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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

tide

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
flood tide
high tide
▪ High tide is at seven in the morning.
low tide
▪ You can walk across to the island at low tide.
neap tide
spring tide
stem the tide/flow/flood of sth
▪ The measures are meant to stem the tide of illegal immigration.
tide pool
turned the tide
▪ The victory turned the tide of the war in North Africa.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
high
▪ The seas around California are today warmer than at any time since 1957 and there are record high tides.
▪ When he comes down, it is like high tide along the shore-all the wet muddy places sparkle with life and motion.
▪ At high tides, sections of the line are submerged, whilst the sea scours away the track bed.
▪ That day, a high tide and strong winds brought flooding to coasts fringing the Firth of Clyde.
▪ Police in Essex and Kent issued flood warnings for yesterday afternoon's high tide and further problems were expected later.
▪ This commonly occurs at high tide.
▪ He had been walking on the riverbank observing a high tide.
▪ When there's a high tide they get sea water in their sitting rooms!
incoming
▪ The noise of the incoming tide had interrupted their games on the sand further out in the estuary.
▪ They write themselves, the way an incoming tide seeks its own level.
▪ But once she was alone with her knitting depression crept up on Leonora like an incoming tide.
▪ It was swamped by the incoming tide and sank at about 5am yesterday.
▪ She guessed they'd come about twenty yards inland; she could still hear the sigh and fall of the incoming tide.
▪ The striking of the half hour alerted me to the incoming tide of darkness.
▪ When the track splits at a sign warning of incoming tides, take the left fork towards the shore.
low
▪ At Lyness, the Thorsvoe noses in on the low tide.
▪ It hit us at lower tide.
▪ She imagined the castle, at low tide, grey, black, then silver in the changing light.
▪ The stench of low tide hung over the entire area, from the river all the way over to the Five Points.
▪ Near to them is Lindisfarne or Holy Isle which can only be reached by way of a causeway at low tide.
▪ It was always low tide in the Five Points.
▪ At low tide it is sometimes just possible to cross the channel without swimming.
▪ A count at low tide tallies nearly 800 rocks, reefs, islands and other features poking above the surface.
political
▪ But things change quickly at Ferrari and, in 1990, he found himself swimming against the political tide.
▪ With the bishops also back in the House of Lords, the political tide had now turned very markedly against the Puritans.
▪ But the political tide seemed to be flowing in a different direction.
▪ Plenty of work here for thinkers who can catch the political tide.
▪ But by then the political tide had shifted firmly against it.
rising
▪ If not, there will have been a real loss, which will no doubt add to the rising tide of semi-literacy.
▪ Is that snow wind's whine the same travelling still, the rising wind and tide reaching your body buried in sand?
▪ Otherwise every traffic jam will gradually vanish beneath a rising tide of its own foamy output.
▪ The steps were green with mould where the rising tide lapped against them.
▪ Trams stood marooned as they were engulfed by a rising tide of workers demanding a hearing.
▪ In fact, without his realizing it a rising tide of change was lapping around his ankles.
strong
▪ Avoid strong tides, offshore winds, poor visibility or sailing in the dark.
▪ Well, there was a strong el tide this summer.
▪ Local storms at sea and strong equinoctial tides may affect whale migration routes that pass close to the coast.
▪ It tugged at the coils of my hair as if it wanted to see them floating on its strong gray tides.
■ NOUN
ebb
▪ And she couldn't bear the thought of being sucked back into the ebb tide of loneliness again either.
▪ It was ebb tide and the current was in their favour.
▪ Flounders were plentiful, with many undersize fish caught on the ebb tide.
▪ But Grace wouldn't need them to go out to sea on the ebb tide.
▪ He had missed the ebb tide.
spring
▪ While the Conference met, high spring tides were oozing through the paving of the Piazza San Marco.
▪ Outside, the mob surged around me, retiring and returning like a spring tide.
▪ The highest of the spring tides might wash up all around the houseboat but it would never float again.
▪ They were helped by a Spring tide which caused extensive flooding and rendered all the fords impassable.
▪ A month later in the high spring tides, his body was washed up in Cadgwith Cove.
▪ But next day we were ready to take advantage of the high spring tide and fly.
turn
▪ Should the current tide turn, we will think about it with great pleasure and renewed confidence.
■ VERB
catch
▪ The enforced lie-in was welcome; we caught the tide and enjoyed a short, rough crossing to Taransay.
▪ Plenty of work here for thinkers who can catch the political tide.
▪ As the particles catch Lucifer's magnetic field, it is extended into space like a fishing net caught by the tide.
flow
▪ But the political tide seemed to be flowing in a different direction.
▪ They felt the tide would continue flowing their way.
▪ The tide was flowing strongly his way.
▪ How majestically he stands on one foot in the roiling surf as the tide flows in.
▪ He was in the office each day but the tide of work flowed around him.
▪ There is no doubt about the direction in which the intellectual tide is flowing.
▪ The sun will rise; the tides will flow.
▪ When the tide flows out, the current often flows straight out to sea washing any distressed windsurfer with it.
rise
▪ It rises with the tide, only no one's so daft as to stay and see how high.
▪ The 10, 000 welfare families are just the latest recruits in the rising tide of local poverty.
▪ Crime, unemployment and homelessness add to the rising tide of despair.
▪ A rising economic tide lifts not just spending but spirits, while a receding tide depresses people.
▪ It is said on the river that a Thames barge, once she has risen with the tide, never sinks completely.
▪ Everything was affected by the rising tide including the growth of moderate, pragmatic Socialism.
▪ Increasingly easy access to credit and lax credit checking procedures by lenders has contributed to the rising tide of debt.
stem
▪ Through this conservative normativist theory Dicey attempted to stem the tide of government growth in a collectivist direction.
▪ Even the great Chicago fire of 1871 could not stem the tide.
▪ Barnes managed to stem the tide a little by giving Liverpool a genuine attacking outlet.
▪ This illustrates the type of practical public health action that could be taken to stem the tide of obesity.
▪ By the closing rounds he was reduced to throwing wild haymakers in a desperate attempt to stem the tide.
▪ Only one way to stem the tide for Ireland: take out Figo.
▪ Both the Senate and the administration seemed powerless to stem the tide of hysteria.
▪ But even visions of breastfeeding could not stem the tide this time.
sweep
▪ For others it implied that the centuries-old problems of poverty and inequality had been swept away in the tide of prosperity.
▪ And he turned resolutely away and was swept with the tide down the tunnel to the plane.
▪ Then he learnt that she was the man's daughter, and frivolous thoughts were swept away on a tide of sympathy.
▪ He is sweeping along on a tide of revisionism.
▪ We are being swept away on a tide of picaresque Euromovies.
▪ Philip was as reluctant as Henry, but the two Kings were now swept along by the tide of public opinion.
swimming
▪ In promoting recycling as the best answer to waste disposal, environmentalists are therefore swimming against the tides of the market.
▪ A few lawmakers are swimming against the tide.
▪ But things change quickly at Ferrari and, in 1990, he found himself swimming against the political tide.
▪ There was no point in swimming against the tide.
▪ Carey bobbed like jetsam, always awkward even though Ellwood was swimming with the tide.
▪ We find ourselves swimming against the tide.
▪ The Treasury was swimming against the tide. 2.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
strong wind/current/tide
▪ A strong wind was now blowing and there was a loud crack of thunder.
▪ Disadvantages: Lack of volume, thus difficult to sail in all but strong winds.
▪ Firefighters must contend with steep canyons and the strong winds, not to mention hot and dry conditions.
▪ In very strong winds the critical place for ground handling is at the tail.
▪ Rip A strong current, commonly experienced on surf beaches.
▪ The same materials, thrown into the Martian atmosphere by strong winds, give the Martian sky a pinkish color.
▪ There was a strong wind blowing from the north.
▪ Toward late afternoon, a strong wind came up and the sky clouded over.
swim against the tide/current etc
▪ Light given out by distant galaxies has to swim against the tide of expansion to get to us.
▪ There s no point in you tryin to swim against the tide now, is there?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Driftwood on the beach was brought in by the tide.
▪ It is unclear who will pay for the tide of refugees flowing into the country.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ At high tides, sections of the line are submerged, whilst the sea scours away the track bed.
▪ Even the great Chicago fire of 1871 could not stem the tide.
▪ She couldn't resist the challenge of swimming back over the tide when the boys suggested it.
▪ Sometimes when the afternoon tide of heat reached its high mark, we would go over to the hotel.
▪ The tide turned when Tamerlane invaded their territory and in 1398 successfully raided Delhi, and sacked it without mercy.
▪ The young, the old, the frail are all sucked into its sweeping tide.
▪ They have repeatedly looked for a connection between crustal tides and earthquakes over the past few decades, but to no avail.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
strong wind/current/tide
▪ A strong wind was now blowing and there was a loud crack of thunder.
▪ Disadvantages: Lack of volume, thus difficult to sail in all but strong winds.
▪ Firefighters must contend with steep canyons and the strong winds, not to mention hot and dry conditions.
▪ In very strong winds the critical place for ground handling is at the tail.
▪ Rip A strong current, commonly experienced on surf beaches.
▪ The same materials, thrown into the Martian atmosphere by strong winds, give the Martian sky a pinkish color.
▪ There was a strong wind blowing from the north.
▪ Toward late afternoon, a strong wind came up and the sky clouded over.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Tide

Tide \Tide\, n. [AS. t[=i]d time; akin to OS. & OFries. t[=i]d, D. tijd, G. zeit, OHG. z[=i]t, Icel. t[=i]?, Sw. & Dan. tid, and probably to Skr. aditi unlimited, endless, where a- is a negative prefix. [root]58. Cf. Tidings, Tidy, Till, prep., Time.]

  1. Time; period; season. [Obsoles.] ``This lusty summer's tide.''
    --Chaucer.

    And rest their weary limbs a tide.
    --Spenser.

    Which, at the appointed tide, Each one did make his bride.
    --Spenser.

    At the tide of Christ his birth.
    --Fuller.

  2. The alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of bays, rivers, etc., connected therewith. The tide ebbs and flows twice in each lunar day, or the space of a little more than twenty-four hours. It is occasioned by the attraction of the sun and moon (the influence of the latter being three times that of the former), acting unequally on the waters in different parts of the earth, thus disturbing their equilibrium. A high tide upon one side of the earth is accompanied by a high tide upon the opposite side. Hence, when the sun and moon are in conjunction or opposition, as at new moon and full moon, their action is such as to produce a greater than the usual tide, called the spring tide, as represented in the cut. When the moon is in the first or third quarter, the sun's attraction in part counteracts the effect of the moon's attraction, thus producing under the moon a smaller tide than usual, called the neap tide.

    Note: The flow or rising of the water is called flood tide, and the reflux, ebb tide.

  3. A stream; current; flood; as, a tide of blood. ``Let in the tide of knaves once more; my cook and I'll provide.''
    --Shak.

  4. Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current.

    There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune.
    --Shak.

  5. Violent confluence. [Obs.]
    --Bacon.

  6. (Mining) The period of twelve hours. Atmospheric tides, tidal movements of the atmosphere similar to those of the ocean, and produced in the same manner by the attractive forces of the sun and moon. Inferior tide. See under Inferior, a. To work double tides. See under Work, v. t. Tide day, the interval between the occurrences of two consecutive maxima of the resultant wave at the same place. Its length varies as the components of sun and moon waves approach to, or recede from, one another. A retardation from this cause is called the lagging of the tide, while the acceleration of the recurrence of high water is termed the priming of the tide. See Lag of the tide, under 2d Lag. Tide dial, a dial to exhibit the state of the tides at any time. Tide gate.

    1. An opening through which water may flow freely when the tide sets in one direction, but which closes automatically and prevents the water from flowing in the other direction.

    2. (Naut.) A place where the tide runs with great velocity, as through a gate. Tide gauge, a gauge for showing the height of the tide; especially, a contrivance for registering the state of the tide continuously at every instant of time. --Brande & C. Tide lock, a lock situated between an inclosed basin, or a canal, and the tide water of a harbor or river, when they are on different levels, so that craft can pass either way at all times of the tide; -- called also guard lock. Tide mill.

      1. A mill operated by the tidal currents.

      2. A mill for clearing lands from tide water.

        Tide rip, a body of water made rough by the conflict of opposing tides or currents.

        Tide table, a table giving the time of the rise and fall of the tide at any place.

        Tide water, water affected by the flow of the tide; hence, broadly, the seaboard.

        Tide wave, or Tidal wave, the swell of water as the tide moves. That of the ocean is called primitive; that of bays or channels derivative. See also tidal wave in the vocabulary.
        --Whewell.

        Tide wheel, a water wheel so constructed as to be moved by the ebb or flow of the tide.

Tide

Tide \Tide\ (t[imac]d), v. t. To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream.

They are tided down the stream.
--Feltham.

Tide

Tide \Tide\, v. i. [AS. t[=i]dan to happen. See Tide, n.]

  1. To betide; to happen. [Obs.]

    What should us tide of this new law?
    --Chaucer.

  2. To pour a tide or flood.

  3. (Naut.) To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse.

Wikipedia

TIDE

Tide (brand)

Tide (Alo, Vizir or Ace in some countries) is the brand-name of a laundry detergent manufactured by Procter & Gamble, first introduced in 1946.

Tide (disambiguation)

A tide is the rise and fall of a sea level caused by the Moon's gravity and other factors.

Tide may also refer to:

Tide (album)

Tide is the sixth album by Antônio Carlos Jobim, released in 1970 on A&M Records and arranged by Deodato.

Tide (transportation company)

Tide ASA is a public transport company in Hordaland, Norway which resulted from the merger of Gaia Trafikk and Hardanger Sunnhordlandske Dampskipsselskap (HSD). The company provides the public transit network in the city of Bergen, and most of the bus service in Hordaland on contract with Skyss. Tide also runs the buses in northern Rogaland on contract with Kolumbus.

The group has two daughter companies, Tide Buss AS that operates the scheduled busses, and the leiseure travel company Tide Reiser AS that also operates express, airport and charter buses and chartered ferries and fast passenger craft. The largest owners are Det Stavangerske Dampskibsselskap (75%) and Sparebanken Vest (10%). The company is listed on the Oslo Stock Exchange with head offices in Bergen.

Formerly, Tide operated the passenger- and car ferry routes previously operated by HSD and Stavangerske, with the daughter company Tide Sjø.

Tide (time)

[[Image:BewcastleCross2.jpg|thumb|right|200px|

An illustration of the four faces of the Bewcastle Cross, with the Tide dial on the second from the left.]] Tide is an obsolete or archaic term for time, period or season. It survives in compounds such as Yuletide, eventide, shrovetide, Eastertide, noontide, etc.

A simple noun tide was used synonymously with time and as a unit of time with hour in Old English and Middle English, but this usage became obsolete in the 15th century and survives only in occasional poetic reference to "occasion" or "favourable, proper time". Contemporary English narrows the application of the word to the tides of the sea.

Wiktionary

tide

Etymology 1 n. 1 The periodic change of the sea level, particularly when caused by the gravitational influence of the sun and the moon. 2 A stream, current or flood. 3 (context chronology obsolete except in liturgy English) Time, notably anniversary, period or season linked to an ecclesiastical feast. 4 (context mining English) The period of twelve hours. 5 Something which changes like the tides of the se

  1. 6 Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current. 7 (context obsolete English) Violent confluence — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis%20Bacon v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream. 2 (context intransitive English) To pour a tide or flood. 3 (context intransitive nautical English) To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse. Etymology 2

    vb. (context intransitive obsolete English) To happen, occur.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

tide

"to carry (as the tide does)," 1620s, from tide (n.). Usually with over. Earlier it meant "to happen" (Old English; see tidings). Related: Tided; tiding.

tide

Old English tid "point or portion of time, due time, period, season; feast-day, canonical hour," from Proto-Germanic *tidiz "division of time" (cognates: Old Saxon tid, Dutch tijd, Old High German zit, German Zeit "time"), from PIE *di-ti- "division, division of time," suffixed form of root *da- "to divide, cut up" (cognates: Sanskrit dati "cuts, divides;" Greek demos "people, land," perhaps literally "division of society," daiesthai "to divide;" Old Irish dam "troop, company").\n

\nMeaning "rise and fall of the sea" (mid-14c.) probably is via notion of "fixed time," specifically "time of high water;" either a native evolution or from Middle Low German getide (compare Middle Dutch tijd, Dutch tij, German Gezeiten "flood tide, tide of the sea"). Old English seems to have had no specific word for this, using flod and ebba to refer to the rise and fall. Old English heahtid "high tide" meant "festival, high day."

WordNet

tide

  1. v. rise or move foward; "surging waves" [syn: surge] [ant: ebb]

  2. cause to float with the tide

  3. be carried with the tide

tide

  1. n. the periodic rise and fall of the sea level under the gravitational pull of the moon

  2. something that may increase or decrease (like the tides of the sea); "a rising tide of popular interest"

  3. there are usually two high and two low tides each day [syn: lunar time period]

Usage examples of "tide".

I wondered if any of the others could see the darker tides running behind the placid affability he presented to them.

Beany crep out esy and hunted round til we found the string and we tide it agen as tite as we cood and then we crep back into the porch and peeked through the window.

That the tide of agrarianism was gradually flowing westward as the frontier advanced is apparent from the election returns in the States bordering on the upper Mississippi.

Can change with its false times and tides, Like hope and terror,-- Alas for Love!

I knew that with the tide the big evil-looking albacore sharks hunted inshore upon the flood.

Fishing the seething tide-race through the main channel at full spring tide, and shouting with excitement as the golden amberjack came boiling up in the wake, bellies flashing like mirrors, to hit the dancing feather lures, and send the Penn reels screeching a wild protest, and the fibreglass rods nodding and kicking.

When these tides reach our own century and become the transforming rage of nations, we may feel the need to consult the source books, the very prose of apocalyptic struggle.

Opposite the islet, the beach consisted first of sand, covered with black stones, which were now appearing little by little above the retreating tide.

At high tide in the afternoon I watched his guests diving from the tower of his raft, or taking the sun on the hot sand of his beach while his two motor-boats slit the waters of the Sound, drawing aquaplanes over cataracts of foam.

The tall figure of Aragon stood at the helm, letting the boat drift on the tide.

Philadelphia, at tide jet-copters landing, the runnels of autocars and ramps of footers coming and going, into and out of every high-rise building in sight.

Having observed Siett and Balant in high tide position, I was not surprised that Nikum lay nearly drowned.

The tide was high, and the ragged rocks of the Banc des Violets in the south and the Corbiore in the west were all but hidden.

From anywhere off Beachy Head, the nearest harbour was Pevensey, not Bulverhythe, and to catch the tide they altered course towards it.

Verteidigung der Stadt die Waffen ergreifen und entging bei einem Ausfall nur mit genauer Noth dem Tode.