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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

tight

I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a firm/tight grip
▪ The streets were crowded and she kept a tight grip on her bag.
a sharp/tight bend (=a curve that changes direction suddenly)
▪ That road sign means you are approaching a sharp bend.
a sharp/tight curve (=one that turns suddenly in another direction)
▪ There's a tight curve in the road up ahead.
a tight budget (=small and limited)
▪ Most young people have to live within a tight budget.
a tight constraint (=a strict limit)
▪ They were operating within tight financial constraints.
a tight deadline (=one that is difficult because it does not allow much time to do something)
▪ As a journalist, you have to be able to work to tight deadlines.
a tight smilewritten (= when you are not really happy or friendly)
▪ As he stepped past Carson he gave a quick, tight smile of acknowledgement.
a tight/firm hold
▪ Rose had a tight hold of her hand.
a tight/sharp corner (=very curved and difficult to drive around)
▪ Go slowly because there’s a sharp corner up ahead.
close/tight
▪ Most people were predicting a close race.
get...out of a tight spot
▪ I hope you can help get me out of a tight spot.
Hold on tight
Hold on tight!
puts...in...tight spot
▪ This puts the chairman in a very tight spot.
tight curls (=curves that are very close together)
▪ Her dark hair was arranged in tight curls.
tight fit
▪ I managed to get everything into the suitcase, but it was a tight fit.
tight schedule (=including a lot of things that must be done in a short time)
▪ I’m going to be working to a very tight schedule.
tight
▪ The knot in my shoelaces is really tight.
tightly/tight shut
▪ He went on sobbing, his eyes tight shut.
tight/rigid controls (=strict controls)
▪ the introduction of tighter controls on immigration
tight/strict (=good security, so that something is very safe)
▪ The event passed off peacefully, amid tight security.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
too
▪ Make sure that stockings or tights as well as shoes are not too tight.
▪ The head twists out as if the skin is wearing an old fashioned collar that's too tight for comfort.
▪ Buying a size larger just because the shoes feel too tight only means a narrow shoe that slips off!
▪ Jean-Paul glanced down at his own suit, which was too tight for him, and damned uncomfortable.
▪ We wedged it in place firmly, but not too tight against the lintel, leaving room for adjustment.
▪ Always wear the right clothing for the activity you choose - clothing worn too tight can hinder circulation.
up
▪ You can lace up tight for the next couple of weeks and try to act normal.
▪ He curled up tight and slept better than he had done all year.
▪ You were rolled up tight as a mummy in canvas, then water was poured on it.
▪ But he kept his mouth buttoned up tight.
▪ Pike took off the peaked cap and tucked it inside his overall which he then zipped up tight to the neck.
▪ Or paper bags tied up tight at the neck.
▪ When fate marks you down for immortality you'd just better bite the bullet and lace your boots up tight.
■ NOUN
ball
▪ She curled up in a tight ball as though to stop herself from breaking apart.
▪ Frankie climbed into bed, curled himself into a tight ball and pulled the covers up over his head.
▪ I crawl into my sleeping bag and curl up in a tight ball.
▪ She could feel that the muscles in her stomach were clenched into a tight ball.
▪ The Princesse crumpled the telegram into a tight ball.
budget
▪ The government would end price controls and subsidies to industry, and impose tight budgets and curbs on welfare spending.
▪ And, Tom was working on a tight budget.
▪ We had a really tight budget and we feared the cost of turning it into a home was way beyond our means.
▪ Some may experience considerable pressure to meet technical or scientific goals within a short time or within a tight budget.
▪ Working on a tight budget, we opted for more on-board memory at the expense of a large capacity harddisk.
▪ The panel wanted to make the new drugs accessible to poor Texans but was faced with a tight budget.
▪ The competition set a fairly tight budget so Julia decided to mix second-hand clothes with new ones.
▪ But because of the general economic climate, you may still feel as though you must manage on a tight budget.
control
▪ At no time did the abbey relinquish to these groups any of its tight control over economic life.
▪ Firecracker reacted to the tight control on his whereabouts by trying to elude his protectors.
▪ But Ickes, through his tight control over time and money, is doing his bit too.
▪ Margret Rey, who kept tight control over the vast franchise, died just before Christmas at the age of 90.
▪ And keep a tight control of your budget.
▪ Now, plainly, tighter controls on vehicles entering the City are essential.
▪ The tight control on public sector pay is crucial and underlines the fact that the Government intends to practise what it preaches.
corner
▪ However, the cover is very easily removed if you need to get into a tight corner.
▪ The drivers roared round tight corners and skilfully navigated a twisty, bendy and muddy course.
▪ They get the argument out of a tight corner, and make for a less fatalistic scenario.
▪ However, employers could find themselves in a tight corner if they attempted to increase employee contributions or reduce benefits.
▪ The plate can be moved from side to side and backwards for tight corners.
▪ The moment he emerged on to a flat stretch of road after negotiating a particularly tight corner the explanation was obvious.
▪ It was a typical women's downhill course: relatively low-speed, but extremely technical with tight corners.
▪ And now here was I in a tight corner and was I going to use violence?
deadline
▪ A strong background in quantitative analysis, careful attention to detail and an ability to work to tight deadlines are essential skills.
▪ Thus he is confident of meeting the very tight deadlines for the Virgin order.
▪ He interpreted Henry's wishes to the craftsmen and saw that tight deadlines were met.
▪ Recruitment always operates to tight deadlines, such as catching the last post.
▪ But working to scale from a cartoon drawing and meeting a tight deadline posed problems for the sculpture's designer.
end
▪ Raiders owner Al Davis then switched Williams to tight end during training camp.
▪ Rookie tight end Rickey Dudley has to be more involved with the passing game.
▪ They throw to the tight end same way we do.
▪ After finally agreeing to report to the Green Bay Packers, the tight end found himself a forgotten man.
▪ Bucs tight end Jackie Harris sustained a groin pull and sat out the second half.
▪ You could be a tight end, maybe a linebacker.
▪ I made the move to tight end to help the team, and now I just want to contribute.
▪ Johnson started the winning drive with a 16-yard completion to tight end Andrew Glover.
fit
▪ After turning the Disc you have a tighter fit, but not necessarily a better one.
▪ It was going to be a tight fit.
▪ This tighter fit enables caffeine to plug the receptor, thus preventing adenosine from binding.
▪ He got up as quickly as the tight fit of the table in the breakfast nook would allow.
▪ We arrive in Paris, and make a tight fit into a tiny chambre de bonne in the Fifteenth Arrondissement.
grip
▪ The humans had grown their winter coats, and the high buildings trembled in the tight grip of their stress equations.
▪ Apple, however, kept a tight grip on its technology and suffered the consequences.
▪ The best way for the government to achieve this is to keep a tight grip on the tigerish tendencies of the economy.
▪ The tight grip of the Gascon nobility on the Church served their dynastic interests well.
▪ He got the ends of the belt around his hands and wound them into a good, tight grip.
▪ In Pomerania this reaction took the form of an even tighter grip on the feudal peasantry and serfs of the great estates.
▪ Outside in her car she kept a tight grip on herself, refusing to let her humiliation reduce her to tears.
▪ Anybody who thought that Bath's tight grip on the Pilkington Cup was over had better think again.
hold
▪ She would be keeping a tight hold on her feelings from now on.
▪ We got up, he pushed me roughly towards the door, keeping a tight hold of me.
▪ He had a tight hold on the audience, totally in command of his band.
▪ Philip gripped tight hold of Caspar's collar.
▪ The tight hold was maintained by Thatcher's government.
▪ For Winnie herself, it required the tightest hold, the fumes of the stuff, to keep her wits about her.
▪ Keep tight hold and continue while there's time.
▪ It should not be imagined that the tiny Party élite at either of these provincial levels could maintain a tight hold.
knot
▪ Ice-cold, shocked, her stomach a tight knot of abject terror, Polly gazed wildly around her.
▪ He loosened the tight knot round his throat.
▪ She sat there, eyes glowing, twisting her handkerchief into a tight knot.
▪ She hurriedly tidied her hair, pulling it back until it hurt and securing the tight knot with pins.
▪ There was a tight knot of anger in her stomach.
money
▪ The combination of tight money and high debt is causing more than token distress.
▪ The parallels with the years since 1988, also characterized by strong deflationary pressure and tight money, are apparent.
rein
▪ Non-executive directors would keep executives on a tight rein.
▪ Apart from anything else, it would be necessary to keep Hilary Todd on a tight rein.
▪ I tend to keep a tight rein at first, and gradually relax as I get to know them.
▪ Her only chance of survival, she felt, was to keep a tight rein over her feelings and words.
restriction
▪ Mr Stoiber has been in the forefront of those calling for tighter restrictions on asylum-seekers and ordinary immigrants.
▪ The rest will be open to exploration companies under tight restrictions.
▪ But under a voluntary agreement, the parent retains parental responsibility, and tight restrictions should only apply in extreme circumstances.
schedule
▪ It was an alarmingly tight schedule.
▪ More than two-thirds were businessmen who travel on tight schedules and pay high fares.
▪ Visiting a school in Doncaster in December 1989, Charles was on another very tight schedule, again with BitC.
▪ The scrutiny process as a tight schedule and is in four parts: investigation; action plan; implementation; implementation report.
▪ Construction only began in mid-October and recent heavy rains have hampered the already tight schedule.
▪ Renwick fell silent, too, calculating the tight schedule ahead.
security
▪ The promoters are promising tight security to prevent ravers leaving the site.
▪ He was also starting to rebel against the tight security.
▪ The confusions of war, the tight security covering the country, made communication difficult.
▪ As I look back on it, the whole episode showed the need for tighter security screening.
▪ Amid tight security, Francis Mullen and his younger brother James appeared before Liverpool city magistrates.
▪ Statewide, $ 13 million was appropriated for tighter security at existing prisons.
▪ Critics include the panel charged with reviewing how tighter security measures might affect freedoms and civil rights.
ship
▪ There was no discipline problem there, to speak of, because the principal and teachers ran such a tight ship.
smile
▪ I just smiled a tight smile.
▪ John permitted himself a tight smile as he darted through the Strand's morning traffic.
▪ The blonde struck a pose and fixed a tight smile on her immaculately made-up face.
▪ She gives him a tight smile and wrinkles her nose.
▪ As he stepped past Carson he gave a quick, tight smile of acknowledgement.
▪ Only Jennifer White Dove replied to his greeting, with a tight smile.
▪ There was a tight smile on her lips.
spot
▪ I think also that three other Hearthwares shall come, in case we need to fight our way out of some tight spot.
▪ He had been in many tight spots during his life, and guarding a warehouse did not trouble him unduly.
▪ Eight extra bullets in a tight spot could mean the difference between life and death.
▪ BThis is one of the tight spots of the restaurant business.
▪ Drawbacks are the introduction of a bit more slop in the system and the potential for reduced access in tight spots.
▪ Or a mite more forgiving in a tight spot?
▪ You're in a tight spot.
squeeze
▪ Pausing just before stepping out into view, she absorbed the scene with a tight squeeze inside her heart.
▪ Despite the tight squeeze, the office has graced Borrego Springs with a personal touch over the decades.
▪ Voice over Once inside, it was clear just what a tight squeeze it would be.
▪ It was a tight squeeze and she tore her jacket.
▪ If you do it would be a tight squeeze for you all in Tom's house.
▪ There were only ninety of them, but it was a tight squeeze.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a (tight) squeeze
▪ It'll be a tight squeeze, but you can ride in the back seat.
▪ Democratic plans for Medicare rely mostly on putting a squeeze on health care providers, such as hospitals and doctors.
▪ Descend steeply from Hor Point to a stile, then ascend to a squeeze gap.
▪ His hand came out and took hold of her ankle, gave it a squeeze and a shake.
▪ In summary, Warwickshire's batting is usually adequate as long as the bowlers are able to put a squeeze on the opposition.
▪ Pausing just before stepping out into view, she absorbed the scene with a tight squeeze inside her heart.
▪ She reached out a hand, gave mine a squeeze.
▪ She slipped her hand into his, and he gave it a squeeze before he released it.
▪ Whereas the bulk of industry faced higher costs and a squeeze on profits, the oil majors had a profit bonanza.
keep a tight rein on sb/sth
sit tight
▪ Just sit tight - I'll be there in ten minutes.
▪ You sit tight while I go and get some help.
▪ You might want to sit tight a few months and see what happens to the stock market.
▪ But Solomon sat tight in his rain barrel, and after the cossacks had left empty-handed, he made his escape.
▪ He might just sit tight inside the castle.
▪ Or the rabbits sit tight underground as they become cornered by the ferrets.
▪ She is loath to encourage folks to sit tight.
▪ Then city officials sat tight and hoped it would pay off.
▪ Through the summer runup in technology stock prices, executives at the on-line service provider sat tight.
▪ When an intruder approaches, the parents fly off and the chicks sit tight nomatterhow close it comes.
▪ You could head back to the Cities, just sit tight.
sleep tight
▪ Good night, kids. Sleep tight!
▪ I don't sleep tight so that's all right.
▪ With promises of endless ice cream when he awoke, Mama kissed her little son and bade him goodnight, sleep tight.
tight spot
▪ BThis is one of the tight spots of the restaurant business.
▪ Drawbacks are the introduction of a bit more slop in the system and the potential for reduced access in tight spots.
▪ Eight extra bullets in a tight spot could mean the difference between life and death.
▪ He had been in many tight spots during his life, and guarding a warehouse did not trouble him unduly.
▪ I think also that three other Hearthwares shall come, in case we need to fight our way out of some tight spot.
▪ Or a mite more forgiving in a tight spot?
▪ You're in a tight spot.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Seat belt tight? Good, this could be a rough ride."
▪ a tight deadline
▪ a tight skirt
▪ Cover with a tight lid and refrigerate.
▪ Her mother gave a tight, forced smile.
▪ I've never been very good at reversing into tight parking spaces.
▪ I don't wear my black dress very much. It's very tight around the waist.
▪ I never wear tight clothes - I just don't feel comfortable in them.
▪ If the straps aren't tight enough, the saddle can slip.
▪ If your shirt collar's too tight, undo your top button.
▪ Ken hasn't always been so tight with money.
▪ Laws controlling the emission of greenhouse gases are not nearly tight enough.
▪ Make sure the lid is tight enough so that it won't leak.
▪ Money has been really tight because we had major car problems.
▪ My chest was tight with tension.
▪ My schedule is very tight right now, but I'll try to fit you in.
▪ Security at the conference was extremely tight.
▪ The planes approached in a tight grouping.
▪ The report recommends tighter controls on the advertising of cigarettes.
▪ The treaty would place tight limits on weapons testing.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ How else, they assume, but tight coordination and control to deal with so many moving parts?
▪ I just smiled a tight smile.
▪ Mr Stoiber has been in the forefront of those calling for tighter restrictions on asylum-seekers and ordinary immigrants.
▪ She curled up in a tight ball as though to stop herself from breaking apart.
▪ The humans had grown their winter coats, and the high buildings trembled in the tight grip of their stress equations.
▪ Though unwelcome, this decline was predicted and planned for - and spending was therefore rightly under tight constraint in 1992.
II.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
hold
▪ I dozed off and on, as my mother held tight to the rope around my waist.
shut
▪ She lay with her eyes tight shut and her mind held to a determined blank.
▪ The doors leading into the halls of real political and economic power and influence were still shut tight against us.
▪ He was sitting on the floor among the cracker wrappings and the crumbs, his shoulders shaking, his eyes tight shut.
▪ Lily froze underneath him, her eyes tight shut.
▪ They were shut tight, without a crack to see through.
▪ She screwed her eyes tight shut, trying to forget the images of last night.
▪ And still, the public schools are shut tight.
sit
▪ Then city officials sat tight and hoped it would pay off.
▪ But Solomon sat tight in his rain barrel, and after the cossacks had left empty-handed, he made his escape.
▪ But unless you see some serious fanfare, sit tight.
▪ She is loath to encourage folks to sit tight.
Sit tight, and hope that when they dry out the vinyl skin will tighten up again.
▪ You could head back to the Cities, just sit tight.
▪ Through the summer runup in technology stock prices, executives at the on-line service provider sat tight.
▪ But if he could only sit tight, nothing at all would happen.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Her eyes were shut tight as she screamed.
▪ Sylvia handed me a large parcel, tightly wrapped in brown paper.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Betty's hand was tight across her mouth now and she turned swiftly away and went back into the scullery.
▪ Pack it tight, add basketball footage as dramatic as it is trite, and throw it into the Hollywood Plot Machine.
▪ She lay with her eyes tight shut and her mind held to a determined blank.
▪ She made his costume, cutting down a white linen shirt and fitting it tight up round the neck.
▪ Through the summer runup in technology stock prices, executives at the on-line service provider sat tight.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Tight

Tie \Tie\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Tied(Obs. Tight); p. pr. & vb. n. Tying.] [OE. ti?en, teyen, AS. t[=i]gan, ti['e]gan, fr. te['a]g, te['a]h, a rope; akin to Icel. taug, and AS. te['o]n to draw, to pull. See Tug, v. t., and cf. Tow to drag.]

  1. To fasten with a band or cord and knot; to bind. ``Tie the kine to the cart.''
    --1 Sam. vi. 7.

    My son, keep thy father's commandment, and forsake not the law of thy mother: bind them continually upon thine heart, and tie them about thy neck.
    --Prov. vi. 20,21.

  2. To form, as a knot, by interlacing or complicating a cord; also, to interlace, or form a knot in; as, to tie a cord to a tree; to knit; to knot. ``We do not tie this knot with an intention to puzzle the argument.''
    --Bp. Burnet.

  3. To unite firmly; to fasten; to hold.

    In bond of virtuous love together tied.
    --Fairfax.

  4. To hold or constrain by authority or moral influence, as by knotted cords; to oblige; to constrain; to restrain; to confine.

    Not tied to rules of policy, you find Revenge less sweet than a forgiving mind.
    --Dryden.

  5. (Mus.) To unite, as notes, by a cross line, or by a curved line, or slur, drawn over or under them.

  6. To make an equal score with, in a contest; to be even with. To ride and tie. See under Ride. To tie down.

    1. To fasten so as to prevent from rising.

    2. To restrain; to confine; to hinder from action.

      To tie up, to confine; to restrain; to hinder from motion or action.

Tight

Tight \Tight\ (t[imac]t), obs. p. p. of Tie.
--Spenser.

Tight

Tight \Tight\, v. t. To tighten. [Obs.]

Tight

Tight \Tight\, a. [Compar. Tighter (t[imac]t"[~e]r); superl. Tightest.] [OE. tight, thiht; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. [thorn][=e]ttr, Dan. t[ae]t, Sw. t["a]t: akin to D. & G. dicht thick, tight, and perhaps to E. thee to thrive, or to thick. Cf. Taut.]

  1. Firmly held together; compact; not loose or open; as, tight cloth; a tight knot.

  2. Close, so as not to admit the passage of a liquid or other fluid; not leaky; as, a tight ship; a tight cask; a tight room; -- often used in this sense as the second member of a compound; as, water-tight; air-tight.

  3. Fitting close, or too close, to the body; as, a tight coat or other garment.

  4. Not ragged; whole; neat; tidy.

    Clad very plain, but clean and tight.
    --Evelyn.

    I'll spin and card, and keep our children tight.
    --Gay.

  5. Close; parsimonious; saving; as, a man tight in his dealings. [Colloq.]

  6. Not slack or loose; firmly stretched; taut; -- applied to a rope, chain, or the like, extended or stretched out.

  7. Handy; adroit; brisk. [Obs.]
    --Shak.

  8. Somewhat intoxicated; tipsy. [Slang]

  9. (Com.) Pressing; stringent; not easy; firmly held; dear; -- said of money or the money market. Cf. Easy, 7.

WordNet

tight

  1. adv. firmly or tightly; "held fast to the rope"; "her foot was stuck fast"; "held tight" [syn: fast]

  2. in an attentive manner; "he remained close on his guard" [syn: close, closely]

tight

  1. adj. closely constrained or constricted or constricting; "tight skirts"; "he hated tight starched collars"; "fingers closed in a tight fist"; "a tight feeling in his chest" [ant: loose]

  2. pulled or drawn tight; "taut sails"; "a tight drumhead"; "a tight rope" [syn: taut]

  3. set so close together as to be invulnerable to penetration; "in tight formation"; "a tight blockade"

  4. pressed tightly together; "with lips compressed" [syn: compressed]

  5. used of persons or behavior; characterized by or indicative of lack of generosity; "a mean person"; "he left a miserly tip" [syn: mean, mingy, miserly]

  6. affected by scarcity and expensive to borrow; "tight money"; "a tight market"

  7. of such close construction as to be impermeable; "a tight roof"; "warm in our tight little house" [ant: leaky]

  8. of textiles; "a close weave"; "smooth percale with a very tight weave" [syn: close]

  9. securely or solidly fixed in place; rigid; "the bolts are tight"

  10. (of a contest or contestants) evenly matched; "a close contest"; "a close election"; "a tight game" [syn: close]

  11. very drunk [syn: besotted, blind drunk, blotto, crocked, cockeyed, fuddled, loaded, pie-eyed, pissed, pixilated, plastered, potty, slopped, sloshed, smashed, soaked, soused, sozzled, squiffy, stiff, tiddly, tiddley, tipsy, wet]

  12. exasperatingly difficult to handle or circumvent; "a nasty problem"; "a good man to have on your side in a tight situation" [syn: nasty]

  13. demanding strict attention to rules and procedures; "rigorous discipline"; "tight security"; "stringent safety measures" [syn: rigorous, stringent]

  14. packed closely together; "the stood in a tight little group"; "hair in tight curls"; "the pub was packed tight"

Wikipedia

Tight

Tight may refer to:

Tight (INXS song)

"Tight" is the only single released from The Best of INXS album by INXS. The song was written by Andrew Farriss and recorded by the band during the sessions for Welcome to Wherever You Are in 1992.

Tight (album)

Tight is the debut album by the American rock band Mindless Self Indulgence. The album was originally released on April 20, 1999 through Uppity Cracker Recording Group. After having been out of print for many years, the album was reissued as Tighter on April 26, 2011 through The End Records. The reissue features updated artwork and packaging, 12 previously unreleased tracks, and a bonus DVD.

The song " Bring the Pain" is a cover of a Method Man song from his album Tical. The song "Bite Your Rhymes" references lyrics from Vanilla Ice's " Ice Ice Baby". There is a hidden track, "JX-47", where guitarist Steve plays acoustic guitar and sings nonsensical lyrics. The tracks "Mindless Self Indulgence" and "Ecnegludni Fles Sseldnim" are messages from the band's answering machine. They both concern getting the band booked for a live show, but both times the caller (Octavio 9) couldn't remember the band's name.

On April 20, 2008, the band posted "Tight", in its entirety, on their MySpace page in honor of its ninth year from the original release.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

tight

c.1400, tyght "dense, close, compact," from Middle English thight, from Old Norse þettr "watertight, close in texture, solid," and also from Old English -þiht (compare second element in meteþiht "stout from eating"), both from Proto-Germanic *thinhta- (cognates: Middle High German dihte "dense, thick," German dicht "dense, tight," Old High German gidigan, German gediegen "genuine, solid, worthy"), from PIE root *tenk- (2) "to become firm, curdle, thicken" (cognates: Irish techt "curdled, coagulated," Lithuanian tankus "close, tight," Persian tang "tight," Sanskrit tanakti "draws together, contracts").\n

\nSense of "drawn, stretched" is from 1570s; meaning "fitting closely" (as of garments) is from 1779; that of "evenly matched" (of a contest, bargain, etc.) is from 1828, American English; that of "drunk" is from 1830. Of persons, "close, intimate, sympathetic" from 1956. From 1670s as an adverb; to sit tight is from 1738; sleep tight as a salutation in sending someone off to bed is by 187

  1. Related: Tightly; tightness. Tight-assed "unwilling to relax" is attested from 1903. Tight-laced is recorded from 1741 in both the literal and figurative senses. Tight-lipped is first attested 187

Wiktionary

tight

  1. 1 Firmly held together; compact; not loose or open. 2 Fitting close, or too close, to the body. 3 Of a space, etc, narrow, so that it is difficult for something or someone to pass through it. 4 Of a turn, sharp, so that the timeframe for making it is narrow and following it is difficult. 5 Under high tension. adv. 1 Firmly, so as not to come loose easily. 2 Soundly. v

  2. (context obsolete English) To tighten.

Usage examples of "tight".

The Abies girl was lying there dead and stinking and his face got tight, then he made a little fist as though he was going to yell.

Then, very slowly, very gently, he gathered myself and Achates in his arms, and held us tight.

Also remember to keep your profit margins as tight as possible because, as in infomercial advertising, the markup must be high for the TV shopping channel to make money.

His chest was hot and tight, his eyes were afire with the sight of her and his hands ached to touch her splendid face.

Without stopping to shut the hatch Sai climbed through and ran along the tight tunnel leading to the aft compartment, and felt the deck tilt as the ship turned at high speed.

Ali Aga caught it, held it tight in his fist as if it were a bird which might fly away, and bent down to kiss the lavish hand.

Keir grabbed the aiglets and held them tight until they fleshed out into hands once again.

But Rae had lived through the inverted version of Alameda, and the closer she got to the old neighborhood, the tighter she clenched her jaw.

Pacino pulled himself to his feet and followed Alameda through the tight passageway aft to the hatch they had come in from, then back to the original airlock and into the next compartment aft.

The Amar were uneasy, moving about constantly, talking in low short bursts, mothers stroking their infants in the birth slings that kept the unformed hatchlings tight against the skin.

In the clearing around the Twins many of the Amar were already asleep, rolled tight into their sleeping leathers, their heads covered, their toes naked to the darkening night.

My first experiences in Egypt, pursuing mummies and climbing up and down cliffs, had convinced me that trailing skirts and tight corsets were a confounded nuisance in that ambience For many years my working costume had consisted of pith helmet and shirtwaist, boots, and Turkish trousers, or bloomers.

The main company of the expedition wanted to sit tight with the tents and weather it out, but Angekok insisted that we would be better off tramping blindly through the snow.

I kept a firm hold on the aquamanile as Drake pulled me tighter against him.

The uniform was as archaistic as tights and a doublet, and much more uncomfortable.