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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

tire

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a tired cliché (=boring because it has been used so often)
▪ The story is based on a series of tired clichés.
desperately poor/ill/tired etc
▪ He was desperately ill with a fever.
look tired/happy/sad etc
▪ You look tired. You should go to bed.
old though it is/tired though he was etc
▪ Strange though it may seem, I like housework.
sleepy/tired
▪ His eyes looked sleepy.
▪ Her hair was a mess and her eyes were tired.
sleepy/tired (also wearyliterary)
▪ He rubbed his tired eyes and yawned.
snow tire
though old/tired etc
▪ The rooms, though small, were pleasant and airy.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be sick (and tired) of (doing) sth
▪ Gad, I was sick and tired of life.
▪ I think the archivist who helped me is sick of the sight of me by now.
▪ I was sick of concealments - those retentions of his.
▪ I was sick of following baseball through the abbreviated box scores of the international Herald Tribune.
▪ No one, knowing the Patriarch, could doubt that, after a day of his voice, Zacco was sick of him.
▪ People were sick of the war.
▪ We are sick and tired of the proliferation of guns.
▪ When we first started we were sick of the way many groups would adopt a cool persona for interviews.
tired of (doing) sth
▪ But by then, the hedgehog was tired of waiting and was walking away across the croquet-ground.
▪ His sister, Marie, his children-they had all grown tired of him.
▪ I am old, and tired of life.
▪ It was April, his children were tired of riding, and his wife, Clara, was pregnant.
▪ It was possible, of course, but not likely that Zacco had grown tired of his Christmas truce.
▪ She is tired of being asked.
▪ This line has won him widespread backing among middle class voters tired of 17 uninterrupted years of Tory rule.
▪ We are getting tired of people behaving like prima donnas.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I felt as if I could run all day without tiring.
▪ I won't tire you with a long visit. I just wanted to stop in and see how you were doing.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ That coming from him who would go sick with a bad back whenever a job tired him.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
flat
▪ He had no useful information about the shooting that took place nearby as Cosby changed a flat tire, police said.
▪ If you have a flat tire, stuff like that happens.
▪ The doctoral student was apparently attempting to change a flat tire when his assailant struck.
▪ She explains to Jose that they have a flat tire and muse go back down the road to the big house.
▪ Suppose he had a flat tire?
▪ Tight shoes A motorcycle with two flat tires.
▪ In the above case, it would be contextually inappropriate to be only reporting a flat tire at a gas station.
■ NOUN
maker
▪ In order to make up for falling retail prices, tire makers have been struggling to raise prices to car makers.
■ VERB
burn
▪ Texas-Lehigh Cement Company in Buda was recently granted a permit to burn tires for fuel.
change
▪ He had no useful information about the shooting that took place nearby as Cosby changed a flat tire, police said.
▪ When we reached the car, I held a flashlight while Lydell White Plume changed the tire.
▪ The doctoral student was apparently attempting to change a flat tire when his assailant struck.
make
▪ That can make the tires slippery.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Commission officials said tire burning is not new to Texas.
▪ Now the tire companies have fought back.
▪ On the concrete floor inside are tire tracks, and skid marks where kids have done wheelies or donuts.
▪ That can make the tires slippery.
Wikipedia

Tire (disambiguation)

Tire or tyre is the ring-shaped rubber covering that is fitted around the rim of a vehicle's wheel and is filled with air.

Tire may also refer to:

  • Tiredness or fatigue
  • Tire, İzmir, a district in Turkey, and the center town of the district

Tire

A tire (American English) or tyre (British English) is a ring-shaped vehicle component that covers the wheel's rim to protect it and enable better vehicle performance. Most tires, such as those for automobiles and bicycles, provide traction between the vehicle and the road while providing a flexible cushion that absorbs shock.

The materials of modern pneumatic tires are synthetic rubber, natural rubber, fabric and wire, along with carbon black and other chemical compounds. They consist of a tread and a body. The tread provides traction while the body provides containment for a quantity of compressed air. Before rubber was developed, the first versions of tires were simply bands of metal fitted around wooden wheels to prevent wear and tear. Early rubber tires were solid (not pneumatic). Today, the majority of tires are pneumatic inflatable structures, comprising a doughnut-shaped body of cords and wires encased in rubber and generally filled with compressed air to form an inflatable cushion. Pneumatic tires are used on many types of vehicles, including cars, bicycles, motorcycles, buses, trucks, heavy equipment, and aircraft. Metal tires are still used on locomotives and railcars, and solid rubber (or other polymer) tires are still used in various non-automotive applications, such as some casters, carts, lawnmowers, and wheelbarrows.

Wiktionary

tire

Etymology 1 alt. (context intransitive English) To become sleepy or weary. vb. (context intransitive English) To become sleepy or weary. Etymology 2

alt. 1 (context obsolete English) accoutrements, accessories. 2 (context obsolete English) dress, clothes, attire. 3 A covering for the head; a headdress. 4 Metal rim of a wheel, especially that of a railroad locomotive. 5 (lb en North America) The rubber covering on a wheel; a tyre. 6 A child's apron covering the upper part of the body, and tied with tape or cord; a pinafore. Also (term tier English). n. 1 (context obsolete English) accoutrements, accessories. 2 (context obsolete English) dress, clothes, attire. 3 A covering for the head; a headdress. 4 Metal rim of a wheel, especially that of a railroad locomotive. 5 (lb en North America) The rubber covering on a wheel; a tyre. 6 A child's apron covering the upper part of the body, and tied with tape or cord; a pinafore. Also (term tier English). vb. (context transitive obsolete English) To dress or adorn. Etymology 3

alt. 1 (context obsolete English) To seize, pull, and tear prey, as a hawk does. 2 (context obsolete English) To seize, rend, or tear something as prey; to be fixed upon, or engaged with, anything. vb. 1 (context obsolete English) To seize, pull, and tear prey, as a hawk does. 2 (context obsolete English) To seize, rend, or tear something as prey; to be fixed upon, or engaged with, anything. Etymology 4

n. A tier, row, or rank.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

tire

"to weary," also "to become weary," Old English teorian (Kentish tiorian) "to fail, cease; become weary; make weary, exhaust," of uncertain origin; according to Watkins possibly from a PIE *deu-s-, suffixed form of root *deu- (1) "to lack, be wanting." Related: Tired; tiring.

tire

late 15c., "iron plates forming a rim of a carriage wheel," probably from tire "equipment, dress, covering" (c.1300), a shortened form of attire (n.). The notion is of the tire as the dressing of the wheel. The original spelling was tyre, which had shifted to tire in 17c.-18c., but since early 19c. tyre has been revived in Great Britain and become standard there. Rubber ones, for bicycles (later automobiles) are from 1877. A tire-iron originally was one of the iron plates; as a device for separating a tire from a wheel, by 1909.

tire

"furnish with a tire," 1899, from tire (n.).

WordNet

tire

n. hoop that covers a wheel; "automobile tires are usually made of rubber and filled with compressed air" [syn: tyre]

tire

  1. v. get tired of something or somebody [syn: pall, weary, fatigue, jade]

  2. exhaust or tire through overuse or great strain or stress; "We wore ourselves out on this hike" [syn: wear upon, tire out, wear, weary, jade, wear out, outwear, wear down, fag out, fag, fatigue] [ant: refresh]

  3. deplete; "exhaust one's savings"; "We quickly played out our strength" [syn: run down, exhaust, play out, sap]

  4. cause to be bored [syn: bore] [ant: interest]

The Collaborative International Dictionary

tire

Tier \Ti"er\, n. [See Tire a headdress.] A chold's apron covering the upper part of the body, and tied with tape or cord; a pinafore. [Written also tire.]

Usage examples of "tire".

When we went on holidays, we called it going pink-eye, my Aboriginal father carried me on his shoulders when I was tired.

Here is the Park, And O, the languid midsummer wafts adust, The tired midsummer blooms!

He tried to move to the aft end of the room but immediately felt tired and dizzy.

The slim Senite appeared on the screen, no longer looking ageless and aloof, but shaken and tired.

This must have been one of his bored days, spent wandering aimlessly through the house with an occasional pause to glance over some possession of his before he grew tired of it and began wandering again.

A tremendous squeal of tires was followed by a deadening crash as the Alfa hit the truck full on.

I only danced one minuet with her, for my amorous exploits and the heavy supper I had taken had tired me, and I longed for rest.

They do not tire, and perhaps they would have carried you away when Amour Magique closed, to dance for them until you collapsed.

Throughout the remaining conversation the Anointed was visibly tired and irritable, while John was simply impatient to be done and leave.

Until now I have earned twenty crowns, but I am afraid the lady will get tired of it, and you can make me earn two sequins by answering a line.

He was ravenous for the buttermilk, and when he stretched on the bench in the arbour the flickering patches of sunlight so tantalized his tired eyes, while the bees made such splendid music, he was soon sound asleep.

Gaar and I were much more tired than Arem, considering that we walked the entire way.

Once Sweetie grew tired of barking at the armadillo, she followed me up the front steps and to the door.

Of course she enjoyed a good fuck and never tired of letting men get into her pants but the truth was what she found deeply arousing was taking control of a man.

That was good, that was a relief, but there remained such a distance to travel, over ground that seemed shaky as aspic beneath her, and she really was very tired When she crumpled unconscious to the cobbles, she had the good fortune to be noticed.