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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

appeal

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a charity appeal (=an act of asking people to give money to a charity)
▪ The organization is launching a charity appeal for a new air ambulance.
a right of appeal (=the right to ask for an official decision to be changed)
▪ In these circumstances, there is no right of appeal.
an appeal fund (=money collected to help people who are in a very bad situation)
▪ The appeal fund has now reached £65,000.
an appeal/request for aid
▪ International aid agencies launched an appeal for emergency aid.
an appeals court/court of appeal (=dealing with cases in which people are not satisfied with a decision)
▪ The appeals court rejected the defence’s argument.
an appeals court/court of appeal (=dealing with cases in which people are not satisfied with a decision)
▪ The appeals court rejected the defence’s argument.
appeal against conviction (=ask a court of law to change it)
▪ The men intend to appeal against their convictions.
Appeal Court
appeal for help (=publicly ask for help)
▪ The police are appealing for help to track down the killer.
appeal to an audience (=be interesting to them)
▪ They brought new fashions into their designs to appeal to a wider audience.
appealed for calm (=asked that the public stay calm)
▪ Hindu leaders appealed for calm after a temple was burnt to the ground.
appeals court
▪ a ruling by a US federal appeals court
ask for/appeal for aid
▪ The Chinese authorities have asked for aid to help the earthquake victims.
Court of Appeal
Court of Appeals
enduring appeal
▪ the enduring appeal of Shakespeare’s plays
has...snob appeal
▪ That kind of car has real snob appeal.
have broad appeal (=be attractive to many different types of people)
▪ Their music has a very broad appeal.
hold (little) interest/appeal/promise etc
▪ Many church services hold little appeal for modern tastes.
right of appeal
sex appeal
▪ She’s young and pretty and full of sex appeal.
suit/satisfy/appeal to sb’s tastes (=provide what someone likes)
▪ We have music to suit every taste.
▪ The magazine caters for all tastes.
the police appeal for sth
▪ Police are appealing for witnesses to the attack.
universal appeal
▪ These stories have universal appeal.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
federal
▪ Forty percent of death sentences have been overturned at federal appeal in recent years.
▪ His case raises a number of issues about controversial speech and illustrates how one federal appeals court treated them.
▪ A legal challenge was launched by the Defenders of Wildlife group and other bodies, and upheld by the federal appeals court.
▪ The federal appeals court agreed with him, saying that the White House demand for secrecy would lead to abuses.
▪ It imperiously overruled not only the Florida court but also the federal appeals court in Atlanta.
▪ A federal appeals court ruled in James's favor.
▪ A federal appeals court upheld the ban, approved by California voters in 1996.
great
▪ It laid the foundation for an organisation with greater appeal to the deaf themselves, particularly the young.
▪ The comparisons can have great appeal to Cooley.
▪ It was for them that the vision of a transformation in political, social and economic relationships held greatest appeal.
▪ There lies the great appeal in her work.
▪ In practice, the great majority of appeals are now decided by inspectors appointed by the Secretary of State for that purpose.
▪ But Walt decided that Dopey would have far greater appeal if he was young and puppyish.
▪ The mobilizing style has a greater appeal when there is dissatisfaction with the statusquo and a feeling that new policies are required.
▪ It is the hinterland that has the greatest appeal.
popular
▪ They are seen in a partisan perspective, a perception that limits the extent of their popular appeal.
▪ But, much more than a filmmaker like Hepworth, he had learnt to find stories that would have genuine popular appeal.
▪ Dramatic life-saving techniques, organ transplants and similar developments have popular appeal.
▪ It is now established as a healthy food, with popular appeal for the ever-growing numbers of health-conscious diners.
▪ The vital ingredient of popular appeal was not there despite several bids to rejig the story.
▪ There was even a buccaneering Robin Hood element, in that their programmes had a genuine popular appeal.
▪ The other is the popular appeal and stature of the president.
▪ Pupils soon grow weary of a parade of historical topics selected solely because they appear to have a popular appeal or relevance.
universal
▪ Within the field of electronic media, the film medium has the most universal appeal and impact.
▪ Its archetypal shape and colour have universal appeal, evoking a sense of fun and childhood.
wide
▪ Given the requisite financial resources, there is no great difficulty about launching exhibitions that have wide public appeal.
▪ Treasury officials expect the securities to have wide appeal to investors, including individuals, pension funds and insurance companies.
▪ After its first year it had the widest appeal of any soap opera.
▪ The emphasis will continue to be on prod-ucts that gain the widest appeal and most acceptance within this group.
▪ The Co-operative movement was a form of mutual aid with a wider working-class appeal although it also largely excluded the poorest.
▪ In trying to craft a document with wide appeal, the drafters produced a softer tone.
▪ Power requires a wider appeal than that to mere sectional interest.
▪ Some of the approaches described below may have wider appeal to your values than others.
■ NOUN
court
▪ In the case of the family proceedings court appeal lies to the Family Division of the High Court.
▪ A party official said it would obey the ruling, but was considering a court appeal.
▪ On both occasions, he won court appeals that returned him to office.
▪ The pair discussed the measure, which is not being enforced pending court appeals.
▪ Currently, federal courts tend to refuse to take such cases until all local and state court appeals are finished.
▪ The appeal would have to be filed within a year of exhausting state court appeals.
■ VERB
allow
▪ I agree with it, and for the reasons which he gives I, too, would allow the appeal.
▪ The Lord Chancellor, Lord Mackay, concurred with allowing the taxpayers' appeal on the grounds of statutory construction alone.
▪ For these reasons, and for the reasons set out in the judgment of Balcombe L.J., I would allow this appeal.
▪ Held, allowing the appeal, but ordering a retrial.
▪ To the extent indicated, we would allow the appeal and the cross-appeal.
▪ For these reasons I would allow these appeals.
broaden
▪ Instead of toning himself down, to broaden his appeal, he toned himself up, and hit his 30 percent ceiling.
consider
▪ Defeated management-employee buy-out bid leader John Hackney considered taking an appeal to the courts.
▪ A party official said it would obey the ruling, but was considering a court appeal.
▪ He is considering an appeal against his five-year sentence, it was revealed last night.
▪ The Supreme Court left that ruling in effect by refusing to consider an appeal from the state of Texas.
▪ McConville said today that he was considering an appeal.
▪ Last month, the California Supreme Court refused to consider an appeal.
▪ In considering an appeal all these avenues will need to be explored.
▪ The Test and County Cricket Board were last night seeking urgent talks with major counties to consider an appeal.
dismiss
▪ So I would dismiss this appeal.
▪ My Lords, for the reasons given I would however dismiss this appeal.
▪ Held, dismissing the appeal, the judge had not referred to any specific provision of the Code.
▪ Accordingly, despite the width of the order and recognising that this is an exceptional case, I would dismiss this appeal.
▪ After careful consideration of all the evidence and relevant law the Tribunal either upholds or dismisses the appeal.
▪ If I could have seen a respectable way to dismiss this appeal I should have been happy to do so.
file
▪ No fee is payable on filing an appeal.
▪ No sooner had voters approved Prop. 209 than civil rights lawyers filed appeals challenging its constitutionality.
▪ Human rights lawyers filed an appeal to the supreme court.
▪ Then they filed another appeal in the federal courts challenging the constitutionality of the death penalty.
▪ A party aggrieved by a decision of an industrial tribunal has 42 days in which to file an appeal.
▪ Because attorneys for Partners filed appeals, Atkins' case may take years to resolve.
hear
▪ Appeals are to be heard by an appeals committee, constituted in accordance with Schedule 2 of the Act.
▪ The case was appealed to federal court after the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals refused to hear her appeal.
▪ A conveyancing appeals tribunal will be set up to hear appeals against the decisions of the board.
▪ The Supreme Court, without comment, refused to hear the case on appeal.
▪ But her mum never knew - until she heard an appeal on the radio.
▪ It would hear appeals involving assessments, chaired by a lawyer, and decisions would be legally binding.
▪ Julie Brown, Coalville, Leicester It's good to hear the stamp appeal is going so well.
▪ It ignored the option of allowing the recounts to continue while it heard Mr Bush's appeal.
hold
▪ Demonstrations were held in favour of Havel's appeal, including a meeting of 50,000 people in Prague on Nov. 21.
▪ The Oregon and Washington laws are on hold pending appeals.
▪ Richard Branson holds little appeal for them.
▪ Another aspect which holds large appeal for the child is the vileness of the stepmother and stepsisters.
▪ This is the only group of men for whom Joan Collins seems to hold any appeal.
▪ So held the court of appeals for the Eighth Circuit, reversing a district court in a Missouri case.
▪ It was for them that the vision of a transformation in political, social and economic relationships held greatest appeal.
▪ Fishing held no appeal for her either.
launch
▪ Victor Hall has launched his annual appeal for information regarding his son's disappearance.
▪ The couple launched an appeal which evoked a generous response from organisations, companies and individuals.
▪ They've launched an appeal to send canned food, medicine and toys to the needy.
▪ The couple have already launched a second appeal and are willing to talk to clubs and organisations about their experiences.
▪ But the Official Solicitor immediately launched an appeal.
▪ He now has 28 days to leave, or launch an appeal against the decision.
▪ Christine Hancock, chairwoman of the trustees, last week launched an appeal for more funds for the service.
▪ She has now launched an appeal with hundreds of envelopes addressed to Environment Secretary Michael Howard.
limit
▪ But the high cost of workflow systems limits their appeal to the larger organisation.
▪ Conservatives and civil libertarians alike had expressed fears over the provisions limiting federal appeals for prisoners.
▪ Commentators who are too committed to particular types of action limit their appeal.
▪ Some investment advisers said, though, that the tax treatment and other features of the securities will limit their appeal.
▪ And if anyone believes that such flexible working arrangements limit the appeal of the practitioner, then they are mistaken.
▪ In these cases, there is simply no space for films with a more limited appeal.
▪ I have suggested that they were limited in their appeal because the changes they opposed were confined to doctrinal issues.
lodge
▪ As a precaution, the Jarrett's accountant lodged a formal appeal.
▪ Hakkar lodged an appeal, which was turned down.
▪ The Wimbledon midfield player officially lodged an appeal with the Football Association against his £20,000 fine and six-month suspended ban.
▪ Mr Fitzgerald immediately lodged an appeal.
▪ In other cases it means the period during which an appeal can be lodged.
▪ Ceausescu's lawyers immediately lodged an appeal against the verdict.
▪ Sarhadi, who had been arrested in December, had unsuccessfully lodged an appeal against extradition.
lose
▪ Cheltenham Borough Council lost its appeal against capping.
▪ Beyond this age, they lose much of their appeal.
▪ Even Torquay, when there is two-and-a-half feet of snow on the ground, will lose some of its appeal.
▪ Eating lost its appeal when bowels could no longer handle waste easily.
▪ Read in studio A man who was refused a job because of his beard has lost his appeal at an industrial tribunal.
▪ Even ratting contests and prize-fights seemed to lose their appeal in the last quarter of the century.
▪ If the men lose their appeal they could face additional costs of several thousand pounds.
▪ In 1953, Beaverbrook decided the column had lost its appeal.
make
▪ Family make public appeal to help catch Richard's killer.
▪ The fire had crumbled down to grayness, and one of the lamps made a gurgling appeal for attention.
▪ Before Marcos spoke, other comandantes made brief appeals for greater respect for indigenous people.
▪ Kennedy and other opponents of habeas corpus reform made a last-minute appeal to have the provision stripped from the bill.
▪ This argument can make little appeal to anyone not caught up in the artifices of philosophy.
▪ Beneath its realist exterior, it too can make its more subliminal appeal.
▪ Instead, Museveni says, parties make appeals along tribal or sectarian lines.
▪ Her only recourse was to make a formal appeal through her lawyer.
raise
▪ Students at the college have raised £6,000 for the appeal so far by parachute jumps and other fund-raising efforts.
▪ The king gave £150,000 and the rest of the money was raised by an appeal fund.
▪ A £5m development appeal launched yesterday by the Natural History Museum has already raised £2.5m.
▪ This gives us an indication of how much money we will need to raise for the appeal.
▪ The scientists hope to raise £100,000 through an appeal by Windsor Safari Park.
▪ And another £500 had been raised for the appeal.
▪ And thanks to their efforts a further £387 was raised for the appeal.
reject
▪ In May 1986 the Supreme Court rejected his final appeals and Pinkerton was executed by lethal injection.
▪ He rejected a mild appeal from Bernstein to run the quotation intact.
▪ A differently composes Court of Appeal rejected an appeal by the local authority on the substantive questions.
▪ The Supreme Court rejected his appeal.
▪ The latter two issues have been rejected on appeal.
▪ On April 28 the Supreme Court rejected an appeal by former Col.-Gen.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
appealing look/expression/voice etc
lodge a complaint/protest/appeal etc
▪ A NORTH-EAST woman has lodged a complaint after an ambulance took almost an hour to arrive at an accident.
▪ Ceausescu's lawyers immediately lodged an appeal against the verdict.
▪ Hakkar lodged an appeal, which was turned down.
▪ Mr Fitzgerald immediately lodged an appeal.
▪ She agrees to go the city council and lodge a complaint.
▪ The Wimbledon midfield player officially lodged an appeal with the Football Association against his £20,000 fine and six-month suspended ban.
▪ This prompted the Foreign Ministry in Bonn to lodge a protest with the Czechoslovak ambassador.
▪ When the public prosecutor appealed against that ruling, Pasko lodged a complaint in an attempt to clear his name.
snob value/appeal
▪ And of course there is the sheer snob appeal of being able to avoid the herd.
▪ These berries even have snob appeal.
▪ Three university researchers say they now have a surprising answer: snob appeal.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Dozens of relief agencies have responded to the drought-stricken country's appeal.
▪ Fink writes with eloquence about the appeal of the Jewish faith for her.
▪ Much of Corfu's appeal lies in its lively night life.
▪ The film is flawed, although it has a certain nostalgic appeal.
▪ The war continues as a fresh UN appeal for a ceasefire has been rejected.
▪ While animation has universal appeal, audiences have become increasingly insistent on high standards.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Few would argue the sheer appeal of Adams's images; they are, by any standard, beautiful things.
▪ It has a glowing global appeal.
▪ The appeal has been five years in the hearing.
▪ The social security appeal tribunals are a typical example.
▪ There is, it must be said, a strong kitsch appeal to the supermodels' star status.
▪ Those appeals are in the works.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
directly
▪ By appealing directly to his fellow-citizens and banking on a generous response, the President may just have gambled correctly.
▪ Twice he appealed directly to Leanna over the airwaves, though he was aware she never listened to the radio.
▪ Artists and journalists are not so dependent upon their colleagues' approval but can appeal directly to the laity.
more
▪ And, ironically, the more worn they are, the more appealing they become.
▪ Users find moving images more appealing than still images and listening more appealing than reading text on a screen.
▪ Ingraham appealed more to young voters and advocated a 10-year limit of the Prime Minister's term in office.
▪ Apparently the show appealed more to adults than children.
▪ Korn/Ferry perhaps appeals more to aggressive, fast-growth conglomerates than to old-fashioned, traditional companies.
▪ Users find moving images more appealing than still images and listening more appealing than reading text on a screen.
▪ Science's masculine image makes it more appealing to boys who are likely to be less emotionally mature.
▪ His mind always at work, Alvin pondered ways to make such programs more appealing to unsophisticated audiences.
to
▪ Who do they think the product will appeal to?
▪ The type of evidence appealed to by Bell in support of his argument is revealing.
▪ What else could we appeal to, to tell us whether something is true, than the evidence of our senses?
▪ The first is the kinds of evidence that the theories appeal to in support of their views.
▪ Solicit means to invite entice, appeal to, or request another person.
▪ And the ear is not the only sensitive part of the human anatomy which Cloverleaf is designed to appeal to.
▪ Thinks I haven't got any better feelings to appeal to, does he?
▪ Are there general principles to appeal to?
■ NOUN
conviction
▪ Widdowson appealed against conviction on the technicality that obtaining hire-purchase did not amount to obtaining services.
▪ He appealed the conviction, but lost in June 1992.
▪ Both men stated their intention to appeal against their convictions.
▪ Under the new rules, state prisoners would have only one chance to appeal their convictions at the federal level.
▪ When the three appealed against their convictions they were successful.
▪ He is free on bail while appealing the conviction.
▪ Lozano was allowed to remain free on bail while appealing against his conviction.
▪ He appealed against conviction, submitting that the trial judge's decision was wrong in law.
information
▪ Mrs McGrath said he was arrested after a local newspaper set up a hotline appealing for information.
▪ Northern Ireland Railways has replaced the telephones, and the police, telephone Moira 611222, have appealed for information.
▪ Blanche gave a few more curt television interviews, voicing her horror at the murder and appealing for any information.
▪ Police are baffled by the killing and are appealing for fresh information.
▪ Police in Armagh are appealing for information about the weekend burglary.
▪ Police are appealing for anyone with information to come forward.
▪ Police say they may be sold cheap and are appealing for information.
▪ Police are appealing for anyone with information about the theft to contact them.
police
▪ She suffered a broken ankle and was also treated at Dryburn. Police are appealing for witnesses.
▪ Voice over Police are appealing for any witnesses to the attack to come forward.
Police hunt for street attacker POLICE are appealing for witnesses to an unprovoked attack on a 20 year-old man.
▪ In Mrs Clark's case she did beat the tender, but the police appealed the decision.
▪ The driver of the lorry has been questioned and police have appealed for further witnesses.
▪ Gunman assaults woman after terror drive POLICE appealed yesterday for witnesses after a woman was kidnapped at gunpoint and sexually assaulted.
▪ Scrap plea: Police have appealed to scrap dealers to look out for brass electrical equipment stolen from Wearmouth Colliery.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
appealing look/expression/voice etc
snob value/appeal
▪ And of course there is the sheer snob appeal of being able to avoid the herd.
▪ These berries even have snob appeal.
▪ Three university researchers say they now have a surprising answer: snob appeal.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The defendant is planning to appeal.
▪ The Murrays have appealed to the public for any information about their missing daughter.
▪ The Red Cross is appealing for donations of food and clothing following the earthquake.
▪ The speaker had appealed to the miners to vote for their union.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But the justices also requested arguments on whether the group appealing the case has standing to be before the Supreme Court.
▪ Getting that information released could also mean appealing to the highest courts.
▪ He appealed to the army, still largely loyal to the Shah.
Wikipedia

Appeal (disambiguation)

__NOTOC__ Appeal may refer to:

Appeal (motion)

In parliamentary procedure, a motion to appeal from the decision of the chair is used to challenge a ruling of the chair.

Appeal

In law, an appeal is the process in which cases are reviewed, where parties request a formal change to an official decision. Appeals function both as a process for error correction as well as a process of clarifying and interpreting law. Although appellate courts have existed for thousands of years, common law countries did not incorporate an affirmative right to appeal into their jurisprudence until the 19th century.

(Sex) Appeal

(Sex) Appeal (Taiwan: 寒蟬效應, China: 不能说的夏天) is a 2014 Taiwanese-Chinese youth romance drama film directed by Wang Wei-ming. It was released in Taiwan and China on October 24, 2014.

Appeal (cricket)

In the sport of cricket, an appeal is the act of a player on the fielding team asking an umpire for a decision regarding whether a batsman is out or not. According to the Laws of Cricket, an umpire may not rule a batsman out unless the fielding side appeals. There have been occasions when a batsman has otherwise technically been out, but the fielding team neglected to appeal so the umpire did not declare him out. An appeal may be made at any point before the bowler starts his run-up for the next ball.

According to the Laws of Cricket, an appeal is a verbal query, usually in the form of, "How's that?" to an umpire. Since the taking of a wicket is an important event in the game, members of the fielding team often shout this phrase with great enthusiasm, and it has transmuted into the slightly abbreviated form, "Howzat?", often with a greatly extended final syllable. Sometimes the second syllable is omitted entirely, the player emitting an elongated cry of simply "How?"

Most players also raise their arms or point at the umpire as part of the appeal. Some players have established their own trademark appeals as well.

Although technically an appeal is required for the umpire to make a decision, in practice it is often obvious to all that a batsman is out, and the batsman may walk off the field without waiting for the decision of the umpire. This is invariably the case when a batsman is out bowled or to an obvious catch. However, the batsman is always entitled to stand his ground and wait for a decision from the umpire. In cases where he considers he might not be out, such as a catch taken low near the grass or where it is not clear whether the ball hit the bat, batsmen will not take the walking option. It is then up to the fielding team to appeal for a decision. Sometimes a batsman will walk even when it is not clear to others that he is out, if in his own mind he is certain he was out; this is considered to be the epitome of sportsmanlike behaviour.

Some decisions, such as leg before wicket, always require an appeal and the umpire's decision, as no batsman will preempt the umpire on what requires fine judgment of several factors. Run-outs and stumpings are usually appealed and decided by an umpire, unless the batsman is clearly out of his ground and obviously out. Appealing differs vastly from sledging in the context that appealing is not supposed to be offensive or directly taunting to the other team, and more of a celebration to the appealing team. However, excessive appealing is against ICC's Code of Conduct:

Under the ICC Cricket Code of Conduct, it is considered unsportsmanlike to:

  • appeal excessively;
  • appeal in an intimidating manner towards an umpire; or
  • appeal under the knowledge that the batsman is not out.

Any instances of such behaviour are punishable by fines or match bans, as adjudicated and imposed by the match referee.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Appeal

Appeal \Ap*peal"\, n. [OE. appel, apel, OF. apel, F. appel, fr. appeler. See Appeal, v. t.]

  1. (Law)

    1. An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re["e]xamination or review.

    2. The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected.

    3. The right of appeal.

    4. An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public.

    5. An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver. See Approvement.
      --Tomlins.
      --Bouvier.

  2. A summons to answer to a charge.
    --Dryden.

  3. A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty.

    A kind of appeal to the Deity, the author of wonders.
    --Bacon.

  4. Resort to physical means; recourse.

    Every milder method is to be tried, before a nation makes an appeal to arms.
    --Kent.

Appeal

Appeal \Ap*peal"\, v. t.

  1. (Law) To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of re["e]xamination of for decision.
    --Tomlins.

    I appeal unto C[ae]sar.
    --Acts xxv. 11.

  2. To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request.

    I appeal to the Scriptures in the original.
    --Horsley.

    They appealed to the sword.
    --Macaulay.

Appeal

Appeal \Ap*peal"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Appealed; p. pr. & vb. n. Appealing.] [OE. appelen, apelen, to appeal, accuse, OF. appeler, fr. L. appellare to approach, address, invoke, summon, call, name; akin to appellere to drive to; ad + pellere to drive. See Pulse, and cf. Peal.]

  1. (Law)

    1. To make application for the removal of (a cause) from an inferior to a superior judge or court for a rehearing or review on account of alleged injustice or illegality in the trial below. We say, the cause was appealed from an inferior court.

    2. To charge with a crime; to accuse; to institute a private criminal prosecution against for some heinous crime; as, to appeal a person of felony.

  2. To summon; to challenge. [Archaic]

    Man to man will I appeal the Norman to the lists.
    --Sir W. Scott.

  3. To invoke. [Obs.]
    --Milton.

Wiktionary

appeal

n. 1 (context legal English)

  1. An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re-examination or review.

  2. The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected.

  3. The right of appeal.

  4. An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public.

  5. An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver. 2 A summons to answer to a charge. 3 A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty. 4 # (context cricket English) The act, by the fielding side, of asking an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not. 5 Resort to physical means; recourse. 6 The power to attract or interest. vb. 1 (context transitive obsolete English) To accuse (someone of something). 2 (context transitive legal chiefly US English) To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of reexamination of for decision. 3 (context transitive English) To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request. 4 (context intransitive English) To be attractive.

WordNet

appeal

  1. v. take a court case to a higher court for review; "He was found guilty but appealed immediately"

  2. request earnestly (something from somebody); ask for aid or protection; "appeal to somebody for help"; "Invoke God in times of trouble" [syn: invoke]

  3. be attractive to; "The idea of a vacation appeals to me"; "The beautiful garden attracted many people" [syn: attract] [ant: repel]

  4. challenge (a decision); "She appealed the verdict"

  5. cite as an authority; resort to; "He invoked the law that would save him"; "I appealed to the law of 1900"; "She invoked an ancient law" [syn: invoke]

appeal

  1. n. earnest or urgent request; "an entreaty to stop the fighting"; "an appeal for help"; "an appeal to the public to keep calm" [syn: entreaty, prayer]

  2. attractiveness that interests or pleases or stimulates; "his smile was part of his appeal to her" [syn: appealingness, charm]

  3. (law) a legal proceeding in which the appellant resorts to a higher court for the purpose of obtaining a review of a lower court decision and a reversal of the lower court's judgment or the granting of a new trial; "their appeal was denied in the superior court"

  4. request for a sum of money; "an appeal to raise money for starving children" [syn: solicitation, collection, ingathering]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

appeal

c.1300, in the legal sense, from Old French apel (Modern French appel), back-formation from apeler (see appeal (v.)). Meaning "call to an authority" is from 1620s; that of "attractive power" attested by 1916.

appeal

early 14c., originally in legal sense of "to call" to a higher judge or court, from Anglo-French apeler "to call upon, accuse," Old French apeler "make an appeal" (11c., Modern French appeler), from Latin appellare "to accost, address, appeal to, summon, name," iterative of appellere "to prepare," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + pellere "to beat, drive" (see pulse (n.1)). Related: Appealed; appealing.\n

\nProbably a Roman metaphoric extension of a nautical term for "driving a ship toward a particular landing." Popular modern meaning "to be attractive or pleasing" is quite recent, attested from 1907 (appealing in this sense is from 1891), from the notion of "to address oneself in expectation of a sympathetic response."

Usage examples of "appeal".

I counsel you to appeal to the Church Universal as to whether you should abjure these articles or not.

They appeal with confidence to the Persian history of Sherefeddin Ali, which has been given to our curiosity in a French version, and from which I shall collect and abridge a more specious narrative of this memorable transaction.

State courts have acted, the federal courts will usually leave the prisoner to the usual and orderly procedure of appeal to the Supreme Court.

The direct actionists by their inflammatory speeches and writings are especially successful in gaining recruits from among the more disorderly elements of society, whereas the political actionists appeal rather to those persons who are opposed to the destruction of life and property.

It appears, then, that progressive degeneration of an organ can be adequately explained by variation with the removal of natural selection, and that it is not necessary or desirable to appeal to any Lamarckian factor of an unexplainable and undemonstrable nature.

Whether a federal question has been adequately presented to and decided by a State court has been held to be in itself a federal question, to be decided by the Supreme Court on appeal.

I shall endeavour to extract, from the midst of insult and contempt and maledictions, those admonitions which may tend to correct whatever imperfections such censurers may discover in this my first serious appeal to the Public.

Balance-the relationship between elements in an advertisement so that the visual appeal is complementary to the message.

Urged by the information which Afy thinks she unconsciously obtains from Lachen, and harrowed by the idea that I am about to tear her from England, she has appealed to the Duke in a manner to which they were both unused.

As often as he is pressed by the demands of the Koreish, he involves himself in the obscure boast of vision and prophecy, appeals to the internal proofs of his doctrine, and shields himself behind the providence of God, who refuses those signs and wonders that would depreciate the merit of faith, and aggravate the guilt of infidelity.

I think perhaps the Hunt would appeal to your particular sporting instinct, Aiken Drum.

Amongst the Central Australian natives there is never any idea of appealing for assistance to any one of these Alcheringa ancestors in any way, nor is there any attempt made in the direction of propitiation, with one single exception in the case of the mythic creature called Wollunqua, amongst the Warramunga tribe, who, it may be remarked, is most distinctly regarded as a snake and not as a human being.

The first twelve articles are devoted to the pope, the annates, the appointment of foreigners to German benefices, the appeal of cases to Rome, the asserted authority of the papacy over bishops, the emperor, and other rulers.

The secret of the epoch-making success of the apologetic theology is thus explained: These Christian philosophers formulated the content of the Gospel in a manner which appealed to the common sense of all the serious thinkers and intelligent men of the age.

This case came to the Supreme Court on appeal from a decree of the circuit court of appeals dissolving an injunction restraining certain registration officials from excluding the appellant from the voting list.