Find the word definition

Crossword clues for try

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
try
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
hear/try a case (=listen to the evidence before making a judgment)
▪ The case will be heard by a federal judge.
tried desperately
▪ The doctors tried desperately to save her life.
tried her hardest
▪ She tried her hardest to ignore what he’d said.
try an approach
▪ Some scientists have been trying an alternative approach.
try not to laugh (=to not laugh, even though something is funny, because it would not be polite)
▪ ‘Are you all right?’ Amy said, trying not to laugh.
try/attempt to escape
▪ Some prisoners tried to escape, but most were recaptured or shot.
try/manage/fail to persuade sb
▪ I’m trying to persuade your dad to buy some shares.
try/test/tax sb's patience (=make it difficult for someone to continue to be patient)
▪ The guy at the desk was beginning to try my patience.
who were...trying to kid
▪ We thought we could change the world. Just who were we trying to kid?
won’t be for want of trying
▪ Well, if he doesn’t get the job it won’t be for want of trying!
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
again
▪ Some of those who fail may enrol in a cram school for a year and try again.
▪ There was no answer to his knock, so he tried again.
▪ Please try again with a valid value.
▪ Wilson will try again this legislative session, Spidell said.
▪ Being somewhat surprised by this, I tried again, using the 550C Windows driver, but with the DeskJet Portable connected.
▪ We waited in terrible patience, and he tried again.
▪ Something of the sort is being tried again at Waco.
▪ Then Thornton went back home to Arkansas, but eventually came back to try again.
desperately
▪ She was trying desperately to regain her composure.
▪ Some plantation families tried desperately to maintain their traditional lifestyle by pretending they still had slaves.
▪ He was trying desperately to keep memories at bay.
▪ Some expend tremendous energy desperately trying to stop the clock.
▪ The Lieutenant was desperately trying to stay in his saddle.
▪ About eight months later she desperately tried to get him back in.
▪ He is unfailingly polite and tries desperately to understand other people's views.
hard
▪ Naseby tried hard to read over his shoulder.
▪ Robert and Barbara Walter are trying hard not to be overcome by Derby fever.
▪ The Bishop tried hard to express his grateful thanks.
▪ At halftime, Oregon is up by twelve points, and Jody is trying hard not to let her emotions show.
▪ She felt bubbly with fun, and had to try hard not to let it show too much.
▪ But now I was trying hard, and I could see how limited I was.
▪ Stuart tried hard to reach but the shelf was just too high.
▪ He begins to fantasize that if he tried hard he could shrink to a tiny size and crawl inside the set.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(do/try) the ... thing
▪ Rick's doing the starving artist thing right now.
do/try your damnedest
▪ We both tried our damnedest but it didn't work.
▪ All right, tell the girls, do your damnedest.
▪ But both the Trust and those of us lucky enough to live there will do our damnedest to prevent it.
▪ He had tried to make it work, tried his damnedest, but she had absolutely no sense of taste or refinement.
▪ If I do as you suggest and tell Billy about us, he will do his damnedest to destroy me in revenge.
full/top marks for effort/trying/persistence etc
▪ You had to give Anthony top marks for persistence, she thought to herself.
▪ You had to give the woman full marks for persistence.
nice try
▪ It was a nice try, a necessary try, but one that ultimately failed.
▪ You miscalculated, but it was a nice try.
tried and tested/trusted/true
▪ After all, these methods are tried and tested.
▪ Alternatively you could pick up a pinstripe suit from tried and trusted Marks & Spencer.
▪ Disposable workers Modern methods of super-exploitation, tried and tested in the Third World, are coming home to industrialized countries.
▪ Look for the more creative solution - the tried and true don't always bring the best results.
▪ Others stick to the tried and tested method with a sponge.
▪ Some parts of the blueprint will have been tried and tested, and found to be reliable.
▪ The genre is tried and true, of course, from Animal House to Reality Bites.
▪ These have the advantage of being tried and tested and involve lower cost.
try your hand at (doing) sth
▪ A visit to West Dorset also offers a perfect opportunity to try your hand at windsurfing.
▪ If you have the urge to try your hand at a grant, do so!
▪ Isaac Mizrahi tried his hand at the corset, and in the process turned out some fabulous evening dresses.
▪ It's time to try my hand at the settled life.
▪ Just like Walsh, too, Robinson first tried his hand at broadcasting.
▪ Many who are in the process of acquiring these technical skills may wish to try their hand at grantsmanship.
▪ More than once, more than a dozen times I have been tempted to try my hand at another profession.
▪ Plenty of Christians have tried their hand at putting their beliefs into prose or poetry, usually with calamitous aesthetic results.
try/chance your luck
▪ Akinbiyi was next up to try his luck after 25 minutes, following a great break from the left touchline.
▪ And if Mr. Birt does find himself out of a job, he could always try his luck as a timeshare salesman.
▪ But the next time Berger tried his luck, it produced a spectacular dividend.
▪ He squatted down with a stick to try his luck.
▪ Moments later Pauleta tried his luck with a fizzing 30-yarder, but Shay Given got a hand to it.
▪ Well, I strongly recommend that you try your luck on any wide verges close to towns.
▪ Why not try your luck and help others at the same time?
▪ Without a pub to be seen for miles we decided to try our luck in the bar of the hilton.
use/try every trick in the book
▪ I tried every trick in the book to reform him.
▪ Victoria used every trick in the book to undermine Patsy in order to get the new job colleagues knew Patsy had earned.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Do you like goat's milk?" "I don't know, I've never tried it."
▪ Harriet picked up the ball and tried a shot at the basket.
▪ Have you tried Alison's carrot cake?
▪ Have you tried those new barbecue-flavoured crisps?
▪ He tried to walk past me down the stairs, but I stopped him.
▪ His mother tried threats, bribery -- everything, but Danny still refused to go to school.
▪ I'll go try the phone upstairs.
▪ I'll tell some jokes to try and cheer him up.
▪ I'm sorry, but Ms. Bouvier is out of the office. Could you try again later.
▪ I tried aerobics once, but I didn't really enjoy it.
▪ I tried all the keys, but none of them would open the door.
▪ I tried to get another job but I had no luck.
▪ I knocked, then tried the door. It was open, but the room was empty.
▪ I think you should try planning your essays in rough before you start writing.
▪ I was trying hard to concentrate, but my mind kept wandering.
▪ I went around the back to try the windows, but they were all locked.
▪ Nadine tried six stores before she found the book Sam wanted.
▪ Running is really good exercise - you should try it.
▪ Sorry I didn't phone you. I did try, but your line was busy.
▪ There was no answer at his workplace, so Mandy tried his home number.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A gang of youths threw stones and missiles at officers who were trying to break up the display.
▪ Another over-eager cat has discovered one of the basic truths of garden life: never try to kill a toad.
▪ Baseball, though, is a bad place to try to find stability.
▪ He tried to phone for help.
▪ He tried to read some deeper personal message into it.
▪ I think we stayed for about a week just trying to get more and more of a body count.
▪ If his Mummy tried to come, she was sent away.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
good
▪ Well, that's a better try, Ferg.
▪ He gave it a good try.
▪ But it's a good try.
▪ It is a good try, but it will not wash.
▪ The hon. Gentleman is having a good try.
▪ So the answer is no. 2 Good try - but you got it the wrong way round!
late
▪ The South-West's late try came when Clough was sent a hospital pass and Fallon booted the loose ball over the line.
▪ Botha converted, and not even Tony Underwood's marvellous late try could rescue a game which left everyone breathless.
▪ Ally Donaldson kicked two penalty goals for Currie and converted a late try by Dean Mack.
▪ Cardiff attacked gamely in the final quarter and scored a late try through Jeffreys.
▪ Further mistakes by the Lions permitted the hyped-up home team to level at 12-12 and score a late, irrelevant try.
nice
▪ Sorry, Arnie. Nice try, but we like the pic our snapper took of you much better.
▪ All news to you, huh, Bernie? Nice try.
▪ It was a nice try, a necessary try, but one that ultimately failed.
▪ You miscalculated, but it was a nice try.
only
▪ The only try came from Sudbury scrum-half Steve Glen.
▪ But the Soviet Union managed to fashion the only try of the game at Hellfire Corner.
▪ New Zealand held the lead for long periods and their frequent advantages depended on the only try of the match.
▪ Ben Crawley got the only try as Saracens beat relegation favourites Rugby 14-6.
▪ But Saracens hit back with 2 penalties and the only try of the game, an up and under.
■ NOUN
penalty
▪ There was also a penalty try.
▪ If we take the Campese knock-on in the World Cup final, I personally would awarded a penalty try.
▪ Under the new law I would still be able to award a penalty try.
▪ When it is a two-on-one situation near the line, then the penalty try will result.
▪ All four of Neath's tries were close-to-the-line affairs, including a penalty try award.
▪ Morrison awarded them a contentious penalty try after Leicester's pack brought down Bath's drive from a lineout.
▪ West led 12-0 at half-time through a penalty try converted by John Stabler, who also kicked two penalties.
■ VERB
award
▪ Under the new law I would still be able to award a penalty try.
▪ New Zealand took only four minutes before making their first strike with flanker Josh Kronfeld being awarded a try.
convert
▪ He also converted Ian Jones's try off the touchline.
▪ Laing converted this try, and two penalty tries awarded as the Instonians scrum got on top.
▪ Earlier, Craggs had kicked a penalty and then hit the post when attempting to convert Steve Towns' try.
▪ With White converting all the tries, Alton ran out comfortable winners after a terrible start.
▪ Didier Camberabero kicked a penalty and converted a characteristic try by Serge Blanco.
▪ Ally Donaldson kicked two penalty goals for Currie and converted a late try by Dean Mack.
▪ Gregory converted the try and as he had also kicked a penalty goal early in the match Nottingham were on their way.
give
▪ We decided the deception was the worst part of it and agreed to give honesty a try.
▪ He gave it a good try.
▪ I reckon if I had had a flat and everything I could have given it a try.
▪ If you decide to give massage a try, be careful: Massage can be either sedating or stimulating to the body.
▪ If you live north of Watford, give it a try.
▪ Oh, Scoonie gave other sports a try.
▪ Well yes, I suppose I could give it a try but I don't want to promise anything.
▪ Our family gave it a try on a recent weekend.
grab
▪ Just before the final whistle, former Leeds player Gary Divorty grabbed a consolation try, converted by stand-off Bishop.
▪ He added two more penalties before Darryl Pitt and Shane Buckley grabbed a try apiece.
score
▪ As some one once said: he's the sort of player you cheer when he scores a try against your side.
▪ Bath had used a variation of this move to score their first try.
▪ Ballantyne scored a try which cancelled out a strike by Mike Debusk then sent in Keith Johnston for a second.
▪ He scored two tries and converted one of them.
▪ Then the 19-year-old athlete scored a try as Wigan beat a Great Britain select side 37-36.
▪ Then the hungry Ben Cohen popped up on the right to score his seventh try in only nine Tests.
▪ The home side ended the game in style with Martin Morris scoring the final try in injury time.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(do/try) the ... thing
▪ Rick's doing the starving artist thing right now.
do/try your damnedest
▪ We both tried our damnedest but it didn't work.
▪ All right, tell the girls, do your damnedest.
▪ But both the Trust and those of us lucky enough to live there will do our damnedest to prevent it.
▪ He had tried to make it work, tried his damnedest, but she had absolutely no sense of taste or refinement.
▪ If I do as you suggest and tell Billy about us, he will do his damnedest to destroy me in revenge.
give sth a try/shot/whirl
▪ Are you having trouble fixing the printer? Let me give it a shot.
▪ But on this case, I can not give it a try - that is the point.
▪ He says he thought he'd give it a try, but he got stuck.
▪ Joe gives her the shot twice a week.
▪ Magnus grew fat on brown wholemeal scraps and Gina gave up trying to keep him away.
▪ She had given up trying to read to him, play with him, teach him anything: he could not learn.
▪ Vladimir finally gave up trying to teach me and returned to his sketching.
▪ We wanted into the book badly, and gave it a shot one afternoon.
nice try
▪ It was a nice try, a necessary try, but one that ultimately failed.
▪ You miscalculated, but it was a nice try.
tried and tested/trusted/true
▪ After all, these methods are tried and tested.
▪ Alternatively you could pick up a pinstripe suit from tried and trusted Marks & Spencer.
▪ Disposable workers Modern methods of super-exploitation, tried and tested in the Third World, are coming home to industrialized countries.
▪ Look for the more creative solution - the tried and true don't always bring the best results.
▪ Others stick to the tried and tested method with a sponge.
▪ Some parts of the blueprint will have been tried and tested, and found to be reliable.
▪ The genre is tried and true, of course, from Animal House to Reality Bites.
▪ These have the advantage of being tried and tested and involve lower cost.
try your hand at (doing) sth
▪ A visit to West Dorset also offers a perfect opportunity to try your hand at windsurfing.
▪ If you have the urge to try your hand at a grant, do so!
▪ Isaac Mizrahi tried his hand at the corset, and in the process turned out some fabulous evening dresses.
▪ It's time to try my hand at the settled life.
▪ Just like Walsh, too, Robinson first tried his hand at broadcasting.
▪ Many who are in the process of acquiring these technical skills may wish to try their hand at grantsmanship.
▪ More than once, more than a dozen times I have been tempted to try my hand at another profession.
▪ Plenty of Christians have tried their hand at putting their beliefs into prose or poetry, usually with calamitous aesthetic results.
try/chance your luck
▪ Akinbiyi was next up to try his luck after 25 minutes, following a great break from the left touchline.
▪ And if Mr. Birt does find himself out of a job, he could always try his luck as a timeshare salesman.
▪ But the next time Berger tried his luck, it produced a spectacular dividend.
▪ He squatted down with a stick to try his luck.
▪ Moments later Pauleta tried his luck with a fizzing 30-yarder, but Shay Given got a hand to it.
▪ Well, I strongly recommend that you try your luck on any wide verges close to towns.
▪ Why not try your luck and help others at the same time?
▪ Without a pub to be seen for miles we decided to try our luck in the bar of the hilton.
use/try every trick in the book
▪ I tried every trick in the book to reform him.
▪ Victoria used every trick in the book to undermine Patsy in order to get the new job colleagues knew Patsy had earned.
what is sb trying to prove?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ After several tries, Lou finally reached Sylvia at her office phone number.
▪ Don't give up yet - have another try.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Beattie put them ahead after two minutes with an opportunist try but Dungait replied for Morpeth.
▪ But it is worth a try.
▪ Centre John Devereux converted, with giant prop Mark Jones then brushing aside two tackles to crash over for the second try.
▪ Certainly it was worth a try.
▪ Full-back Liley strode into the left-hand corner for a splendid try and there was still a man to spare.
▪ If your insomnia is similar to the following examples, you might want to give bright-light therapy a try.
▪ With White converting all the tries, Alton ran out comfortable winners after a terrible start.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Try

Try \Try\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. tried; p. pr. & vb. n. Trying.] [OE. trien to select, pick out, F. trier to cull, to out, LL. tritare to triturate (hence the sense of, to thresh, to separate the grain from the straw, to select), L. terere, tritum, to rub, bruise, grind, thresh. See Trite.]

  1. To divide or separate, as one sort from another; to winnow; to sift; to pick out; -- frequently followed by out; as, to try out the wild corn from the good. [Obs.]
    --Sir T. Elyot.

  2. To purify or refine, as metals; to melt out, and procure in a pure state, as oil, tallow, lard, etc.
    --Shak.

    The words of the Lord are pure words: as silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times.
    --Ps. xii. 6.

    For thou, O God, hast proved us: thou hast tried us, as silver is tried.
    --Ps. lxvi. 10.

  3. To prove by experiment; to apply a test to, for the purpose of determining the quality; to examine; to prove; to test; as, to try weights or measures by a standard; to try a man's opinions.

    Let the end try the man.
    --Shak.

  4. To subject to severe trial; to put to the test; to cause suffering or trouble to.

    Thus far to try thee, Adam, I was pleased.
    --Milton.

    These are the times that try men's souls.
    --Thomas Paine (1776)

  5. To experiment with; to test by use; as, to try a remedy for disease; to try a horse.

    Come, try upon yourselves what you have seen me.
    --Shak.

    To ease her cares the force of sleep she tries.
    --Swift.

  6. To strain; to subject to excessive tests; as, the light tries his eyes; repeated disappointments try one's patience.

  7. (Law) To examine or investigate judicially; to examine by witnesses or other judicial evidence and the principles of law; as, to try a cause, or a criminal.

  8. To settle; to decide; to determine; specifically, to decide by an appeal to arms; as, to try rival claims by a duel; to try conclusions.

    Left I the court, to see this quarrel tried.
    --Shak.

  9. To experience; to have or gain knowledge of by experience.
    --Milton.

    Or try the Libyan heat or Scythian cold.
    --Dryden.

  10. To essay; to attempt; to endeavor. Let us try . . . to found a path. --Milton. To try on.

    1. To put on, as a garment, to ascertain whether it fits the person.

    2. To attempt; to undertake. [Slang]
      --Dickens.

      Syn: To attempt; endeavor; strive; aim; examine.

      Usage: Try, Attempt. To try is the generic, to attempt is the specific, term. When we try, we are usually uncertain as to success; when we attempt, we have always some definite object in view which we seek to accomplish. We may be indifferent as to the result of a trial, but we rarely attempt anything without a desire to succeed.

      He first deceased: she for a little tried To live without him; liked it not, and died.
      --Sir H. Wotton.

      Alack, I am afraid they have a waked, And 't is not done. The attempt, and not the deed, Confounds us.
      --Shak.

Try

Try \Try\, v. i.

  1. To exert strength; to endeavor; to make an effort or an attempt; as, you must try hard if you wish to learn.

  2. To do; to fare; as, how do you try! [Prov. Eng.]

Try

Try \Try\, n.

  1. A screen, or sieve, for grain. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
    --Holland.

  2. Act of trying; attempt; experiment; trial.

    This breaking of his has been but a try for his friends.
    --Shak.

  3. In Rugby and Northern Union football, a score (counting three points) made by grounding the ball on or behind the opponent's goal line; -- so called because it entitles the side making it to a place kick for a goal (counting two points more if successful).

Try

Try \Try\, a. [Cf. Try, v. t.] Refined; select; excellent; choice. [Obs.] ``Sugar that is try.''
--Chaucer.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
try

c.1300, "examine judiciously, discover by evaluation, test;" mid-14c., "sit in judgment of," also "attempt to do," from Anglo-French trier (13c.), from Old French trier "to pick out, cull" (12c.), from Gallo-Roman *triare, of unknown origin. The ground sense is "separate out (the good) by examination." Sense of "subject to some strain" (of patience, endurance, etc.) is recorded from 1530s. To try on "test the fit of a garment" is from 1690s; to try (something) on for size in the figurative sense is recorded by 1946. Try and instead of try to is recorded from 1680s.

try

late 15c., "screen for sifting," from try (v.). From 1832 as "an effort, an attempt."

Wiktionary
try

Etymology 1 n. 1 An attempt. 2 An act of tasting or sampling. 3 (context rugby English) A score in rugby, analogous to a touchdown in American football. vb. To attempt; to endeavour. Followed by infinitive. Etymology 2

  1. (context obsolete English) fine, excellent.

WordNet
try
  1. n. earnest and conscientious activity intended to do or accomplish something; "made an effort to cover all the reading material"; "wished him luck in his endeavor"; "she gave it a good try" [syn: attempt, effort, endeavor, endeavour]

  2. [also: tried]

try
  1. v. make an effort or attempt; "He tried to shake off his fears"; "The infant had essayed a few wobbly steps"; "The police attempted to stop the thief"; "He sought to improve himself"; "She always seeks to do good in the world" [syn: seek, attempt, essay, assay]

  2. put to the test, as for its quality, or give experimental use to; "This approach has been tried with good results"; "Test this recipe" [syn: test, prove, try out, examine, essay]

  3. put on trial or hear a case and sit as the judge at the trial of; "The football star was tried for the murder of his wife"; "The judge tried both father and son in separate trials" [syn: judge, adjudicate]

  4. take a sample of; "Try these new crackers"; "Sample the regional dishes" [syn: sample, try out, taste]

  5. examine or hear (evidence or a case) by judicial process; "The jury had heard all the evidence"; "The case will be tried in California" [syn: hear]

  6. give pain or trouble to; "I've been sorely tried by these students"

  7. test the limits of; "You are trying my patience!" [syn: strain, stress]

  8. melt (fat, lard, etc.) in order to separate out impurities; "try the yak butter"; "render fat in a casserole" [syn: render]

  9. put on a garment in order to see whether it fits and looks nice; "Try on this sweater to see how it looks" [syn: try on]

  10. [also: tried]

Wikipedia
Try (disambiguation)

A try is a way of scoring points in rugby league and rugby union.

Try may also refer to:

  • Conversion (gridiron football), a way of scoring points in American and Canadian football
  • Boiling fat, such as in a whaling operation, to produce oil
  • TRY, the ISO 4217 code for the Turkish lira
Try (Blue Rodeo song)

"Try" is a song written by Greg Keelor and Jim Cuddy, and recorded by Canadian country rock group Blue Rodeo. Released in October 1987, it was the second single from their debut album, Outskirts. The song peaked at number 1 on the RPM Country Tracks chart, number 3 on the Adult Contemporary chart and number 6 on the Top Singles chart. At the 1989 Juno Awards, "Try" was named Single of the Year and Video of the Year.

Try

A try is a way of scoring points in rugby union and rugby league football. A try is scored by grounding the ball (the ball must be touching the player when coming into contact with the ground) in the opposition's in-goal area (on or behind the goal line). Rugby union and league differ slightly in defining 'grounding the ball' and the 'in-goal' area.

The term try comes from try at goal, signifying that originally, grounding the ball only gave the opportunity to try to score with a kick at goal.

A try is analogous to a touchdown in American and Canadian football, with the major difference being that a try requires the ball be simultaneously touching the ground in the in-goal area and an attacking player who is in the field of play or in-goal (the official name of the extra point in American football according to NFL rules is the try). In the laws of both codes of rugby, the term touch down formally refers only to grounding the ball by the defensive team in their in-goal. Although occasionally people refer to a try as a 'touchdown', the correct usage for the action is 'grounding the ball'.

Try (Nelly Furtado song)

"Try" is a song by Canadian singer-songwriter Nelly Furtado, taken from her second studio album, Folklore (2003). The song, written by Furtado herself, and Brian West, was released as the second single from the album in February 2004.

Lyrically, Furtado said the song "is about the reality of love. My energy used to just go everywhere, but now I'm more grounded because I've found true love. The idea here is that, yeah, sometimes life sucks. But life is only so long, and somebody can come along who makes you want to be a better person. You just have to roll with the punches. So "Try" is not a happy-go-lucky song. It has a strange arrangement because the chorus happens only twice, and the end is improvisational. It's like one of those epic power ballads." The Los Angeles Times said of "Try", "Her unfettered enthusiasm wins out as she sings of passion for life".

Try (Pink song)

"Try" is a song recorded by American singer Pink, which she released as the second single from her sixth album, The Truth About Love (2012). Written and composed by Busbee and Ben West, and produced by Greg Kurstin, it is a pop rock ballad about taking risks with love, no matter what consequences may result.

"Try" received positive reviews from music critics who noted that it is one of the standout tracks on the album and called it a hit. Commercially, the song was a success, reaching number one in Spain and the top-10 in Australia, Austria, Canada, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Poland, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States, while reaching the top-20 in most countries. The Floria Sigismondi-directed video features shots of a paint-covered Pink and her male counterpart expressing their frustrations through contemporary dance.

Try (album)

Try is the fourth studio album by contemporary Christian musiccian Bebo Norman. The album is the third with Essential Records, and his fifth album overall including his first independent release. This album was released on August 24, 2004, and the producers are Brown Bannister, Matt Bronleewe and Mitch Dane.

Try (Schiller song)

Try is the first single from the 2010 Schiller gold album Atemlos with vocals by singer Nadia Ali from New York City. The single was officially released on 9 March 2010 and was peaking at number 58 on German Singles Chart in 2010. The single includes the song ″Salton Sea″. The cover art work shows a photography of a scene from the music video with Nadia Ali and Christopher von Deylen. The music video was shot in Berlin, Germany.

Try (The Killing)

"Try" is the thirty-fourth episode of the American television drama series The Killing, which aired on July 14, 2013. The episode is written by Nic Sheff and Aaron Slavick; directed by Lodge Kerrigan. In the episode, Pastor Mike ( Ben Cotton) kidnaps Sarah Linden ( Mireille Enos). Stephen Holder ( Joel Kinnaman) and the police must listen to the Linden/Pastor conversation via her two-way radio, which she has activated unbeknownst to Pastor Mike. Ray Seward ( Peter Sarsgaard) panics as his execution is two days away. Bullet ( Bex Taylor-Klaus) roams the streets looking for Lyric (Julia Sarah Stone) and learns about Angie Gower ( Laine MacNeil).

Try (Colbie Caillat song)

"Try" is a song recorded by American singer-songwriter Colbie Caillat from her fifth studio album, Gypsy Heart. It was released as the lead single on June 9, 2014 via Republic Records. The song was written by Caillat, Babyface and Jason Reeves and was produced by Babyface. Lyrically, the midtempo ballad is about not trying to be someone else in order to make others happy and it was written after a session where Caillat was feeling pressure to be someone she was not, both musically and image-wise. It received acclaim from music critics, who noted it was a simple, but beautiful empowering ballad.

The song has charted moderately on the US Billboard Hot 100, while becoming her highest-charting single in five years in Australia and Canada. To promote the song, a lyric video including female fans and artists, such as Sheryl Crow, Sara Bareilles, Christina Perri and others, without any makeup on, to give emphasis to the song message, was released on June 10, 2014. Later, an official music video was released on July 8, 2014. It features the singer alongside a diverse set of women with makeup and wigs, while removing them throughout the video, ending it natural. It went viral over the internet, accumulating over 27 million views in almost two months. The song was certified platinum by the RIAA on March 20, 2015.

Try (The Walking Dead)

"Try" is the fifteenth and penultimate episode of the fifth season of the post-apocalyptic horror television series The Walking Dead, which aired on AMC on March 22, 2015. While grieving for Aiden, Deanna begins to reconsider her choice to bring in Rick's group after Nicholas lies about the circumstances of Noah's death, as tensions begin to rise between Rick and Pete over the latter's abuse towards Jessie, and Rick's brutality begins to boil into insanity. The group also grieves over Noah's death, with Glenn becoming traumatized while Sasha is overwhelmed with grief and begins hunting walkers, forcing Michonne and Rosita to chase her. Aaron and Daryl continue to look for survivors while Carl and Enid bond.

Usage examples of "try".

Tane and Asara were firing on the first Aberrant creature, trying to dissuade it from the panicking manxthwa, but it held fast.

Dale of the Tower: there shall we abide a while to gather victual, a day or two, or three maybe: so my Lord will hold a tourney there: that is to say that I myself and some few others shall try thy manhood somewhat.

She went into the ablutions area and took a shower, trying to ignore the thing, which continued to watch her, or she presumed it was watching her, through its unblinking golden eye-slit.

The scene I cannot describe--I should faint if I tried it, for there is madness in a room full of classified charnel things, with blood and lesser human debris almost ankle-deep on the slimy floor, and with hideous reptilian abnormalities sprouting, bubbling, and baking over a winking bluish-green spectre of dim flame in a far corner of black shadows.

I was staring up at the stars, thinking of the Gibson and McIlroy and that abo walking out alive, trying to picture what had really happened, my thoughts ranging and the truth elusive.

The third and fourth humans on the island had tried to find their privacy as far from the abo village and the tunnel pool as possible.

I had not tried to get myself on the uneditable tape, to provide the watchers some clue about where this abomination was taking place .

I strove again, then, to escape, pulling against the bonds, trying to abraid them against the back of the blade.

Panting, Abrim tried to brace himself against the smooth tunnel wall, but the low-friction coating defeated him and he began to slide slowly backward.

This exclusive club of cocaine abusers gradually began to recruit new members and, by 1959, 30 heroin addicts in theUKhad tried cocaine.

You get older daughters trying to protect younger siblings by doing anything they can to keep the abusive father focused on them.

The room was abuzz with lesser courtiers trying to take their first step on the long and slippery ladder to preferment and office.

Banish weighed briefly the prospect of trying to get Abies back on the line, then dismissed it and set down the handset.

She tried to ignore the dizzying perspective plucking at her peripheral vision over the low sides of the pod and concentrated instead on the stress and acceleration vectors graphically represented on her screen.

She flexed the controls, watching the moire patterns of stress and acceleration shift, trying to correlate them with what she was feeling.