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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

weigh

verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
weighed anchor (=lifted the anchor)
▪ The next morning, they weighed anchor and began to move south again.
weighs...pounds
▪ Moira weighs about 130 pounds.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
about
▪ Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing about 250 g were fasted for 24 hours and killed by decapitation.
▪ One huge stone still stands at Lochmaben: seven feet-ten inches high, weighing about ten tons.
▪ At birth it weighed about 40 kilos.
▪ Each weighed about 54 grains of gold.
also
▪ It also weighs in as the most comfortable waterproof jacket I've worn.
▪ Lower prices for Treasury bonds also weighed on stock prices somewhat, traders said.
▪ Heavily-weighted oil stocks also weighed the market down as investors booked profits after the sector's recent strong run.
as
▪ These weighed as heavily in the social balance as the areas of social tension like Galicia.
▪ Not bad for a car which weighs as much as a Range Rover.
▪ I slumped to the ground, despair weighing as heavily as the load on my back.
carefully
▪ He is anxious that all demands for screening from pressure groups - of doctors or patients - should be weighed carefully.
▪ Since creation and innovation mean divergence from the group, every word must be carefully weighed.
▪ These were considerations which Fru Møller weighed carefully.
▪ This is not the foolishly bold prediction of a diehard supporter, but the carefully weighed assessment of facts.
▪ Every statement is based on observation; every conclusion is supported by evidence; every judgement is carefully weighed.
▪ Perhaps, although we carefully weighed the pros and cons.
▪ After carefully weighing the alternatives, we opted for a system that is simple to use and easy to understand.
down
▪ Renwick, weighed down with nickels and dimes, began his calls.
▪ I glanced over at Kip again and saw him wince when he weighed down on the pedal with his hurt foot.
▪ She was weighed down with a confusing mixture of feelings that sometimes felt so mellow and piquant, it was almost pleasant.
▪ She collects stones to weigh down her basket, but as there is no hurry she falls asleep on the bank.
▪ She stayed in bed, weighed down by what she called grief.
▪ Their pace is heavy, as if weighed down by the attention and suspense that follows their every step.
▪ She was weighed down by it.
▪ The rest were weighed down by an accumulation of debts incurred during the wars and natural disasters of the preceding century.
heavily
▪ The shame, the guilt, the remorse were weighing heavily upon the parents.
▪ The family matter weighs heavily on him, and he is probably sensing high levels of stress and embarrassment.
▪ External debt continues to weigh heavily upon these countries.
▪ Dear Parents: The responsibility for the boys is weighing heavily on us these days.
▪ Time was weighing heavily upon him.
▪ But there were other factors that weighed heavily in the decision to retire the Rotterdam.
▪ Mozart was no doubt a good Catholic, but his religion did not weigh heavily upon him.
▪ Racing shoes are designed specifically for élite runners, for whom marginal differences weigh heavily.
in
▪ I weighed in on Monday, got blood pressured, then drove through blinding rain into the Guildford one-way system.
▪ September Vogue weighs in with 734 pages of heavy print, Bazaar with 488.
▪ The largest Jilin stone weighed in at well over one thousand kilograms.
▪ He thought suddenly of Antony Royd, weighed in at four pounds, doing eleven lengths in four minutes.
▪ Elated by their first opportunity to serve as Guardians of Truth and Traditional Wisdom, they weighed in with equally reactionary vigor.
▪ With the B1-R retailing at £550 and the cab weighing in at £460, that leaves us £500 for a bass.
▪ The Police Officers Association will weigh in heavily on behalf of the rights of its members.
less
▪ There is not much point in weighing less but looking as if you are suffering from some wasting disease.
▪ If it weighs less, the object will sink.
▪ Neutrinos are thought to weigh less than 20 eV, if anything.
▪ An average light box is roughly twenty-four inches by thirteen inches and weighs less than ten pounds.
▪ Neither of us can remember just why this process took four hands when she weighed less than seven pounds.
▪ Most of Brooks's mobots weighed less than ten pounds.
▪ It weighs less than 12, 500 pounds, and its ride is likened to that of a glider.
more
▪ The size of the neat, compact body is deceptive: the Devon can weigh more than a Hereford or Beef Shorthorn.
▪ She must have weighed more than three hundred pounds.
▪ The debt burden is weighing more and more heavily on the weakest economies.
▪ None of them weighed more than 100 pounds or stood much more than 5 feet tall.
▪ They didn't weigh more than a few ounces.
▪ He was about six feet tall and rail-thin; he could not have weighed more than one hundred and forty pounds.
▪ Some bags are available with cotton or polycotton linings and these are more comfortable but they weigh more.
▪ At all ages, males weigh more than females; this is also true for each part, or cut.
only
▪ This over-the-head version weighed only 14 oz and went into a neat little stuff sack.
▪ The T53-L-l l gas-turbine engine develops eleven hundred horsepower yet weighs only five hundred pounds.
▪ Diplodocus was remarkably lithe, weighing only 10 tons in spite of being some 28 metres long.
▪ The handset looks like an elongated remote control and weighs only 1 pound.
▪ In all, the Buckau weighed only 20 tonnes more after her conversion.
▪ Genghis, assembled out of model car parts, weighed only 3. 6 pounds.
▪ Yield is best from ducks that weigh at least 4 pounds, although many mallards weigh only 2 to 3 pounds.
▪ Herrera, who weighed only 137, was wobbled a few more times in the fight but never again left his feet.
over
▪ Hafpor is a big man, nearly two metres tall and weighing over 100 kilograms.
▪ We are the only fleas weighing over a hundred pounds.
▪ Each truck has to carry 26 of them, together weighing over a ton.
▪ He was nearly five feet high, and though badly undernourished weighed over a hundred pounds.
▪ When I tell you she weighed over a ton, you can see why we were a bit nervous.
▪ The whole plate, with its glass window, feels substantial - it weighs over 260 grams.
▪ The number of lorries weighing over 10 tonnes unladen shot up by 230 percent.
▪ This bomber and its cargo probably weighs over a hundred tons.
up
▪ A computer is the only way he could weigh up the effect of the bus fare factor.
▪ Interestingly, 5-foot-6-inch women now can weigh up to 155 pounds, but in 1942 their limit was 140.
▪ The focus of the drama shifts to discovering the dangers, and weighing up pros and cons of using the magic carpet.
▪ Thinker - producing carefully considered ideas and weighing up and improving ideas from other people.
▪ When you are weighing up which lender to go to for your loan, you ignore their differences at your peril.
▪ On Monday Clark's board met to weigh up three rival offers, all believed to be about £150 million.
▪ In calmer times I try to analyse, weighing up the pros and cons.
▪ In the final analysis, organizations have to weigh up the anticipated benefits of particular media against the costs involved.
■ NOUN
advantage
▪ He could see her deciding whether to agree or disagree, he could see her weigh the advantages and the possible disadvantages.
▪ She weighed the advantages of telling him about Nuadu and the terrible crimson mask against the matter of his allegiance.
▪ In making these decisions, people will have to weigh up the relative advantages and disadvantages of the various alternative assets.
balance
▪ All current affairs in the whole world of lamentable war and strife needed to be weighed in this balance.
▪ Any potential for increased farm production has to be weighed in the balance against stubborn facts.
▪ One other piece of evidence seems to weigh in the balance on the side of Fisher-the phenomenon of copying.
benefit
▪ In the final analysis, organizations have to weigh up the anticipated benefits of particular media against the costs involved.
▪ Individual companies will have to weigh the risks and benefits carefully before deciding whether to participate.
▪ He was weighing the benefits of having one when he felt some one in the room with him.
con
▪ The focus of the drama shifts to discovering the dangers, and weighing up pros and cons of using the magic carpet.
▪ Perhaps, although we carefully weighed the pros and cons.
▪ Rab weighed the cons and heard the rats.
▪ During the past few months, we have again weighed upthe pros and cons of reapplying now, or waiting for the time being.
costs
▪ Some means of weighing up the costs and benefits of such an approach is therefore capable of being employed.
▪ Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia also refused to require the government to weigh financial costs against health benefits.
▪ The potential benefits must be weighed up against the costs involved and the risk of failure.
▪ At least there are benefits to be weighed against the costs!
evidence
▪ His style is lucid and he emerges as an honest broker who judiciously weighs the historical evidence.
▪ After the weighing the evidence, the panel is expected to give its opinion Thursday.
▪ Our task is to weigh the evidence objectively and impartially.
▪ They had listened intently and weighed the evidence for three days before they made their decision.
▪ Final microbiological diagnosis was made by two infectious disease specialists who weighed all available clinical evidence.
▪ Your impartiality in weighing the evidence they have presented to you is the ornament of our system at law.
▪ This is, in one sense, unobjectionable and Kemp rightly weighs the evidence for influence circumspectly.
▪ Then weigh the evidence which confronts you and decide what help you need, if any.
factor
▪ Food is a great indicator of perceived social status, and innovations will have to weigh up these factors with care.
foot
▪ The creature itself grows to a hundred feet and weighs a hundred and sixty tons.
▪ At the base, the thickness of a typical column might be such that a foot length weighs a thousand pounds.
▪ It was fair-sized, four feet long and weighing twenty-five to thirty pounds.
▪ Goldie Preston Tracy Richmond stood 6-#foot-4, weighed 350 pounds and wore a man's size 14 shoe.
▪ He was a handsome man, standing five feet nine inches and weighing twelve stone.
▪ He was like 6 foot 3, weighed like 300 pounds and had a big beard.
hundred
▪ She must have weighed more than three hundred pounds.
▪ The T53-L-l l gas-turbine engine develops eleven hundred horsepower yet weighs only five hundred pounds.
▪ I weighed less than a hundred pounds.
▪ The three of them together could have easily weighed nine hundred pounds.
▪ The Cardwell, all by itself, according to Bill Stultz, weighed a hundred pounds.
▪ He was about six feet tall and rail-thin; he could not have weighed more than one hundred and forty pounds.
▪ He weighed less than a hundred pounds; you could see he was just barely holding on.
▪ Mrs Lambertson weighed under one hundred pounds, and the murders of the defenseless couple sparked outrage throughout the state.
inches
▪ One huge stone still stands at Lochmaben: seven feet-ten inches high, weighing about ten tons.
▪ An average light box is roughly twenty-four inches by thirteen inches and weighs less than ten pounds.
▪ He was a handsome man, standing five feet nine inches and weighing twelve stone.
▪ The man was described as 5 feet 8 inches tall, weighing 275 pounds, with a multi-day beard growth.
▪ He is about 5 feet, 10 inches tall and weighs about 175 pounds.
▪ Amber is described as 4 feet, 7 inches tall, weighing about 80 pounds.
▪ Chester Shirley described his wife as about 5 feet, 8 inches tall, weighing 185 pounds.
▪ The other hostage, Roswell, is about 5 feet, 8 inches tall and weighs 135 to 140 pounds.
mind
▪ But until then, that second job weighs on their mind and their time every day when they arrive at work.
possibility
▪ I weigh possibilities till I am afraid of the strength of my own health and of their evident health.
▪ Blue gets back to his room on Orange Street, lies down on his bed, and tries to weigh the possibilities.
▪ He has to weigh up the possibility of a conviction for something, as opposed to the accused walking free.
pound
▪ It was fair-sized, four feet long and weighing twenty-five to thirty pounds.
▪ Since then it has banned the public from placing stamped parcels weighing more than 1 pound in mail collection boxes.
▪ He now weighs twenty nine pounds ... week old lambs would normally turn the scales at around fifteen pounds.
▪ Heather was the smallest baby of all, weighing in under six pounds.
▪ Among the objects salvaged were gold dishes, weighing a pound each, with the image of the emperor on them.
▪ It weighs seven pounds twelve ounces, is ten and a half inches long and nine inches wide.
▪ Chilperic also showed Gregory a gold salver covered with gems, weighing fifty pounds.
▪ He thought suddenly of Antony Royd, weighed in at four pounds, doing eleven lengths in four minutes.
pounds
▪ It was fair-sized, four feet long and weighing twenty-five to thirty pounds.
▪ Molly had only one problem: she weighed 380 pounds.
▪ He now weighs twenty nine pounds ... week old lambs would normally turn the scales at around fifteen pounds.
▪ On the lower floors of Worldwide Plaza, the concrete would weigh about 70 pounds per square foot.
▪ It weighs seven pounds twelve ounces, is ten and a half inches long and nine inches wide.
▪ Wasson said a steel truss weighing about 2 million pounds will be raised atop the northeast and southeast towers on May 20-21.
▪ Chilperic also showed Gregory a gold salver covered with gems, weighing fifty pounds.
▪ Her backpack must have weighed twenty pounds.
price
▪ Lower prices for Treasury bonds also weighed on stock prices somewhat, traders said.
pro
▪ The focus of the drama shifts to discovering the dangers, and weighing up pros and cons of using the magic carpet.
▪ Perhaps, although we carefully weighed the pros and cons.
▪ In calmer times I try to analyse, weighing up the pros and cons.
▪ But it is a matter of realistically weighing up the pros and cons.
▪ Before initiating an incident, you weighed up the pros and cons of the costs in time.
▪ During the past few months, we have again weighed upthe pros and cons of reapplying now, or waiting for the time being.
▪ It could only be left to each Group Organiser to weigh up the pros and cons of the situation.
▪ If necessary use the decision-making exercise to weigh up the pros and cons of closely competing options as described previously.
risk
▪ Individual companies will have to weigh the risks and benefits carefully before deciding whether to participate.
▪ These must be weighed against the risks in standing on the sidelines.
▪ The danger of inflation, after all, must be weighed against other risks, such as lost growth and jobs.
▪ We weigh up the risks and possible repercussions of each and every situation.
▪ He weighed the risks of taking it against its usefulness in covering distance faster than a pair of legs.
scale
▪ A Weighty Decision Tired of your scales groaning when you weigh yourself every morning?
stone
▪ And Bannister, who weighs 22 stone and has size 17 feet, could be Cadle's secret weapon.
▪ I weighed eleven stone when I was in the Line: before I came out with that I weighed five stone ten.
▪ But the big two, weighing 35 stones between them, reckon he's got no chance.
▪ I weighed eleven stone when I was in the Line: before I came out with that I weighed five stone ten.
▪ The lifeguard, who weighs fifteen stone and does not shave beneath her arms, yells at me to stop.
▪ A Prague newspaper said yesterday that he weighed 36 stone.
▪ The bad news is he weighs just under 30 stone at press time, down fourteen stone from his previous weight.
▪ Suitcases that had once been quite light now felt as if they were weighed down with stones.
ton
▪ It was an extraordinary 32 metres long, weighing possibly up to 100 tons.
▪ Most of the sculptures there weigh about half a ton.
▪ Each truck has to carry 26 of them, together weighing over a ton.
▪ The thing weighed a black ton.
▪ It looked as though it weighed a ton and seemed to quiver every so often.
▪ Some one mentioned to me that 18 to 24 inches of snow on a driveway 10 by 40 feet weighs a ton.
▪ Each caisson weighed 240 tons with water in it, and could carry one barge or two narrow boats.
▪ It is 10' in diameter and weighs some 40 tons.
tonne
▪ Just the tongue from such a mouth can weigh up to 4.22 tonnes.
▪ The new armour is heavy, and a Challenger weighs a massive 60 tonnes.
▪ Trains up to 800m long weighing 1600 tonnes have already been run.
▪ The new car body weighed 9.55 tonnes, and the unladen weight of the complete car proved to be 17.29 tonnes.
▪ The number of lorries weighing over 10 tonnes unladen shot up by 230 percent.
▪ Drivers with lorries weighing above 7.5 tonnes face a five mile detour around the bridge.
▪ In all, the Buckau weighed only 20 tonnes more after her conversion.
tons
▪ It was an extraordinary 32 metres long, weighing possibly up to 100 tons.
▪ It filled a 30-foot by 50-foot room and weighed 30 tons.
▪ Each caisson weighed 240 tons with water in it, and could carry one barge or two narrow boats.
▪ Locomotives weighing thirty or forty tons caused havoc where wheel met rail, iron rails sometimes needing replacement every two years.
▪ It is 10' in diameter and weighs some 40 tons.
▪ The whale was about thirty feet long, half the length of Hsu Fu, and would have weighed about seven tons.
▪ They weighed 57 tons each, tare.
▪ Each barge weighs about 850 tons and carries about eleven hundred tons of steel.
word
▪ He began to weigh his words with great care, struggling to express himself as economically and clearly as possible.
■ VERB
continue
▪ However, continue to weigh each day if at all possible.
▪ External debt continues to weigh heavily upon these countries.
▪ We do strongly recommend that you continue to weigh yourself regularly.
▪ When your programme is fully finished, continue to weigh each day for a few months.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
weigh a ton
▪ That piano weighs a ton. You'll need four men to lift it.
▪ What on earth have you got in this suitcase? It weighs a ton!
▪ Your bag weighs a ton!
▪ Each one seemed to weigh a ton at least to four small eight-year-olds.
▪ I expect the cab weighs a ton, but the whole kit is still very portable, size-wise.
▪ It looked as though it weighed a ton and seemed to quiver every so often.
▪ Some one mentioned to me that 18 to 24 inches of snow on a driveway 10 by 40 feet weighs a ton.
▪ That thing over there seems to weigh a ton.
▪ The shire horses are direct descendants of the great war horses, and each one weighs a ton.
▪ They were full of books and weighed a ton.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Weigh all the ingredients carefully before mixing them together.
▪ a special machine that weighs each truck and its cargo
▪ Allen is a fast runner, despite weighing 325 pounds and having a chest like a barrel.
▪ At all ages, men weigh more than women.
▪ Dieters shouldn't weigh themselves too often.
▪ Each whale was about 40 feet long and weighed 45 tonnes.
▪ Every time I weigh myself I seem to have got heavier!
▪ How much do you weigh, Diane?
▪ How much does this parcel weigh?
▪ I've never seen anything like it -- some of those cabbages must have weighed 8 pounds at least.
▪ I weigh eight stone now, exactly.
▪ I haven't had time to weigh all of my options.
▪ It'll take two of us to get it out of the car, it weighs a ton!
▪ Our portable computer weighs 7 pounds and costs about $4000
▪ She weighs about 58 kg.
▪ She didn't tell me how much the baby weighed.
▪ Some of their players weigh over 300 pounds.
▪ The blue whale is a vast creature, weighing up to 30 tons.
▪ What do you weigh -- a hundred kilos or so?
▪ You have to weigh the sugar exactly when you make wine.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Both weighed exactly, the same: 475 pounds.
▪ It looked as though it weighed a ton and seemed to quiver every so often.
▪ She collects stones to weigh down her basket, but as there is no hurry she falls asleep on the bank.
▪ The Boston Globe nurse weighed each woman and measured her thighs before and after the experiment.
▪ The stones seemed not to weigh the room towards the earth but to be ready to lift it into the sky.
▪ They would probably weigh it and work out the value that way.
▪ Wasson said a steel truss weighing about 2 million pounds will be raised atop the northeast and southeast towers on May 20-21.
▪ What weighs on the other side of the scale?
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Weigh

Weigh \Weigh\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Weighed; p. pr. & vb. n. Weighing.] [OE. weien, weyen, weghen, AS. wegan to bear, move; akin to D. wegen to weigh, G. w["a]gen, wiegen, to weigh, bewegen to move, OHG. wegan, Icel. vega to move, carry, lift, weigh, Sw. v["a]ga to weigh, Dan. veie, Goth. gawigan to shake, L. vehere to carry, Skr. vah. ????. See Way, and cf. Wey.]

  1. To bear up; to raise; to lift into the air; to swing up; as, to weigh anchor. ``Weigh the vessel up.''
    --Cowper.

  2. To examine by the balance; to ascertain the weight of, that is, the force with which a thing tends to the center of the earth; to determine the heaviness, or quantity of matter of; as, to weigh sugar; to weigh gold.

    Thou art weighed in the balances, and art found wanting.
    --Dan. v. 27.

  3. To be equivalent to in weight; to counterbalance; to have the heaviness of. ``A body weighing divers ounces.''
    --Boyle.

  4. To pay, allot, take, or give by weight.

    They weighed for my price thirty pieces of silver.
    --Zech. xi. 12.

  5. To examine or test as if by the balance; to ponder in the mind; to consider or examine for the purpose of forming an opinion or coming to a conclusion; to estimate deliberately and maturely; to balance.

    A young man not weighed in state affairs.
    --Bacon.

    Had no better weighed The strength he was to cope with, or his own.
    --Milton.

    Regard not who it is which speaketh, but weigh only what is spoken.
    --Hooker.

    In nice balance, truth with gold she weighs.
    --Pope.

    Without sufficiently weighing his expressions.
    --Sir W. Scott.

  6. To consider as worthy of notice; to regard. [Obs. or Archaic] ``I weigh not you.'' --Shak. All that she so dear did weigh. --Spenser. To weigh down.

    1. To overbalance.

    2. To oppress with weight; to overburden; to depress. ``To weigh thy spirits down.''
      --Milton.

Weigh

Weigh \Weigh\, n. [See Wey.] A certain quantity estimated by weight; an English measure of weight. See Wey.

Weigh

Weigh \Weigh\, v. i.

  1. To have weight; to be heavy. ``They only weigh the heavier.''
    --Cowper.

  2. To be considered as important; to have weight in the intellectual balance.

    Your vows to her and me . . . will even weigh.
    --Shak.

    This objection ought to weigh with those whose reading is designed for much talk and little knowledge.
    --Locke.

  3. To bear heavily; to press hard.

    Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff Which weighs upon the heart.
    --Shak.

  4. To judge; to estimate. [R.]

    Could not weigh of worthiness aright.
    --Spenser.

    To weigh down, to sink by its own weight.

Weigh

Weigh \Weigh\ (w[=a]), n. (Naut.) A corruption of Way, used only in the phrase under weigh.

An expedition was got under weigh from New York.
--Thackeray.

The Athenians . . . hurried on board and with considerable difficulty got under weigh.
--Jowett (Thucyd.).

Wiktionary

weigh

vb. 1 (context transitive English) To determine the weight of an object. 2 (context transitive English) Often with "out", to measure a certain amount of something by its weight, e.g. for sale. 3 (context transitive figuratively English) To determine the intrinsic value or merit of an object, to evaluate. 4 (context intransitive figuratively obsolete English) To judge; to estimate. 5 (context transitive English) To consider a subject. (rfex) 6 (context transitive English) To have a certain weight. 7 (context intransitive English) To have weight; to be heavy; to press down. 8 (context intransitive English) To be considered as important; to have weight in the intellectual balance. 9 (context transitive nautical English) To raise an anchor free of the seabed. 10 (context intransitive nautical English) To weigh anchor. 11 To bear up; to raise; to lift into the air; to swing up. 12 (context obsolete English) To consider as worthy of notice; to regard.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

weigh

Old English wegan (class V strong verb, past tense wæg, past participle wægon) "find the weight of, measure; have weight; lift, carry, support, sustain, bear; move," from Proto-Germanic *wegan (cognates: Old Saxon wegan, Old Frisian wega, Dutch wegen "to weigh," Old Norse vega, Old High German wegan "to move, carry, weigh," German wiegen "to weigh"), from PIE *wegh- "to move" (cognates: Sanskrit vahati "carries, conveys," vahitram "vessel, ship;" Avestan vazaiti "he leads, draws;" Greek okhos "carriage;" Latin vehere "to carry, convey;" Old Church Slavonic vesti "to carry, convey;" Lithuanian vežu "to carry, convey;" Old Irish fecht "campaign, journey").\n

\nThe original sense was of motion, which led to that of lifting, then to that of "measure the weight of." The older sense of "lift, carry" survives in the nautical phrase weigh anchor. Figurative sense of "to consider, ponder" (in reference to words, etc.) is recorded from mid-14c. To weigh in in the literal sense is from 1868, originally of jockeys; figurative meaning "bring one's influence to bear" is from 1909.

WordNet

weigh

  1. v. have a certain weight

  2. show consideration for; take into account; "You must consider her age"; "The judge considered the offender's youth and was lenient" [syn: consider, count]

  3. determine the weight of; "The butcher weighed the chicken" [syn: librate]

  4. have weight; have import, carry weight; "It does not matter much" [syn: count, matter]

  5. to be oppressive or burdensome; "weigh heavily on the mind", "Something pressed on his mind" [syn: press]

Wikipedia

Weigh (disambiguation)

To weigh something is to measure its weight.

Weigh may also refer to:

Usage examples of "weigh".

Banish weighed briefly the prospect of trying to get Abies back on the line, then dismissed it and set down the handset.

He had the advantage of owning an excellent network of reporters of transgressions, for he enlisted Lucius Decumius and his crossroads brethren as informers, and cracked down very hard on merchants who weighed light or measured short, on builders who infringed boundaries or used poor materials, on landlords who had cheated the water companies by inserting bigger-bore adjutage pipes from the mains into their properties than the law prescribed.

Leaving the blade in for fear of doing more damage, Kumul lifted Ager gently as if he weighed no more than a child.

But despite his acquittal the Latvian remained a dead Latvian and weighed on his mind like a ton of bricks, although he was said to have been a frail little man, afflicted with a stomach ailment to boot.

Bunsen cells, it will be precipitated in an arborescent brittle form, ill adapted for weighing.

The black tin weighed by the vanner is supposed to correspond in quality with the black tin returned from the floors of the mine for which he is assaying, but this differs materially in different mines with the nature of the gangue.

Later we found that it weighed 122 pounds avoirdupois, and was not much bigger than a magnum of champagne.

Dutch traders were scrupulously honest in their dealings and purchased by weight, establishing it as an invariable table of avoirdupois, that the hand of a Dutchman weighed one pound, and his foot two pounds.

Their babies were both born at full term, both are breast-feeding, weigh within a few ounces of each other, and are less than two weeks apart in age.

While weighing the various intangibles and unpredictables, Bade received a report from General Rast.

I complained about his tendency to weigh his story down with vast wads of bafflegab and infodump and strain for vaguely poetic sound bites.

She wore a lot of bangles and necklaces and seemed weighed down by the sheer quantity of decoration she carried on her body.

We saw her in fantastic dresses of silk and lace, edged with turquoise filigree, white gowns, and yellow hats, waving a fan of blue feathers, with expensive bangles of silver and gold weighing her arms, and necklaces of pearl and jade round her neck.

His splendid achievements, the bashaws whom he encountered, the armies that he discomfited, and the three thousand Turks who were slain by his single hand, must be weighed in the scales of suspicious criticism.

Bossuet, after weighing all historical considerations, felt obliged to acquit Beze of instigating the crime.