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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

trust

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a position of trust
▪ As a church leader, he was in a position of trust.
a trust fund (=money that belongs to one person, but is controlled by another)
▪ Proceeds from the sale of the house will go into a trust fund for the children.
a trusted friend
▪ She told only a few trusted friends.
abused...trust
▪ Morris abused the trust the firm had shown in him.
betrayed...trust
▪ She had betrayed her parents' trust.
implicit faith/trust/belief
▪ They had implicit faith in his powers.
mutual respect/trust/understanding etc
▪ Mutual respect is necessary for any partnership to work.
▪ European nations can live together in a spirit of mutual trust.
trust fund
trust your instinct(s) (also rely on your instincts) (= believe that your instincts are correct)
▪ I've trusted my instincts in the past and they've usually been right.
unit trust
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
charitable
▪ And in 9 months, local people raised £600,000 and set up a charitable trust to run the hospital.
▪ The castle and the estate will be managed by charitable trusts on behalf of the state.
▪ The Fund has been able to assist with new charitable trusts at Thirlestane and Newliston in Lothian.
▪ Impasse is funded by Cleveland County Council, charitable trusts and industry.
▪ Jay was amused by her go-getting energy, especially when Lucy had done battle with yet another charitable trust or foundation.
▪ Following the death of Edgar Kaufmann the office was dismantled and moved to the headquarters of the family's charitable trust.
▪ It is run by a charitable trust and so relies on grants and donations for its survival.
discretionary
▪ We have also been influenced by representations about the position of privately owned companies held on discretionary trusts.
▪ Wealth Protector, which combines a discretionary trust with a choice of investment plans.
▪ There may, for instance, be a foreign discretionary trust which wishes to acquire a lease in the United Kingdom.
▪ Mr X gives property to an overseas discretionary trust.
▪ The trust was a discretionary trust.
▪ For individuals with substantially less money, Dunedin will take on a minimum of £10,000 for its discretionary unit trust management service.
▪ Thus discretionary trusts have lost many of their fiscal advantages.
mutual
▪ This ensures good eye contact which is very important in promoting mutual trust and confidence between members.
▪ And they deeply understood how to integrate work and fun to promote mutual trust, learning, and performance.
▪ The partners' duties A vital component of a partnership is the mutual trust between partners.
▪ Leadership without mutual trust is a contradiction in terms.
▪ Hostages are a useful as well as a time-honoured gesture of mutual trust.
▪ Maintaining that vital balance between faith and doubt, preserving that mutual trust, is a primary task for any leader.
▪ Leader-member relations are good if they all look forward to working together and there is mutual trust and respect.
▪ Successful partnerships must be based upon a sense of security and mutual trust.
public
▪ Estrada has been charged with bribery, corruption, violating the constitution and betraying the public trust.
▪ We sometimes forget a basic precept of government: Public office is public trust.
▪ High-volume sales need public trust.
▪ To support Prop 201 is challenging public trust.
▪ Its reputation wasn't threatened but enhanced. Public trust in the court deepened.
▪ How does it enhance the public trust to allow legislators to hide behind anonymous votes?
▪ When I ran for Public Works, I ran ori a platform of public trust and honesty.
▪ On the other hand, could I just walk away from a public trust?
■ NOUN
deed
▪ Any new stock will need to be constituted by an appropriate trust deed or loan stock instrument.
▪ Under the trust deed I appoint a Government observer and am consulted on the appointment of the chairman.
▪ Trustees for the stockholders and eurobond holders are appointed under trust deeds.
▪ These trust deeds usually contain an expert clause about the remuneration of the trustee appointed under the deed.
▪ The terms of the trust will need to be documented and the trustee made a party to the trust deed.
▪ You can also ask to see a copy of the trust deed as well as the latest annual report and audited accounts.
fund
▪ We have seen that this does not tend to include funds such as the superannuation fund and trust funds.
▪ The government now is proposing further to escalate its efforts by putting some of the Social Security trust fund in stocks.
▪ In return, Freeport must begin building a $ 100 million trust fund for environmental programs.
▪ The event raised £1m, most of which was set aside for investment in a trust fund.
▪ I am hiring a lawyer to look into that trust fund, Marie had written.
▪ Mrs Kelsall set up a trust fund from the profits.
▪ The trust fund now collects money from 125 million workers to pay benefits to 43 million people.
funds
▪ We have seen that this does not tend to include funds such as the superannuation fund and trust funds.
▪ The sum needed to cover the gap would gradually decrease each year as proceeds from parental trust funds phase into the system.
▪ If everyone were required to convert their parental trust funds to annuities at retirement, this problem could be alleviated.
▪ Brown Institution trust funds were never adequate, but Twort preferred impecunious independence.
▪ She funded the reductions by cutting spending and reducing state contributions to various pension and trust funds.
▪ If the settlor can call for the trust funds this may reduce the trustees to nominees.
▪ These are educational trust funds, invested in Nicholas and Janus Worldwide.
hospital
▪ The actors have been booked for an extended run at Bradford Royal Infirmary by the local hospital trust.
▪ Immediately before the local elections two of the new self-governing hospital trusts announced 1,000 redundancies.
▪ It is now suggested that the proposed Royal Infirmary hospital trust offers the best means of taking the plan forward.
▪ Is it not perverse, therefore, that some people are suggesting that those hospital trusts should be wound up?
investment
▪ Until 1984 the only way to buy shares in investment trusts was through a stockbroker.
▪ Fidelity Investments is hoping to cash in on some of this traffic by offering three new unit investment trusts.
▪ Sierra has, perfectly legally, targeted underperforming investment trusts.
▪ Investors buy a general claim on the investment trust, rather than buy the assets as in a unit trust.
▪ Developers Diversified is a real estate investment trust that acquires, owns and manages shopping and business centers.
▪ Taylor-Young Investment Management accepts minimum investments of £50,000 for its unit and investment trust service and £100,000 for a wider portfolio.
▪ The real-estate investment trust said it will use the notes to finance property acquisitions and to repay debt.
law
▪ The duty to manage has, under trust law, always been with the trustees.
▪ Any member of the scheme who felt that the terms of the trust were being abused could seek redress under trust law.
property
▪ Where the trustee had alienated the trust property, the beneficiary could not follow it.
▪ Where the trustee is insolvent, the trust property in his possession is not subject to normal execution.
▪ It also allowed execution against the trust property itself, instead of being bound to condemnation in a sum of money.
▪ Since no other texts mention it, we are entitled to conclude that Roman law knew no principle of tracing trust property.
status
▪ Only about 60 people turned up to a recent candle-lit vigil outside Orsett hospital supposedly a protest against trust status being given.
▪ The hospitals that are the subject of the trust status already offer a record of success.
▪ Powys health unit has been invited to prepare an application for trust status in April 1993.
▪ Mrs. Bottomley I am pleased to hear from the hon. Gentleman that there is no more concern about trust status.
▪ They recognise the advantages that will flow from trust status.
▪ Perhaps the five, six or seven which were in favour of trust status.
▪ He sought to represent trust status as an invention of the management.
▪ We now have trust status, however, and I take this opportunity to congratulate the team on its application.
unit
▪ Smaller investors with £30,000 can use the bank's unit trust portfolio management service.
▪ By December 1995, 91 unit trusts had a total asset base of 33. 7 billion rand.
▪ Alternatively, Money Management lists all the investment and unit trusts and gives details of the top performers in each category.
▪ Call Fidelity on for more details. Unit trust.
Units in a unit trust are less immediately convertible to money and their money value can not be guaranteed.
▪ For individuals with substantially less money, Dunedin will take on a minimum of £10,000 for its discretionary unit trust management service.
▪ Personal pensions are offered by insurance companies, banks, building societies, unit trusts and friendly societies.
▪ Both offer a choice of direct equity investment and unit trust investment up to the maximum £2,400.
■ VERB
abuse
▪ In fact, around one-half of the cases can be identified solely from the headlines as persons abusing their positions of trust.
▪ But some doctors have a history of abusing that trust for profit, prescribing unnecessary and ineffective diet regimes to all comers.
▪ Nevertheless, the whole basis of survey work is one of trust and relatively few interviewers abuse this trust.
betray
▪ The girl was betraying the trust that her parents had instilled into her all her young life.
▪ Adrian is shocked that Yasmin betrayed his trust.
▪ No wonder then that on the one occasion when television betrays his trust, his world fell apart.
▪ How could television betray Homer's trust?
▪ Estrada has been charged with bribery, corruption, violating the constitution and betraying the public trust.
▪ He was absolved, neither waking nor sleeping had he betrayed his trust.
▪ As imperial portraits attracted faith, so images of emperors who had betrayed their subjects' trust were treated with contempt.
▪ I couldn't stay with the Sisters because of Andrew; it would be betraying their trust.
build
▪ Open and honest communication and consultation with the public on risk issues builds trust.
▪ Only a handful seemed to appreciate the advantages in actively building trust, credibility, and cooperative relationships with peers.
▪ They need time to build up trust and tell their story.
▪ Why build trust in January, only to dash it to the ground in March?
▪ Genuine peaceful change depends on building trust, forgiveness and sacrificing self-interest.
▪ How does the leader build such trust?
▪ The patient needs help to build trust and to establish her identity.
▪ Other ways leaders build trust and faith in their abilities are: Through self-confidence.
establish
▪ There can be no real intimacy without risk, but it is difficult to establish trust without risk to demonstrate it.
▪ He notes that digital techniques for establishing trust are needed for electronic democracy.
▪ These are the only texts which list the words suitable to establish trusts.
▪ They realized that they had to establish credibility and trust with their subordinates before they could influence them.
▪ Then a Private Members' Bill established a trust to protect it, consisting of representatives from five local councils.
▪ The fateful words do not establish a trust in favour of him, but instead a trust at his expense in favour of another person.
▪ What happens if the conditions for establishing basic trust and security are unfavourable during the early years of childhood?
▪ And it establishes care trusts and sets out legislation on long-term care excluding nursing care from community care services.
hold
▪ Direct words are held to create no trust.
▪ Fasit promises to do so for other assets, to be held in trusts set up by financial institutions.
▪ Objetsd'art there were aplenty, but most of them were held in trust for some collection or gallery.
▪ A good deal of ownership in each district would be held by community trusts.
▪ The knowledge which was held in trust by the Sechem was available to all.
▪ The property here was to be held in trust for his wife and her first son, Maximilian until he was 24.
▪ The estate had been held in trust by the second brother.
▪ Under the Act if A holds a deposit on trust for B absolutely, B becomes the material person.
lose
▪ Personally I think if you two carry on your mum will eventually find out and you will lose her trust.
▪ In addition to reimbursing the overcharges, BofA paid $ 18 million in lost interest to the trusts.
▪ But recently the regime seems to have lost the trust of the people.
▪ Not only would it do no good, but I'd lose every element of trust that I've built up.
▪ You are bound to lose her trust and you could wreck your marriage.
pay
▪ The company, as anticipated, is profitable and a dividend is paid into the trust.
▪ The money is paid into the trust, which invests it.
place
▪ Now investors place less trust in liquidity and more in their own judgment about a security's risks and potential return.
▪ These bonds were placed in a trust.
▪ You are placing a trust in others that in various ways indicates that you have confidence in how they will perform.
▪ I place my trust in Neil.
▪ Joseph only had the word of Mary; and upon that word he had to place his trust and accept his fate.
▪ We had placed our trust in the Tet cease-fire, which the Vietcong had publicly requested.
▪ He must place his trust in the Prime Mover.
▪ I suppose that I must place my trust in you.
put
▪ To do that there may be times when we need to put trust in a professional to help solve our difficulties.
▪ I put all trust in her Heart.
▪ She was putting her trust in the wrong people again.
▪ He replied that nothing had been put forward concerning a trust.
▪ She would prefer to put her trust in a plainer, simpler, hard-handed man.
▪ The soup seemed to fail in its purpose, and so did Herman, in whom I would have put my trust.
▪ It was her who put her trust in him and then turns on him as illustrated on this page.
set
▪ And in 9 months, local people raised £600,000 and set up a charitable trust to run the hospital.
▪ The defense also alleges that Cosby set up a trust account for Jackson in 1994 to pay for her schooling.
▪ A testator would do well, however, to set up a trust if he was concerned that his will might fail.
▪ A company sets up a trust fund into which it contributes new shares of stock or money to buy existing shares.
▪ In no case can it set up a trust.
▪ The family are setting up a charity trust to help other people facing similar difficulties.
▪ Mr X sets up a trust in Jersey.
▪ There are a considerable number of provisions which the taxpayer must carefully take into account when setting up an overseas trust.
win
▪ They have been most successful when they have been able to win the trust and acceptance of the other management board members.
▪ Instinct told her she had won their trust.
▪ Until she won their trust their manners were deferential, identical to the old-fashioned manners of her own youth.
▪ The rapist who wins women's trust and then abuses them is a more sophisticated, devious and frightening operator.
▪ However, these qualities enabled her to win the trust and friendship of many ex-convicts.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
breach of confidence/trust
▪ He has insisted that to name them publicly would be a breach of confidence.
▪ No breach of confidence was alleged but there was said to be a contract not to publish before the report.
▪ Opinions were expressed openly and freely without any breach of confidence.
▪ She and the company's chairman, Weng You-ming, were being sued for breach of trust in the sale.
▪ Such a breach of confidence could rebound in all sorts of directions.
▪ There is no liability for breach of confidence if consent is obtained.
▪ They say any breach of trust has been offset by his attempts to set things right.
▪ You may prefer not to do so because of the risk of breach of confidence or discrimination.
put your faith/trust/confidence in sb/sth
▪ Can she put her faith in the people who oversaw her career before?
▪ Events that happen previously show us that Atticus is a person that we can put our trust in.
▪ He put his faith in the genius of individuals.
▪ None the less, geophysicists continue to look, continue to put their faith in ghosts of a sort.
▪ Others put their faith in camphor.
▪ She was putting her trust in the wrong people again.
▪ The Profitboss puts his trust in his people.
▪ The unfortunate crew of Tai Ki had put their faith in several coats of tung oil, to no effect.
repose your trust/hope etc in sb
tried and tested/trusted/true
▪ After all, these methods are tried and tested.
▪ Alternatively you could pick up a pinstripe suit from tried and trusted Marks & Spencer.
▪ Disposable workers Modern methods of super-exploitation, tried and tested in the Third World, are coming home to industrialized countries.
▪ Look for the more creative solution - the tried and true don't always bring the best results.
▪ Others stick to the tried and tested method with a sponge.
▪ Some parts of the blueprint will have been tried and tested, and found to be reliable.
▪ The genre is tried and true, of course, from Animal House to Reality Bites.
▪ These have the advantage of being tried and tested and involve lower cost.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A new trust has been set up to promote the arts in inner city areas.
▪ After the scandal, the company lost the trust of many of its clients.
▪ Despite her many misfortunes, her trust in God was never shaken.
▪ Establishing trust is the first thing a good teacher does with any student.
▪ People put their trust in their elected officials and expect them to do the best job they can.
▪ She has betrayed the trust which we placed in her.
▪ The Mental Health Trust works to raise awareness of mental illness and help people suffering from mental problems.
▪ The money has been set aside in a trust.
▪ Their partnership is based on trust and cooperation.
▪ To be good leaders, managers must create a climate of mutual trust and respect.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A trust receipt is a legal document that creates a lien on some specific item of inventory.
▪ I first look for character, whether the individual can inspire trust.
▪ It was an act of trust on their part, and it touched me.
▪ Life companies have until the end of 1991 to switch their unit trusts into the underlying shares without tax penalties.
▪ The Fund has been able to assist with new charitable trusts at Thirlestane and Newliston in Lothian.
▪ The nurturing and support they received in labor gave them a deep sense of accomplishment and trust in them-selves.
▪ Wealth Protector, which combines a discretionary trust with a choice of investment plans.
▪ Where the trustee had alienated the trust property, the beneficiary could not follow it.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
never
▪ If they let Miranda down now, he knew that she would probably never trust an adult again.
Never trust a writer I always say, not even me.
▪ They had had accountants to help them in the past but, as a group, Laura never trusted them.
▪ This civil margin once removed, Mr Sammler would never trust the restoration totally.
▪ But Ben did not trust his father; he never trusted him again.
Never trusted him from the first moment.
▪ And she had never trusted anyone before in her life.
▪ When I explained what had happened on the train he shook his head and said one should never trust the Moors.
■ NOUN
instinct
▪ However, I always allow the person to trust their own instincts in such matters.
▪ We were doing step number one, trust our instincts, which told us there was terrible earth ahead.
▪ Only human beings, feeling the hair on the back of their necks and trusting their instincts.
▪ Well, I trust your instincts.
▪ Perhaps the most important piece of advice of all is to trust your own instincts.
▪ I nearly replied, but I shut my mouth instead, trusting some other instinct.
▪ Better to keep your eyes open; better to trust your instincts and take deep breaths between the parked cars.
▪ He trusts his instincts and his tastes, which takes courage in this business.
judgement
▪ It seemed as if the younger generation did not trust the judgement of the leadership.
▪ I trusted his judgement and was hugely relieved when he agreed.
▪ You don't trust the judgement of art critics at all?
unit
▪ Investors will have a choice of three unit trusts: an income trust, a growth trust and an opportunity trust.
▪ Mr. Barnes Has the income generation unit given advice to trust hospitals and health authorities on the building of private wings?
▪ However, because they are unit trusts they are unable to pay interest gross.
▪ A handful of big fund managers pay trail on their Isas and Peps, but not on unit trust sales.
▪ These are unit trusts that have unique characteristics with special appeal for charities.
■ VERB
know
▪ I knew I could trust him implicitly.
▪ People want to know that they can trust you.
▪ In each guerrilla group you need a nucleus of men who know, understand and trust Masud.
▪ When Eddie digs deep and finds that place in herself that knows and trusts her abilities, she plays like a winner.
▪ But I knew I could trust you, and that at least you would believe me.
▪ Gradually, more and more customers came to know and to trust me.
▪ She knew who to trust and who not to trust.
▪ The managers did not know whom to trust.
learn
▪ Higher up the dome became steeper, but by now I'd learned to trust the rock a bit more.
▪ Everyone has these visions; leaders learn to trust them.
▪ I have learned to trust people who can laugh at themselves.
▪ In time, she'd learn to trust him.
▪ If the great engine of capitalism could be harnessed, people would have to learn to trust one another.
▪ We should learn to trust our intuitions, for this is a part of our human heritage.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
breach of confidence/trust
▪ He has insisted that to name them publicly would be a breach of confidence.
▪ No breach of confidence was alleged but there was said to be a contract not to publish before the report.
▪ Opinions were expressed openly and freely without any breach of confidence.
▪ She and the company's chairman, Weng You-ming, were being sued for breach of trust in the sale.
▪ Such a breach of confidence could rebound in all sorts of directions.
▪ There is no liability for breach of confidence if consent is obtained.
▪ They say any breach of trust has been offset by his attempts to set things right.
▪ You may prefer not to do so because of the risk of breach of confidence or discrimination.
tried and tested/trusted/true
▪ After all, these methods are tried and tested.
▪ Alternatively you could pick up a pinstripe suit from tried and trusted Marks & Spencer.
▪ Disposable workers Modern methods of super-exploitation, tried and tested in the Third World, are coming home to industrialized countries.
▪ Look for the more creative solution - the tried and true don't always bring the best results.
▪ Others stick to the tried and tested method with a sponge.
▪ Some parts of the blueprint will have been tried and tested, and found to be reliable.
▪ The genre is tried and true, of course, from Animal House to Reality Bites.
▪ These have the advantage of being tried and tested and involve lower cost.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "He's only fourteen." "I know, but I think we can trust him to look after the baby for an hour."
▪ David's one of my oldest friends - I trust him completely.
▪ I never trusted him.
▪ The hardest thing is finding a car dealer you can trust!
▪ You can trust the quality of the meat they sell.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Could the people be trusted with self-government?
▪ He trusted me, I think, even though we had known each other for only four months.
▪ However, Francie saw no hand and she trusted him.
▪ I trust you will bring the above to the attention of your committee when they meet to consider the application.
▪ She was trusting me not to do that, putting that power in my hands.
▪ The managers did not know whom to trust.
▪ There is an enormous timidity about trusting the impulse.
▪ There is hardly anyone left whom I can trust.
Wikipedia

TRUST

TRUST (Train Running Under System TOPS) is a Network Rail computer system used for monitoring the progress of trains and tracking delays on Great Britain's rail network.

Trust (French band)

Trust is a French heavy metal band founded in 1977 and popular in Europe in the first half of the 1980s. The band was best known for guitarist Norbert "Nono" Krief's prowess, for Bernard "Bernie" Bonvoisin's voice reminiscent of AC/DC's Bon Scott and for his lyrics about social and political themes. Iron Maiden's drummers Nicko McBrain and Clive Burr were part of Trust line-up in the 1980s. The band disbanded in 1984 and reformed in the 2000s for live shows and new recordings.

Trust (Elvis Costello album)

Trust is an album by Elvis Costello and the Attractions. It is Costello's fifth album, and fourth with the Attractions. It was also his fifth consecutive album produced by Nick Lowe, who handled production on all songs except "Big Sister's Clothes" (which the liner notes make clear by stating that Lowe was "not to blame" for it).

Trust (KMFDM song)

"Trust" is a KMFDM song from their 1995 album Nihil which originally appeared as a remix on the " Glory" single in 1994. The remixed version of the song was also included on the Wax Trax! compilation album, Afterburn: '94 and Beyond. Both versions of the song appeared on the German-only Trust/Juke Joint Jezebel release, which came out after the album and used a red version of the " Brute" single cover art. In 2009, a 7" version was released, which also contained both mixes.

Trust (business)

A trust or corporate trust is an American English term for a large business with significant market power. It is often used in a historical sense to refer to monopolies or near-monopolies in the United States during the Second Industrial Revolution in the 19th century and early 20th century.

Trust (Ayumi Hamasaki song)

"Trust" is the third single released by Ayumi Hamasaki on August 5, 1998. It was her first single to enter the Top Ten of the Oricon weekly charts.

Trust (1990 film)

Trust is a 1990 American dark romantic comedy starring Adrienne Shelly and Martin Donovan. It is the second feature film from writer-director Hal Hartley.

Trust (emotion)

In a social context, trust has several connotations. Definitions of trust typically refer to a situation characterized by the following aspects: One party (trustor) is willing to rely on the actions of another party (trustee); the situation is directed to the future. In addition, the trustor (voluntarily or forcedly) abandons control over the actions performed by the trustee. As a consequence, the trustor is uncertain about the outcome of the other's actions; they can only develop and evaluate expectations. The uncertainty involves the risk of failure or harm to the trustor if the trustee will not behave as desired. Vladimir Ilych Lenin expressed this idea with the sentence “Trust is good, control is better”.

Trust can be attributed to relationships between people. It can be demonstrated that humans have a natural disposition to trust and to judge trustworthiness that can be traced to the neurobiological structure and activity of a human brain. Some studies indicate that trust can be altered e.g. by the application of oxytocin.

Conceptually, trust is also attributable to relationships within and between social groups (history, families, friends, communities, organisations, companies, nations, etc.). It is a popular approach to frame the dynamics of inter-group and intra-group interactions in terms of trust.

When it comes to the relationship between people and technology, the attribution of trust is a matter of dispute. The intentional stance demonstrates that trust can be validly attributed to human relationships with complex technologies. However, rational reflection leads to the rejection of an ability to trust technological artefacts.

One of the key current challenges in the social sciences is to re-think how the rapid progress of technology has impacted constructs such as trust. This is specifically true for information technology that dramatically alters causation in social systems.

In the social sciences, the subtleties of trust are a subject of ongoing research. In sociology and psychology the degree to which one party trusts another is a measure of belief in the honesty, fairness, or benevolence of another party. The term " confidence" is more appropriate for a belief in the competence of the other party. Based on the most recent research , a failure in trust may be forgiven more easily if it is interpreted as a failure of competence rather than a lack of benevolence or honesty. In economics trust is often conceptualized as reliability in transactions. In all cases trust is a heuristic decision rule, allowing the human to deal with complexities that would require unrealistic effort in rational reasoning.

Trust (Low album)

Trust is the sixth full-length album by the slowcore band Low, released in 2002 on the Kranky label (see 2002 in music). , the songs "Canada", "In the Drugs" and "Point of Disgust" still regularly appear in the band's live set lists. "(That's How You Sing) Amazing Grace" was also performed during a 2013 show in Washington D.C. at the request of an audience member.

Trust (electronics company)

Trust International B.V. is a privately held company headquartered in Dordrecht, the Netherlands. It is a manufacturer of value-for-money computer accessories that are marketed mostly at low and middle segment price levels. Trust International B.V. is an international company that is active in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America. It currently has 19 branches in Europe and Asia and employs around 250 people in total.

Trust (Pharcyde song)

"Trust" is the first single released from hip hop group The Pharcyde's third album Plain Rap. It peaked at #15 on Hot Rap Tracks.

Trust (TV series)

Trust was a UK television program produced written and created by Simon Block for the BBC by Box TV Productions. It starred Robson Green and a cast of other British actors including Sarah Parish, Neil Stuke, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Eva Birthistle and Ian McShane. Broadcast for only one series in the UK before being put on permanent hold the series had mixed reviews in the UK press; however the series received better reviews when it was rebroadcast on BBC America.

Trust (Saga album)

Trust is a studio album by Saga, their seventeenth album of new material.

Trust (British political party)

Trust was a minor political party in the United Kingdom formed on 26 March 2010 by Stuart Wheeler in the wake of the Westminster expenses scandal. It unsuccessfully fielded two candidates at the 2010 general election.

Trust (2010 film)

Trust is a 2010 American drama thriller film directed by David Schwimmer and based on a screenplay by Andy Bellin and Robert Festinger, and an uncredited story by Schwimmer. It stars Viola Davis, Clive Owen, Catherine Keener, Jason Clarke, and Liana Liberato.

The film is about a teenage girl who becomes a victim of sexual abuse when she befriends a man on the Internet.

Trust (Boney James album)

Trust is the debut album by jazz saxophonist Boney James, released in 1992.

Trust (magazine)

Trust is a free tri-annual investment trust magazine issued by Baillie Gifford, the Edinburgh-based investment management company. Edited by Heather Farmbrough, and first published in June 2004, it reached issue 32 in June 2016.

Trust (Megadeth song)

"Trust" is the first song on American heavy metal band Megadeth's seventh studio album Cryptic Writings. It was released on May 8, 1997 in both English and Spanish language versions. The song had significant airplay and MTV rotation and reached #5 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks chart, making it Megadeth's most successful single to date followed by " Breadline" and "Crush 'Em" from their follow-up album Risk, both of which reached #6 in the same charts. It was later included on the three compilation albums, Capitol Punishment, Back to the Start and Anthology: Set the World Afire, and the box set Warchest.

The song tells the story of relationships that have failed due to mutual dishonesty.

The song was nominated for a Grammy award in January 1998 for best heavy metal performance.

Also, the song's closest competitor on the Billboard 200 of Hard rock was Metallica's " Bleeding Me" (1996-97).

A "Spanish" version of the song was used as a bonus track on the Latin American edition of Cryptic Writings and later on the international remaster of the album. However, only the chorus is in Spanish. The song is otherwise identical to its album counterpart in verse. Mustaine would record a Spanish version of The World Needs A Hero song "Promises" a few years later, which also appeared on the Latin American version of its parent album.

An instrumental version was released for Extreme Championship Wrestling performer Jerry Lynn and was later issued on ECW: Extreme Music compilation.

The drum intro of the song is currently played right before kickoffs during each home game played by the Arizona State Sun Devils. This same intro is very similar to the Pittsburgh Penguins' entrance theme and is featured in the film The Boys of Winter.

Trust (Brother Beyond album)

Trust is the second album of the British boy band / pop group Brother Beyond, released in 1989, by EMI / Parlophone (later re-released by Gong label). It was their last album, since they disbanded, shortly after the release of one more single, a non-album track, called "The Girl I Used to Know", a minor hit in the United States, in 1991. After their two major hits, "The Harder I Try" and "He Ain't No Competition", written for them by famous producers Stock, Aitken and Waterman, the band, as lead singer Nathan Moore puts it on his Official Website, "made the classic mistake of thinking they did not need Stock Aitken and Waterman... We wrote the whole of the next album ourselves and (it) bombed totally". The three singles taken from the Trust album were only minor hits, getting no higher than the UK Top 40. The first, " Drive On", which was also the opening track of Side 2 on the vinyl edition, got to Number 39, in October 1989. The second, " When Will I See You Again?", a soulful ballad by The Three Degrees (written by popular composing duo Gamble & Huff), stopped at Number 43, in December 1989. The third and last, " Trust", the title-track and opener to the whole album, stalled at Number 53, in March 1990.

Trust (Brother Beyond song)

"Trust" is a 1990 single by British boy band / pop group Brother Beyond, taken from their second album, also entitled Trust, released in 1989. It made the Top 60 on the UK Singles Chart, peaking at Number 53, in March 1990. After six consecutive hits to peak inside the Top 50, this song failed to extend that record, but it was, anyway, their ninth consecutive Top 60 hit (having their first single, "I Should Have Lied" failed to chart in the UK Top 75, back in 1986, while their second single, "How Many Times", had only reached Number 62, in 1987). The follow-up to the Trust single, the tune called "The Girl I Used to Know", charting at Number 48, would be their tenth consecutive Top 60, and seventh Top 50 hit in general. Released in January 1991, this latter song would be their very last single, since the group disbanded soon after, though attaining some success with that track in the United States.

The song was written by band members David Ben White and Carl Fysh.

Trust (Revenge)

"Trust" is the second episode of the American television series Revenge. It premiered on ABC on September 28, 2011.

The episode was co-written by Mike Kelley and Joe Fazzio and directed by Phillip Noyce.

Trust (game show)

Trust is a television game show which offers large cash prizes for correctly answering a series of randomized questions of varying. The format based on preconceptions, cooperation, knowledge, strategy and mutual confidence. The format created by Banijay Entertainment/Air Productions and aired in many countries around the world. The first adaptation is the French version in September 2012.

Trust (Greek political party)

Trust was a Muslim political party in the Rhodope region of Greece.

Trust (1976 film)

Trust'' (Finnish:Luottamus'', Russian:Doverie) is a 1976 Finnish-Soviet historical drama film directed by Edvin Laine and Viktor Tregubovich. The film portrays the events leading up to the Finnish Declaration of Independence from Russia in 1917.

Trust (Belgian band)

Trust is a musical group that hails from the Belgian city of Ypres and consists of lead singer Eva Storme, keyboard players Mirek Coutigny and Matthieu Renier and drummer Laurens Platteeuw. During their preparation and the live shows they were coached by Tomas de Soete and their song was produced by Jeroen Swinnen.

They won the Belgian pre-selections of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2007 with their song "Anders" (Different), a popsong about the regrets for things a typical teenager does wrong and regrets after arguing with parents.

Band member Mirek had a guest performance for Debbie and Nancy in the Sportpaleis in Antwerp when he performed 'My first night' for an immense audience. He has also performed a solo in a piano concert in Ghent with a 65-piece orchestra.

Although they conceived the idea to enter the competition in September 2006, they started writing and composing the song just a week before the deadline. Eva wrote the lyrics and the melody, Mirek, helped by Laurens and Matthieu found the chords for which he said he took inspiration from Steven Spielberg's Artificial Intelligence. Laurens composed the percussion.

Trust were stars of the 2008 film Sounds Like Teen Spirit which covered the 2007 contest.

Trust (Keyshia Cole and Monica song)

"Trust" is a song recorded by American recording artist Keyshia Cole. It was written by Cole and Frederick Taylor and co-produced by Donald "Toxic" Alford and Ron Fair for her third studio album, A Different Me (2008). It is a re-recording of the iTunes pre-order bonus song from Cole's previous album Just Like You

In 2008, the ballad was re-recorded as a duet with fellow R&B singer Monica, replacing parts of Cole's original vocals with hers, and was included on Cole's third studio album A Different Me (2008). It was released as the album's third single on , with its music video world premiering on in time for Mother's Day. The song became Monica's sixteenth chart entry on the Hot 100 and her eleventh consecutive top ten hit on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, and becoming Cole's highest-peaking single from the album.

The accompanying music video for "Trust", directed by Chris Robinson, was ranked at 15th on BET's Notarized: Top 100 Videos of 2009 countdown. It also peaked on top on BET's 106 & Park.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Trust

Trust \Trust\, n. [OE. trust, trost, Icel. traust confidence, security; akin to Dan. & Sw. tr["o]st comfort, consolation, G. trost, Goth. trausti a convention, covenant, and E. true. See True, and cf. Tryst.]

  1. Assured resting of the mind on the integrity, veracity, justice, friendship, or other sound principle, of another person; confidence; reliance; reliance. ``O ever-failing trust in mortal strength!''
    --Milton.

    Most take things upon trust.
    --Locke.

  2. Credit given; especially, delivery of property or merchandise in reliance upon future payment; exchange without immediate receipt of an equivalent; as, to sell or buy goods on trust.

  3. Assured anticipation; dependence upon something future or contingent, as if present or actual; hope; belief. ``Such trust have we through Christ.''
    --2 Cor. iii.

  4. His trust was with the Eternal to be deemed Equal in strength.
    --Milton.

    4. That which is committed or intrusted to one; something received in confidence; charge; deposit.

  5. The condition or obligation of one to whom anything is confided; responsible charge or office.

    [I] serve him truly that will put me in trust.
    --Shak.

    Reward them well, if they observe their trust.
    --Denham.

  6. That upon which confidence is reposed; ground of reliance; hope.

    O Lord God, thou art my trust from my youth.
    --Ps. lxxi. 5.

  7. (Law) An estate devised or granted in confidence that the devisee or grantee shall convey it, or dispose of the profits, at the will, or for the benefit, of another; an estate held for the use of another; a confidence respecting property reposed in one person, who is termed the trustee, for the benefit of another, who is called the cestui que trust.

  8. An equitable right or interest in property distinct from the legal ownership thereof; a use (as it existed before the Statute of Uses); also, a property interest held by one person for the benefit of another. Trusts are active, or special, express, implied, constructive, etc. In a

    passive trust the trustee simply has title to the trust property, while its control and management are in the beneficiary.

  9. A business organization or combination consisting of a number of firms or corporations operating, and often united, under an agreement creating a trust (in sense 1), esp. one formed mainly for the purpose of regulating the supply and price of commodities, etc.; often, opprobriously, a combination formed for the purpose of controlling or monopolizing a trade, industry, or business, by doing acts in restraint or trade; as, a sugar trust. A trust may take the form of a corporation or of a body of persons or corporations acting together by mutual arrangement, as under a contract or a so-called gentlemen's agreement. When it consists of corporations it may be effected by putting a majority of their stock either in the hands of a board of trustees (whence the name trust for the combination) or by transferring a majority to a holding company. The advantages of a trust are partly due to the economies made possible in carrying on a large business, as well as the doing away with competition. In the United States severe statutes against trusts have been passed by the Federal government and in many States, with elaborate statutory definitions.

    Syn: Confidence; belief; faith; hope; expectation.

    Trust deed (Law), a deed conveying property to a trustee, for some specific use.

Trust

Trust \Trust\, a. Held in trust; as, trust property; trustmoney.

Trust

Trust \Trust\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Trusted; p. pr. & vb. n. Trusting.] [OE. trusten, trosten. See Trust, n.]

  1. To place confidence in; to rely on, to confide, or repose faith, in; as, we can not trust those who have deceived us.

    I will never trust his word after.
    --Shak.

    He that trusts every one without reserve will at last be deceived.
    --Johnson.

  2. To give credence to; to believe; to credit.

    Trust me, you look well.
    --Shak.

  3. To hope confidently; to believe; -- usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object.

    I trust to come unto you, and speak face to face.
    --2 John 12.

    We trustwe have a good conscience.
    --Heb. xiii. 18.

  4. to show confidence in a person by intrusting (him) with something.

    Whom, with your power and fortune, sir, you trust, Now to suspect is vain.
    --Dryden.

  5. To commit, as to one's care; to intrust.

    Merchants were not willing to trust precious cargoes to any custody but that of a man-of-war.
    --Macaulay.

  6. To give credit to; to sell to upon credit, or in confidence of future payment; as, merchants and manufacturers trust their customers annually with goods.

  7. To risk; to venture confidently.

    [Beguiled] by thee to trust thee from my side.
    --Milton.

Trust

Trust \Trust\, v. i.

  1. To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide.

    More to know could not be more to trust.
    --Shak.

  2. To be confident, as of something future; to hope.

    I will trust and not be afraid.
    --Isa. xii. 2.

  3. To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit.

    It is happier sometimes to be cheated than not to trust.
    --Johnson.

    To trust in, To trust on, to place confidence in,; to rely on; to depend. ``Trust in the Lord, and do good.''
    --Ps. xxxvii. 3. ``A priest . . . on whom we trust.''
    --Chaucer.

    Her widening streets on new foundations trust.
    --Dryden.

    To trust to or To trust unto, to depend on; to have confidence in; to rely on; as, to trust to luck.

    They trusted unto the liers in wait.
    --Judges xx. 36.

Wiktionary

trust

  1. 1 (context obsolete English) secure, safe. 2 (context obsolete English) faithful, dependable. 3 (context legal English) of or relating to a trust. n. 1 confidence in or reliance on some person or quality. 2 dependence upon something in the future; hope. 3 Confidence in the future payment for goods or services supplied; credit. 4 That which is committed or entrusted; something received in confidence; a charge. 5 That upon which confidence is reposed; ground of reliance; hope. 6 (context rare English) trustworthiness, reliability. 7 The condition or obligation of one to whom anything is confided; responsible charge or office. 8 (context legal English) The confidence vested in a person who has legal ownership of a property to manage for the benefit of another. 9 (context legal English) An estate devised or granted in confidence that the devisee or grantee shall convey it, or dispose of the profits, at the will, or for the benefit, of another; an estate held for the use of another. 10 A group of businessmen or traders organised for mutual benefit to produce and distribute specific commodities or services, and managed by a central body of trustees. 11 (context computing English) Affirmation of the access rights of a user of a computer system. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To place confidence in; to rely on, to confide, or repose faith, in. 2 (context transitive English) To give credence to; to believe; to credit. 3 (context transitive English) To hope confidently; to believe; usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object. 4 (context transitive English) to show confidence in a person by intrusting (him) with something. 5 (context transitive English) To commit, as to one's care; to intrust. 6 (context transitive English) To give credit to; to sell to upon credit, or in confidence of future payment. 7 (context transitive English) To risk; to venture confidently. 8 (context intransitive English) To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide. 9 (context intransitive English) To be confident, as of something future; to hope. 10 (context intransitive English) To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit.

WordNet

trust

  1. n. something (as property) held by one party (the trustee) for the benefit of another (the beneficiary); "he is the beneficiary of a generous trust set up by his father"

  2. certainty based on past experience; "he wrote the paper with considerable reliance on the work of other scientists"; "he put more trust in his own two legs than in the gun" [syn: reliance]

  3. the trait of trusting; of believing in the honesty and reliability of others; "the experience destroyed his trust and personal dignity" [syn: trustingness, trustfulness] [ant: distrust]

  4. a consortium of independent organizations formed to limit competition by controlling the production and distribution of a product or service; "they set up the trust in the hope of gaining a monopoly" [syn: corporate trust, combine, cartel]

  5. complete confidence in a person or plan etc; "he cherished the faith of a good woman"; "the doctor-patient relationship is based on trust" [syn: faith]

  6. a trustful relationship; "he took me into his confidence"; "he betrayed their trust" [syn: confidence]

trust

  1. v. have confidence or faith in; "We can trust in God"; "Rely on your friends"; "bank on your good education"; "I swear by my grandmother's recipes" [syn: swear, rely, bank] [ant: distrust, distrust]

  2. allow without fear

  3. be confident about something; "I believe that he will come back from the war" [syn: believe]

  4. expect and wish; "I trust you will behave better from now on"; "I hope she understands that she cannot expect a raise" [syn: hope, desire]

  5. confer a trust upon; "The messenger was entrusted with the general's secret"; "I commit my soul to God" [syn: entrust, intrust, confide, commit]

  6. extend credit to

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

trust

c.1200, from Old Norse treysta "to trust, rely on, make strong and safe," from traust (see trust (n.)). Related: Trusted; trusting.

trust

c.1200, "reliance on the veracity, integrity, or other virtues of someone or something; religious faith," from Old Norse traust "help, confidence, protection, support," from Proto-Germanic abstract noun *traustam (cognates: Old Frisian trast, Dutch troost "comfort, consolation," Old High German trost "trust, fidelity," German Trost "comfort, consolation," Gothic trausti "agreement, alliance"), from Proto-Germanic *treuwaz-, source of Old English treowian "to believe, trust," and treowe "faithful, trusty" (see true (adj.)).\n

\nfrom c.1300 as "reliability, trustworthiness; trustiness, fidelity, faithfulness;" from late 14c. as "confident expectation" and "that on which one relies." From early 15c. in legal sense of "confidence placed in a one who holds or enjoys the use of property entrusted to him by its legal owner;" mid-15c. as "condition of being legally entrusted." Meaning "businesses organized to reduce competition" is recorded from 1877. Trust-buster is recorded from 1903.

Usage examples of "trust".

But owing to the stupid money system, which these laborers them selves help to keep in force, the results of their combined efforts were either usurped by an unproductive class fortunate enough to be born rich, or those shrewd enough to accumulate money, such as trust managers, bankers, real estate speculators, stock jobbers, and brokers, gamblers, burglars, money loan swindlers, high salaried clergymen, etc.

He was also an accurate weather-vane on the quality of my work, whose judgement I quickly learned to trust and respect.

Otherwise respected and trusted members of the community appeared to the afflicted in their fits.

So desperate indeed did the situation of the son of Theodosius appear, to those who were the best acquainted with his strength and resources, that Jovius and Valens, his minister and his general, betrayed their trust, infamously deserted the sinking cause of their benefactor, and devoted their treacherous allegiance to the service of his more fortunate rival.

The principle, applicable to both federal and State courts, that the Court first assuming jurisdiction over property may maintain and exercise that jurisdiction to the exclusion of the other, was held not to be confined to cases where the property has actually been seized under judicial process, but applies as well to suits brought for marshalling assets, administering trusts, or liquidating estates and to suits of a similar nature, where to give effect to its jurisdiction the Court must control the property.

Likewise a woman needs trust, acceptance, appreciation, admiration, approval, and encouragement.

The more she is able to express herself, the more she feels heard and understood, and the more she is able to give a man the loving trust, acceptance, appreciation, admiration, approval, and encouragement that he needs.

She is able to respond with greater love, trust, acceptance, appreciation, admiration, approval, and encouragement.

When she feels a surge of negative feelings, it is especially difficult for a woman to speak in a trusting, accepting, and appreciative way.

The period for a new election of a citizen, to administer the executive government of the United States, being not far distant, and the time actually arrived, when your thoughts must be employed designating the person, who is to be clothed with that important trust, it appears to me proper, especially as it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should now apprize you of the resolution I have formed, to decline being considered among the number of those out of whom a choice is to be made.

I trust you gentlemen appreciate your good fortune in arriving just when you did.

I trust it will not be forgotten, that twenty-five pieces of heavy ordnance have been dragged to the different batteries, mounted, and, all but three, fought by seamen, except one artilleryman to point the guns.

She was an alarming blend of childlike innocence and trust, and an astuteness far beyond her years.

He lay panting a moment, then started to crawl up the pathway, unwilling to trust his balky ankle on this rocky footing.

The Cayman Islands, the Bahamas, and the Netherlands Antilles each provided sophisticated banking services catering to the harried businessman in need of a secure hiding place for funds spirited from under the blind eyes of a trusting partner or the vengeful maw of a wronged spouse.