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KI

Ki or KI may refer to:

Ki (kana)

, in hiragana, in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which each represent one mora. Both represent and are derived from a simplification of the kanji. The hiragana character き, like さ, is drawn with the lower line connected when printing. When writing, the lines are separated (as in the picture to the right).

A dakuten may be added to the character; this transforms it into ぎ in hiragana, ギ in katakana, and gi in Hepburn romanization. The phonetic value also changes, to in initial, and varying between and in the middle of words.

A handakuten (゜) does not occur with ki in normal Japanese text, but it may be used by linguists to indicate a nasal pronunciation .

Form

Rōmaji

Hiragana

Katakana

Normal k-
(か行 ka-gyō)

Ki

きい
きー

キイ
キー

Addition yōonky-
( kya-gyō)

Kya

きゃ

キャ

Kyā

きゃあ
きゃー

キャア
キャー

Kyu

きゅ

キュ

Kyū

きゅう
きゅー

キュウ
キュー

Kyo

きょ

キョ

Kyō

きょう
きょお
きょー

キョウ
キョオ
キョー

Addition dakuteng-
( ga-gyō)

Gi

ぎい
ぎー

ギイ
ギー

Addition yōon and dakuten gy-
( gya-gyō)

Gya

ぎゃ

ギャ

Gyā

ぎゃあ
ぎゃー

ギャア
ギャー

Gyu

ぎゅ

ギュ

Gyū

ぎゅう
ぎゅー

ギュウ
ギュー

Gyo

ぎょ

ギョ

Gyō

ぎょう
ぎょお
ぎょー

ギョウ
ギョオ
ギョー

Other additional forms

Form A (ky-)

Romaji

Hiragana

Katakana

kyi

きぃ

キィ

kye

きぇ

キェ

Ki (goddess)

CuneiformKI (Borger 2003 nr. 737; U+121A0 ) is the sign for "earth". It is also read as GI, GUNNI (=KI.NE) "hearth", KARAŠ (=KI.KAL.BAD) "encampment, army", KISLAḪ (=KI.UD) "threshing floor" or steath, and SUR (=KI.GAG). In Akkadian orthography, it functions as a determiner for toponyms and has the syllabic values gi, ge, qi, and qe.

As an earth goddess in Sumerian mythology, Ki was the chief consort of An, the sky god. In some legends Ki and An were brother and sister, being the offspring of Anshar ("Sky Pivot") and Kishar ("Earth Pivot"), earlier personifications of heaven and earth.

By her consort Anu, Ki gave birth to the Anunnaki, the most prominent of these deities being Enlil, god of the air. According to legends, heaven and earth were once inseparable until Enlil was born; Enlil cleaved heaven and earth in two. An carried away heaven. Ki, in company with Enlil, took the earth.

Some authorities question whether Ki was regarded as a deity since there is no evidence of a cult and the name appears only in a limited number of Sumerian creation texts. Samuel Noah Kramer identifies Ki with the Sumerian mother goddess Ninhursag and claims that they were originally the same figure.

She later developed into the Babylonian and Akkadian goddess Antu, consort of the god Anu (from Sumerian An).

Ki (Korean surname)

Ki, also romanized as Kee or Gi, is a Korean family name. According to the 2000 census, there were 26,679 people with this surname in South Korea.

  • Empress Gi (1315–1369/1370), the last empress of the Yuan Dynasty (Mongol Empire)
  • Gi Dae-seung (1527–1572), Confucian scholar
  • Gi Ja-heon (1562–1624), politician, Yeonguijeong (Prime Minister) of Joseon
  • Ki Bo-bae (b. 1988), archer, 2 gold medalist of the 2012 Summer Olympics
  • Ki Sung-yueng (b. 1989), football player, currently playing for Swansea City A.F.C. (Premier League)

Ki (Devin Townsend Project album)

Ki is the eleventh studio album by Canadian musician Devin Townsend, and the first of six albums in the Devin Townsend Project series. The album was released on May 25, 2009, on Townsend's independent record label HevyDevy Records.

Townsend, the founder, songwriter, and frontman of extreme metal band Strapping Young Lad and progressive metal group The Devin Townsend Band, dissolved both bands in 2006 to spend time with his family and avoid the burnout of touring and interviewing. After a period of self-discovery and a year-long break from songwriting, Townsend began work on a four-album series to clarify his identity as a musician. Ki includes themes of self-control and sobriety, and is musically subtler than much of the artist's previous work, consisting of ambient rock music interlaced with tentative bursts of heavy metal.

The album was written, produced, mixed, and co-engineered by Townsend, who also performed guitar and vocals. Townsend assembled a supporting group of Vancouver musicians including blues drummer Duris Maxwell, rock bassist Jean Savoie, keyboardist Dave Young, and guest vocalist Ché Aimee Dorval to play on the album. While some critics found the album uneven, Ki received generally positive reviews for its unexpected musical direction, along with its production, vocal dynamics, and mix of influences.

Ki (cuneiform)

The cuneiformki sign, is a multi-use sign used in the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Amarna letters and numerous texts. It also has a sumerogram usage (capital letter ( majuscule)). Cuneiform ki is used for syllabic "ki", and also for alphabetic "k", and alphabetic i. It has additional consonant usage for "q", instead of "k", and also "e", "é", and "í" for vowel "i". Its usage numbers from the Epic of Gilgamesh are as follows: ke-(9), ki-(291), -(18), -(62), and KI-(288).

For sumerogram KI, KI becomes Akkadian languageitti, for English language "with".

WordNet

ki

  1. n. the circulating life energy that in Chinese philosophy is thought to be inherent in all things; in traditional Chinese medicine the balance of negative and positive forms in the body is believed to be essential for good health [syn: qi, chi, ch'i]

  2. goddess personifying earth; counterpart of Akkadian Aruru

Wiktionary

ki

Etymology 1 alt. ti, a plant native to the Pacific islands and China, ''Cordyline fruticosa'' n. ti, a plant native to the Pacific islands and China, ''Cordyline fruticosa'' Etymology 2

n. (label en philosophy obsolete) (altform chi English)

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Ki

Ki \Ki\ prop. n. The Sumerian goddess personifying earth; the counterpart of Akkadian Aruru.

Usage examples of "ki".

Then, and only then, had Kien moved on to the city and joined the army of the fledgling Republic of Vietnam.

Brennan and his men had captured documents that contained enough evidence to connect General Kien solidly with all his various criminal activities, from prostitution to drug running to consorting with the North Vietnamese.

Once he reached base, exhausted and more than a little delirious from wounds, infection, and fever, he made the mistake of denouncing Kien to his commanding officer.

Somehow he managed to control himself, and rather than a court-martial he was let off with a warning to leave General Kien alone.

Latham created the jumpers, and Kien controlled them through his loyal lieutenant.

His eyes were as flat and hard as Kien remembered them, though they had an even greater bleakness, as if a major new worry was gnawing at him.

That was all the advantage Kien needed to finally crush his long-time foe.

Annoyed, Kien opened his mouth to say something, then suddenly closed it.

When Kien had set the trap to catch the disloyal Philip Cunningham, he used his own corpse as bait, having been jumped into the body of Leslie Christian.

It failed Kien why anybody would waste his time like that, but he allowed lesser men their divertimenti.

Rick and Mick looked at each other, and Kien realized that neither wanted to be the bearer of bad tidings.

Rick and Mick looked at each other, looked back at Kien, and shrugged.

Rick held it up, giving it another shake as Kien slipped out of the car.

Wyrm approached, still looking angry, and Kien drew back behind his desk.

His father, Kien thought, had been such a hypocrite, always crying and moaning about how poor they were.