitring.]

  1. To place a miter upon; to adorn with a miter. [WordNet sense 2] ``Mitered locks.''
    --Milton.

  2. To match together, as two pieces of molding or brass rule on a line bisecting the angle of junction; to fit together in a miter joint. [WordNet sense 3]

  3. To bevel the ends or edges of, for the purpose of matching together at an angle. [WordNet sense 1]

Mitre

Miter \Mi"ter\, Mitre \Mi"tre\, n. [F. mitre, fr. L. mitra headband, turban, Gr. ?.]

  1. A covering for the head, worn on solemn occasions by bishops and other church dignitaries. It has been made in many forms, the present form being a lofty cap with two points or peaks.
    --Fairholt.

  2. The surface forming the beveled end or edge of a piece where a miter joint is made; also, a joint formed or a junction effected by two beveled ends or edges; a miter joint.

  3. (Numis.) A sort of base money or coin.

    Miter box (Carp. & Print.), an apparatus for guiding a handsaw at the proper angle in making a miter joint; esp., a wooden or metal trough with vertical kerfs in its upright sides, for guides.

    Miter dovetail (Carp.), a kind of dovetail for a miter joint in which there is only one joint line visible, and that at the angle.

    Miter gauge (Carp.), a gauge for determining the angle of a miter.

    Miter joint, a joint formed by pieces matched and united upon a line bisecting the angle of junction, as by the beveled ends of two pieces of molding or brass rule, etc. The term is used especially when the pieces form a right angle, such as the edges of a window frame, and the edge of each piece at the point of junction is cut at a 45[deg] angle to its long direction. See Miter, 2.

    Miter shell (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of marine univalve shells of the genus Mitra.

    Miter square (Carp.), a bevel with an immovable arm at an angle of 45[deg], for striking lines on stuff to be mitered; also, a square with an arm adjustable to any angle.

    Miter wheels, a pair of bevel gears, of equal diameter, adapted for working together, usually with their axes at right angles.

Mitre

Miter \Mi"ter\, Mitre \Mi"tre\, v. i. To meet and match together, as two pieces of molding, on a line bisecting the angle of junction.

Mitre

Mitre \Mi"tre\, n. & v. See Miter.

Wikipedia

Mitre (disambiguation)

Mitre may refer to:

Mitre (New Zealand)

Mitre is the highest mountain of the Tararua Range, situated in the lower North Island of New Zealand. It has a total height of .

The mountain was named after its double peak that resembles a bishop's mitre.

Mitre

The mitre (; Greek: μίτρα, "headband" or "turban"), also spelled miter (see spelling differences), is a type of headgear now known as the traditional, ceremonial head-dress of bishops and certain abbots in traditional Christianity. Mitres are worn in the Orthodox Church, Roman Catholic Church, as well as in the Anglican Communion, some Lutheran churches, and also bishops and certain other clergy in the Eastern Catholic Churches and the Oriental Orthodox Churches. The Metropolitan of the Malankara Mar Thoma Syrian Church also wears a mitre during important ceremonies such as the Episcopal Consecration.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

mitre

noun
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Both lengths are fixed in the normal manner, the longer one first, and the mitre made good with adhesive.
▪ On the way to the tomb there are some mementoes of the great man, a crucifix staff and a mitre.
▪ Pin in place and stitch the folds of the mitre with a drawstitch and hem or slipstitch the remainder of the hem.
▪ She was dressed in black gauze and held a strobe light aloft like a mitre.
▪ Simply cut the appropriate external mitre on a length of cove then cut it off square.
▪ The Bishop took off his mitre and handed it to an adjacent altar-boy.
▪ There was what may have been a bishop's mitre on the skull, which grinned amiably up at us.
▪ Your intended frame may have a broken mitre, or a missing section of decorative moulding.
Wiktionary

mitre

n. 1 A covering for the head, worn on solemn occasions by church dignitaries. It has been made in many forms, mostly recently a tall cap with two points or peaks. 2 (context heraldry English) A heraldry representation of this covering, usually displayed on top of a bishop's or archbishop's coat of arms. 3 The surface forming the bevelled end or edge of a piece where a miter joint is made; also, a joint formed or a junction effected by two beveled ends or edges; a miter joint. 4 (context historical currency) A 13th-century coin minted in Europe which circulated in Ireland as a debased counterfeit sterling penny, outlawed under Edward I. vb. (commonwealth) (alternative spelling of miter English)

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

mitre

bishop's tall hat, late 14c., from Old French mitre, from Latin mitra "headband, turban," from Greek mitra "headband, turban," earlier a belt or cloth worn under armor about the waist, from PIE root *mei- "to tie" (cognates: Sanskrit Mitrah, Old Persian Mithra-, god names; Russian mir "world, peace," Greek mitos "a warp thread"). In Latin, "a kind of headdress common among Asiatics, the wearing of which by men was regarded in Rome as a mark of effeminacy" [OED]. But the word was used in Vulgate to translate Hebrew micnepheth "headdress of a priest."

WordNet

mitre

  1. n. joint that forms a corner; usually both sides are bevelled at a 45-degree angle to form a 90-degree corner [syn: miter joint, mitre joint, miter]

  2. the surface of a beveled end of a piece where a miter joint is made; "he covered the miter with glue before making the joint" [syn: miter]

  3. a liturgical headdress worn by bishops on formal occasions [syn: miter]

Usage examples of "mitre".

All these confidences caused me sorrow and mortification, because they proved to me, not only that I was not in the promised land where a mitre could be picked up, but also that I would be a heavy charge for him.

There was a welt on his forehead where the heavy orphreyed mitre had rested during the long investiture ceremony.

With beaded mitre and with crozier, stalled upon his throne, widower of a widowed see, with upstiffed omophorion, with clotted hinderparts.

Three vials of the tears which daemons weep When virtuous spirits through the gate of Death Pass triumphing over the thorns of life, Sceptres and crowns, mitres and swords and snares, Trampling in scorn, like Him and Socrates.

Tall, pointed both at the front and at the back, the mitre was made of a stiff white cloth and trimmed with thickly embroidered gold ribbons.

Passing through these faculties with baneful haste and a harmful diploma, they lay violent hands upon Moses, and sprinkling about their faces dark waters and thick clouds of the skies, they offer their heads, unhonoured by the snows of age, for the mitre of the pontificate.

The day following I saw there a great number of persons apparelled in divers colours, having painted faces, mitres on their heads, vestiments coloured like saffron, Surplesses of silke, and on their feet yellow shooes, who attired the goddesse in a robe of Purple, and put her upon my backe.

Rhys Michael and Michaela sat at his left, regally coronetted and in royal blue, and both archbishops stood at his right in golden copes and mitres as the Court paid their respects.

Having purchased the usual quota of shirts and shoes, he took a leisurely promenade about the streets, where crowds of people of many nationalities--Europeans, Persians with pointed caps, Banyas with round turbans, Sindes with square bonnets, Parsees with black mitres, and long-robed Armenians--were collected.

All these confidences caused me sorrow and mortification, because they proved to me, not only that I was not in the promised land where a mitre could be picked up, but also that I would be a heavy charge for him.

My next meeting with Johnson was on Friday the 1st of July, when he and I and Dr. Goldsmith supped together at the Mitre.

Another evening Dr. Goldsmith and I called on him, with the hope of prevailing on him to sup with us at the Mitre.

Knights with shattered horseheads, bishops with cracked mitres, pawns with their electronic guts hanging out.

This witness Anderson mentions is probably Joseph Lawende, the cigarette salesman who was believed to have seen Catherine Eddowes with the Ripper at the entrance to Mitre Square.

Spore cases, yellowish green, as large as mitres and much resembling them in shape protruded from the heaps.