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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

times

I.preposition
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
biblical times
▪ The disease dates back to biblical times.
changing times (=a period of time when a lot is changing)
▪ We live in changing times.
countless times
▪ a famous film clip which has been shown countless times
fallen on hard times (=did not have much money)
▪ He had clearly fallen on hard times.
in days/times/years etc gone by (=in the past)
▪ These herbs would have been grown for medicinal purposes in days gone by.
in recent years/months/times etc
▪ The situation has improved in recent years.
in times of hardship
▪ In times of hardship, your family may be the only people you can go to for help.
modern times
▪ It was one of the greatest disasters of modern times.
peak times
▪ Extra buses run at peak times.
the boom years/times
▪ the boom years of the late 1980s
times in a row
▪ I’ve beaten her three times in a row.
times table
▪ Do you know the eleven times table?
Times were hard
Times were hard and they were forced to sell their house.
troubled times
▪ These are troubled times for the coal industry.
turnaround times
▪ We must reduce costs and shorten turnaround times.
twice/three times etc as many
▪ The company now employs four times as many women as men.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
at all times
▪ Carry your passport with you at all times.
▪ Keep your hotel door locked at all times.
▪ Many books recommend carrying your passport with you at all times.
▪ He made a point of chatting to her at all times.
▪ He measured CO2 at all times of the day and night.
▪ Neighbours say the animals bark incessantly at all times of the day and night.
▪ Now she had to consider another person's wishes at all times.
▪ Rice dresses immaculately and stylishly at all times, on the field and off.
▪ To help other people at all times.
▪ We can remind ourselves of, and help our children to realise, the need at all times for compassion.
at the best of times
▪ Even at the best of times the roads are dangerous.
▪ A salmon is slippery enough to handle at the best of times, but one of this size ....
▪ But reason told her it was a precarious business at the best of times.
▪ In fact Polanski, unconventional at the best of times, takes us to the limit - and beyond.
▪ It was run on a shoestring at the best of times and Kelly was merely adding to his problems.
▪ Listening is a difficult and complex skill at the best of times.
▪ Memory was mischievously selective at the best of times Trivia stuck limpet-like and the useful filtered away.
▪ Rising living standards and well-being are ambiguously related at the best of times, and not simply for ecological reasons.
▪ The mind was a delicate mechanism that he disliked interfering with at the best of times.
at times
▪ At times even the most talented athletes lose their motivation.
▪ At times Jean deeply regretted not having children.
▪ In a job like this, you're bound to feel a little stressed at times.
▪ Check that machines and materials will be available at times that suit them.
▪ Even Preston had to admit it was fun at times.
▪ Everybody has to pull together and support each other at times like this.
▪ Granted this role at times seems like little more than an extension of his stint as a motivational speaker.
▪ Hart is an amiable and enthusiastic guide, if a little corny at times.
▪ He wrote beautiful, at times too beautiful prose.
▪ It is one of the devious ways in which we all can behave at times.
▪ It was very inadequate at times, especially in winter if you were on point duty.
behind the times
▪ Once the giants of British retailing, they are now seen as being behind the times.
▪ People in these parts tend to be way behind the times when it comes to issues such as women's rights.
▪ The company's marketing plan is a little behind the times.
▪ As we went towards the platforms, I said, she's frightened of seeming behind the times.
▪ I was about fifty years behind the times.
▪ New York was not behind the times in strange smells.
▪ Newtonmore is a little quiet; some would say behind the times.
▪ Painting nearly always fifty years or even a hundred behind the times.
▪ We may be the ones 257 who are behind the times.
▪ You're behind the times, Arthur, you're old-fashioned.
fall on hard/bad times
▪ At 21 she is set for stardom, but she still finds time for people who have fallen on hard times.
▪ Even by political standards, Gingrich very quickly fell on hard times.
▪ I assumed that if a person fell on hard times some one else in the wider family would rescue them.
▪ Interestingly, though, the bottom 10 includes many household names fallen on hard times.
▪ The Cambridge University Automobile Club had clearly fallen on hard times, too.
▪ The model cities program fell on hard times soon after it began.
▪ With the outbreak of war, the shop fell on harder times.
▪ Worse, because of Jack the father has fallen on hard times and must meet all kinds of debts.
five/ten/many etc times ...
▪ Besides being one of Henry III's most frequent ambassadors to Rome, Alexander served many times as papal judge delegate.
▪ I am feeling much better, though there are many times when I feel a dull ache.
▪ Now, as many times before, the City is missing a chance to put the system right.
▪ The amount of metal needed is ten times what we used on Mars.
▪ The males adapt to their new and relaxed home by evolving at ten times the rate of their consorts.
▪ The prince visited many times more.
▪ The real frequency of worldwide maternal mortality may be as much as three to five times higher than this ratio.
▪ Tours leave five times a day.
for old times' sake
▪ A slight drizzle appeared, just for old times' sake.
▪ I just thought it might have been kinda fun, you know, for old times' sake.
▪ Or even, for old times' sake, one of the left splinter parties.
▪ Then one day, just for old times' sake, I paid a visit to Winston Street.
▪ This was really just for old times' sake, just for fun.
in former times/years
▪ No rocks, to our knowledge, are untouched by life in former times.
let the good times roll
move with the times
▪ You move with the times, or you fail, in this business.
▪ But even Rolls-Royce must be seen to be moving with the times.
▪ Hugh Puddephat, she discovered, had certainly moved with the times.
▪ Male speaker We've got to move with the times.
▪ Mrs Bottomley told them the health service had to move with the times and some closures were inevitable.
▪ Nowadays, he said, prisons had moved with the times like everything else.
▪ Still, I suppose we must move with the times.
▪ They haven't moved with the times, and nor, perhaps, could they.
move/change/keep up with the times
▪ Motoring: Can R-R keep up with the times?
▪ The pub has made no attempt to keep up with the times ... no karaoke here ... just conversation.
nine times out of ten
Nine times out of ten I just skip breakfast and have a coffee.
Nine times out of ten we can beat them, but last night they creamed us.
Nine times out of ten, jobs that become vacant are filled from inside the organization.
nine times out of ten/99 times out of 100 etc
sign of the times
▪ At the time, I took this decay merely as a sign of the times.
▪ But in a sign of the times, Army Chief Gen.
▪ But Reagan read the signs of the times.
▪ Is this a sign of the times?
▪ It was a sign of the times. 1956.
▪ That we owe this to the vast reach of cyberspace is indeed a sign of the times.
▪ This is a real sign of the times and completely eclipses global fears about ecology or famine.
three years/five times etc running
times table
▪ And I don't really know my Two Times Table.
▪ For Peter, puzzles are great fun; he likes to learn such details as state capitals and the times tables.
▪ I expect to recycle our work on the times tables.
▪ She knew her times tables and her Catechism.
twice over/three times over etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Five times six equals thirty.
▪ two times two equals four
▪ What is eight times twelve?
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
at all times
▪ Carry your passport with you at all times.
▪ Keep your hotel door locked at all times.
▪ Many books recommend carrying your passport with you at all times.
▪ He made a point of chatting to her at all times.
▪ He measured CO2 at all times of the day and night.
▪ Neighbours say the animals bark incessantly at all times of the day and night.
▪ Now she had to consider another person's wishes at all times.
▪ Rice dresses immaculately and stylishly at all times, on the field and off.
▪ To help other people at all times.
▪ We can remind ourselves of, and help our children to realise, the need at all times for compassion.
at the best of times
▪ Even at the best of times the roads are dangerous.
▪ A salmon is slippery enough to handle at the best of times, but one of this size ....
▪ But reason told her it was a precarious business at the best of times.
▪ In fact Polanski, unconventional at the best of times, takes us to the limit - and beyond.
▪ It was run on a shoestring at the best of times and Kelly was merely adding to his problems.
▪ Listening is a difficult and complex skill at the best of times.
▪ Memory was mischievously selective at the best of times Trivia stuck limpet-like and the useful filtered away.
▪ Rising living standards and well-being are ambiguously related at the best of times, and not simply for ecological reasons.
▪ The mind was a delicate mechanism that he disliked interfering with at the best of times.
at times
▪ At times even the most talented athletes lose their motivation.
▪ At times Jean deeply regretted not having children.
▪ In a job like this, you're bound to feel a little stressed at times.
▪ Check that machines and materials will be available at times that suit them.
▪ Even Preston had to admit it was fun at times.
▪ Everybody has to pull together and support each other at times like this.
▪ Granted this role at times seems like little more than an extension of his stint as a motivational speaker.
▪ Hart is an amiable and enthusiastic guide, if a little corny at times.
▪ He wrote beautiful, at times too beautiful prose.
▪ It is one of the devious ways in which we all can behave at times.
▪ It was very inadequate at times, especially in winter if you were on point duty.
behind the times
▪ Once the giants of British retailing, they are now seen as being behind the times.
▪ People in these parts tend to be way behind the times when it comes to issues such as women's rights.
▪ The company's marketing plan is a little behind the times.
▪ As we went towards the platforms, I said, she's frightened of seeming behind the times.
▪ I was about fifty years behind the times.
▪ New York was not behind the times in strange smells.
▪ Newtonmore is a little quiet; some would say behind the times.
▪ Painting nearly always fifty years or even a hundred behind the times.
▪ We may be the ones 257 who are behind the times.
▪ You're behind the times, Arthur, you're old-fashioned.
five/ten/many etc times ...
▪ Besides being one of Henry III's most frequent ambassadors to Rome, Alexander served many times as papal judge delegate.
▪ I am feeling much better, though there are many times when I feel a dull ache.
▪ Now, as many times before, the City is missing a chance to put the system right.
▪ The amount of metal needed is ten times what we used on Mars.
▪ The males adapt to their new and relaxed home by evolving at ten times the rate of their consorts.
▪ The prince visited many times more.
▪ The real frequency of worldwide maternal mortality may be as much as three to five times higher than this ratio.
▪ Tours leave five times a day.
for old times' sake
▪ A slight drizzle appeared, just for old times' sake.
▪ I just thought it might have been kinda fun, you know, for old times' sake.
▪ Or even, for old times' sake, one of the left splinter parties.
▪ Then one day, just for old times' sake, I paid a visit to Winston Street.
▪ This was really just for old times' sake, just for fun.
in former times/years
▪ No rocks, to our knowledge, are untouched by life in former times.
move/change/keep up with the times
▪ Motoring: Can R-R keep up with the times?
▪ The pub has made no attempt to keep up with the times ... no karaoke here ... just conversation.
nine times out of ten
Nine times out of ten I just skip breakfast and have a coffee.
Nine times out of ten we can beat them, but last night they creamed us.
Nine times out of ten, jobs that become vacant are filled from inside the organization.
nine times out of ten/99 times out of 100 etc
sign of the times
▪ At the time, I took this decay merely as a sign of the times.
▪ But in a sign of the times, Army Chief Gen.
▪ But Reagan read the signs of the times.
▪ Is this a sign of the times?
▪ It was a sign of the times. 1956.
▪ That we owe this to the vast reach of cyberspace is indeed a sign of the times.
▪ This is a real sign of the times and completely eclipses global fears about ecology or famine.
three years/five times etc running
times table
▪ And I don't really know my Two Times Table.
▪ For Peter, puzzles are great fun; he likes to learn such details as state capitals and the times tables.
▪ I expect to recycle our work on the times tables.
▪ She knew her times tables and her Catechism.
twice over/three times over etc
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Times

Time \Time\, n.; pl. Times. [OE. time, AS. t[=i]ma, akin to t[=i]d time, and to Icel. t[=i]mi, Dan. time an hour, Sw. timme. [root]58. See Tide, n.]

  1. Duration, considered independently of any system of measurement or any employment of terms which designate limited portions thereof.

    The time wasteth [i. e. passes away] night and day.
    --Chaucer.

    I know of no ideas . . . that have a better claim to be accounted simple and original than those of space and time.
    --Reid.

  2. A particular period or part of duration, whether past, present, or future; a point or portion of duration; as, the time was, or has been; the time is, or will be.

    God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets.
    --Heb. i. 1.

  3. The period at which any definite event occurred, or person lived; age; period; era; as, the Spanish Armada was destroyed in the time of Queen Elizabeth; -- often in the plural; as, ancient times; modern times.

  4. The duration of one's life; the hours and days which a person has at his disposal.

    Believe me, your time is not your own; it belongs to God, to religion, to mankind.
    --Buckminster.

  5. A proper time; a season; an opportunity.

    There is . . . a time to every purpose.
    --Eccl. iii. 1.

    The time of figs was not yet.
    --Mark xi. 13.

  6. Hour of travail, delivery, or parturition.

    She was within one month of her time.
    --Clarendon.

  7. Performance or occurrence of an action or event, considered with reference to repetition; addition of a number to itself; repetition; as, to double cloth four times; four times four, or sixteen.

    Summers three times eight save one.
    --Milton.

  8. The present life; existence in this world as contrasted with immortal life; definite, as contrasted with infinite, duration.

    Till time and sin together cease.
    --Keble.

  9. (Gram.) Tense.

  10. (Mus.) The measured duration of sounds; measure; tempo; rate of movement; rhythmical division; as, common or triple time; the musician keeps good time. Some few lines set unto a solemn time. --Beau. & Fl. Note: Time is often used in the formation of compounds, mostly self-explaining; as, time-battered, time-beguiling, time-consecrated, time-consuming, time-enduring, time-killing, time-sanctioned, time-scorner, time-wasting, time-worn, etc. Absolute time, time irrespective of local standards or epochs; as, all spectators see a lunar eclipse at the same instant of absolute time. Apparent time, the time of day reckoned by the sun, or so that 12 o'clock at the place is the instant of the transit of the sun's center over the meridian. Astronomical time, mean solar time reckoned by counting the hours continuously up to twenty-four from one noon to the next. At times, at distinct intervals of duration; now and then; as, at times he reads, at other times he rides. Civil time, time as reckoned for the purposes of common life in distinct periods, as years, months, days, hours, etc., the latter, among most modern nations, being divided into two series of twelve each, and reckoned, the first series from midnight to noon, the second, from noon to midnight. Common time (Mil.), the ordinary time of marching, in which ninety steps, each twenty-eight inches in length, are taken in one minute. Equation of time. See under Equation, n. In time.

    1. In good season; sufficiently early; as, he arrived in time to see the exhibition.

    2. After a considerable space of duration; eventually; finally; as, you will in time recover your health and strength. Mean time. See under 4th Mean. Quick time (Mil.), time of marching, in which one hundred and twenty steps, each thirty inches in length, are taken in one minute. Sidereal time. See under Sidereal. Standard time, the civil time that has been established by law or by general usage over a region or country. In England the standard time is Greenwich mean solar time. In the United States and Canada four kinds of standard time have been adopted by the railroads and accepted by the people, viz., Eastern, Central, Mountain, and Pacific time, corresponding severally to the mean local times of the 75th, 90th, 105th, and 120th meridians west from Greenwich, and being therefore five, six, seven, and eight hours slower than Greenwich time. Time ball, a ball arranged to drop from the summit of a pole, to indicate true midday time, as at Greenwich Observatory, England. --Nichol. Time bargain (Com.), a contract made for the sale or purchase of merchandise, or of stock in the public funds, at a certain time in the future. Time bill. Same as Time-table. [Eng.] Time book, a book in which is kept a record of the time persons have worked. Time detector, a timepiece provided with a device for registering and indicating the exact time when a watchman visits certain stations in his beat. Time enough, in season; early enough. ``Stanly at Bosworth field, . . . came time enough to save his life.'' --Bacon. Time fuse, a fuse, as for an explosive projectile, which can be so arranged as to ignite the charge at a certain definite interval after being itself ignited. Time immemorial, or Time out of mind. (Eng. Law) See under Immemorial. Time lock, a lock having clockwork attached, which, when wound up, prevents the bolt from being withdrawn when locked, until a certain interval of time has elapsed. Time of day, salutation appropriate to the times of the day, as ``good morning,'' ``good evening,'' and the like; greeting. To kill time. See under Kill, v. t. To make time.

      1. To gain time.

      2. To occupy or use (a certain) time in doing something; as, the trotting horse made fast time. To move against time, To run against time, or To go against time, to move, run, or go a given distance without a competitor, in the quickest possible time; or, to accomplish the greatest distance which can be passed over in a given time; as, the horse is to run against time. True time.

        1. Mean time as kept by a clock going uniformly.

        2. (Astron.) Apparent time as reckoned from the transit of the sun's center over the meridian.

WordNet

times

  1. n. the circumstances and ideas of the present age; "behind the times"; "in times like these" [syn: modern times, present time, modern world, contemporary world]

  2. an arithmetic operation that is the inverse of division; the product of two numbers is computed; "the multiplication of four by three gives twelve"; "four times three equals twelve" [syn: multiplication]

Wiktionary

times

n. 1 (plural of time English)Category:English plurals 2 The circumstances of a certain time. prep. product of the previous number and the following number. vb. (en-third-person singular of: time)