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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

variety

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bewildering variety/array/range
▪ a bewildering variety of choices
a combination/variety/number of factors
▪ A combination of factors led to the closure of the factory.
a huge range/variety/selection etc
▪ a huge range of issues
a wide range/variety/choice etc (of sth)
▪ This year’s festival includes a wide range of entertainers.
▪ holidays to a wide choice of destinations
an infinite number/variety of sth
▪ There was an infinite variety of drinks to choose from.
variety show
variety store
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
different
▪ There are different varieties of Keynesians and monetarists.
▪ In this case every firm ends up producing a different variety of the product.
▪ I am also looking back over the last five years at gross margins of different wheat varieties we have grown.
▪ Instead he fills them with any of the dozens of different varieties of liquid that line the walls of his lab.
▪ Only a few thousand of the 250,000 different varieties of wild flowers have been named, he explained.
▪ There are many different varieties of wraps, perfect for each meal of the day.
▪ Three giant production centres on 75 acres of land making 254 different varieties of ice creams and lollies.
▪ In fact, the gene-altered products often seem little different from ordinary varieties when lined up on store shelves.
great
▪ Clearly a great variety of difficulty could be introduced into the tests.
▪ The greatest variety of birds are sighted in late April and May and in late August and September.
▪ Alone, words are subject to a too great variety of interpretation.
▪ There is also an increasing trend towards greater variety in family formations.
▪ There's a great variety of bracken, ferns and other plant life.
▪ Most people still find work in the same towns but in a greater variety of industries.
▪ Methodology and Sources Crime has been studied from a great variety of perspectives.
▪ If you find a great deal of variety, you probably need to articulate a mission for the group.
huge
▪ Other places contain a huge variety of species and have a high biomass.
▪ I've done a lot of work with a huge variety of sprayers.
▪ To some, the huge variety of life in the Burgess shale has been an inspiration.
▪ The huge variety of shapes is partly fashion and partly an attempt to avoid a phenomenon known as spin out.
▪ Murren has a huge variety of signposted walks to take you over the hills and into the mountains.
▪ It was clear from this point that the agencies represented worked in a huge variety of situations.
▪ The existence of such a rule of recognition may take any of a huge variety of forms, simple or complex.
▪ A huge variety will be on sale this year: the majority are frozen and by far the cheapest.
infinite
▪ This should remind of you of the infinite varieties in any one colour and also set you thinking about texture.
▪ The universe offers no such categories or simplifications; only flux and infinite variety.
▪ The sun on its endless tour round and round the sky gives shadows and hues of infinite variety.
▪ It is impossible to describe the infinite variety of hysterical gaits.
▪ Ready to yield up its infinite variety.
▪ Although infinite in variety, it was singular in appeal.
▪ Aristotle would then be saying that the infinite variety of size of Democritean atoms was all below the threshold of perception.
▪ The infinite variety of questions and possible answers, of course, account for the diversity within the subgenre.
large
▪ Cornell University also offers a large variety of short courses on specific themes, held during the summer session.
▪ The largest variety of courses was in dance.
▪ Gravel crunched and a large coniferous variety of evergreen-layered tree waved the path forward as clear.
▪ We consider ourselves heirs to a large variety of historic civilizations.
▪ The development of the gardens has been given high priority and there is a large variety of named trees and shrubs.
▪ This larger variety of the species is sometimes offered in the trade under the commercial name Sagittaria gigantea Hort.
▪ Most kinds of top fruit are available in a large range of varieties.
▪ It was the larger, sweeter varieties that spread, and even they had a hard time of it.
new
▪ The Cotwolds is an important test centre for new varieties of Linseed.
▪ Travel at home and abroad has introduced new varieties of cheese and different cheese dishes.
▪ With the growing interest in waterlilies enthusiasts all over the world are producing new varieties every year.
▪ Now two new varieties have arrived to lure the sweet-toothed.
▪ Fifty-eight new varieties London, Christie's, 14 April.
▪ With all the new and reintroduced varieties now on the market there has never been a better time to grow from seed.
▪ Many new varieties are currently being evaluated in order to widen the range of suitable varieties. requirements 1.
▪ A comparatively new variety, Bandit, also impressed with yielding ability.
rich
▪ Changes in the component values, the particular diode, and the source frequency can give a rich variety of observations.
▪ This rich variety should be preserved, not destroyed, by the gospel.
▪ It is a day to celebrate the rich variety of people within our parish rather than create unnecessary divisions.
▪ The Mawddach Estuary has a rich variety of wetland and woodland habitats attracting a wide range of different species.
▪ A rich variety of plants was found in Central Region ponds, including 68 types of aquatic and 35 wetland plants.
▪ There are several footpaths around the village, which during the summer months provide a rich variety of flora and fauna.
▪ The rich variety of geographical environments provides a background to the diversity of ways of life and traditions of the Yugoslav peoples.
▪ In no area is there a greater need for a rich variety of creative ideas.
whole
▪ Moreover, it has been reworked within the cultural forms and practices of a whole variety of subaltern groups.
▪ Outdoor play is particularly important because it helps them develop in a whole variety of ways.
▪ However, an evaluation of rural depopulation needs to take account of a whole variety of factors.
▪ The answer is that they can't, for a whole variety of reasons.
▪ To help keep the Goblin alive, if not exactly intact, a whole variety of life preserving techniques were originally developed.
▪ A whole variety of subtle strategies are available.
▪ A whole variety of factors will affect the cycle, changing the lengths of each stage or the relationship between stages.
wide
▪ Customer profiles External information was available from a wide variety of sources.
▪ It is currently used in a wide variety of products, platforms, and industries around the world.
▪ Make sure you eat a wide variety of the foods you enjoy.
▪ The decades that followed were host to a wide variety of romance types.
▪ But certain parts of Levi-Strauss' schema have application to a wide variety of ethnographic materials.
▪ The child-use section contains instructional materials in a wide variety of format and subject matter for the children themselves.
▪ A wide variety of experience and direction is on offer.
▪ It feeds on a wide variety of fish - 43 different species are known to be taken as prey.
■ NOUN
show
▪ The Big Three-O will be a spectacular variety show and will be broadcast on the network on 28 December.
▪ The whole crowd later went to a variety show at the Winter Gardens.
▪ United are a variety show when they should be the movie.
■ VERB
choose
▪ This means choosing the right variety can play an important part in making savings further into the season.
▪ Teachers may choose among a variety of strategies.
▪ When choosing several varieties, remember that cross-pollination may be important and that some fruits store for longer than others.
▪ They are told that these are but two examples of relaxation techniques chosen from a wide variety.
▪ You should choose a variety of foods and ring the changes with meals.
▪ Players can choose from among a variety of ancient civilizations, and the software provides detailed historical information about each.
▪ However, if you choose the right varieties, they will also brighten up your garden in a cool, dull summer.
▪ For any particular study one can choose a particular variety of time.
include
▪ Social organization is complex and always includes a variety of classes, orders and groups.
▪ For the same reason, it is also important to include a variety of drinking settings.
▪ Edward Taylor's inspirational jacquard designs include a variety of bold and vibrant patterns based upon cultural themes and motifs.
▪ The social relationships engaged in by Margaret Nicholson include a wide variety of friends and the stress on family ties is missing.
▪ No copying process is perfect, however, and the population of replicators comes to include varieties that differ from one another.
offer
▪ Menus offer a good variety, and regular barbecues are held.
▪ P-Trak does offer a variety of other personal information such as names, addresses and phone numbers.
▪ Sons and daughters could offer the widest variety of support, and were particularly important.
▪ Adventures on a Shoestring has been offering a variety of 90-minute weekend walking tours of New York City for 34 years.
▪ New seasonal selections are added throughout the year; offering a variety of both traditional favourites, as well as more adventurous dishes.
▪ Restaurants across the country are now offering a wide variety of classic and innovative game dishes.
▪ South Gare offers a variety of small fish.
▪ This offers a fine variety of climbing on the edge of Haskett gully.
produce
▪ To overcome this problem many policy papers which examine population ageing produce a variety of projections using different fertility assumptions.
▪ In this case every firm ends up producing a different variety of the product.
▪ With the growing interest in waterlilies enthusiasts all over the world are producing new varieties every year.
▪ Then for every pair of countries that actively produce varieties of the good, we should expect to observe intraindustry trade.
▪ That would produce both balance and variety in the media taken as a whole.
▪ To do this, infants use their motor systems to produce a variety of purposeful actions and behaviors.
▪ These silicate groups come together by sharing oxygen atoms to produce a variety of structures.
▪ Commercially pure ethanol is produced using a variety of chemical reactions to eliminate the water.
provide
▪ There are also many organisations who provide a variety of services to people with HIV/AIDS.
▪ Instead, the company said it provides a variety of ways for employees to resolve conflicts and complaints.
▪ Arrangements have been made with Epps Aviation to provide a variety of services including training, sales and engineering support.
▪ The center, he adds, should provide a wide variety of culture-enriching performances, even if some are not successful.
▪ Griffiths made it clear that care and support could be provided from a variety of sources.
▪ On the other hand the Basic Contemporary Romance provides variety and, occasionally, the unexpected.
▪ Chapter 3 provides information on a variety of religious faiths, and it was here I found the text least satisfactory.
▪ In areas where gardens are protected and some extra care is provided, most cabbage varieties can be virtually a year-round crop.
use
▪ With bricks you must be sure to use the correct variety.
▪ It is currently used in a wide variety of products, platforms, and industries around the world.
▪ A small cottage industry of biotechnology firms has sprung up to investigate this, using a variety of methods.
▪ Sheet steel is used in a wide variety of applications ranging from pails to car hoods.
▪ Changes in the service system in Nottinghamshire were monitored using a wide variety of sources.
▪ Calcium is determined using a variety of other reagents and most reliably by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry.
▪ In Bloomington, Ill., police use a variety of gang definitions, cobbled together from various state and local edicts.
▪ But if you want a great apple pie, use a variety of apples.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a whole range/series/variety etc (of sth)
▪ A regular newsletter keeps people in touch and a whole series of social events are undertaken.
▪ Exercise, in addition to good nutrition, can guard against a whole range of serious ailments.
▪ I think it is going into your subconscious and picking up a whole series of signals.
▪ It is practical activity that is important; the handling of a whole range of materials.
▪ Knitters can choose from a whole range of techniques and their selection will be put on to a video, exclusive to them.
▪ Parks provide space for a whole range of events, from steam rallies to horse shows.
▪ Since then he had survived a whole series of setbacks.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ At that time, all newsreaders spoke a variety of English spoken in southern England, known as Received Pronunciation.
▪ It may be possible to create varieties of fish that have resistance to common diseases.
▪ She's always complaining that her job doesn't have enough variety.
▪ South American growers use the best US seed varieties.
▪ The doctor encouraged him to increase the variety of food that he eats.
▪ The French make many varieties of cheese, from both cows' and goats' milk.
▪ The music on her latest CD shows a great deal of variety.
▪ This is a new variety of apple; we're selling it for the first time.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Bert started to move a huge pile of cardboard boxes which had once housed a variety of motor spares.
▪ During treatment for his injuries and a variety of complications, Dole said his weight plummeted from 194 pounds to 122 pounds.
▪ For all that I have learned a greater variety of games, there are fewer I can tolerate.
▪ Like most bad situations, this one had evolved in a variety of ways.
▪ My own preference has always been for the rough-coated variety since these can withstand weather and rough going very much better.
▪ There is enormous variety to this public-interest assignment.
Wikipedia

Variety

Variety may refer to:

Variety (botany)

In botanical nomenclature, variety (abbreviated var.; in ) is a taxonomic rank below that of species and subspecies but above that of form. As such, it gets a three-part infraspecific name. It is sometimes recommended that the subspecies rank should be used to recognize geographic distinctiveness, whereas the variety rank is appropriate if the taxon is seen throughout the geographic range of the species.

Variety (cybernetics)

In cybernetics, the term variety denotes the total number of distinct states of a system.

Variety (Tokyo Jihen album)

, a.k.a. Goraku is the third studio album by Japanese band Tokyo Jihen, released on September 26, 2007 in Japan through EMI Music Japan and Virgin Music. The album was produced by the band and Japanese recording engineer Uni Inoue. The album contains thirteen tracks and has spawned two singles. The lead single, "O.S.C.A.", was released in July 11, 2007. "Killer-tune" followed as the second single in August 22, 2007.

Variety (Les Rita Mitsouko album)

Variéty is the seventh and last studio album by Les Rita Mitsouko. An English-language version of the album was produced for the international English speaking market under the modified title of Variety. The French-language version reached #5 on the French Albums chart, while the English recording peaked at #163.

Variety (linguistics)

In sociolinguistics a variety, also called a lect, is a specific form of a language or language cluster. This may include languages, dialects, registers, styles or other forms of language, as well as a standard variety. The use of the word "variety" to refer to the different forms avoids the use of the term language, which many people associate only with the standard language, and the term dialect, which is often associated with non-standard varieties thought of as less prestigious or "correct" than the standard. Linguists speak of both standard and non-standard varieties. "Lect" avoids the problem in ambiguous cases of deciding whether or not two varieties are distinct languages or dialects of a single language.

Variation at the level of the lexicon, such as slang and argot, is often considered in relation to particular styles or levels of formality (also called registers), but such uses are sometimes discussed as varieties as well.

Variety (universal algebra)

In mathematics, specifically universal algebra, a variety of algebras is the class of all algebraic structures of a given signature satisfying a given set of identities. Equivalently, a variety is a class of algebraic structures of the same signature that is closed under the taking of homomorphic images, subalgebras and (direct) products. In the context of category theory, a variety of algebras is usually called a finitary algebraic category.

A covariety is the class of all coalgebraic structures of a given signature.

A variety of algebras should not be confused with an algebraic variety. Intuitively, a variety of algebras is an equationally defined collection of algebras, while an algebraic variety is an equationally defined collection of elements from a single algebra. The two are named alike by analogy, but they are formally quite distinct and their theories have little in common.

Variety (1925 film)

Variety ( , also known by the alternative titlesJealousy or Vaudeville) is a 1925 silent drama film directed by Ewald Andre Dupont based on the novel Der Eid des Stephan Huller (1923) by Felix Hollaender. Jannings portrays "Boss Huller," an ex-trapeze artist who runs a seedy carnival with his wife (Maly Delschaft) and child. Huller insists that the family take in a beautiful stranger ( Lya De Putti) as a new sideshow dancer, with whom he develops a new trapeze number. The trapeze scenes are set in the Berlin Wintergarten theatre. The camera swings from long shot to close-up, like the acrobats.

Variety (1935 film)

Variety is a 1935 British musical film directed by Adrian Brunel and starring George Carney, Barry Livesey, Sam Livesey. The film follows a revue show format, with a number of performers playing themselves. It was made at Cricklewood Studios.

Variety (Family Fodder album)

Variety is the tenth album by Family Fodder and was released by London indie label The state51 Conspiracy in July 2013.

Variety (1971 film)

Variety'' (Spanish:Varietés'') is a 1971 Spanish drama film directed by Juan Antonio Bardem and starring Sara Montiel, Vicente Parra and Chris Avram.

Variety (radio)

Variety is a radio format that plays music across numerous genres. Freeform variety is associated with a wide range of programming including talk, sports, and music from a wide spectrum. This format is usually found on smaller, non-commercial public-broadcasting stations such as college radio, community radio or high school radio stations. If a variety formatted station has a program director, that person exerts little if any influence on the music or other programming choices beyond the normal regulatory control required by that country's licensing regulations.

Variety is also associated with full-service radio. This format is primarily found in the rural United States, on commercial AM stations, and on a few FM public radio stations (usually those that play jazz). These stations tend to favor older listeners and play a mix of music that focuses more on older mainstream music, although much broader than the typical suburban oldies or classic hits station; a full-service station will often play music from the adult standards, classic country, adult contemporary or ethnic formats as well. Full-service radio also regularly includes room for local news and talk.

Hot Adult Contemporary and similarly formatted stations often brand with "mix" and "variety" to demonstrate the fact that they play music from several decades (usually from the 1980s to the present). However, these stations have much more restrictive playlists than true variety stations such as those in the freeform and full-service categories. An example is WBNW-FM in Binghamton, NY or www.varietyradio.co.uk. The phrase "variety hits" is a synonym for the adult hits format (typified by the "Male First Name FM" branding), which indeed usually has a larger variety than a typical hot AC station.

Category:Radio formats

Variety (magazine)

Variety is a weekly American entertainment trade magazine and website owned by Penske Media Corporation. It was founded by Sime Silverman in New York in 1905 as a weekly; in 1933 it added Daily Variety, based in Los Angeles, to cover the motion-picture industry; in 1998 it brought out Daily Variety Gotham, based in New York. Variety.com features breaking entertainment news, reviews, box office results, cover stories, videos, photo galleries and more, plus a credits database, production charts and calendar, with archive content dating back to 1905. The last daily printed edition was put out on March 19, 2013. Variety magazine originally reported on theater and vaudeville.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Variety

Variety \Va*ri"e*ty\, n.; pl. Varieties. [L. varietas: cf. F. vari['e]t['e]. See Various.]

  1. The quality or state of being various; intermixture or succession of different things; diversity; multifariousness.

    Variety is nothing else but a continued novelty.
    --South.

    The variety of colors depends upon the composition of light.
    --Sir I. Newton.

    For earth this variety from heaven.
    --Milton.

    There is a variety in the tempers of good men.
    --Atterbury.

  2. That which is various. Specifically:

    1. A number or collection of different things; a varied assortment; as, a variety of cottons and silks.

      He . . . wants more time to do that variety of good which his soul thirsts after.
      --Law.

    2. Something varying or differing from others of the same general kind; one of a number of things that are akin; a sort; as, varieties of wood, land, rocks, etc.

    3. (Biol.) An individual, or group of individuals, of a species differing from the rest in some one or more of the characteristics typical of the species, and capable either of perpetuating itself for a period, or of being perpetuated by artificial means; hence, a subdivision, or peculiar form, of a species.

      Note: Varieties usually differ from species in that any two, however unlike, will generally propagate indefinitely (unless they are in their nature unfertile, as some varieties of rose and other cultivated plants); in being a result of climate, food, or other extrinsic conditions or influences, but generally by a sudden, rather than a gradual, development; and in tending in many cases to lose their distinctive peculiarities when the individuals are left to a state of nature, and especially if restored to the conditions that are natural to typical individuals of the species. Many varieties of domesticated animals and of cultivated plants have been directly produced by man.

    4. In inorganic nature, one of those forms in which a species may occur, which differ in minor characteristics of structure, color, purity of composition, etc.

      Note: These may be viewed as variations from the typical species in its most perfect and purest form, or, as is more commonly the case, all the forms, including the latter, may rank as Varieties. Thus, the sapphire is a blue variety, and the ruby a red variety, of corundum; again, calcite has many Varieties differing in form and structure, as Iceland spar, dogtooth spar, satin spar, and also others characterized by the presence of small quantities of magnesia, iron, manganese, etc. Still again, there are Varieties of granite differing in structure, as graphic granite, porphyritic granite, and other Varieties differing in composition, as albitic granite, hornblendic, or syenitic, granite, etc.

  3. (Theaters) Such entertainment as in given in variety shows; the production of, or performance in, variety shows. [Cant]

    Geographical variety (Biol.), a variety of any species which is coincident with a geographical region, and is usually dependent upon, or caused by, peculiarities of climate.

    Variety hybrid (Biol.), a cross between two individuals of different varieties of the same species; a mongrel.

    Syn: Diversity; difference; kind.

    Usage: Variety, Diversity. A man has a variety of employments when he does many things which are not a mere repetition of the same act; he has a diversity of employments when the several acts performed are unlike each other, that is, diverse. In most cases, where there is variety there will be more or less of diversity, but not always. One who sells railroad tickets performs a great variety of acts in a day, while there is but little diversity in his employment.

    All sorts are here that all the earth yields! Variety without end.
    --Milton.

    But see in all corporeal nature's scene, What changes, what diversities, have been!
    --Blackmore.

WordNet

variety

  1. n. a collection containing a variety of sorts of things; "a great assortment of cars was on display"; "he had a variety of disorders"; "a veritable smorgasbord of religions" [syn: assortment, mixture, mixed bag, miscellany, miscellanea, salmagundi, smorgasbord, potpourri, motley]

  2. noticeable heterogeneity; "a diversity of possibilities"; "the range and variety of his work is amazing" [syn: diverseness, diversity, multifariousness]

  3. (biology) a taxonomic category consisting of members of a species that differe from others of the same species in minor but heritable characteristics; "varieties are frequently recognized in botany"

  4. a show consisting of a series of short unrelated performances [syn: variety show]

  5. a category of things distinguished by some common characteristic or quality; "sculpture is a form of art"; "what kinds of desserts are there?" [syn: kind, sort, form]

  6. a difference that is usually pleasant; "he goes to France for variety"; "it is a refreshing change to meet a woman mechanic" [syn: change]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

variety

1530s, "change of fortunes," from Middle French variété and directly from Latin varietatem (nominative varietas) "difference, diversity; a kind, variety, species, sort," from varius "various" (see vary). Meaning diversity, absence of monotony" is from 1540s; that of "collection of different things" is from 1550s; sense of "something different from others" is from 1610s. In reference to music hall or theatrical performances of a mixed nature, first recorded 1868, American English.

Wiktionary

variety

n. 1 The quality of being varied; diversity. 2 A specific variation of something. 3 A number of different things.

Usage examples of "variety".

I was scooting my chair on its track back and forth along the row of sensor consoles that reported and recorded a variety of basic abiotic data.

The most serious variety of the disease is characterized by an abnormally sweet urine.

I think this must be admitted, when we find that there are hardly any domestic races, either amongst animals or plants, which have not been ranked by some competent judges as mere varieties, and by other competent judges as the descendants of aboriginally distinct species.

In a variety of analogous forms in different countries throughout Europe, the patrimonial and absolutist state was the political form required to rule feudal social relations and relations of production.

The several varieties of Cress are stimulating and anti-scorbutic, whilst each contains a particular essential principle, of acrid flavour, and of sharp biting qualities.

The ivy-leaved variety is found in England, with nodding fresh-coloured blossoms, and a brown intensely acrid root.

A burning acridity of taste is the common characteristic of the several varieties of the Buttercup.

Alsike clover has much the same adaptation to soils as the medium and mammoth varieties, but will grow better than these on low-lying soils well stored with humus.

Johnson, inferior to none in philosophy, philology, poetry, and classical learning, stands foremost as an essayist, justly admired for the dignity, strength, and variety of his style, as well as for the agreeable manner in which he investigates the human heart, tracing every interesting emotion, and opening all the sources of morality.

This could also have happened in New Zealand, where a variety of archaic adze types has been found.

Even the succulent blue lilies--a variety of the agapanthus which is so familiar to us in English greenhouses--hung their long trumpet-shaped flowers and looked oppressed and miserable, beneath the burning breath of the hot wind which had been blowing for hours like the draught from a volcano.

I had five boxes of Fiddle Faddle, two bags of Double-Stuff Oreo cookies, a ten-pack of Snickers bars, two bags of Fritos and one of Doritos, seven Gogurts in a variety of flavors, one bag of Chips Ahoy chocolate chip cookies, a box of Count Chocula, a two-pound bag of Skittles, and a six-pack of Yoo-Hoo locked in my room.

So he would never have seen that out of the twenty-seven thousand eight hundred and forty-six starships which had come to Norfolk, twenty-two of them experienced an alarming variety of severe mechanical and electrical malfunctions as they departed for their home planets.

He said it was a hardy winter variety of alopecia that flourishes in the frost.

Connie discovers that alopecia is a scalp condition and not a variety of rare winter-flowering plant?