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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

hit

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bullet hits/strikes sb
▪ The first bullet hit him in the back.
a car hits sth/crashes into sth
▪ I saw the car leave the road and hit a tree.
a chart hit (=a song or album in the charts)
▪ At last the band had got a chart hit.
a hit list (=a list of people, organizations etc that someone wants to harm or stop)
a hit movie (=a successful movie)
▪ He has directed a string of hit movies.
a hit on a website (=an occasion when someone visits a website)
▪ There have already been 5000 hits on our website.
a (huge) box office hit/success
a shot hits sb/sth
▪ The shot hit the burglar in the chest and killed him instantly.
a storm hits/strikes (a place)
▪ We should try to get home before the storm hits.
a wave hits sb/sth
▪ He was hit by a wave of nausea every time he tried to stand up.
an earthquake hits/strikes a place (=happens in a particular place)
▪ The region was struck by a major earthquake last year.
badly hit (=be badly affected)
▪ Businesses have been badly hit by the economic slowdown.
be hit by a recession (=be badly affected by it)
▪ Rural areas have been hardest hit by the recession.
fall to/hit/reach etc a new low (=be worth less than ever before)
▪ The euro has fallen to a new low against the dollar.
hit a ball
▪ He swung the bat back and hit the ball hard.
hit a target
▪ Not every bomb hit its target.
hit list
▪ He was on a terrorist’s hit list.
hit man
hit on an ideainformal (= suddenly think of an idea)
▪ Then we hit on the idea of renting a cottage.
hit parade
hit squad
hit the big time
▪ The 46-year-old author has finally hit the big time.
hit the bottle (=regularly drink too much)
▪ She was under a lot of stress, and started hitting the bottle.
hit the charts (=enter the charts)
▪ The group eventually hit the charts.
hit the headlines (=make the headlines)
▪ Crane hit the headlines after she was arrested for the murder of her husband.
hit the stands (=became available to buy)
▪ One week, three magazines hit the stands with Peace Corps stories.
hit...home run
▪ I didn’t think I could hit a home run.
hit/run into a snag
▪ The grand opening hit a snag when no one could find the key.
hit/strike oil (=to find oil when you are digging for it)
▪ The engineers drilled down a few hundred metres until they hit oil.
▪ The Ohio Oil Company struck oil on May 3rd.
lightning hits/strikes sth
▪ The house had been hit by lightning.
reach/achieve/hit a target (=meet it)
▪ They achieved their target with just days to spare.
slam on/jam on/hit the brakes (=use them suddenly and with a lot of force)
▪ The car in front stopped suddenly and I had to slam on the brakes.
smash hit
▪ They had a smash hit with their first single.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
badly
▪ Vodafone, which could also be badly hit by such a move, lost 10p to 504p.
▪ It should also drum up more work for a profession that has been badly hit by the recession.
▪ The refrigeration industry will be the most badly hit.
▪ The Tapies market was also badly hit.
▪ So does Huddur - another badly hit town.
▪ Motorists passing through Tewkesbury have been badly hit.
▪ Traders in Ross have been particularly badly hit.
hard
▪ Many of the old takeover favourites were also hard hit as speculators moved to take their profits.
▪ I hit hard at the inadequacies in housing in the city.
▪ The bulb had obviously been hit hard soas to break its filament, to ensure no warning light came on.
▪ But then the booze started hitting hard, and I got really scared.
▪ Those farmers who compromise on safety must be hit hard, where it hurts - in the pocket.
▪ Every sector of the technology group was hit hard today.
▪ But properties were hit hard with Greycoat, Speyhawk and Stanhope losing ground.
▪ As usual, some stocks were hit hard because they delivered dismal news.
home
▪ She could see that her remark had hit home.
▪ His comment hit home for me, as both therapist and layperson.
▪ Within hours, the reality of the situation had hit home.
▪ By the early 1970s, this realization had already hit home.
▪ His foot hit home, sinking deep into the little man's belly.
▪ All of a sudden the hollowness of our triumph over nature hit home with striking effect.
▪ And to go back to your start-up page hit Home.
▪ Then her words seemed to hit home.
■ NOUN
ball
▪ O'Neill won the opener on the final ball but was then hit with breaks of 77, 60 and 56.
▪ In 1883, a ball hit into that area was a double.
▪ I feel very comfortable when the ball is hit to him.
▪ Three Hoops stood over the ball and Larsson hit an unstoppable right-foot screamer into the top corner.
▪ The ball hits her square in the face.
▪ The ball carrier will no longer hit and drive.
▪ I drove the ball as far and as straight as any ball I have ever hit in my life.
bottom
▪ At the time, I thought one had hit rock bottom.
▪ Page has hit proverbial rock bottom and has become a walking skeleton living on the streets.
▪ The 28-year-old mechanical engineer's fortunes took a dramatic twist midway through last season when his career hit rock bottom.
▪ They say you have to hit bottom before things start looking up.
▪ It really worries me what the impact could be in a few years when we hit the bottom of the business cycle.
floor
▪ Greenslade and I had hit the floor early.
▪ If you smell smoke, hit the floor, and crawl to the nearest exit.
▪ He was dead before his body hit the floor.
▪ Colonels and privates hit the dirt floor as one!
▪ All that hit the floor was a glossy leaflet inviting her to discover the magic of Christmas at the local hypermarket.
▪ He heard Barnabas hit the study floor running, scattering a braided rug to kingdom come.
▪ The last thing Ardamal heard as he raced down the corridor was the tinkle of metal parts hitting the floor.
▪ Somebody snapped out the lights inside at the sound of those shots and everybody hit the floor.
ground
▪ As they hit the ground, she drove her fingers into his left eye.
▪ The stream of vomit sailed through the air, and it seemed a long time before it hit the ground.
▪ The aeroplane fell apart when it hit the ground.
▪ When it hit the ground I knew it was a real animal.
▪ My legs folded, both knees hit the ground, and I scrambled, in a rage, back on to the wheelbarrow.
▪ The company also could shape a well-educated, flexible pool of employment candidates who could hit the ground running.
▪ Another boy is hitting the ground with a pickaxe, while a third is holding on to some blue plastic sheeting.
▪ It was a great day to pass out: You never would have hit the ground.
headline
▪ Not long afterwards the Dams Raid took place, and this did hit the headlines and captured the imagination of the public.
▪ Their problems all hit the headlines.
▪ Only a life-or-death issue such as a liver or heart will hit the headlines.
▪ Pundits' predictions of repossessions topping 80,000 during 1991 hit the headlines.
▪ Institutions that hit the headlines with accounts paying top-flight rates might also have a few skeletons in the cupboard.
▪ Ride a big winner, hit the headlines - that's racing.
▪ He will not hit the headlines, but he will receive the gratitude of patients and nurses.
▪ But what will actually be done about traffic Sir - Once again the traffic issue hits the headlines.
high
▪ It was only a month ago that the index hit a post crash high of 2,423.9.
▪ With the right company, certainly the stock should hit new highs with the next bull market.
▪ Johannesburg hit a record high, ending 0.2% up.
▪ Datatec's share price had a rollercoaster ride last year, it hit a high of R146 in March.
▪ The contract hit a high of 101. 23 earlier.
▪ Lead experienced the biggest swing, hitting a ten-year high of £800 a tonne in March.
▪ The shares hit a high of $ 36. 75 last year.
jackpot
▪ Vernon hits the jackpot Cardiff 2, Bath 3.
▪ People who hit a $ 50 jackpot likely have found their favorite spot.
▪ The 1987 Sunflowers tour hit the jackpot.
▪ On lottery day, Boston Marathon officials discovered they had hit the jackpot.
▪ He felt as if he'd hit the jackpot.
▪ And six days later she hit the jackpot ... when Bonnie paid back the cash.
▪ This time, though, they hit the jackpot with number 3 from Richard Jones.
▪ But they'd had a thorough look through his life just to be sure and hit the jackpot entirely by chance.
mark
▪ In any book of several hundred pages you're bound to hit the mark occasionally.
▪ The first time I saw him hit from the farthest mark, I cheered.
▪ Had the muddy weed really hit its mark?
▪ If one of us hits the half-century mark, we all do.
▪ Today I have to hit as many marks as possible, and Dixie can find them fast.
▪ Not every story hits the mark.
▪ It took five years for revenue to hit the £1 million mark.
▪ About half hit the comic mark.
market
▪ PhotoFinish was well received when it first hit the market under a year ago.
▪ Multimedia keyboards go a step beyond the ergonomically designed keyboards that hit the market a couple of years ago.
▪ Mr Smith must learn that hitting the pay packet hits the housing market, and that hits the institutions.
▪ Today, just a few years after musical compact discs hit the mass market, the long box is history.
▪ A system called DigiBox is expected to hit the market soon.
▪ Once those properties hit the market, their true value will be found out.
▪ More painful still, 16-megabit chips will hit the market at only nine times the price of existing 4-megabit DRAMs.
▪ But a new demographic product hitting the market could take the revolution a step further.
peak
▪ Worst affected will be those who upped borrowings when miners' earnings hit a peak in the early 80s.
▪ It is one of several hormones that hit peak levels in the bloodstream in early adulthood and then decline steadily.
▪ It hit a peak on 20 October with 16,188 barrels, the highest daily figure recorded since production started in 1987.
▪ Terfel hits the peaks early and never falters.
▪ The blade hit the peak of the man's cloth-covered helmet, ringing his ears like the knell of doom.
▪ Since futures prices hit their peak, they have fallen by 54 percent, to around $ 1. 08 a pound.
▪ Printer and software sales also hit a peak.
recession
▪ It should also drum up more work for a profession that has been badly hit by the recession.
▪ Background: The New York area was hit hard by the recession, but pent-up demand is pushing up prices.
▪ But those images are becoming harder and harder to stomach in a world hit by recession.
▪ Reverend Sawyer says like everything else, his church is being hit by the recession.
▪ And not surprisingly, the motorists hardest hit by recession are those living in London and the south-east.
▪ The Automobile Industry is among the hardest hit by the recession.
▪ The South-East and West Midlands have been hardest hit by the recession.
▪ She says rural areas have been hard hit by the recession.
road
▪ Gina Coulstock, 18, stumbled, fell heavily and was knocked out when she hit the road.
▪ Travelers will find it more comfortable and interesting to hit the road this year.
▪ So next time you hit the road make sure it doesn't hit back.
▪ Time to hit the road again.
▪ Doogie allowed himself a small smile of satisfaction as Shifty-Eyes hit the road, then he turned and grabbed Pointy-Beard's tie.
▪ We packed up and hit the road.
▪ I slowed for the roundabout but still managed to hit the motorway slip road at fifty-five.
▪ Once we hit the road out of town, a sign suddenly announced the concert.
rock
▪ At the time, I thought one had hit rock bottom.
▪ Demonstrators smashed in the face, hit with rocks.
▪ The 28-year-old mechanical engineer's fortunes took a dramatic twist midway through last season when his career hit rock bottom.
▪ A 5.4-magnitude earthquake hits southern Oregon, killing a motorist whose pickup was hit by falling rock.
▪ Hello! has won a reputation as heralding disaster by featuring families apparently in bliss just before they hit the rocks.
▪ The one guy drop-kicked him and another guy hit him with a rock.
▪ It was immediately answered by another shot, which hit a rock behind him.
roof
▪ Two shells hit the roof and one exploded in the corridor during the night.
▪ Top editors hit the roof Maybe one picture, but a page full of pictures of black women?
▪ He hit the roof when the pair left to set up home in a bedsit.
▪ The shell hit the roof of the building and made a mess of the inside of the building.
▪ He hit the roof as soon as Peter came in.
▪ What would Old Chao do if he saw them, hit the roof on his way into outer space?
▪ Its hitting the roof so soon had stopped the process.
▪ Well, honey, I hit the roof.
spot
▪ The cognac was not quite up to Skipton's fine Napoleonic standards, but it hit the spot with unerring accuracy.
▪ It is one reason why the Clippers seem to hit a dry spot offensively in most games.
▪ She looked thoroughly sophisticated, the type to want to hit the night spots.
▪ Remember when Wilkinson hit that rough spot in the board meeting?
▪ A young teenage girl often becomes hypercritical of her mum-and knows exactly how to hit her weak spots.
▪ Finally, doctors hit the right spot, and the sound of angry hornets filled the operating room.
▪ It just hit the right spot.
▪ So why does it shock us and shake us so badly when we hit a tough spot?
street
▪ Equipped with such information, I decided it was time to hit the streets.
▪ We bounced over the railroad tracks in Fresno and hit the wild streets of Fresno Mextown.
▪ With its packages yet to hit the street, Clarify figures its technology will cop the leadership position.
▪ But after the officer leaves, Michael grabs his sleeping bag and hits the streets.
▪ The service is currently in beta testing and should hit the streets in the first quarter of next year.
▪ Miguel left, shivering when he hit the street.
▪ When the idea hit the streets, we at Guitarist were unanimous in wanting to throw our weight behind the project.
▪ Laid-off workers are hitting the streets.
target
▪ Leonard's workrate overall produced 438 punches, of which just over half hit the target.
▪ Last year, Trent noted, one-third of the cancer drugs approved hit specific targets.
▪ The Lancasters had to drop the bouncing bomb from precisely sixty feet to hit their target.
▪ The large drops leave the spray behind and pass on to hit the target.
▪ The Horde have been, are and can be inspirational but don't always hit the target here.
▪ My man, the bag, was hit in each target location twice.
▪ Although of limited accuracy by modern standards, the Scuds were reasonably successful at hitting large targets such as urban settlements.
▪ A pistol like this can hit somewhere near its target.
trail
▪ Sefton hit the cup trail tomorrow with a home tie against Metrovick in the Provincial Trophy third round.
▪ Tyros get kick-started by taking shoeless jaunts around their house, back yard and neighborhood before hitting the trail.
▪ Tornado alerts were broadcast throughout the afternoon but the crowds still hit the pilgrimage trail to the Arkansas capital.
▪ Those who hit the trail, and those who build the homestead.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
as soon as your head hits the pillow
be at/hit/reach rock bottom
▪ By four o'clock Melissa's spirits were at rock bottom.
be hard hit/be hit hard
chart-topping record/group/hit etc
direct hit
▪ One bomb scored a direct hit on the aircraft carrier.
▪ A direct hit on the Al-Rasheed was ruled out because of the western journalists there.
▪ Both were direct hits, as he knew they would be.
▪ He was killed instantly, a direct hit.
▪ I lay under my cot and prayed that our hooch would not take a direct hit with a rocket.
▪ It was in a dance hall, a direct hit.
▪ The bomb had been a direct hit and only the last few dwellings had still been standing afterwards.
▪ The next one was a direct hit, and the whole ceiling did come down.
▪ With a beautiful clean throw Trondur made a direct hit.
hit sb like a ton of bricks
▪ The news of her accident hit me like a ton of bricks.
hit the hay
hit the mother lode
hit the sack
▪ Then the two cups of decaff before you hit the sack.
▪ When they do, they hit the sack for marathon love-making sessions - that's once Bill's made the bed!
▪ Your husband needs to relax before he hits the sack.
hit the wall
▪ During the 1982 recession, the deepest since the Depression, state governments began to hit the wall.
▪ Each time the ball hits the wall a brick disappears and you're closer to your aim of breaking down the wall.
▪ He expected to hit the wall of the cliff somewhere up ahead.
▪ I miss and hit the wall.
▪ It gathers speed, and suddenly hits the wall by the foot of the bed.
▪ It hit the wall four feet below him.
▪ It hit the wall near the window and smashed.
▪ Witnesses swear that as fast as the line drive hit the wall, Rivera was rounding second before it touched the ground.
hit/drive/hammer etc sth home
hit/miss the mark
▪ All too often, national political coverage misses the mark.
▪ As a welfare program, the minimum wage misses the mark because it worsens the status of the most disadvantaged youths.
▪ But the show missed the mark on other aspects of police work, the group said.
▪ In any book of several hundred pages you're bound to hit the mark occasionally.
▪ In your recent coverage of Novell's letter of intent to purchase Unix System Laboratories you've really missed the mark.
▪ The movie itself simply misses the mark.
▪ The umpires green-flagged the crash but penalised Stripes for hitting the mark, effectively giving Kanza the race.
▪ Words don't always hit the mark, do they?
hit/reach rock bottom
▪ After we lost the contract, morale in the office reached rock bottom.
▪ Confidence in the city's police force has hit rock bottom.
▪ Joan Rivers reveals how she hit rock bottom and recovered in her autobiography.
▪ As a result, hotel values hit rock bottom in 1992&.
▪ At the time, I thought one had hit rock bottom.
▪ But this time he does seem to have hit rock bottom.
▪ Ogmore to Barry beach sport hit rock bottom.
▪ The 28-year-old mechanical engineer's fortunes took a dramatic twist midway through last season when his career hit rock bottom.
hit/strike home
▪ The reality of the war didn't hit home until someone from the neighborhood was killed.
▪ All of a sudden the hollowness of our triumph over nature hit home with striking effect.
▪ And to go back to your start-up page hit Home.
▪ By the early 1970s, this realization had already hit home.
▪ His comment hit home for me, as both therapist and layperson.
▪ It must have struck home in some way.
▪ She could see that her remark had hit home.
▪ They spend much of the book showing how various companies have used them to hit home runs or strike out.
▪ Within hours, the reality of the situation had hit home.
hit/strike paydirt
hit/strike the right/wrong note
▪ He reworked everything he wrote until he had hit the right note of Gailic pedantry.
▪ So are buskers in Gloucester striking the right note with their audience?
▪ That would have the merit of simplicity, but would it strike the right note socially?
kick/hit a man when he's down
knock/hit sb for six
▪ He'd done it again, she realised in amazement - with just a few choice words he'd knocked her for six.
pound/hit the pavement
▪ For months, Garcia pounded the pavement for jobs.
▪ And if my next fifteen years are spent pounding the pavement in search of a job without a handset in it - too bad.
▪ He turned and saw a lithe figure in a track suit pounding the pavement towards him.
▪ I wrenched the wheel round in a tight turn, hitting the pavement as I went.
▪ It began to rain when she was half way along Gloucester Road, big spots like buttons hitting the pavement.
▪ Or pull out your own wheels and hit the pavement.
▪ The brown paper bag tied with white string hit the pavement, split and corn went all over the place.
▪ When he's not on the track competing, you will find Paul out pounding the pavements.
run into/hit the buffers
the hit parade
the shit hits the fan
▪ The shit really hit the fan when Andy saw the phone bill.
touch/hit a (raw) nerve
▪ I had finally touched a nerve.
▪ Our article touched a raw nerve.
▪ Q: Why has that era hit a nerve with people now?
▪ The charge has hit a nerve, persuading the company to earmark 265 Levantine buildings for special restoration.
▪ The subject of hawkers had touched a raw nerve.
▪ The theatrical farce touches a nerve.
▪ The wide current appeal of such music seems to touch a nerve of communal masochism.
▪ They also touched a nerve of public anxiety.
touch/hit a raw nerve
▪ Our article touched a raw nerve.
▪ The subject of hawkers had touched a raw nerve.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Hit the brakes!
▪ A sudden rise in inflation always hits living standards.
▪ Analysts say that the value of the Euro could hit rock bottom in the next few months.
▪ As oil production increased, prices hit an all-time low.
▪ Be careful with that stick! You nearly hit me with it.
▪ Buildings that had gotten hit by bombs had still not been repaired.
▪ Careful, don't hit your head.
▪ Dad! Peter keeps hitting me!
▪ Don't hit him, he'll only hit you back.
▪ Elderly people were the hardest hit by the increase in tax on fuel.
▪ Five sailors were killed when their ship hit a mine.
▪ Greg Davis didn't disappoint his teammates, hitting six field goals in six attempts.
▪ He hit him hard in the stomach.
▪ He pulled out of the driveway without looking, and almost hit another car.
▪ He ran out into the road and almost got hit.
▪ I hit my elbow on the corner of that table.
▪ I had hit a few snags in my work.
▪ I have to hit the books.
▪ If sales continue to increase, output may hit the 500,000 mark this year.
▪ It's time to hit the shower.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Courtney was a traditionalist, besides which Jack's career had finally begun to hit the fast track.
▪ He hit a few three-irons and three-woods and that was it.
▪ His face hit the concrete before any of the rest of him.
▪ In 1852 he again played well, hitting 24 and 40 not out and 60 against Dalton.
▪ This is somewhat like making the target broader so that it becomes easier to hit.
▪ When I hit the elephant grass, I just kept going.
▪ Yet only by luck did he hit one of the skaters - who was blasted apart.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ The splashy novelty number was a big hit.
▪ In Britain the biggest box-office hit was Batman Returns with Pounds 2.77 million in the first three days.
▪ Agnes was the biggest hit of that year.
▪ The big hit with the kiddies had to be the Pirates Club.
▪ I went with the mugs and they're a big hit.
direct
▪ Opposite An archer fish achieves a direct hit.
▪ With a beautiful clean throw Trondur made a direct hit.
▪ Not unless it's a direct hit, then you've had it anyway.
▪ No effective defense was possible against a direct hit.
▪ One scored a direct hit but, despite being showered with glass, there were no serious injuries.
▪ Both were direct hits, as he knew they would be.
▪ Points are awarded for direct hits and speed.
▪ He was killed instantly, a direct hit.
great
▪ Or perhaps it's belting out Slade's greatest hits with your best friends and a bottle of wine?
▪ Box sets collect music into greatest hits, anthologies, chronologies, complete collected works, best-of and worst-of packages.
▪ With luck, a few years will bring a greatest hits compilation.
huge
▪ One brand new product that seems to have scored a huge hit at the recent MacWorld show is Adobe's Illustrator.
instant
▪ Meanwhile, the Cheltenham Festival's newest race, the £40,000 added Coral Cup, has been an instant hit with trainers.
▪ Unveiled in 1986, the megaliths were an instant hit.
▪ The Plaza Girls, a troupe of tall dancers that were an instant hit with the public.
▪ Shearer, an instant hit at Blackburn, has yet to convince me.
late
▪ Kylie would spend hours listening to the radio, singing or humming along the latest hits.
recent
▪ Kaufman's not shy about comparing his latest, Terror Firmer, to a certain recent hit starring Anthony Hopkins.
■ NOUN
chart
▪ Over a soundtrack of appropriate chart hits, unidentified teenagers talked about coming to terms with their own sexuality.
▪ It seems this year's surprise chart hit has prompted a renewed interest in the didgeridoo.
record
▪ The first hit record to ever mention a baby though?
▪ Played loose and desperate by Marcus Naylor, Floyd has a hit record out, but he needs another.
▪ The initial costs of the latter are generally held to be underwritten by the large surplus generated by any big hit record.
show
▪ That boy was Luke Perry, heart-throb star of hit show Beverly Hills 90210.
smash
▪ It may not be the London Palladium but it is a smash hit!
▪ Have a great day and we hope your dot.com venture is a smash hit.
▪ Daly has been, quite literally, the smash hit of the Masters with the crowds, attracting the biggest galleries.
■ VERB
become
▪ He was jointly responsible for writing at least one tune which became a hit and made a name for the other writer.
▪ Revived in syndication, the show went on to become an international hit.
▪ His recording of the title song became a massive hit and I understand a new sexier image will be revealed around Christmas.
▪ But when the show became a hit, I think a lot of people looked at television differently.
▪ The disc flopped, but the song became a substantial hit for Tracey Ullman four years later.
▪ Coolidge already has become a hit with neighbors and members of the Chamber of Commerce.
score
▪ One brand new product that seems to have scored a huge hit at the recent MacWorld show is Adobe's Illustrator.
▪ One scored a direct hit but, despite being showered with glass, there were no serious injuries.
▪ If a Skeleton manages to score a wounding hit on an adventurer, something quite hideous happens.
▪ Punters throw coins, trying to score a hit in the tin trays.
▪ Whatever else, the media is scoring a direct hit on itself.
▪ It therefore has to aim at a carefully judged angle to the apparent direction if it is going to score a hit.
▪ It missed mostly; when it did score a hit there was a screaming ping and no more.
▪ A shell scored a direct hit on a petrol tank, and he felt the wave of heat from fifty yards off.
take
▪ He runs too upright, relies too much on sheer strength instead of evading defenders, and so takes too many hits.
▪ We had taken a hit on the fuel tank.
▪ He sees that we're taking the hits and that we can handle the pain.
▪ The high number of craters suggest Mathilde has been taking hits for several billion years.
▪ They absorb these losses either by taking the hit themselves or by paying insurance premiums that are roughly equal to those losses.
▪ Its conspicuous lack of charm took two major hits in the national media in the last month alone.
▪ As Lambert watched, one SE5a took a hit from a shell and fell sideways.
▪ We took four hits, and immediately, we went into a rapid descent to elude the machine guns.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be at/hit/reach rock bottom
▪ By four o'clock Melissa's spirits were at rock bottom.
be hard hit/be hit hard
chart-topping record/group/hit etc
direct hit
▪ One bomb scored a direct hit on the aircraft carrier.
▪ A direct hit on the Al-Rasheed was ruled out because of the western journalists there.
▪ Both were direct hits, as he knew they would be.
▪ He was killed instantly, a direct hit.
▪ I lay under my cot and prayed that our hooch would not take a direct hit with a rocket.
▪ It was in a dance hall, a direct hit.
▪ The bomb had been a direct hit and only the last few dwellings had still been standing afterwards.
▪ The next one was a direct hit, and the whole ceiling did come down.
▪ With a beautiful clean throw Trondur made a direct hit.
haul off and hit/punch/kick sb
hit sb like a ton of bricks
▪ The news of her accident hit me like a ton of bricks.
hit/drive/hammer etc sth home
hit/miss the mark
▪ All too often, national political coverage misses the mark.
▪ As a welfare program, the minimum wage misses the mark because it worsens the status of the most disadvantaged youths.
▪ But the show missed the mark on other aspects of police work, the group said.
▪ In any book of several hundred pages you're bound to hit the mark occasionally.
▪ In your recent coverage of Novell's letter of intent to purchase Unix System Laboratories you've really missed the mark.
▪ The movie itself simply misses the mark.
▪ The umpires green-flagged the crash but penalised Stripes for hitting the mark, effectively giving Kanza the race.
▪ Words don't always hit the mark, do they?
hit/reach rock bottom
▪ After we lost the contract, morale in the office reached rock bottom.
▪ Confidence in the city's police force has hit rock bottom.
▪ Joan Rivers reveals how she hit rock bottom and recovered in her autobiography.
▪ As a result, hotel values hit rock bottom in 1992&.
▪ At the time, I thought one had hit rock bottom.
▪ But this time he does seem to have hit rock bottom.
▪ Ogmore to Barry beach sport hit rock bottom.
▪ The 28-year-old mechanical engineer's fortunes took a dramatic twist midway through last season when his career hit rock bottom.
hit/strike home
▪ The reality of the war didn't hit home until someone from the neighborhood was killed.
▪ All of a sudden the hollowness of our triumph over nature hit home with striking effect.
▪ And to go back to your start-up page hit Home.
▪ By the early 1970s, this realization had already hit home.
▪ His comment hit home for me, as both therapist and layperson.
▪ It must have struck home in some way.
▪ She could see that her remark had hit home.
▪ They spend much of the book showing how various companies have used them to hit home runs or strike out.
▪ Within hours, the reality of the situation had hit home.
hit/strike paydirt
hit/strike the right/wrong note
▪ He reworked everything he wrote until he had hit the right note of Gailic pedantry.
▪ So are buskers in Gloucester striking the right note with their audience?
▪ That would have the merit of simplicity, but would it strike the right note socially?
knock/hit sb for six
▪ He'd done it again, she realised in amazement - with just a few choice words he'd knocked her for six.
not know what hit you
the hit parade
touch/hit a raw nerve
▪ Our article touched a raw nerve.
▪ The subject of hawkers had touched a raw nerve.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Titanic" was a big hit all over the world.
▪ a new hit single from Janet Jackson
▪ an album of the Beatles' greatest hits
▪ Our site had 2000 hits in the first month.
▪ The official World Cup web-site scored a record number of hits last week.
▪ When I first heard the song I knew it would be a hit.
▪ You may get thousands of hits that are irrelevant to your question.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But the decision seems to be a hit with the scouts.
▪ It lasted longer and that, a better hit.
▪ Still, it was a shock when Vee-Jay filed for bankruptcy in 1965, while it was still turning out hits.
▪ The tuna tartare with chopped avocado, the clam chowder with smoked bacon and the giant Louisiana prawns were all a hit.
▪ They absorb these losses either by taking the hit themselves or by paying insurance premiums that are roughly equal to those losses.
▪ This time Dennis claimed hits on a destroyer while Osborne inflicted damage on a supply ship.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Hit

Hit \Hit\, pron. It. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Hit

Hit \Hit\, 3d pers. sing. pres. of Hide, contracted from hideth. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Hit

Hit \Hit\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hit; p. pr. & vb. n. Hitting.] [OE. hitten, hutten, of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. hitte to hit, find, Sw. & Icel. hitta.]

  1. To reach with a stroke or blow; to strike or touch, usually with force; especially, to reach or touch (an object aimed at).

    I think you have hit the mark.
    --Shak.

  2. To reach or attain exactly; to meet according to the occasion; to perform successfully; to attain to; to accord with; to be conformable to; to suit.

    Birds learning tunes, and their endeavors to hit the notes right.
    --Locke.

    There you hit him; . . . that argument never fails with him.
    --Dryden.

    Whose saintly visage is too bright To hit the sense of human sight.
    --Milton.

    He scarcely hit my humor.
    --Tennyson.

  3. To guess; to light upon or discover. ``Thou hast hit it.''
    --Shak.

  4. (Backgammon) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; -- said of a single unprotected piece on a point.

    To hit off, to describe with quick characteristic strokes; as, to hit off a speaker.
    --Sir W. Temple.

    To hit out, to perform by good luck. [Obs.]
    --Spenser.

Hit

Hit \Hit\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hit; p. pr. & vb. n. Hitting.] [OE. hitten, hutten, of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. hitte to hit, find, Sw. & Icel. hitta.]

  1. To reach with a stroke or blow; to strike or touch, usually with force; especially, to reach or touch (an object aimed at).

    I think you have hit the mark.
    --Shak.

  2. To reach or attain exactly; to meet according to the occasion; to perform successfully; to attain to; to accord with; to be conformable to; to suit.

    Birds learning tunes, and their endeavors to hit the notes right.
    --Locke.

    There you hit him; . . . that argument never fails with him.
    --Dryden.

    Whose saintly visage is too bright To hit the sense of human sight.
    --Milton.

    He scarcely hit my humor.
    --Tennyson.

  3. To guess; to light upon or discover. ``Thou hast hit it.''
    --Shak.

  4. (Backgammon) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; -- said of a single unprotected piece on a point.

    To hit off, to describe with quick characteristic strokes; as, to hit off a speaker.
    --Sir W. Temple.

    To hit out, to perform by good luck. [Obs.]
    --Spenser.

Hit

Hit \Hit\, v. i.

  1. To meet or come in contact; to strike; to clash; -- followed by against or on.

    If bodies be extension alone, how can they move and hit one against another?
    --Locke.

    Corpuscles, meeting with or hitting on those bodies, become conjoined with them.
    --Woodward.

  2. To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, -- often with implied chance, or luck.

    And oft it hits Where hope is coldest and despair most fits.
    --Shak.

    And millions miss for one that hits.
    --Swift.

    To hit on or To hit upon, to light upon; to come to by chance; to discover unexpectedly; as, he hit on the solution after days of trying. ``None of them hit upon the art.''
    --Addison.

Hit

Hit \Hit.\ adj. Having become very popular or acclaimed; -- said of entertainment performances; as, a hit song, a hit movie.

Hit

Hit \Hit\, n.

  1. A striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything.

    So he the famed Cilician fencer praised, And, at each hit, with wonder seems amazed.
    --Dryden.

  2. A stroke of success in an enterprise, as by a fortunate chance; as, he made a hit; esp. A performance, as a musical recording, movie, or play, which achieved great popularity or acclaim; also used of books or objects of commerce which become big sellers; as, the new notebook computer was a big hit with business travellers.

    What late he called a blessing, now was wit, And God's good providence, a lucky hit.
    --Pope.

  3. A peculiarly apt expression or turn of thought; a phrase which hits the mark; as, a happy hit.

  4. A game won at backgammon after the adversary has removed some of his men. It counts less than a gammon.

  5. (Baseball) A striking of the ball; as, a safe hit; a foul hit; -- sometimes used specifically for a base hit.

  6. An act of murder performed for hire, esp. by a professional assassin.

    Base hit, Safe hit, Sacrifice hit. (Baseball) See under Base, Safe, etc.

Wikipedia

Hit (baseball)

In baseball statistics, a hit (denoted by H), also called a base hit, is credited to a batter when the batter safely reaches first base after hitting the ball into fair territory, without the benefit of an error or a fielder's choice.

Hit (disambiguation)

Hīt

Hīt, also spelled Heet , ancient name Is, is an Iraqi city in Al-Anbar province. Hīt lies northwest of Ramadi, the provincial capital.

On the Euphrates River, Hīt is a small walled town built on two mounds on the site of the ancient city of Is. In ancient times, the town was known for its bitumen wells, which were used as far back as 3,000 years ago, to include building of Babylon and for caulking boats. Hīt also became a frontier fortress for Assyria. Now, Hīt is a marketplace for agricultural produce and oil pipelines to the Mediterranean Sea cross the Euphrates there. It was regarded as the head of navigation on the river before the decline in river traffic.

In October 2014, the city had fallen to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. An offensive was launched in February 2016 by the Iraqi Army and allied forces to liberate the city. The Iraqi Army, backed by U.S. airstrikes, liberated Hīt from ISIL on 14 April 2016.

Hit (album)

Hit, also known as Peter Gabriel: The Definitive Two CD Collection, is a 2003 compilation album of songs by the English rock musician Peter Gabriel. It reached No. 29 in the UK album charts and No. 100 in the U.S.. Disc one is labelled Hit and disc two Miss, reflecting the first disc which comprises Gabriel's best known chart singles and the second featuring his more obscure material.

The two-disc set is different in the UK and U.S. because of the second disc. The second disc in the U.S. spans fourteen songs by Gabriel, whilst the UK second disc features fifteen songs. Only some of these appeared on the U.S. version. The UK version collects at least one track from every studio album by Gabriel, including soundtracks, except for Birdy, which is the only album not represented by a track.

The album is Gabriel's first compilation album since 1990's Shaking the Tree: Sixteen Golden Greats and is so far the most recent that was released.

Hit (drink)

Hit is a carbonated soft drink that was introduced in Venezuela over 40 years ago. It is now owned by The Coca-Cola Company. The graphic logo and design is similar to Coke's brand Fanta and, in fact, it is Fanta with a different name.

Flavors:

  • Apple (Manzanita in Spanish, literally "Little Apple")
  • Grape (Uva in Spanish)
  • Orange (Naranja in Spanish)
  • Kolita (mix of tutti-frutti, vanillin and chewing gum)
  • Pineapple (Piña in Spanish)

Available in these flavors until 2003:

  • Passion Fruit (Parchita in Spanish)
  • Tangerine (Mandarina in Spanish)
  • Guarana (renamed as Senzao)
  • Grapefruit (Toronja in Spanish, renamed Quatro)

Category:Coca-Cola brands

Hit (Internet)

A hit is a request to a web server for a file, like a web page, image, JavaScript, or Cascading Style Sheet.

When a web page is downloaded from a server the number of "hits" or "page hits" is equal to the number of files requested. Therefore, one page load does not always equal one hit because often pages are made up of other images and other files which stack up the number of hits counted. Because one page load does not equal one hit, it is an inaccurate measure of a website's popularity or web traffic. A more accurate measure of web traffic is how many page views a web site has.

Hits are useful when evaluating the requirements of your server, depending on the number and size of files which need to be transferred for one request. Servers should be tested to make sure they meet throughput targets (i.e., they should be capable of processing a certain number of "hits" per second).

Unique hits count the number of different individuals who have generated at least one hit.

WordNet

hit

  1. n. (baseball) a successful stroke in an athletic contest (especially in baseball); "he came all the way around on Williams' hit"

  2. the act of contacting one thing with another; "repeated hitting raised a large bruise"; "after three misses she finally got a hit" [syn: hitting, striking]

  3. a conspicuous success; "that song was his first hit and marked the beginning of his career"; "that new Broadway show is a real smasher"; "the party went with a bang" [syn: smash, smasher, strike, bang]

  4. (physics) an brief event in which two or more bodies come together; "the collision of the particles resulted in an exchange of energy and a change of direction" [syn: collision]

  5. a dose of a narcotic drug

  6. a murder carried out by an underworld syndicate; "it has all the earmarks of a Mafia hit"

  7. a connection made via the internet to another website; "WordNet gets many hits from users worldwide"

  8. [also: hitting]

hit

  1. v. cause to move by striking; "hit a ball"

  2. hit against; come into sudden contact with; "The car hit a tree"; "He struck the table with his elbow" [syn: strike, impinge on, run into, collide with] [ant: miss]

  3. affect or afflict suddenly, usually adversely; "We were hit by really bad weather"; "He was stricken with cancer when he was still a teenager"; "The earthquake struck at midnight" [syn: strike]

  4. deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument; "He hit her hard in the face"

  5. reach a destination, either real or abstract; "We hit Detroit by noon"; "The water reached the doorstep"; "We barely made it to the finish line"; "I have to hit the MAC machine before the weekend starts" [syn: reach, make, attain, arrive at, gain]

  6. reach a point in time, or a certain state or level; "The thermometer hit 100 degrees"; "This car can reach a speed of 140 miles per hour" [syn: reach, attain]

  7. hit with a missile from a weapon [syn: shoot, pip]

  8. cause to experience suddenly; "Panic struck me"; "An interesting idea hit her"; "A thought came to me"; "The thought struck terror in our minds"; "They were struck with fear" [syn: strike, come to]

  9. make a strategic, offensive, assault against an enemy, opponent, or a target; "The Germans struck Poland on Sept. 1, 1939"; "We must strike the enemy's oil fields"; "in the fifth inning, the Giants struck, sending three runners home to win the game 5 to 2" [syn: strike]

  10. hit the intended target or goal

  11. produce by manipulating keys or strings of musical instruments, also metaphorically; "The pianist strikes a middle C"; "strike `z' on the keyboard"; "her comments struck a sour note" [syn: strike]

  12. encounter by chance; "I stumbled across a long-lost cousin last night in a restaurant" [syn: stumble]

  13. gain points in a game; "The home team scored many times"; "He hit a home run"; "He hit .300 in the past season" [syn: score, tally, rack up]

  14. consume to excess; "hit the bottle"

  15. kill intentionally and with premeditation; "The mafia boss ordered his enemies murdered" [syn: murder, slay, dispatch, bump off, polish off, remove]

  16. drive something violently into a location; "he hit his fist on the table"; "she struck her head on the low ceiling" [syn: strike]

  17. pay unsolicited and usually unwanted sexual attention to; "He tries to hit on women in bars"

  18. [also: hitting]

Wiktionary

hit

Etymology 1 n. 1 A blow; a punch; a striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything. 2 A success, especially in the entertainment industry. vb. 1 (lb en heading physical) ''To strike.'' 2 # (lb en transitive) To administer a blow to, directly or with a weapon or missile. 3 # (lb en transitive) To come into contact with forcefully and suddenly. 4 # (lb en transitive slang) To kill a person, usually on the instructions of a third party. 5 # (lb en transitive military) To attack, especially amphibiously. 6 (lb en transitive colloquial) To briefly visit. 7 (lb en transitive informal) To encounter. 8 (lb en heading) ''To attain, to achieve.'' 9 # (lb en transitive informal) To reach or achieve. 10 # (lb en intransitive) To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, often by luck. 11 # To guess; to light upon or discover. 12 (lb en transitive) To affect negatively. 13 (lb en heading games) ''To make a play.'' 14 # (lb en transitive cards) In blackjack, to deal a card to. 15 # (lb en intransitive baseball) To come up to bat. 16 # (lb en backgammon) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; said of a single unprotected piece on a point. 17 (lb en transitive computing programming) To use; to connect to. 18 (lb en transitive US slang) To have sex with. 19 (lb en transitive US slang) To inhale an amount of smoke from a narcotic substance, particularly marijuana Etymology 2

pron. (context dialectal English) (l en it It).

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

hit

late 15c., "a rebuke;" 1590s as "a blow," from hit (v.). Meaning "successful play, song, person," etc., 1811, is from the verbal sense of "to hit the mark, succeed" (c.1400). Underworld slang meaning "a killing" is from 1970. Meaning "dose of narcotic" is 1951, from phrases such as hit the bottle.

hit

late Old English hyttan, hittan "come upon, meet with, fall in with, 'hit' upon," from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse hitta "to light upon, meet with," also "to hit, strike;" Swedish hitta "to find," Danish and Norwegian hitte "to hit, find," from Proto-Germanic *hitjan, of uncertain origin. Related: Hitting. Meaning shifted in late Old English period to "strike," via "to reach with a blow or missile," and replaced Old English slean in this sense. Original sense survives in phrases such as hit it off (1780, earlier in same sense hit it, 1630s) and is revived in hit on (1970s).\n

\nUnderworld slang meaning "to kill by plan" is 1955 (as a noun in this sense from 1970). To hit the bottle "drink alcohol" is from 1889. To hit the nail on the head (1570s) is from archery. Hit the road "leave" is from 1873; to hit (someone) up "request something" is from 1917. Hit and run is 1899 as a baseball play, 1924 as a driver failing to stop at a crash he caused. To not know what hit (one) is from 1923.

Usage examples of "hit".

As soon as abreaction hits one of your group, the others soon topple - one after the other they are hooked.

The long obsession had died with Maynard, and he had been dead before he hit the peat, like Cascade and Cotopaxi, Abseil and Col.

After an hour of on-line searching for a technical vulnerability that would give him access to a main development server, he hit the jackpot.

There was not an archer in Achar who could better them now, Belial mused, as he watched them practice hitting moving targets while at the gallop.

And even if the freak chance that had struck Wally with a severe loss of his mental acuity, were to hit him too, he wanted no anaesthesia, no blurring of the memory.

Amazingly this revelation hits thousands of smokers who believed they had addictive personalities until they tried Easyway.

Salem Falls 313 It hit Addle then, what Meg had been doing at the cemetery.

The werewolf to the left of Adeem ducked and the star flew by him, hitting Adeem in the shoulder.

Since my responsibility was not only to promote the publication to subscribers but to advertisers as well, we used a theme that hit a high note with the advertising community.

Eventually someone hit on the idea of breeding typhus in the labs and spraying it in an aerosol form from airplanes.

The second hit the fuselage aft of the jet exhaust, cutting the aircraft in half.

He had to guess, of course, which way agile Tallareyish would spin, and even though he guessed correctly that the elf would go to his right, his swipe was batted aside, not once but three times, before it ever got close to hitting the mark.

At once the riding became easier, for the moment a gust of wind hit the machine on one side, the elevators and ailerons shifted and counteracted its uneven effect.

The RTAF Hueys and the Marine helos on loan to the Thai airmobile forces lifted from the jungle clearing at almost the same moment that the American Hornets were hitting SAM sites at U Feng and along the Taeng River Valley.

Lilliputian ropes restraining a sleek, mechanical Gulliver, Ake hit the forward thrusters and the ship shot backwards out of the slot that had held it like a sword being pulled from a scabbard.