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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

tweed

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a tweed/wool/sheepskin/leather coat
▪ I love her black leather coat.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
brown
▪ He had a many-pocketed shooting jacket, brown, with a flat brown tweed cap.
▪ He lay around all afternoon in his brown tweed suit, and even pulled a button off the jacket.
▪ He wears an old-fashioned brown tweed jacket, looks like it has biscuit crumbs sprinkled all over it.
■ NOUN
cap
▪ He had a many-pocketed shooting jacket, brown, with a flat brown tweed cap.
▪ Above them, in the pulpit, a black magician in a tweed cap held his hands high in blasphemous benediction.
▪ He is wearing a tweed cap and an ancient blue trenchcoat.
coat
▪ She wore a tweed coat with a Cairngorm brooch in the lapel and a furry green felt hat.
▪ I was expecting a trim man in a tweed coat, but my expectations were wrong.
▪ They were both in their fifties - she in a tweed coat, he in a sports Jacket and flannels.
▪ You can wear a tweed coat if you like but you risk being cold and wet.
jacket
▪ As a result, the traditional party outfit of flamboyant cravat and tweed jacket has been replaced by the ninety-nine-pound wool suit.
▪ Charles Gullans always wore some sort of tweed jacket and a huge pair of saddle oxfords.
▪ She could still feel, from fingertip to elbow, the textures of cotton shirt, silk tie and tweed jacket.
▪ He wore a tweed jacket over a dark blue turtle-necked jersey and he had a robust mod mustache.
▪ For Diana, a heavy tweed jacket for draughty Balmoral would be a snip at £9.95.
▪ He was still in his riding clothes, well-cut jodhpurs and an old tweed jacket.
▪ The familiar tweed jackets appeared in fresh fruit pastel shades enlivened with a spattering of matched sequins.
▪ She smelt the newness of his clothes, his tweed jacket, the soft shirt, the corduroys.
overcoat
▪ Doone followed us into the kitchen, removed a grey tweed overcoat and sat by the table in his much-lived-in grey suit.
▪ Tessa wasn't even dressed - she was wearing his old tweed overcoat over her pyjamas.
skirt
▪ Jenny, in a purple tweed skirt and a leather jerkin and black boots, stepped delicately inside.
▪ The girl was in a long tweed skirt and long boots so that not an inch of leg was to be seen.
▪ She was dressed in a sensible tweed skirt and a rather elegant cashmere sweater.
▪ Her tweed skirt was soaking and its friction rubbed sore patches behind her knees.
suit
▪ A little later, neatly dressed in tweed suit and cashmere jersey she climbed the stairs to Phoebe's flat.
▪ He lay around all afternoon in his brown tweed suit, and even pulled a button off the jacket.
▪ Behind the table sat a large three-piece tweed suit.
▪ He was not in uniform, unusual for him, wore a tweed suit, white shirt and black tie.
▪ In the opposite corner was a portly man in a baggy tweed suit.
▪ But he stooped and appeared to shamble as he walked, chunky and untidy in his tweed suit.
▪ She was a large lady, dressed in a tweed suit, with a pleasingly direct manner.
■ VERB
wear
▪ She wore a tweed coat with a Cairngorm brooch in the lapel and a furry green felt hat.
▪ She wearing tweed only because she was selling tweed.
▪ He wore a tweed hat, the brim turned down, a waterproof shooting jacket and wellingtons.
▪ Charles Gullans always wore some sort of tweed jacket and a huge pair of saddle oxfords.
▪ He is wearing a tweed cap and an ancient blue trenchcoat.
▪ He wore a tweed jacket over a dark blue turtle-necked jersey and he had a robust mod mustache.
▪ He was not in uniform, unusual for him, wore a tweed suit, white shirt and black tie.
▪ You can wear a tweed coat if you like but you risk being cold and wet.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As a result, the traditional party outfit of flamboyant cravat and tweed jacket has been replaced by the ninety-nine-pound wool suit.
▪ He placed his Harris tweed on his lap, over folded hands.
▪ He took off the phoney glasses and tweed hat and threw them to one side.
▪ He was dressed for an Edwardian shooting party in a full suit of tweed plus fours.
▪ I was expecting a trim man in a tweed coat, but my expectations were wrong.
▪ She could still feel, from fingertip to elbow, the textures of cotton shirt, silk tie and tweed jacket.
▪ She wearing tweed only because she was selling tweed.
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

tweed

1839, a trade name for a type of woolen fabric:\n\nMICHAEL NOWAK, alias John Mazurkiewiez, was indicted for stealing on the 15th of April 2 ¼ yards of woollen cloth, called tweed, value 12s., and 2 ¼ yards of woollen cloth, called doe skin, value 17s., the goods of George Priestley Heap.

[London Central Criminal Court minutes of evidence from 1839]

\nThis apparently developed from the "Tweed Fishing or Travelling Trousers" advertised in numerous publications from 1834-1838 by the clothing house of Doudney & Son, 49 Lombard Street.\n\nSo celebrated has amateur rod-fishing in the Tweed become, that the proper costume of the sportsman has now become an object of speculation among the London tailors, one of whom advertises among other articles of dress "Tweed Fishing Trousers." The anglers who have so long established their head-quarters at Kelso, for the purpose of enjoying the amusement of salmon fishing in the Tweed, have had excellent sport lately : some of the most skilful having caught five or six salmon a day, weighing from six to fourteen pounds each.

["New Sporting Magazine," June 1837]

\nThus ultimately named for the River Tweed in Scotland. The place name has not been explained, and it is perhaps pre-Celtic and non-Indo-European.
Wikipedia

Tweed

Tweed may refer to:

  • Tweed (cloth), a woolen fabric

Tweed (cloth)

Tweed is a rough, woollen fabric, of a soft, open, flexible texture, resembling cheviot or homespun, but more closely woven. It is usually woven with a plain weave, twill or herringbone structure. Colour effects in the yarn may be obtained by mixing dyed wool before it is spun.

Tweeds are an icon of traditional Irish and British country clothing, being desirable for informal outerwear, due to the material being moisture-resistant and durable. Tweeds are made to withstand harsh climate and are commonly worn for outdoor activities such as shooting and hunting, in both Ireland and the United Kingdom. "Lovat" is the name given to the green used in traditional Scottish tweed. In Ireland, tweed manufacturing is most associated with County Donegal.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Tweed

Tweed \Tweed\, n. [Probably a corruption of twills. See Twill.] A soft and flexible fabric for men's wear, made wholly of wool except in some inferior kinds, the wool being dyed, usually in two colors, before weaving.

WordNet

tweed

  1. n. thick woolen fabric used for clothing; originated in Scotland

  2. (usually in the plural) trousers [syn: flannel, gabardine, white]

Wiktionary

tweed

n. A coarse woolen fabric used for clothing.

Usage examples of "tweed".

They hung Playboy Playmates on the wall, set up his hi-fi, with the tweed speaker covers, and his aquarium with the grow light and the bubbler, which imparted a chill, dank smell to the basement air.

He wore creaseless flannel trousers and a brown tweed jacket with patches all over it and bits of dried food on the lapels.

The distances to the neighbouring villages of Darnick and Newstead, and across the Tweed to Gattonsville, seemed so shrunken.

Van Deef entered as George was speaking, wearing tweed britches that had nothing in common with his jacket.

His symptoms themselves developed symptoms, troughs and nodes he charted with morbid attention in the dumpster, in his suspenders and horrid tweed cap, clutching a shopping bag with his wig and coat and comely habilements he could neither wear nor pawn.

In this deplorable state of body and mind, was I jogging on towards the Tweed, by the side of the small river called Ellan, when, just at the narrowest part of the glen, whom should I meet full in the face but the very being in all the universe of God would the most gladly have shunned.

Greave of the Feoffees, a stocky man in a loud-checked tweed suit with a face as soft and brown and wrinkled as an over-ripe russet apple.

Those unable to find shelter in one of the friaries, nunneries, public houses, or private homes on either side of the Tweed were obliged to live under canvas, encamped on the common lands that extended out into the surrounding countryside.

Tweed and Heep were soon on their feet only to hit the floor again as a second volley followed the first.

Tweed and Heep were alone with the Bellman, overseeing a document that I found out later was my termination warrant.

But she only held the centre of the stage a minute, for Monkey entered at her heels, bursting with delight in a long green macintosh thrown over another tweed skirt that hid her feet and even trailed behind.

What meeter place could there be for dreaming than the twilit banks of Tweed?

I was trying too hard, as if I had thought of nothing else except her visit the whole six days, so I wore an old Donegal tweed sports jacket, with one of the original Pringle pullovers underneath, brown moleskin trousers, a good leather belt, soft rust-coloured cotton shirt, a dark-green knitted tie, Argyle socks, and my second-best dark-brown Lobb brogues.

Inverpolly he had been used to wearing what most of the men wore, a thick sweater and corduroy or tweed slacks, but now he was nattily attired in a black jacket, pinstripe trousers, very white linen and a bow tie.

While he was still engaged with the Exchange, Nevil Bennet strolled in, clad in his usual outrageous tweed, a pinkish shirt, and a purple tie.