Find the word definition

Wikipedia

Chi (letter)

Chi ( uppercaseΧ, lowercaseχ; ) is the 22nd letter of the Greek alphabet, pronounced or in English.

Chi

Chi or CHI may refer to:

Chi (unit)

The chi is a traditional Chinese unit of length. Although it is often translated as the "", its length was originally derived from the length of the human forearm, similar to the ancient cubit. It first appeared during China's Shang dynasty approximately 3000 years ago and has since been adopted by other East Asian cultures such as Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Its present value is standardized around a third of a meter, although the exact standards vary among the mainland of the People's Republic of China, its special administrative region of Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

In its ancient and modern forms, the chi is divided into 10 smaller units known as cun (the "Chinese inch") and 10 chi together form one zhang.

Chi (kana)

, in hiragana, or in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which each represent one mora. Both are phonemically although for phonological reasons, the actual pronunciation is .

The kanji for one thousand (千, sen), appears similar to チ, and at one time they were related, but today チ is used as phonetic, while the kanji carries an entirely unrelated meaning.

Many onomatopoeic words beginning with ち pertain to things that are small or quick.

The dakuten forms ぢ, ヂ, pronounced the same as the dakuten forms of the shi kana in most dialects (see yotsugana), are uncommon. They are primarily used for indicating a voiced consonant in the middle of a compound word (see rendaku), and they can never begin a word, although some people will write the word for hemorrhoids (normally じ) as ぢ for emphasis. The dakuten form of the shi character is sometimes used when transliterating "di", as opposed to チ's dakuten form; for example, Aladdin is written as アラジン Arajin, and radio is written as ラジオ. More commonly though is to use ディ instead, such as ディオン to translate the name Dion.

In the Ainu language, チ by itself is pronounced , and can be combined with the katakana ヤ, ユ, エ, and ヨ to write the other sounds as well as sounds. The combination チェ (pronounced ), is interchangeable with セ゚.

Chi (magazine)

Chi (Italian for "Who") is an Italian weekly gossip magazine geared towards a female viewership published in Milan, Italy.

Chi (mythology)

Chi means either "a hornless dragon" or "a mountain demon" (namely, chimei 螭魅) in Chinese mythology. Hornless dragons were a common motif in ancient Chinese art, and the chiwen 螭吻 (lit. "hornless-dragon mouth") was an Imperial roof decoration in traditional Chinese architecture.

Chi (Chobits)

is a fictional character in the manga series Chobits and its anime adaptation. Chi is a Chobit, a type of personal computer called a persocom that is far more technologically advanced than regular persocoms, and who are said to possess true machine intelligence rather than relying on software programs like other persocoms. She is found by Hideki, a high school graduate who has no idea about her unique abilities or of her past. Over the course of the series Hideki tries to discover what type of persocom Chi is, being told that she is something special. He finds her a job, and has to deal with her being kidnapped at one point. Chi learns about the things around her and what it means to be in love. At the end of the series, Chi finds the person "just for her", and her forgotten identity is revealed, causing Hideki to confront his feelings.

In two interviews describing the series Chi's creators, CLAMP, said it would be much easier if computers could speak to you when they had errors. Chi is voiced by Rie Tanaka in the anime and Georgette Rose in its English counterpart. The manga and anime follow Hideki's find of Chi and their relationship, but differ in the storyline. Chi's critical reception has been mostly positive, with reviewers calling her "cute". In addition to Chobits, she is also a crossover character in the series Tsubasa: Reservoir Chronicle and is referenced in other works.

Chi (Who)

"Chi (Who)" is a 2008 Italian language debut single by Aram Quartet an Italian group of artists who won the first season of Italian series of The X Factor in 2008.

The song "Chi (Who)" was written by X Factor judge Morgan and vocal coach Gaudy for the show and was performed by Aram Quartet during the finals of the series for Rai 2 that aired on 27 November 2009.The single was officially released by Sony BMG as an EP immediately after the announcement of the results with Aram Quartet declared as winner. It reached #5 on 5 June 2008 on the Italian Singles Chart in its first week of release, then going down to #9 the following week.

Chart (2008)

Peak
position

Italian Singles Chart

5

Chi (film)

Chi is a 2013 National Film Board of Canada documentary film by Anne Wheeler about Vancouver actress Babz Chula and her death from cancer. Part of the film was shot at an ayurvedic clinic in Kerala, India, where Chula had travelled for cancer treatment in 2010.

The idea to make a film about her story first occurred to Wheeler when she cast Chula, already diagnosed with cancer in real life, as a cancer patient who dispenses philosophical advice in her 2008 TV movie, Living Out Loud. When Wheeler and Chula worked together again the following year on Carl Bessai’s film Fathers & Sons, Chula shared the story of a patient she'd met at a chemotherapy who credited her recovery to treatment in India. Wheeler, who had spent considerable time in India, decided to accompany Chula on her search for a cure.

The film had its world premiere in April 2013 at the Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival. On March 9, 2014, Chi was named best short documentary film at the Canadian Screen Awards.

Wiktionary

chi

Etymology 1 alt. The twenty-second letter of the Classical Greek and Modern Greek Greek alphabets. n. The twenty-second letter of the Classical Greek and Modern Greek Greek alphabets. Etymology 2

alt. (label en philosophy) A life force in traditional Chinese philosophy, culture, traditional Chinese medicine, etc. related (but not limited) to breath and circulation n. (label en philosophy) A life force in traditional Chinese philosophy, culture, traditional Chinese medicine, etc. related (but not limited) to breath and circulation Etymology 3

alt. 1 The Chinese foot, a traditional Chinese unit of length based on the human forearm 2 (qualifier: Mainland China) The Chinese unit of length standardized in 1984 as 1/3 of a meter. 3 (qualifier: Taiwan) The Taiwanese unit of length standardized as 10/33 of a meter, identical to the Japanese shaku. 4 (qualifier: Hong Kong) The chek or Hong Kong foot, a unit of length standardized as 0.371475 meters. n. 1 The Chinese foot, a traditional Chinese unit of length based on the human forearm 2 (qualifier: Mainland China) The Chinese unit of length standardized in 1984 as 1/3 of a meter. 3 (qualifier: Taiwan) The Taiwanese unit of length standardized as 10/33 of a meter, identical to the Japanese shaku. 4 (qualifier: Hong Kong) The chek or Hong Kong foot, a unit of length standardized as 0.371475 meters.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

chi

22nd letter of the Greek alphabet, representing a -kh- sound (see ch). The letter is shaped like an X, and so the Greek letter name was used figuratively to signify such a shape or arrangement (as in khiasma "two things placed crosswise;" khiastos "arranged diagonally; marked with an X;" khiazein "to mark with an 'X', to write the letter 'X'"). Some dialects used chi to represent the -ks- sound properly belonging to xi; Latin picked this up and the sound value of chi in Latin-derived alphabets is now that of English X.

WordNet

chi

  1. n. the circulating life energy that in Chinese philosophy is thought to be inherent in all things; in traditional Chinese medicine the balance of negative and positive forms in the body is believed to be essential for good health [syn: qi, ch'i, ki]

  2. the 22nd letter of the Greek alphabet [syn: khi]

Usage examples of "chi".

Not only had Chi been his cushion to accepting his humble life as a refugee, his new friend had also taught him the joys and tricks of cooking.

The younger one, Chi, seemed like a born adventurer who had really not set high goals to his life.

Lang translated and Chi giggled, making the old lady hide her face out of embarrassment.

After two sober nights, I inquired if there was anything to drink on board and Chi promised to buy a bottle of whisky from the sailors.

Despite my deep distaste for such entertainment, I did not find it particularly disturbing as it gave me legitimate chance to concentrate on English-speaking Lang without feeling bad for not involving Chi in the conversation.

I could see that something similar was happening to my friends and our conversation about happiness and perils of refugee life degenerated into humming silly songs with Chi and not really paying much attention to what was being said.

It had all ended up with gulping the last drops of whisky with Chi in my cabin and with an immediate subsequent collapse.

He and Chi had chosen the most difficult path towards their summit, whatever it was.

It somehow seemed to me that Chi was in some ways already approaChing his.

We managed to find a moment with Lang and Chi before it was time for the passengers to disembark.

I suggested to Chi through the amused interpretation by Lang who had difficulties in keeping a straight face.

Lang told me not to worry, that he had been telling Chi the same thing.

Finally Chi slapped me on the shoulder, with his eyes smiling wide and cheerfully under that charming thick black tuft of hair.

Lang gave him a present in the form of a thick volume of words and lyrics for evergreens and other sing-alongs, and Chi showed remarkable talent in imitating the texts once Lang had pronounced them to him a few times.

At first, Lang suffered from periods of nausea and dizziness caused by the constant movement of the vessel, whereas Chi remained in good form and spirit irrespective of the weather and moods of the passengers.