Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

weight

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a weight problem (=the problem of being too fat)
▪ Patients with weight problems were put on a strict diet.
a weight/height limit
▪ The weight limit per bag is 20 kilos.
add weight to the suggestion/idea etc
▪ Recent research adds weight to the theory that the climate is changing.
be unequal in size/weight etc
▪ The pieces were unequal in length.
beneath the weight of (=unable to support the weight of)
▪ Some roofs collapsed beneath the weight of so much snow.
birth weight (=a baby’s weight when it is born)
▪ Many factors may affect a baby’s birth weight.
body weight
▪ You have exactly the right body weight for your height.
buckle under the pressure/strain/weight
▪ A weaker person would have buckled under the weight of criticism.
lose weight/height/speed etc
▪ You’re looking slim. Have you lost weight?
▪ The plane emptied its fuel tanks as it started losing altitude.
shed weight (=lose weight from your body)
▪ Doing exercise is the best way to shed surplus weight.
support...weight
▪ During sleep, our spine no longer needs to support the weight of our body.
troy weight
under the weight of (=unable to support the weight of)
▪ The bench collapsed under the weight of so many people.
weight gain
▪ Eating too many fatty foods could cause weight gain.
Weight loss
Weight loss should be gradual.
weight training
▪ He does weight training at the gym twice a week.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
average
▪ Alternatively, five inmates of the same average weight could be flown without luggage.
▪ These charts show the average weights for individuals of varying heights, with separate charts available for males and females.
▪ Now, for most foods, legislation allows the average weight to be stated.
▪ The suspect was described as a white male of average height and weight between 25 to 32 years old.
▪ So too, in some cases, is the average weight per age of children under three.
▪ The average tusk weight has dropped from Poachers ambush elephants, machine-gun them and then hack their tusks out.
▪ The average weight gain after lunch was about 2.5 pounds, which is appropriate in normal cases.
dry
▪ Size can be measured as height, leaf area, volume, fresh weight, dry weight, etc.
▪ It absorbs up to a fifth of its dry weight of water without feeling damp, she says.
▪ Measurements of dry weight gain showed a marked decline in relative growth rate below 5°C.
▪ As before, W denotes weight, but this time fresh or dry weight as suitable.
▪ The performance of the transplants was measured by vegetative growth expressed as dry weight at harvest after twelve months.
equal
▪ The new title gave equal weight to both nationalities in the republic.
▪ Whereas in the Catholic Church the word and Churches Doctrine held equal weight.
▪ Will social factors be given equal weight with medical factors when determining such claims?
▪ Everyone's opinion has equal weight.
▪ It would ensure that the vote of every citizen had equal weight.
▪ These two strands have an approximately equal weight in terms of student workload and contribution to the overall assessment.
▪ If, for example, two perceptive functions are of equal weight, they tend to interfere with and jam each other.
▪ If you don't have fresh fruit to hand, just use an equal weight of canned or frozen fruit instead.
extra
▪ But the extra weight of the kiddies holding on to them, they sank as well.
▪ The men who were most prone to carry extra weight on their bellies were also at higher cataract risk.
▪ I know it was only the extra weight of the Cross that got me up that hill.
▪ The extra weight acted as levers which made Hsu Fu twist and wrack even more.
▪ Simply calculate the extra weight and add the correct value of stamps for that particular weight and destination.
▪ Presumably, he wished the carboys to float; but he had neglected the extra weight of the stoppers!
▪ They reckoned that my extra weight had protected my heart, and I was also wearing heavy, rubber-soled safety boots.
▪ But when the Padres plummeted to last place last week, the hefty Vaughn contract took on extra weight.
full
▪ She rolled on top of him, letting her full weight rest on his body.
▪ When we pushed against them, they toppled with the full force and weight of a massive trunk.
▪ Sid slowly allowed the scales to take the full weight of the fish.
▪ Relieved, she now felt the full and shocking weight of what she had just witnessed.
▪ Now the full weight of responsibility fell on Doris.
▪ The full weight of community wrath was brought down firmly on a few who tried to speak their own minds.
▪ Accordingly the full weight of the curial machine was now brought into play.
▪ Right then, a crank breaks and the rider lands with full weight on the frame crossbar, then crashes.
great
▪ He could hardly ease himself free from the great stinking weight.
▪ Then slowly, as if struggling against some great weight, they start to move.
▪ I also love spaghetti with a simple sauce - pasta's great for weight watchers.
▪ This is a man of the greatest weight, to whose friendship we can not be indifferent.
▪ There had to be more to it than simply filling in a few spaces with a ballpoint; greater symbolic weight was required.
▪ I longed to feel the great buzzard's weight on my fist.
▪ I have no doubt that his opinion will carry great weight.
▪ Although these facts were not matters to which any great weight could be attached, they were relevant.
heavy
▪ Monks tied the locket to a heavy weight and dropped it into the water.
▪ Ironing was a business of lifting heavy metal weights heated on the stove top.
▪ Marlene woke to the sound of a heavy weight being dragged across the floor.
▪ Both heavy weights and light weights have slow and fast oscillations.
▪ If you lift heavy weights and you lift in the wrong way, you can obviously do yourself damage.
▪ I combine cardiovascular and muscular workouts with moderate to heavy weights, a lot of repetitions and no rest in between sets.
▪ Lifting very heavy weights can also raise your blood pressure considerably for a short time.
▪ Steeped again in current events and the heavy weight of the world, I felt my memory grow fuzzy.
ideal
▪ We are generous and define obesity as being more than 120 percent ideal body weight.
▪ The nonsmoking, sedentary men involved in the study were 20 percent to 60 percent over ideal weight, but otherwise healthy.
▪ Charts, then, are only a rough guide to ideal weight.
▪ Finally, you can plan ahead and continue with some sort of contingency contract when you have attained your ideal weight.
▪ Guides to ideal weight often seem arbitrary and inflexible.
▪ This answer falls within the acceptable range and so indicates that this person is at or reasonably close to her ideal weight.
▪ For health - as opposed to fashion - reasons, there is a 2-stone range of ideal weight for your height.
▪ Daily total caloric requirements were calculated from Long's equation modified for ideal body weight.
light
▪ Both heavy weights and light weights have slow and fast oscillations.
▪ It is lighter in weight and does not need the heavy winches and guide frame of the deep diving bells.
▪ Manual is good because it is cheaper than power operation and, we assume, lighter in weight.
▪ Remember to use light weights and be very cautious when first exercising the spinal erectors.
▪ In addition to its very light weight, it was very durable.
▪ Their versatility and light weight makes them attractive for backpacking - albeit at a price.
▪ A honeycomb provides the most rigid structure with lightest weight.
low
▪ Barker etal reported that low birth weight was associated with lower adult lung function but not with symptoms of wheeze.
▪ Predominantly affecting young women, the central feature of this disorder is an abnormally low weight achieved by extreme caloric restriction.
▪ The seriousness of the low weight is often denied by the patient.
▪ Many people believed that such low molecular weight products were all one could hope for from ethylene.
▪ The key is its low weight.
▪ The low weight comes from the chassis design.
▪ You can try to rationalize your low weight loss.
▪ Reduced glutathione is known as a major low molecular weight scavenger of free radicals in cytoplasm.
molecular
▪ Amino-acid sequencing is limited to smaller molecules, for example the endogenous opioid met-enkephalin with a molecular weight of 573.
▪ The remainder stays in the donor stream with the large molecular weight substances and is subsequently discarded.
▪ The position and sizes of molecular weight standards are indicated.
▪ Reduced glutathione is known as a major low molecular weight scavenger of free radicals in cytoplasm.
▪ The main chemical constituent of mucus is a waterproof high molecular weight glycoprotein.
▪ These polymers, based on methacrylate chemistry, have high molecular weights and therefore form very stable coatings owing to their multipoint attachment.
▪ This shows that for mixing to take place between high molecular weight components the solubility parameters would have to be virtually identical.
sheer
▪ Due to its sheer weight it can only be used at the Centre by special permission of the Department of Transport.
▪ The intensity of the introductions made me tremble, overtaken by the sheer weight of their status.
▪ Ari was exhausted by the sheer weight of first impressions of the city.
▪ He forced though - even if going back: the sheer weight of his blows - Anton down on his hands and knees.
▪ In terms of money, grass-roots organization, blocking power and sheer weight, the Democrats and Republicans rule supreme.
▪ In the case of a particularly large breed this is perhaps understandable, because of the sheer weight.
▪ The sheer weight of goodwill fax messages told them of this fact.
▪ The sheer weight of dicta amassed was intimidating, but Mr. Ashworth conceded he could find no authority actually binding on me.
■ NOUN
birth
▪ Barker etal reported that low birth weight was associated with lower adult lung function but not with symptoms of wheeze.
▪ Low birth weight is another measure of the well-being of infants and children.
▪ As the example of Table 7 shows, both late fetal and early neonatal mortality rise steadily with decreasing birth weight.
▪ Our results pertain to a sample of 101 subjects, in many of whom the birth weight was obtained by maternal recall.
▪ The inclusion of birth weight as one of the enrolment characteristics is probably inappropriate.
▪ Several studies revealed conditions that affect prematurity and birth weight.
▪ This was the sample used for the analysis of birth weight, gestational age, and respiratory symptoms.
▪ Plasma fibrinogen concentrations, for example, are related to weight at 1 year but not independently to birth weight.
body
▪ Forces that can be up to five times your body weight on each stride.
▪ Loss of only 10 percent of body weight, regular aerobic exercise and quitting smoking lead the list.
▪ These results did not differ when acid output was expressed as mmol/h/kg lean body mass or mmol/h/kg fat free body weight.
▪ He then measured their body weight.
▪ Ideally, if you are overweight you will eat slightly less than is necessary to maintain a constant body weight.
▪ We are generous and define obesity as being more than 120 percent ideal body weight.
▪ The stability of a stance depends upon the distribution of the body weight.
control
▪ Once you start eating in a healthier way, good weight control should become much easier.
▪ In celebration of a new weight control year, the Quaker Oats Co. has developed yet another rice cake flavor.
▪ It may be tempting to talk a great deal about what you have learned about diet, nutrition, exercise, and weight control.
▪ PreSnackwellian researchers proposed high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets for weight control.
▪ Keep the business of weight control in perspective.
▪ But all those favorites can fit, even on weight control diets or eating plans designed to manage heart disease or diabetes.
▪ The actual weight at the end of each month can then be filled in as the weight control regime progresses.
▪ Your own, personalized weight control programme has not been a sudden thing but has evolved over a long period of time.
gain
▪ Parents may also need some advice and discussion about the types of high-calorie food that are important for weight gain and growth.
▪ But we wanted a program that used weight gain per month instead.
▪ Varicose veins Hormone changes and weight gain give rise to varicose veins.
▪ In a vicious cycle, weight gain increases insulin resistance increases weight gain.
▪ Body weight gain was satisfactory in all rats included in this study.
▪ This contradiction is what leads to much of this country's weight gain, particularly in young people.
▪ Her diarrhoea decreased with improved appetite and weight gain, a rising serum albumin, and resolution of her peripheral oedema.
▪ Neither prevention of weight gain nor maintenance of weight loss was included in this research project.
loss
▪ Look out for smell of solvent on breath, nose-bleeds, sores around nose and mouth, weight loss.
▪ What kind of diet promotes weight loss?
▪ Just aim to stay where you are until the tough period is over and you can recommence your weight loss regime.
▪ Suppose, for example, that only seven children showed weight loss.
▪ Will you get a big weight loss this week, or will it come next week, or not at all?
▪ Or better yet, see a doctor who specializes in weight loss.
▪ First, consider the situation where weight loss is not as good as expected.
▪ But for others, it may be too dramatic or raise too many expectations about weight loss.
problem
▪ Animal fats and refined sugar contribute to a weight problem and can be a factor in heart and arterial disease.
▪ She is an expert on how a low-calorie diet and exercise can beat cellulite and other weight problems.
▪ People who don't have a weight problem may simply not be as sensitive to these shifts.
▪ You want a relatively slow but controlled and permanent solution to your weight problem.
▪ For the first time in my life I had a weight problem.
▪ Conquering your weight problem is probably the most important thing in your life right now.
▪ The mirror test Many people with weight problems avoid full-length mirrors as much as possible.
▪ But if this is your only way of relaxing then you may acquire a weight problem.
■ VERB
add
▪ The fixing process is simple and clean, and only minimally increases wall thickness and adds little dead weight to the structure.
▪ It added to the weight we would carry, which was a lot if you were a gunner or a Duper man.
▪ The mixture is coagulated and titanium dioxide is added to adjust the weight.
▪ A magazine article indicated I might benefit from adding weight lifting to my exercise program.
▪ These findings add considerable weight to the claims that emotional arousal is of causal significance to relapse.
▪ You can change the center of gravity by adding weight to one part of the object.
▪ Does the tone and content of source C add weight to Snowden's argument? 11.
▪ However you install the stove, remember that you will be adding a lot of weight on the floor.
bear
▪ But to my mind neither section 8 nor the Gillick decision will bear the weight which he seeks to place upon them.
▪ I went down the steps, slowly, enjoying the way each step bore my weight.
▪ Yet these will hardly bear the weight of a theory so grand as the fusion of legacy and trust.
▪ Differences that had seemed slight when they were in their early twenties now bore social weight.
▪ The Hooper who existed in Brideshead Revisited, though, bore all the weight of Waugh's opprobrium.
▪ If the floor is properly framed, you should not need extra support underneath to bear the weight of the fireplace.
▪ As a foundation it is inadequate to bear the weight of the case that Mr. McGregor sought to build upon it.
▪ His arms were numb, his hands too weak to bear his weight.
carry
▪ Any inability to carry the weight on the hind-legs will trigger off resistance in the mouth.
▪ Those companies felt their name carried more weight in the East.
▪ Whether he was more than that, whether he carried weight with the monarch or the Council, was up to him.
▪ We carry the weight of the race and the weight of racism.
▪ Before 1966 these claims were not widely supported and carried little political weight.
▪ Indeed, in planning a food garden for next season, the cookbook may carry more weight.
▪ Cigar can no longer be accused of never carrying weight.
feel
▪ He took his hand away, but as she stumbled down the ladder she could still feel its warm weight.
▪ He could feel the weight in his forehead.
▪ A woman of such forthright views as yourself would, I feel, lend considerable weight to this project.
▪ Corrigan felt the weight of the old man fall against him.
▪ She felt the weight of something fastened on her head, circling her brow.
▪ And as that sense of independence grew, so the need I felt to control my weight subsided and finally disappeared altogether.
▪ Finally he felt her weight settle on the pillion seat.
▪ The studs should be immobile and feel like they have weight on them.
give
▪ But you must not plead in behalf of your will and refuse to give due weight to mine.
▪ In two subsequent cases, however, federal appeals courts have given greater weight to the rights of teachers.
▪ Proportional systems elect several candidates in multi-member constituencies, giving due weight to minority votes.
▪ He may even give greater weight to what his perspective is not designed to illuminate.
▪ Fit again Barnbrook can give the weight away.
▪ Several people took to squatting on the floor with shoes removed, having given in to the weight of their metallic dresses.
▪ The cultural approach to organisations needs to be welded to a political analysis if these determinants are to be given proper weight.
▪ I also do not give much weight to enthusiastic endorsements-empirical support is a sine qua non.
increase
▪ Hair loss, tremors, and increased weight are also occasional problems.
▪ The application of this technology strengthens the head of the racket without increasing its weight.
▪ The gene is also associated with increased body weight.
▪ Will he promise to resist all attempts to increase the maximum permitted weights of heavy lorries?
▪ The growth and increasing economic weight of groups generated more extensive and complex demands of government.
▪ Start with 5 reps at 75% of your maximum lift, then increase the weight but decrease the reps to 4.
▪ Cardiovascular death rates fell progressively with increasing birth weight.
keep
▪ Although the blown rubber keeps there weight down, wear patterns after 300 and 400 miles seem to bear out this view.
▪ Only 2 percent of patients had kept the weight off after two years.
▪ He does not smoke, eats frugally to keep down his weight and trains six days each week.
▪ They are both fit and active but I find it very difficult to keep their weight up.
▪ The secret to keeping the weight down and energy up is to serve meals that are calorie intensive.
▪ Some 23 percent believe that smoking keeps down weight.
▪ Indeed, for a while, Odette managed to keep her weight stable.
▪ You can keep portions small enough to keep to your target weight.
lend
▪ I lent weight to his side of the story but they sent him down.
▪ The bishops insisted that the Capitol Hill prayer vigil was non-partisan, but the impending election lent the event political weight.
▪ A woman of such forthright views as yourself would, I feel, lend considerable weight to this project.
▪ I owe it to Victoria to lend some retrospective weight to our parting.
▪ It's the first time a leading drinks company has lent its weight to such a campaign.
▪ The law lends its weight to uphold and enforce contracts freely entered into.
▪ Not withstanding the need for more investigation, the evidence surveyed in the previous chapter certainly lends weight to this view.
▪ Recognising this paradox lends weight to the patriarchy thesis, explaining away many apparent counter-examples.
lift
▪ If you were to lift that weight several times, you would find that the muscle gradually began to ache.
▪ Two or three days a week, the crew will run three to five miles, then lift weights.
▪ The first time you lifted the weight, perhaps 60 per cent of the fibres in that muscle were called into action.
▪ Ironing was a business of lifting heavy metal weights heated on the stove top.
▪ If you lift heavy weights and you lift in the wrong way, you can obviously do yourself damage.
▪ My buddies knew that I was lifting weights with Mr Barraza.
▪ Well, I was one of the people who couldn't do it even if I wasn't lifting a heavy weight.
▪ Do you want to build up your body and lift weights?
lose
▪ Your aim should not be to lose weight, but to bring your eating habits under your control.
▪ Since it was drawn, Kaczynski had aged, broken his nose and lost weight.
▪ How fast will I be able to lose weight?
▪ People who lose weight and keep it off eat a low-fat diet with an occasional splurge.
▪ She had lost weight in the last few weeks and the jeans were a little loose about her waist.
▪ Most lengthy studies show that people who lose weight over the years seem to die earlier than those whose weight remains stable.
▪ I was determined to lose the weight.
▪ Some people do lose weight when they normalize their eating, but not everyone.
pull
▪ All members were expected to pull their weight.
▪ The superiors counted on the new managers to pull their weight in contributing to the superiors' agendas.
▪ Some members of this class haven't been pulling their weight.
▪ You subs are not pulling your weight.
▪ He pulled a lot of weight at Fox, so they went along with his demand for changes.
▪ For the average business, pulses and linseed didn't pull their weight.
▪ He just didn't pull his weight domestically.
▪ He didn't pull his weight, but knew how to keep it from the consultants.
put
▪ All the fish have put on weight, the Pictus especially have grown about half-an-inch.
▪ My former heartthrob has put on weight.
▪ She says they're being fed chicken and trout, and have put on lots of weight.
▪ The latter approach appears to be putting more weight on our political system than the system is able to bear.
▪ I righted myself and pain shot up my right leg as I put weight on it.
▪ The rector loved the sight of his doctor and friend, who had put on weight and improved in color.
▪ She constantly restrained her eating for fear of putting on weight.
▪ The man increased his pressure, putting all his weight behind the knife arm.
reduce
▪ If you reduce your weight you change the amount of energy you need.
▪ In short, everything is reduced to number, weight, and measure.
▪ It reduces the weights of rules which may never have occurred in any conflict set.
▪ The first guideline is very important, not only for reducing your weight now but for controlling it in the future.
▪ This considerably reduces shrinkage and weight loss.
▪ Approach it one step at a time - just as you are reducing your weight and inches.
▪ This reduces the effective weight of that tank which, if not counteracted, will upset the basic balance of the system.
▪ Mazda had tyres specially made for the AZ-1 to reduce unsprung weight.
shift
▪ He shifted his weight so that his body brushed lightly against hers.
▪ One hip shifted her weight to that side, and suddenly every angle softly flowed into another.
▪ You can make the bike move up to 1.5 metres in a corner just by shifting your weight.
▪ He was frantically shifting his weight from side to side.
▪ The blonde student woke early in Devon, and shifted under the sleeping weight of his arm.
▪ The blank man be-hind her coughed and shifted weight, preparing to be embarrassed.
▪ However divorce is as effective as dieting for shifting stubborn weight!
▪ It crunched under her boots as she shifted her weight.
support
▪ The liquid helps to support the weight of the compass card, and also dampens oscillation.
▪ The floors themselves were strong enough to support the weight of the materials used to fill in the gaps.
▪ Both your stand and the floor it stands on must be capable of supporting this weight.
▪ A major concern, he said, is that many sky divers use canopies that are too small to support their weight.
▪ The design specifications had called for the columns to rest on bedrock that supported a weight of seven tons per square foot.
▪ Righting the stool with his foot, he pushed it under Jason's dangling toes to support some of the weight.
▪ The main structural consideration with any door or window is supporting the weight of the structure above.
throw
▪ How dare the Nottinghamshire police suppose they can throw their weight around in this way?
▪ Mortgage traders were the sort of fat people who grunt from the belly and throw their weight around, like sumo wrestlers.
▪ Very strong in his own way, not swaggering or throwing his weight about, but a great inner strength.
▪ He clambered forward, loosed the ropes, and threw his weight on the sail to bring it dawn.
▪ This threw his weight on to the outside of the feet which affected his whole balance, causing excessive stress throughout his entire body.
▪ When you held one of those slugs in your hand, it had a hefty throwing weight.
▪ Feminists threw their weight behind Mrs Killea's campaign, and hundreds of students attended a rally in support of abortion rights.
▪ It's a chance for rugby to throw its weight around.
watch
▪ He was already having to watch his weight.
▪ Avoid smoking. 4. Watch your weight. 5.
▪ But don't get obsessed with weight watching.
▪ He wore expensive suits, watched his weight, nursed friendships where friendships mattered.
▪ This is of tremendous help to anyone who is watching their weight and their health.
▪ Claire is watching her weight now.
▪ Blanche had been doomed to fight for her promotion, watch her weight, and fret over her childlessness.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
add weight to sth
▪ Does the tone and content of source C add weight to Snowden's argument? 11.
▪ Opposition leaders said the killing added weight to their demands for a change in government.
▪ Perhaps the enormous anti-Gorbachev demonstrations in Moscow do add weight to that particular reaction.
▪ The device of a court of five judges was adopted to add weight to the reconsideration of the earlier cases.
▪ The function of the double bassoon is to add weight to the bass.
▪ Three strengths of the study add weight to its conclusions.
▪ You can change the center of gravity by adding weight to one part of the object.
it/that is a load/weight off sb's mind
lend weight/support to sth
▪ I lent weight to his side of the story but they sent him down.
▪ In these circumstances it was the business of responsible churchmen to lend support to the monarch in every way they could.
▪ Not withstanding the need for more investigation, the evidence surveyed in the previous chapter certainly lends weight to this view.
▪ President Clinton lent support to the bill Monday.
▪ Recognising this paradox lends weight to the patriarchy thesis, explaining away many apparent counter-examples.
▪ Some psychoanalytic writing appears to lend support to these assumptions.
▪ The recent closures of the paper mill and the aluminium smelter at Invergordon lend weight to this argument.
▪ These results lend support to the idea that tenascin alternative splice forms may also have functional significance at the protein level.
net weight
▪ Documents must not be handed to drivers or otherwise issued with blank spaces for recording particulars of tare weights or net weights.
punch above your weight
put on weight/12 lbs/4 kg etc
the sheer weight/size etc
▪ Ari was exhausted by the sheer weight of first impressions of the city.
▪ First, there was the sheer size of his positions.
▪ He forced though - even if going back: the sheer weight of his blows - Anton down on his hands and knees.
▪ He was slightly taken aback by the sheer size of the girl.
▪ I grow bored with the sheer size of the glass and have to force myself to continue, he wrote.
▪ One of the difficulties is the sheer size of the family.
▪ The intensity of the introductions made me tremble, overtaken by the sheer weight of their status.
▪ Then there's the sheer size of the damn thing.
throw your weight around
▪ She likes to throw her weight around -- it makes her feel important.
▪ The commission has a reputation for throwing its weight around.
▪ Why is everyone so upset? Has George been throwing his weight around again?
▪ But being annual they would be open to reprisals if they threw their weight around too much.
▪ But that bloody Caitlin, he had to throw his weight around.
▪ Do we in petty ways throw our weight around?
▪ How dare the Nottinghamshire police suppose they can throw their weight around in this way?
▪ It's a chance for rugby to throw its weight around.
▪ Maybe she could have handled that a little more tactfully instead of sounding as though she was throwing her weight around.
▪ Mortgage traders were the sort of fat people who grunt from the belly and throw their weight around, like sumo wrestlers.
▪ The apprentice was some distant relation of Pollitt's wife; that'd be why he was throwing his weight around.
throw your weight behind sb/sth
▪ Bahlman is throwing his weight behind the cultural center proposal.
▪ But Gloucester learnt their lesson and threw their weight behind the task.
▪ Chris is following in the footsteps of other Merseyside sports personalities by throwing his weight behind drugs prevention.
▪ Feminists threw their weight behind Mrs Killea's campaign, and hundreds of students attended a rally in support of abortion rights.
▪ The idea has been mooted of throwing our weight behind her version.
▪ When the idea hit the streets, we at Guitarist were unanimous in wanting to throw our weight behind the project.
▪ Why he chose to throw his weight behind a man who stood such a slender chance remains unclear.
worth your/its weight in gold
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I've been trying to lose weight for over a year now.
▪ I think he looks better now that he's put on some weight.
▪ If you can guess the weight of the cake, you win a prize.
▪ It's true, people who stop smoking do tend to gain weight.
▪ Jim was staggering along under the weight of a huge box of encyclopaedias.
▪ metric weight
▪ My height is six feet, and my weight is 173 pounds.
▪ My job requires lifting heavy weights such as TVs and refrigerators.
▪ Premature babies have a low birth weight.
▪ Several branches had been torn from the trees by the weight of the snow.
▪ She's always worried about her weight.
▪ Sudden or unexplained weight loss may be an early indication of health problems.
▪ The weight of evidence against her led to her conviction.
▪ The weight of the water makes the tub sink slightly.
▪ The average sperm whale is 72 feet long and about 90 tons in weight.
▪ The cost of postage depends on the weight of the package
▪ Top quality hams range in weight from eight to eighteen pounds.
▪ Twins and triplets are expected to have lower birth weights than single infants.
▪ Vehicles over a certain weight are not allowed to use the bridge.
▪ Victory was easy for a man of his weight and strength.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As a result of the government's programme, the weight of the public enterprise sector was significantly curtailed.
▪ For women, there was little relationship between weight and early death at all.
▪ He stands with his weight on the right foot, his face lightly turned in that direction.
▪ It goes without saying that Quinn lost a good deal of weight during this period.
▪ It was no less than he deserved for carrying the weight of his team on his shoulders all game long.
▪ Whipped butter and flavoured butters are more expensive than butter weight for weight.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
down
▪ White's body was found stabbed and weighted down in a lake near Cirencester in 1989.
▪ She tried to roll over but her body seemed weighted down, turned to stone.
▪ Suddenly, it dredges up ghosts weighted down and buried in haste after a fierce battle.
▪ The second one was doing a lot of drugs to keep her weight down.
▪ Maybe it never will, if it was weighted down, but we should have enough even without that.
▪ I threw the head weighted down with stones into a canal.
▪ A sodden heaviness weighted down her limbs.
▪ The place is electric with drama, with something weighty, weighted down more by the pressure of the storm.
■ NOUN
company
▪ The index is a price-weighted list of 36 companies designed to measure the economy of west-central Florida.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
it/that is a load/weight off sb's mind
net weight
▪ Documents must not be handed to drivers or otherwise issued with blank spaces for recording particulars of tare weights or net weights.
the sheer weight/size etc
▪ Ari was exhausted by the sheer weight of first impressions of the city.
▪ First, there was the sheer size of his positions.
▪ He forced though - even if going back: the sheer weight of his blows - Anton down on his hands and knees.
▪ He was slightly taken aback by the sheer size of the girl.
▪ I grow bored with the sheer size of the glass and have to force myself to continue, he wrote.
▪ One of the difficulties is the sheer size of the family.
▪ The intensity of the introductions made me tremble, overtaken by the sheer weight of their status.
▪ Then there's the sheer size of the damn thing.
worth your/its weight in gold
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ fishing lines weighted with lead
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Basically, by weighting the left rail the board turns to the right and viceversa.
▪ Telmex, the top weighted stock, gained a further 65 centavos at 24.55 pesos.
Wikipedia

Weight (album)

Weight is the fourth full-length studio album by the Rollins Band, released on April 12, 1994 (see 1994 in music). It featured the band's biggest hits, " Liar" and "Disconnect," which gained rotation on MTV and gained popularity after being featured on Beavis and Butt-head. The song "Civilized" was also used as the closing theme for Dennis Miller Live from 1994-2002 on HBO.

Weight (disambiguation)

Weight is a measurement of the gravitational force acting on an object. In non-scientific contexts it may refer to an object's mass (quantity of matter). Figuratively, it refers to the seriousness or depth of an idea or thought, or the danger and urgency of a situation.

Weight may also refer to:

Weight

In science and engineering, the weight of an object is usually taken to be the force on the object due to gravity. Weight is a vector whose magnitude (a scalar quantity), often denoted by an italic letter W, is the product of the mass m of the object and the magnitude of the local gravitational acceleration g; thus: . The unit of measurement for weight is that of force, which in the International System of Units (SI) is the newton. For example, an object with a mass of one kilogram has a weight of about 9.8 newtons on the surface of the Earth, and about one-sixth as much on the Moon. In this sense of weight, a body can be weightless only if it is far away (in principle infinitely far away) from any other mass. Although weight and mass are scientifically distinct quantities, the terms are often confused with each other in everyday use (i.e. comparing and converting force weight in pounds to mass in kilograms and vice-versa).The National Standard of Canada, CAN/CSA-Z234.1-89 Canadian Metric Practice Guide, January 1989:

  • 5.7.3 Considerable confusion exists in the use of the term "weight." In commercial and everyday use, the term "weight" nearly always means mass. In science and technology "weight" has primarily meant a force due to gravity. In scientific and technical work, the term "weight" should be replaced by the term "mass" or "force," depending on the application.
  • 5.7.4 The use of the verb "to weigh" meaning "to determine the mass of," e.g., "I weighed this object and determined its mass to be 5 kg," is correct.

There is also a rival tradition within Newtonian physics and engineering which sees weight as that which is measured when one uses scales. There the weight is a measure of the magnitude of the reaction force exerted on a body. Typically, in measuring an object's weight, the object is placed on scales at rest with respect to the earth, but the definition can be extended to other states of motion. Thus, in a state of free fall, the weight would be zero. In this second sense of weight, terrestrial objects can be weightless. Ignoring air resistance, the famous apple falling from the tree, on its way to meet the ground near Isaac Newton, is weightless.

Further complications in elucidating the various concepts of weight have to do with the theory of relativity according to which gravity is modelled as a consequence of the curvature of spacetime. In the teaching community, a considerable debate has existed for over half a century on how to define weight for their students. The current situation is that a multiple set of concepts co-exist and find use in their various contexts.

Weight (representation theory)

In the mathematical field of representation theory, a weight of an algebraA over a field F is an algebra homomorphism from A to F, or equivalently, a one-dimensional representation of A over F. It is the algebra analogue of a multiplicative character of a group. The importance of the concept, however, stems from its application to representations of Lie algebras and hence also to representations of algebraic and Lie groups. In this context, a weight of a representation is a generalization of the notion of an eigenvalue, and the corresponding eigenspace is called a weight space.

Weight (surname)

  • Carel Weight, a British artist
  • Doug Weight, an American ice hockey player
  • Greg Weight, an Australian photographer

Weight (song)

Weight is the debut single released by drag queen Latrice Royale. The single was released on January 15, 2014. The song plays with the homophones " weight" and "wait", revolving around the topics of food, hunger and cravings. The track features a rap from fellow drag performer Epiphany Mattel.

Weight (strings)

The a-weight of a string, for a a letter, is the number of times that letter occurs in the string. More precisely, let A be a finite set (called the alphabet), a ∈ A a letter of A, and c ∈ A a string (where A is the free monoid generated by the elements of A, equivalently the set of strings, including the empty string, whose letters are from A). Then the a-weight of c, denoted by wt(c), is the number of times the generator a occurs in the unique expression for c as a product (concatenation) of letters in A.

If A is an abelian group, the Hamming weight wt(c) of c, often simply referred to as "weight", is the number of nonzero letters in c.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Weight

Weight \Weight\, n. [OE. weght, wight, AS. gewiht; akin to D. gewigt, G. gewicht, Icel. v[ae]tt, Sw. vigt, Dan. v[ae]gt. See Weigh, v. t.]

  1. The quality of being heavy; that property of bodies by which they tend toward the center of the earth; the effect of gravitative force, especially when expressed in certain units or standards, as pounds, grams, etc.

    Note: Weight differs from gravity in being the effect of gravity, or the downward pressure of a body under the influence of gravity; hence, it constitutes a measure of the force of gravity, and being the resultant of all the forces exerted by gravity upon the different particles of the body, it is proportional to the quantity of matter in the body.

  2. The quantity of heaviness; comparative tendency to the center of the earth; the quantity of matter as estimated by the balance, or expressed numerically with reference to some standard unit; as, a mass of stone having the weight of five hundred pounds.

    For sorrow, like a heavy-hanging bell, Once set on ringing, with his own weight goes.
    --Shak.

  3. Hence, pressure; burden; as, the weight of care or business. ``The weight of this said time.''
    --Shak.

    For the public all this weight he bears.
    --Milton.

    [He] who singly bore the world's sad weight.
    --Keble.

  4. Importance; power; influence; efficacy; consequence; moment; impressiveness; as, a consideration of vast weight.

    In such a point of weight, so near mine honor.
    --Shak.

  5. A scale, or graduated standard, of heaviness; a mode of estimating weight; as, avoirdupois weight; troy weight; apothecaries' weight.

  6. A ponderous mass; something heavy; as, a clock weight; a paper weight.

    A man leapeth better with weights in his hands.
    --Bacon.

  7. A definite mass of iron, lead, brass, or other metal, to be used for ascertaining the weight of other bodies; as, an ounce weight.

  8. (Mech.) The resistance against which a machine acts, as opposed to the power which moves it. [Obs.]

    Atomic weight. (Chem.) See under Atomic, and cf. Element.

    Dead weight, Feather weight, Heavy weight, Light weight, etc. See under Dead, Feather, etc.

    Weight of observation (Astron. & Physics), a number expressing the most probable relative value of each observation in determining the result of a series of observations of the same kind.

    Syn: Ponderousness; gravity; heaviness; pressure; burden; load; importance; power; influence; efficacy; consequence; moment; impressiveness.

Weight

Weight \Weight\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Weighted; p. pr. & vb. n. Weighting.]

  1. To load with a weight or weights; to load down; to make heavy; to attach weights to; as, to weight a horse or a jockey at a race; to weight a whip handle.

    The arrows of satire, . . . weighted with sense.
    --Coleridge.

  2. (Astron. & Physics) To assign a weight to; to express by a number the probable accuracy of, as an observation. See Weight of observations, under Weight.

  3. (Dyeing) To load (fabrics) as with barite, to increase the weight, etc.

  4. (Math.) to assign a numerical value expressing relative importance to (a measurement), to be multiplied by the value of the measurement in determining averages or other aggregate quantities; as, they weighted part one of the test twice as heavily as part 2.

Wiktionary

weight

n. 1 The force on an object due to the gravitational attraction between it and the Earth (or whatever astronomical object it is primarily influenced by). 2 An object used to make something heavier. 3 A standardized block of metal used in a balance to measure the mass of another object. 4 importance or influence. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To add weight to something; to make something heavier. 2 # (cx transitive dyeing English) To load (fabrics) with barite, etc. to increase the weight. 3 (context transitive English) To load, burden or oppress someone. 4 (context transitive mathematics English) To assign weights to individual statistics. 5 (context transitive English) To bias something; to slant. 6 (context transitive horse racing English) To handicap a horse with a specified weight.

WordNet

weight

  1. v. weight down with a load [syn: burden, burthen, weight down] [ant: unburden]

  2. present with a bias; "He biased his presentation so as to please the share holders" [syn: slant, angle]

weight

  1. n. the vertical force exerted by a mass as a result of gravity

  2. sports equipment used in calisthenic exercises and weightlifting; a weight that is not attached to anything and is raised and lowered by use of the hands and arms [syn: free weight, exercising weight]

  3. the relative importance granted to something; "his opinion carries great weight"

  4. an artifact that is heavy

  5. an oppressive feeling of heavy force; "bowed down by the weight of responsibility"

  6. a system of units used to express the weight of something [syn: system of weights]

  7. a unit used to measure weight; "he placed two weights in the scale pan" [syn: weight unit]

  8. (statistics) a coefficient assigned to elements of a frequency distribution in order to represent their relative importance [syn: weighting]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

weight

Old English gewiht "weighing, weight, downward force of a body, heaviness," from Proto-Germanic *wihti- (cognates: Old Norse vætt, Danish vegt, Old Frisian wicht, Middle Dutch gewicht, German Gewicht), from *weg- (see weigh).\n

\nFigurative sense of "burden" is late 14c. To lose weight "get thinner" is recorded from 196

  1. Weight Watcher as a trademark name dates from 1960. To pull one's weight (1921) is from rowing. To throw (one's) weight around figuratively is by 192

  2. Weight-training is from 1945. Weight-lifting is from 1885; weight-lifter (human) from 189

weight

"to load with weight," 1747 (figuratively, of the mind, from 1640s), from weight (n.). Of horses in a handicap race, 1846. Sense in statistics is recorded from 1901. Related: Weighted; weighting.

Usage examples of "weight".

Apparently satisfied it would support his weight, he leaned back, rocking gently while Abie prepared their coffee.

The abutments also must be strong enough to take safely the thrust of the weighted arch, as the slightest movement in these supports will cause deflection and failure.

The metal hoops of the accelerating cage sang lightly as the weight came on.

Miraculously unbroken despite the changes in acceleration, its weight was impossible to guess in the microgravity of the ship, but its mass was pleasing.

If, after adding excess of silver nitrate to insure a complete precipitation, the arsenate of silver be filtered off, the weight of the arsenic could be estimated from the weight of silver arsenate formed.

This human cargo represents a weight of about twenty tons, which is equivalent to that of thirty persons, two boars, three sows, twelve piglets, thirty fowls, ten dogs, twenty rats, a hundred balled or potted breadfruit and banana plants, and twelve tons of watergourds, seeds, yams, tubers, coconuts, adzes and weapons.

Sleek in some lines and blunt in others, it resembled the F-42, an experimental Air Force fighter unmatched in stealth, maneuverability, and weapons, with a thrust that well exceeded its weight, and aeroelasticity that allowed its wings to alter according to commands from its onboard mesh.

The monarch instantly retired to his chamber, and, as he lay, trembling with aguish cold, under a weight of bed-clothes, he expressed, in broken murmurs to his physician Elpidius, his deep repentance for the murders of Boethius and Symmachus.

Maintenancebots stood along the base of the walls, their wide, flexible crawler trolleys looking alarmingly spindly for the weight they had to carry.

What little currency Alec had seen were crude lozenges of copper or silver, distinguished only by weight and a few crude symbols struck in.

The platform tilted down ominously as he shifted his weight, but Alec hauled him quickly to safety on the stairs.

Some great French alienists recommend cold shower baths of three minutes or more, but a man in a London asylum recently died from the weight of icy water pouring down on him.

All of which I submit as evidence that the man I boxed with was a totally different man from the poor, ninety-pound weight of eight years before, who, given up by physicians and alienists, lay gasping his life away in a closed room in Portland, Oregon.

If it is ambergris, we are made men: we have but to go to the nearest dealer and change it for its weight in gold, ha, ha, ha!

Lord King had recently issued a circular-letter to his tenants, that he would no longer receive bank-notes at par, but that his rents must for the future be paid either in English guineas, or in equivalent weight of Portuguese gold coin, or in bank notes amounting to a sum sufficient to purchase such an equivalent weight of gold.