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Crossword clues for tax

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
tax
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a budget/tax proposal (=a budget/tax plan)
▪ Criticism of the budget proposals was voiced by the International Monetary Fund.
a tax bill
▪ There are various ways you can reduce your tax bill.
a tax burden
▪ These changes will ease the tax burden for small businesses.
a tax increase
▪ The government had no choice but to impose a tax increase.
a tax loophole
▪ The government lost billions because of a tax loophole.
a tax rate
▪ People objected to higher property tax rates.
a tax threshold
▪ The Conservatives promised to help the lower paid by increasing the tax threshold.
capital gains tax
car tax
carbon tax
▪ carbon taxes on fossil fuels
Child Tax Credit
collect tax/rent/a debt
▪ The landlady came around once a month to collect the rent.
corporation tax (=tax that companies have to pay on their profits)
council tax
cut taxes/rates
▪ The government is expected to cut interest rates next month.
direct tax
estate tax
excise duty/tax (=the money paid as excise)
▪ excise duty on tobacco
exempt from...tax
▪ The interest is exempt from income tax.
exempted from...tax
▪ Charities are exempted from paying the tax.
file...tax returns
▪ Today is the deadline for Americans to file their tax returns.
green tax
high price/charge/tax etc
▪ If you want better public services, you’ll have to pay higher taxes – it’s as simple as that.
import taxes/duties/tariffs
▪ The US imposed huge import duties on products from Europe.
income tax (=tax that you pay on your income)
▪ The standard rate of income tax is to be cut by 0.5%.
income tax
indirect tax
inheritance tax
inspector of taxes
levy a tax/charge/fine etc (on sth)
▪ a new tax levied on all electrical goods
payroll tax
poll tax
price/rate/tax etc hikes
▪ Several airlines have proposed fare hikes, effective October 1.
progressive tax
regressive tax
rent/mortgage/tax arrears
▪ He was ordered to pay rent arrears of £550.
road tax
sales tax
stealth tax
tax allowance
▪ a new tax allowance
tax avoidance (=legal way of not paying tax)
▪ a tax avoidance scheme
tax avoidance
tax bracket
▪ It may put you in a higher tax bracket.
tax break
▪ tax breaks for small businesses
tax collector
tax cuts
▪ The President announced tax cuts.
tax deductible
▪ Interest charges are tax deductible.
tax disc
tax dodge (=a way of avoiding paying tax)
▪ Businesses are investing in tree plantations as a tax dodge .
tax dodge
tax evasion
▪ He is in prison for tax evasion.
tax evasion
tax exempt
tax exemption
▪ You qualify for a tax exemption on the loan.
tax exile
tax haven
tax incentives (=a reduction in tax, offered to people as an incentive)
▪ Tax incentives are provided for employees to buy shares in their own companies.
tax inspector
tax liability (=a legal responsibility to pay tax)
▪ The government is planning to increase the tax liability on company cars.
tax reform
▪ The Chancellor's proposals for tax reform met strong resistance in the Commons.
tax relief
▪ You can get tax relief on private health insurance premiums.
tax return
tax revenues
▪ an increase in tax revenues of 8.4%
tax shelter
tax year
tax/copyright/divorce etc law(s)
▪ an accountant who knows about tax law
tax/insurance/credit card etc fraud
▪ He’s been charged with tax fraud.
tax/ticket/debt/refuse collector
the rate of interest/pay/tax etc
▪ They believe that Labour would raise the basic rate of tax.
try/test/tax sb's patience (=make it difficult for someone to continue to be patient)
▪ The guy at the desk was beginning to try my patience.
value-added tax
windfall tax
withholding tax
Working Tax Credit
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
corporate
▪ They have not pumped up taxes; personal and corporate income taxes have remained at reasonable levels.
▪ According to Congress's Joint Committee on Taxation, corporate tax breaks in the 1995 fiscal year might reach 60 billion.
▪ He would end a corporate capital tax, privatize some government-owned corporations, tighten welfare rules and reduce trade-union powers.
▪ The corporate income tax base was broadened while the tax rate was reduced.
▪ An increase in the top corporate income tax rate to 36 percent from the current 34 percent.
▪ The cost would be offset in part from repeal of corporate tax breaks.
▪ The existence of a mark-up has to be taken into account when considering the response to a corporate tax.
▪ Recall from Chapter 7 that the corporate income tax entails a problem of double taxation.
direct
▪ After 1994, all the autonomies were allowed to keep 15 % of the direct income tax revenues attributable to their region.
▪ Then on March 22, 1765, Parliament in the Stamp Act imposed the first direct tax on the colonies.
▪ This points to shifting the emphasis away from direct tax on people's incomes and on to taxes on wealth or on spending.
▪ In 1294-7, it has been calculated, the laity and clergy together yielded £280,000 in direct taxes to the king.
▪ But the larger part is supposed to come from direct taxes.
▪ In contrast, direct taxes can only be changed at Budget time.
▪ We have already seen how, in both theory and practice, direct taxes on income affect incentives to work.
▪ What is the effect of the combination of direct and indirect taxes?
federal
▪ They offer investors federal tax credits -- and, in some cases, matching provincial credits.
▪ That would push the top federal tax rate for these under-$ 60, 000 earners to 40 % or more.
▪ This was to be financed without raising federal taxes.
▪ The proposals surfaced after Congress decided to explore ways to overhaul the cumbersome federal tax system.
▪ By Jan. 1, 2000, there will be no state or federal taxes of any kind.
▪ Experts say there is a good chance Congress will eventually convert the decades-old federal income tax into something else.
▪ Exhibit 2. 1 summarizes the current federal corporate income tax rate.
▪ The 4. 3-cent a gallon tax was added on to the existing 14. 1-cent-a-gallon federal tax in 1993.
high
▪ However, that is not a good reason for trying to levy high tax rates that no-one can enforce.
▪ Some Democrats say it would require a relatively high tax rate near 20 percent to produce sufficient revenue.
▪ The whole country would like to know at what level of income they intend to increase the higher rate of tax.
▪ The communities then scramble to raise money -- turning to higher taxes.
▪ Distributions are subject to ordinary income tax, and taking too large a distribution could propel you into a higher tax bracket.
▪ We leave it to the Opposition to advocate higher taxes.
▪ Or would you prefer a return to high taxes and secondary picketing?
indirect
▪ Their logic is reflected in the kinds of indirect tax that are levied.
▪ So far we have discussed the impact of indirect taxes on allocative efficiency.
▪ In 1433 indirect taxes contributed about £27,000 perannum to a net revenue of £36,000.
▪ For these reasons, indirect taxes are usually regarded as a more flexible instrument of macroeconomic policy.
▪ However, others suggest that consumers are well aware of the impact of indirect taxes on the price level.
▪ It has contributed to the decline in direct portfolio investment as opposed to indirect investment through tax exempt institutions.
▪ What is the effect of the combination of direct and indirect taxes?
▪ Although indirect taxes as a whole are regressive, there is some variation between different types of indirect tax.
local
▪ Income on any overseas assets backing this policy may be paid subject to a local withholding tax.
▪ Low local taxes are not always a recipe for electoral success.
▪ It also would generate up to $ 2 billion in federal, state and local royalty and tax payments.
▪ The leaflet is available free of charge from tax enquiry centres and local tax offices.
▪ City expansion has increased local property tax revenues and has thwarted some flight to suburbia.
▪ They demanded new schools, supported by local taxes and managed by locally elected bodies.
▪ The treasurer collects local taxes and invests city money until it is needed.
low
▪ As one goes further south, people will be paying lower regional taxes and will vote Conservative.
▪ Foreign money capitalized the long expansion that lower taxes helped to create.
▪ Income tax thresholds were raised from G$10,000 to G$48,000 with lower tax rates planned to offset the withdrawal of personal allowances.
▪ Republican voters say they want low taxes and prudent spending cuts.
▪ But lower taxes and a prudent approach to borrowing do not mean public spending fall; quite the reverse.
▪ Presumably, the student will have little other income, and therefore be in a low tax bracket.
▪ The government sets the local price of petrol absurdly low while imposing taxes of over 80% on the company's revenues.
▪ The Senate majority leader talked about a balanced budget, smaller government, lower taxes, and a strong foreign policy.
■ NOUN
allowance
▪ These include a capital gains tax cut, a 15% investment tax allowance and across-the-board tax rate cuts.
▪ Personal tax allowances are expected to be frozen and taxes on petrol, drink and tobacco raised.
▪ This could, of course, be extended to the whole range of non-personal tax allowances.
▪ The cardinal rule is: only register if your taxable income is less than your tax allowances.
▪ It offered married men a tax allowance of some one-and-a-half times the single person's allowance to which working wives were entitled.
▪ Employers' social security contributions were reduced by 4.3 percent from Jan. 1, 1993, and income tax allowances were reduced.
▪ Pressure is mounting for tax allowances on childcare.
▪ Because everybody claimed the allowances, the cost of increasing the value of the tax allowances was substantially increased.
base
▪ This decision is likely to be influenced by the age and tax base cost of the company's plant.
▪ If the economy is managed properly it can benefit us all with some impressive growth in jobs and tax base.
▪ The tax base in the suburbs is largely composed of single-family residences.
▪ Quotas are figured into land values and thus affect the tax base.
▪ The tax base, or rateable value, is the net annual value of the property occupied.
▪ The corporate income tax base was broadened while the tax rate was reduced.
▪ Such help to industry shrinks the tax base.
▪ Mayors inherited an eroding tax base and the loss of jobs.
bill
▪ This year's two community charges come to £656, while this year's council tax bill will amount to £517.
▪ Simpson recently paid two overdue tax bills of more than $ 706, 000.
▪ The council tax Bill exists because the poll tax was the disaster that so many hon. Members said it would be.
▪ If the family earns $ 100, 000, the tax bill drops by 22 percent.
▪ That may mean sizeable tax bills on employers' pension contributions for employees.
▪ The House version of the tax bill was 1, 379 pages long, the Senate version 1, 580 pages.
▪ It will mean a £50 cut per household on average council tax bills.
▪ Without even realizing, it runs up a payroll tax bill of $ 85, 000.
break
▪ This will also be the year when Woopies - well off older people - get a tax break.
▪ For this, the government gives the paper companies tax breaks.
▪ Savers must keep the account open for five years to qualify for the tax breaks.
▪ Companies with large property holdings, like oil and gas corporations, want the consumption taxes because those represent tax breaks.
▪ If all of the tax breaks are doing that much damage, go ahead and eliminate them.
▪ White House aides said Clinton will map proposed tax breaks specifically aimed at helping community college students.
▪ Any advantage that a tax break can achieve, a subsidy can accomplish just as easily.
▪ The market took off because of a simple tax break.
burden
▪ Immediate pressure on peasant living standards was relieved by the abolition of redemption dues and restraint of the tax burden.
▪ But tax harmonizing brings with it an implicit harmonization of spending levels, since total tax burdens must be basically similar.
▪ The total tax burden has risen only slightly.
▪ Connell notes that for individuals, the tax burden would shift from the wealthy to the middle class.
▪ The interim dividend is 2.5p, against 1.75p and earnings were 0.5p higher at 8.2p after a slightly lower tax burden.
▪ And to an extraordinary extent, diverse groups agree on what the maximum tax burden should be.
▪ Proper road prices would raise the motoring tax burden.
▪ Today the employer-employee payroll tax burden has hit a joint 15. 3 %, if you include Medicare.
car
▪ Read in studio Police have begun a campaign against car tax dodgers.
▪ The abolition of car tax is a good idea.
▪ Then the Chancellor helped the industry by abolishing car tax in his Autumn Statement.
▪ Mr Gould had gone to Mr Hoad's home in Gloucester to collect unpaid fines for parking and car tax.
▪ The cut in car tax and the increase in capital allowances will also help to boost confidence.
▪ It also calls for a higher price threshold for company car tax.
▪ This will benefit business directly, as will the abolition of the car tax.
▪ Mr Lamont said he had made clear he would recoup the cost when he abolished car tax.
code
▪ In the latter case you would need to get a new tax code number from your employer.
▪ An all-out campaign to truly simplify the tax code, and answer basic small business riddles, is long overdue.
▪ Plenty of obstacles, from tax codes to bureaucrats, remain.
▪ They blamed not the Internal Revenue Service but the tax code.
▪ In 1986, for instance, Dole supported an inheritance tax code that greatly benefited the Gallos.
▪ The commission did identify 60 areas where the tax code might be simplified.
▪ The real purpose of the tax code is to supply tax breaks for politicians to auction off to campaign contributors.
▪ With the incentives of the tax code, the law firms and corporations have become the new Versailles.
collector
▪ But with the tax collectors anxious to get their hands on every ha'penny, the Chancellor can not afford to be generous.
▪ Of course, the very concept of a popular tax collector is as oxymoronic as jumbo shrimp.
▪ But the rich will always be better at hiding from the tax collector than the poor.
▪ Also patron of bankers, book-keepers, customs agents, security guards, and tax collectors.
▪ Do we exclude them in the same way as tax collectors etc.
▪ Pollution Tax: Many of the unemployed income tax collectors will be retrained as Pollution Inspectors.
▪ Playing hide and seek with the tax collector is a popular game.
▪ Within this society their were a number of groups considered as outcasts, of which were included tax collectors.
concession
▪ They would enjoy major tax concessions, including 50 percent rebates in their first year and 25 percent in their second.
▪ How is the free-market economy to be reconciled with continued large-scale tax concessions for house mortgages and private pensions?
▪ Forestry companies no longer granted tax concessions have been trying to offload their holdings.
▪ It also received a host of tax concessions.
▪ Mr. Jackson I have already referred to the tax concession in the 1990 Budget.
▪ Market-distorting activities arise from state aids such as subsidies, tax concessions, and other financial help given to domestic companies.
▪ Macleod was attacked by both liberals and conservatives in the Legco for failing to provide sufficient tax concessions to middle income earners.
▪ Private pension scheme tax concessions grew as part of deliberate policy.
credit
▪ Simultaneously, tax credits can target state support to approved groups, and promote socially desirable economic behaviour.
▪ It criticized Clinton for vetoing the 1996 Republican budget that provided for a $ 500-per-child tax credit.
▪ President Bill Clinton vetoed that, and proposed instead some small tax credits and tax deductions for higher education.
▪ These ranged from providing training to workplace mentors and supervisors to tax credits for the wages paid to school-to-work participants.
▪ Firstly, in 1986 there was a reform of Federal Insurance tax; congress dropped tax credit for individual contributions.
▪ That bill includes a host of other provisions, including simplified pension rules and tax credits for hiring disadvantaged youth.
▪ He also said that the Conservatives would keep the working families tax credit, but would reform it.
▪ Two years ago the state also eliminated the tax credit cap on research and development.
cut
▪ He has also made modest tax cuts of his own in New York City.
▪ When the tax cut was going through Congress, the figures seemed too unimaginable to really resonate.
▪ And to top it all, there were tax cuts too.
▪ He also said Republicans would make several attempts to pass tax cuts aimed at businesses and the middle class.
▪ However, we seem more intent on using further tax cuts to prolong the party.
▪ Instead, Dole proposed a 15 percent tax cut.
▪ That would mean using all the fruits from economic growth for public services rather than tax cuts.
▪ And he repeated his plan for a $ 500 million state tax cut.
evasion
▪ Two separate counts of tax evasion were filed against their son and daughter.
▪ Each count of felony tax evasion can put you behind bars for 5 years with a $ 100, 000 fine.
▪ The Commission argued that this was the best system because it would avoid both tax evasion and double taxation.
▪ Later he pleaded guilty to mail fraud and tax evasion in connection with defrauding Rose clients of nearly $ 400, 000.
▪ He is a vain, devious showman accused of bribery, tax evasion, fraud and mafia connections.
▪ While serving a federal prison sentence for mail fraud and tax evasion, &038;.
▪ Far be it from us to condone tax evasion.
▪ Capone came back downtown and had things his own way until the federal government imprisoned him for tax evasion.
exemption
▪ Establishing such enclaves would inevitably encourage the immigration of larger companies seeking tax exemptions.
▪ This firm is assisting the organization in resolving problems related to its tax exemption.
▪ Instead, you can use your annual capital gains tax exemption-currently £7,200-to shelter the returns from the taxman.
▪ The result was that the government created a paper blizzard of promissory notes and tax exemptions.
▪ For basic-rate payers, the tax exemption will not compensate for the low rate.
▪ In 1920, Austen Chamberlain transformed the system by allowing tax exemptions to be claimed nomatterhow big the taxpayer's income.
▪ Increased tax exemptions for gifts to museums would also be very helpful.
haven
▪ Even so-called tax havens may fail to live up to their privileged reputation.
▪ The Bill would make it illegal to carry on business with tax havens.
▪ Another tax haven to emerge recently is Western Samoa.
▪ For the same reason, I fear that an accountant's expert knowledge of tax havens may once again be a saleable commodity.
▪ Tax authorities tend to subject tax haven operations to close scrutiny.
▪ Some tax havens combine these advantages with an extensive tax treaty network.
incentive
▪ Indiana has sometimes spent too much on tax incentives to lure companies inside its borders.
▪ The tax incentive is applied generally to all adoptions, foreign and domestic.
▪ This helped persuade the Government to take action altering tax incentives for planting in the 1988 Budget.
▪ Dole is focusing on long-run growth and tax incentives.
▪ We have introduced new tax incentives for savings.
▪ Encouragement in this direction was to be provided by tax incentives and state-subsidized research and development.
▪ In previous chapters we have discussed tax incentives, competition policy, and industrial policy.
▪ It also claims that emissions could be stabilized by 1994 through the use of new technologies and tax incentives for fuel-efficient cars.
income
▪ I pay income tax at the basic 25 percent rate.
▪ Other potential trouble spots for Forbes include his refusal to release his personal income tax returns, as Dole has done.
▪ A comparison with the total income tax due will disclose either an over or under payment of income tax.
▪ Taylor attacked a proposal by Forbes to replace the current graduated income tax with a flat tax of 17 percent.
▪ If rebates are extensive this takes on some aspects of an income tax too.
▪ They might remember also that without bipartisan accommodation the graduated income tax never would have become a constitutional amendment.
▪ Lord Howe said increases in basic rate income tax were not unthinkable.
▪ The policies which had the most direct impact concerned income tax.
increase
▪ Gradually Congress was won over to the need for tax increases and cuts in public expenditure.
▪ Reduce the deficit through tax increases and some spending restraints.
▪ Mr Dorrell said he hoped a gradual tax increase would make the principle more acceptable to drivers.
▪ User fees have become ever more popular as resistance to tax increases has mounted.
▪ The Budget Resolution contained no tax increase and no tampering with Social Security.
▪ Mr Greenspan also said it would be wrong to pay for the war with a tax increase or surcharge.
▪ But many Republican politicians worry that voters would view any change as a tax increase.
inheritance
▪ Abolish the present inheritance tax and make recipients pay on gifts above a certain band as income.
▪ The same ordinarily holds true of payroll and inheritance taxes.
▪ Also, where there is property located outside the United Kingdom, no inheritance tax will be payable.
▪ In 1986, for instance, Dole supported an inheritance tax code that greatly benefited the Gallos.
▪ The modern form of death duties is the inheritance tax.
▪ But the loudest gripes concerned my criticism of the legislation to phase out inheritance tax.
▪ Property left to a surviving spouse remains, as before, free of inheritance tax.
▪ Thus inheritance tax is concerned with gratuitous transactions. 5.
law
▪ Gaps when they are found in our tax laws are usually speedily filled.
▪ Actually, 1995 was the lowest year for California tax law changes that I can remember.
▪ The 12 also chipped away at one of the other stumbling blocks, the need to harmonise tax laws across the Community.
▪ In the tax law, it is said, an ounce of prevention is worth about a million dollars of cure.
▪ Federal tax law bars use of such funds to further a political agenda.
▪ That statement was silent on the question of whether Gingrich deliberately misled the committee or skirted tax law.
▪ Federal tax law covered 16 pages then.
▪ In 1774 Backus wrote Samuel Adams a letter of protest as he watched constables arrest Baptists for offenses against tax laws.
liability
▪ The losses suffered during the start-up phase of a business can be used to reduce the tax liabilities of the owners.
▪ These are non-statutory rules made by the Inland Revenue stipulating when full tax liability will not be enforced.
▪ Individuals owning their own businesses must compare the expected tax liability of a proprietorship or partnership with the liability of a corporation.
▪ The company's corporation tax liability is due on 1 October 1995 and its returns and accounts by 31 December 1995.
▪ Interest rates also reflect the tax liability associated with the income attached to the ownership of particular securities.
▪ By balancing profits and loss in this way, total tax liability may be reduced.
▪ Many high-income people can reduce their income tax liabilities very substantially by availing themselves of this loophole.
poll
▪ He was the leader of the Labour controlled council which came into conflict with the the Government over poll tax last year.
▪ Surely all poll tax cases should be stopped until the matter has been sorted out.
▪ Like the poll tax, the council tax would also take account of the number of adults in each household.
▪ What should replace the poll tax -; should the citizens not decide?
▪ A large number of people seem to share the Prime Minister's belief that the poll tax is already abolished.
▪ They criticise the poll tax, but when they were in office the rates went through the roof.
▪ The poll tax, he said, is central to change and to improving the inner cities.
▪ The arrangements announced yesterday to ease the introduction of the poll tax are symptomatic of a less rigorous approach.
property
▪ A naked property tax would be simpler, but it would not be as fair.
▪ Funding would come from sales taxes, property taxes and fees the state would turn over to the counties.
▪ A property tax is essentially unfair unless so many qualifications are built into it that it becomes complicated and expensive to administer.
▪ For example, even when land is sold, the property tax is not likely to be shifted.
▪ If we are to have a property tax, it must be logical, and the logic is clear.
▪ It could start by reducing the property tax rate, charging everyone less, including Tucson residents.
▪ The property tax will be levied, on the predictable base of immovable property, to yield the required annual debt repayments.
▪ With bonding authority, you can sell bonds for projects and then pay off the bonds with a local property tax.
rate
▪ Similar to covenant payments, the gift is made net of basic rate tax.
▪ Interest is paid quarterly in January, April, July and October; basic rate tax is deducted.
▪ This means that unless you are a higher rate tax payer, there is nothing else for you to pay.
▪ Those with earnings just above the tax threshold bore the heaviest burden of the flat rate tax as a proportion of income.
▪ Mr. Allason I congratulate my right hon. and learned Friend on the abolition of composite rate tax.
▪ The tax credit which accompanies a dividend matches the basic rate liability but the trustees pay additional rate tax of 10%.
▪ The rate of interest on the bonds is quoted net of basic rate tax.
reform
▪ But such concessions would undermine the very principles on which the case for tax reform is based.
▪ I came down on the side of tax reform.
▪ Others are much more interested in microeconomic questions, like tax reform, local-government finance and the role of subsidies and benefits.
▪ In the late 1980s the Conservative government increased the pace of its tax reform.
▪ He would personally lead the right for tax reform.
▪ The intention is to indicate the degree of ambiguity and the general lack of information that can characterize debate on tax reform.
▪ Two years ago, an independent bipartisan panel on tax reform chaired by Sen.
relief
▪ You can get a wife's earned income tax relief on the part of your pension which you earned from your own contributions.
▪ In 1990 the Gift Aid Scheme allows tax relief on single cash gifts to charities.
▪ So the single person now receives the same tax relief on a £30,000 mortgage as a couple.
▪ Budget the cost through fixed monthly payments and - depending on the project - offset some of the cost through tax relief.
▪ He is also expected to announce tax relief for overseas donations of existing drugs by pharmaceutical companies.
▪ The Chancellor has also cut back tax relief on relocation packages for employees.
▪ The outcome is foreshadowed by the radio speeches, in which he devoted more attention to tax relief than deficit reduction.
▪ However, he blew cold again on home loan borrowers by reducing the rate of mortgage tax relief by five full points.
return
▪ I completed a tax return but heard nothing more.
▪ One beauty of a flat tax supposedly is that tax returns would be simple.
▪ Reclaiming this tax involves filling in a tax return, including details of your salary received and the tax deducted.
▪ S corporation shareholders can also claim the losses of their corporations on their own tax returns.
▪ She is a 61-year-old housewife and does not receive a tax return.
▪ Even the math behind a simple tax return carries assumptions that are open to challenge.
▪ If your child has already paid tax, he or she must complete a tax return to receive a rebate.
▪ Other potential trouble spots for Forbes include his refusal to release his personal income tax returns, as Dole has done.
revenue
▪ If the government wishes to raise tax revenue in order to subsidize the poor, it should levy a tax on films.
▪ Forecasts of state tax revenue are beginning to produce mild surprises on the upside.
▪ Government need tax revenue to pay for public goods and to make transfer payments to the poor.
▪ Variety of Taxes Governments can raise tax revenue only if they can identify the activities on which the tax rates apply.
▪ If they do not change, tax revenue may fall anyway, as business leaves for friendlier haunts.
▪ The king had at his disposal, not tax revenue, but plunder and tribute amassed through warfare.
▪ Central government clearly earns a substantial tax revenue from sport, both indirectly, on expenditure, and directly, on incomes.
▪ Beginning from a zero rate, a small increase in the tax rate will yield some tax revenue.
system
▪ Table 7.2 shows very clearly what a proportionately high price the poor pay for their social services through the tax system.
▪ The proposals surfaced after Congress decided to explore ways to overhaul the cumbersome federal tax system.
▪ It was our colonial system which created export-based farming and the tax systems which continued the depopulation of the villages.
▪ The objective here is to introduce the fundamental characteristics of the tax system.
▪ Some of these taxes will be local, but some will come from central government revenue raised through the national tax system.
▪ Our tax system has shifted relentlessly toward taxes that allow no deductions for family dependents.
▪ If it were abolished, administration of the poll tax system would be easier.
▪ That unabashedly and unmistakably should be the purpose of any Republican tax system for the years ahead.
year
▪ The paper also considers the possibility that the self-employed should prepare tax accounts for the tax year.
▪ The publishers wanted to deliver the books before the end of their tax year, which was imminent.
▪ This sum is then included as part of a claimant's taxable income during the relevant tax year.
▪ A combination of the two processes means that you can use seven years of unused tax relief in one tax year.
▪ This will need to be done before the start of the tax year, i.e. before 6 April.
▪ It increases with income and with the passage of months during the tax year.
▪ In this current tax year, children can earn up to £4,385 before tax is levied.
▪ By the end of the tax year, National Savings had invested £39.7 billion-another record figure.
■ VERB
collect
▪ His cadres collect taxes and impose justice.
▪ Local officials collect no taxes from federal property and large tax-exempt institutions and are forbidden to raise taxes on commuters.
▪ The Revenue will have to collect tax from each individual partner.
▪ Atlanta-based Delta, though, says it thinks collecting the tax retroactively will be up to the government.
▪ There is, in theory, no reason why the state should not collect a great deal more tax than it does.
▪ States collect taxes and subsume many of the responsibilities of governing from the county.
▪ Republics collect taxes but are refusing to pass them on to the central government.
▪ It will have promised its elderly more than it can collect in taxes from those who are working.
impose
▪ The legislator, for example, has reason to impose a certain tax.
▪ In imposing taxes for state purposes, they are not doing what Congress is empowered to do.
▪ The way to raise energy prices is to impose a tax.
▪ Would it be a valid objection to an Order made under this statute that it imposes a tax?
▪ The District Court believed that it had no alternative to imposing a tax increase.
▪ It would impose taxes on business and individuals which would discourage enterprise and discourage people from trying to work hard.
▪ The District Court therefore abused its discretion in imposing the tax itself.
introduce
▪ The proposal is not to introduce a wealth tax under the form that it has been proposed elsewhere.
▪ A substantial tax on marriage has been introduced into our tax code for many couples. 5.
▪ He can, of course, introduce more taxes in his combined revenue and spending exercise in November.
▪ The majority Nationalists introduced an alternative tax bill Tuesday to block the opposition bill.
▪ For he went on to introduce new taxes.
▪ But the rebels introduced an equitable tax system and an agrarian reform program, distributing land to poor villagers.
▪ We have introduced new tax incentives for savings.
▪ There would be no reason to have introduced the poll tax and no reason for another arbitrary and unfair property tax.
levy
▪ If the government wishes to raise tax revenue in order to subsidize the poor, it should levy a tax on films.
▪ A unanimous vote of the Board of Supervisors is required to levy such a sales tax, which doesn't seem likely.
▪ Now those landowners have become greedy and demand high rents - and we help to exploit the peasants by levying crippling taxes.
▪ The study does propose levying a $ 3 tax per departing passenger at Lindbergh, starting in 1997.
▪ However, that is not a good reason for trying to levy high tax rates that no-one can enforce.
▪ Legislative acts that levied taxes and defined benefits have never contained any provisions for investing in assets to provide future benefits.
▪ Domestic rates will be abolished and in their place local authorities will levy a poll tax.
▪ However it does not levy a general sales tax; sales taxes are the bread and butter of most state governments.
pay
▪ The firm has to pay 1050 in corporation tax on the balancing charge and 5340 in capital gains tax.
▪ We are not paying any taxes and keep afloat only with the help of barter deals.
▪ They work all day and pay tax on the money they earn.
▪ The citizens of almost all other major developed economies pay higher taxes than we do.
▪ Another way to measure an individual's capacity to pay tax is the amount of capital assets he or she may have.
▪ But I never shoplift, and I pay my taxes.
▪ They suffer as it is, and now may have to pay tax on money they deserve.
▪ Second, you must file and pay all taxes owing for the next five years in a timely matter.
raise
▪ In 1996, a further modification to the system was agreed, giving regional governments important new responsibilities to raise tax revenues.
▪ The Front had promised victory and had raised taxes to pay for it.
▪ If the government wishes to raise tax revenue in order to subsidize the poor, it should levy a tax on films.
▪ It would also raise the payroll tax 1. 52 percentage points.
▪ In my local authority it is estimated that only 9 percent. of overall income will be raised by the council tax.
▪ How could the federal government make up the revenue drain that would result to avoid raising other taxes or increasing the deficit?
▪ It has become a truism of modern politics that people will never vote to raise their taxes.
▪ If they replace those benefits with higher wages, that would raise the income tax bill for workers.
reduce
▪ Table 16-2 shows that the first Thatcher government was able to reduce marginal tax rates substantially, especially for the very rich.
▪ Forbes' platform makes sense in a state on a mission to eliminate the income tax and substantially reduce the property tax.
▪ One key task was to reduce tax rates.
▪ The losses suffered during the start-up phase of a business can be used to reduce the tax liabilities of the owners.
▪ Capital allowances reduce a company's tax liability and thus improve its after-tax cash flow.
▪ Republicans also offered to reduce their tax cuts by about a fourth.
▪ Labour regards reducing taxes and defending ourselves as equally sinful.
▪ The deficit also is growing because of an economic slowdown that has reduced the amount of taxes collected, government officials say.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
back rent/taxes/pay etc
▪ A former landlord said she was still owed several thousand dollars in back rent.
▪ Dave Escott bought at the height of the boom, and any back rent will only add to his negative equity.
▪ He owes $ 10, 000 in back taxes.
▪ Homar sued for reinstatement of his job, back pay and money damages.
▪ I needed a release from the tax office showing that I owed no back taxes.
▪ Look, she said, he's left, bolted, owing three months' back rent.
▪ Next: What to do when you can not afford to pay back taxes.
▪ The Internal Revenue Service has been battling him for years for back taxes and penalties related to one venture.
be subject to a rule/law/penalty/tax etc
income/tax/age etc bracket
▪ Dataquest said only 12 percent in this income bracket owned computers.
▪ In addition they estimated the implied income tax brackets associated with each dividend payout level.
▪ It's all to do with the £19,250 tax bracket and engines below 2 litres.
▪ Jack Kemp would have to recommend that tax brackets be compressed to as low as 10 percent to dull their allure.
▪ Name the ethnicity, tax bracket or wardrobe, and they were there in full force.
▪ The key is, does your tax bracket justify buying munis?
▪ Together, that amounts to an annual tax saving of up to £1,000, compared to cars in a higher tax bracket.
▪ Why should you and I be in the same tax bracket as Steve Forbes?
punitive taxes/price increases etc
set sth against tax
▪ Parents can also set costs against tax.
set sth off against tax
tax refund
▪ Delta Air Lines says it is no longer processing airline excise tax refunds for people who bought tickets with a credit card.
▪ Imagine if only 13 percent of the adults who are owed tax refunds this year got them.
▪ The agency issues more than $ 130 billion in tax refunds each year.
▪ To get direct deposit of your tax refund, file Form 8888 with your return.
▪ You said when you get your income tax refund.
tax/fare dodger
▪ And he identified poll tax dodgers as part of the problem.
▪ And the trawl for tax dodgers also threw up other misdemeanours.
▪ On March 6 pay bonuses were announced for all soldiers and an amnesty was declared for deserters and draft dodgers.
▪ Read in studio Police have begun a campaign against car tax dodgers.
▪ The government, it seems, is counting heavily on getting money from tax dodgers.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Although the tax on cigarettes has doubled in the past two years, sales are still going up.
▪ Consumers are angry that the tax on petrol has gone up yet again.
▪ He failed to report and pay income tax on a portion of his income.
▪ He pleaded guilty to charges of fraud and tax evasion.
▪ I made over $600 a week, which was around $450 after tax.
▪ proposals for an increase in taxes to pay for medical care
▪ Sales tax in the state is 8%.
▪ The Chancellor said he would cut income tax by 2 pence in the pound.
▪ The city will have to raise taxes to pay for the roads.
▪ The Republicans promised to reduce taxes before the last election.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Big business has further reduced its contributions by ingenious tax avoidance strategies.
▪ Clinton is already banking on the savings to make possible a $ 98 billion tax cut over five years.
▪ Employers' social security contributions were reduced by 4.3 percent from Jan. 1, 1993, and income tax allowances were reduced.
▪ He will advise you on the inheritance tax your estate might incur and ways in which this may be reduced.
▪ How could the federal government make up the revenue drain that would result to avoid raising other taxes or increasing the deficit?
▪ The package will also cut the securities trading tax to 0. 21 percent from 0. 30 percent.
▪ Weber said tax reform could have been a good issue for the Republicans this year.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
heavily
▪ Piedmont, the most economically advanced part of the state, was also the most heavily taxed.
▪ The Passport Office has been heavily taxed with a backlog of requests from the recent government closings.
only
▪ In other words, the Lords said, Parliament intended that teachers should be taxed only on the marginal cost.
▪ Money we spend on goods and services gets taxed only once, when we earn it.
▪ A S$200,000 taxable income, for example, is only taxed at 17.05%.
▪ It would be equally ridiculous to think of taxing only unemployed workers to finance the unemployment compensation payments which they receive.
▪ California had worked out agreements with states such as Oregon and Arizona for each to tax only its own residents.
■ NOUN
basis
▪ Orders for payment by the plaintiffs of costs to be taxed on the standard basis have already been made in this action.
▪ During the litigation orders were made for certain of the defendants' costs to be taxed on a standard basis.
benefit
▪ Dole voted to tax the benefits of only upper-income people.
car
▪ I just hope they don't tax company cars any more than they already have done.
▪ The Conservative government has made a half-hearted attempt to tax company cars - half-hearted because it fears upsetting natural Tory voters.
company
▪ The Isle of Man currently does not tax non-resident holding companies.
gain
▪ The gain may be taxed at the basic rate of income tax therefore or at the higher rate.
▪ Capital gains are not taxed in the year they occur but when they are realized.
government
▪ Now the Government wants to tax my pension.
▪ The federal government does not tax cities, states or counties.
▪ For the euro to work effectively, it requires strong co-ordination between interest rates and how governments tax and spend.
▪ A draft urged governments to tax up the price of tobacco to discourage its use.
▪ Páll tells me that no one catches puffin any more, not since the government tried to tax the hunt.
▪ Then came the Government, determined to tax it.
▪ Most governments tax the profits of multinationals where firms report them as earned.
▪ Now the Government plans to tax people like myself who are on invalid-ity pensions.
income
▪ Thus, the income could not be taxed upon the taxpayer, under this head.
▪ The first $ 5, 000 of income is taxed at 20 percent.
▪ The purchaser will not necessarily wish to be paid as if the income had been taxed.
▪ But the key difference, according to Buchanan and Gramm, is that investment income would not be taxed under Forbes.
▪ The income arising is taxed at 10%.
▪ Some Republicans and many Democrats have attacked the proposal as favoring the rich, because investment income would not be taxed.
▪ Each individual is granted allowances or exemptions that reduce the total amount of income liable to tax.
▪ A chief question is whether all types of income should be taxed.
money
▪ Many overseas jurisdictions do not tax expatriates on money held offshore, so the gains may therefore not be taxed at all.
▪ True to its nature, California is considered the first to tax athletes for the money they earned while in-state.
percent
▪ The first $ 5, 000 of income is taxed at 20 percent.
▪ That includes capital gains income from the sale of stocks and other investments, now taxed at 28 percent.
▪ Businesses are taxed at 35 percent.
power
▪ Handing over the power to tax and spend means handing over the power to govern.
▪ But the power to tax also is the lifeblood of powerful manipulators of the political system.
▪ Local authorities can not be independent of central government unless they have an adequate power to tax.
▪ It could also be argued that the power to tax should be assigned a value in a governmental balance sheet.
profit
▪ The election avoids the cessation and commencement bases applying in assessing profits to tax when a person leaves or joins a partnership.
▪ Corporate profits are taxed at the corporate rate, regardless of the individual income of the owners.
rate
▪ We don't want a party that believes the rich and poor should be taxed at the same rate.
▪ Corporate profits, however, are taxed at the cOrpOrate rate independently of the individual Owners' income.
▪ Amounts over this are taxed at a single rate of 40 percent.
▪ The gain may be taxed at the basic rate of income tax therefore or at the higher rate.
▪ Recall from Chapter 2 that salary payments above the wage base are taxed at a combined rate of 2. 9 percent.
▪ The benefits paid from the fund are taxed at the rate appropriate to the pensioner's circumstances.
state
▪ How far does the knowledge that the state will tax away high salaries deter people from entering high-earning and demanding jobs?
▪ The son could not see why the state should tax the schoolmaster to support the priest, but never vice versa.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
back rent/taxes/pay etc
▪ A former landlord said she was still owed several thousand dollars in back rent.
▪ Dave Escott bought at the height of the boom, and any back rent will only add to his negative equity.
▪ He owes $ 10, 000 in back taxes.
▪ Homar sued for reinstatement of his job, back pay and money damages.
▪ I needed a release from the tax office showing that I owed no back taxes.
▪ Look, she said, he's left, bolted, owing three months' back rent.
▪ Next: What to do when you can not afford to pay back taxes.
▪ The Internal Revenue Service has been battling him for years for back taxes and penalties related to one venture.
be subject to a rule/law/penalty/tax etc
income/tax/age etc bracket
▪ Dataquest said only 12 percent in this income bracket owned computers.
▪ In addition they estimated the implied income tax brackets associated with each dividend payout level.
▪ It's all to do with the £19,250 tax bracket and engines below 2 litres.
▪ Jack Kemp would have to recommend that tax brackets be compressed to as low as 10 percent to dull their allure.
▪ Name the ethnicity, tax bracket or wardrobe, and they were there in full force.
▪ The key is, does your tax bracket justify buying munis?
▪ Together, that amounts to an annual tax saving of up to £1,000, compared to cars in a higher tax bracket.
▪ Why should you and I be in the same tax bracket as Steve Forbes?
punitive taxes/price increases etc
tax refund
▪ Delta Air Lines says it is no longer processing airline excise tax refunds for people who bought tickets with a credit card.
▪ Imagine if only 13 percent of the adults who are owed tax refunds this year got them.
▪ The agency issues more than $ 130 billion in tax refunds each year.
▪ To get direct deposit of your tax refund, file Form 8888 with your return.
▪ You said when you get your income tax refund.
tax/fare dodger
▪ And he identified poll tax dodgers as part of the problem.
▪ And the trawl for tax dodgers also threw up other misdemeanours.
▪ On March 6 pay bonuses were announced for all soldiers and an amnesty was declared for deserters and draft dodgers.
▪ Read in studio Police have begun a campaign against car tax dodgers.
▪ The government, it seems, is counting heavily on getting money from tax dodgers.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Company profits are currently taxed at 34%.
▪ The rich are supposed to be taxed at a higher rate than the poor.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Forbes, who is calling for a 17 percent flat rate, would not tax dividends, interest or capital gains.
▪ No, it didn't tax your brains at all.
▪ Parts of the economy need more spending in order to sustain profits, but all need to be taxed less.
▪ There were alarming reports that retired persons on fixed incomes were on the brink of being taxed out of their homes.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Tax

Tax \Tax\, n. [F. taxe, fr. taxer to tax, L. taxare to touch, sharply, to feel, handle, to censure, value, estimate, fr. tangere, tactum, to touch. See Tangent, and cf. Task, Taste.]

  1. A charge, especially a pecuniary burden which is imposed by authority. Specifically:

    1. A charge or burden laid upon persons or property for the support of a government.

      A farmer of taxes is, of all creditors, proverbially the most rapacious.
      --Macaulay.

    2. Especially, the sum laid upon specific things, as upon polls, lands, houses, income, etc.; as, a land tax; a window tax; a tax on carriages, and the like.

      Note: Taxes are annual or perpetual, direct or indirect, etc.

    3. A sum imposed or levied upon the members of a society to defray its expenses.

  2. A task exacted from one who is under control; a contribution or service, the rendering of which is imposed upon a subject.

  3. A disagreeable or burdensome duty or charge; as, a heavy tax on time or health.

  4. Charge; censure. [Obs.]
    --Clarendon.

  5. A lesson to be learned; a task. [Obs.]
    --Johnson.

    Tax cart, a spring cart subject to a low tax. [Eng.]

    Syn: Impost; tribute; contribution; duty; toll; rate; assessment; exaction; custom; demand.

Tax

Tax \Tax\ (t[a^]ks), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Taxed; p. pr. & vb. n. Taxing.] [Cf. F. taxer. See Tax, n.]

  1. To subject to the payment of a tax or taxes; to impose a tax upon; to lay a burden upon; especially, to exact money from for the support of government.

    We are more heavily taxed by our idleness, pride, and folly than we are taxed by government.
    --Franklin.

  2. (Law) To assess, fix, or determine judicially, the amount of; as, to tax the cost of an action in court.

  3. To charge; to accuse; also, to censure; -- often followed by with, rarely by of before an indirect object; as, to tax a man with pride.

    I tax you, you elements, with unkindness.
    --Shak.

    Men's virtues I have commended as freely as I have taxed their crimes.
    --Dryden.

    Fear not now that men should tax thine honor.
    --M. Arnold.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
tax

c.1300, "impose a tax on," from Old French taxer "impose a tax" (13c.) and directly from Latin taxare "evaluate, estimate, assess, handle," also "censure, charge," probably a frequentative form of tangere "to touch" (see tangent (adj.)). Sense of "to burden, put a strain on" first recorded early 14c.; that of "censure, reprove" is from 1560s. Its use in Luke ii for Greek apographein "to enter on a list, enroll" is due to Tyndale. Related: Taxed; taxing.

tax

early 14c., "obligatory contribution levied by a sovereign or government," from Anglo-French tax, Old French taxe, and directly from Medieval Latin taxa, from Latin taxare (see tax (v.)). Related: Taxes. Tax-deduction is from 1942; tax-shelter is attested from 1961.

Wiktionary
tax

n. money paid to the government other than for transaction-specific goods and services. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To impose and collect a tax from (a person). 2 (context transitive English) To impose and collect a tax on (something). 3 (context transitive English) To make excessive demands on.

WordNet
tax
  1. n. charge against a citizen's person or property or activity for the support of government [syn: taxation, revenue enhancement]

  2. [also: taxes (pl)]

tax
  1. v. levy a tax on; "The State taxes alcohol heavily"; "Clothing is not taxed in our state"

  2. set or determine the amount of (a payment such as a fine) [syn: assess]

  3. use to the limit; "you are taxing my patience" [syn: task]

  4. make a charge against or accuse; "They taxed him failure to appear in court"

  5. [also: taxes (pl)]

Wikipedia
Tax

A tax (from the Latintaxo) is a financial charge or other levy imposed upon a taxpayer (an individual or legal entity) by a state or the functional equivalent of a state to fund various public expenditures. A failure to pay, or evasion of or resistance to taxation, is usually punishable by law. Taxes consist of direct or indirect taxes and may be paid in money or as its labour equivalent. Some countries impose almost no taxation at all, or a very low tax rate for a certain area of taxation.

Usage examples of "tax".

Here the Court declared that the right of a citizen, resident in one State, to contract in another, to transact any lawful business, or to make a loan of money, in any State other than that in which the citizen resides was a privilege of national citizenship which was abridged by a State income tax law excluding from taxable income interest received on money loaned within the State.

Court was unable to concede that a Georgia statute levying on inhabitants of the State a poll tax payment of which is made a prerequisite for voting but exempting females who do not register for voting, in any way abridged the right of male citizens to vote on account of their sex.

Paris in an infinite number of petty questions as to tenants, abutters, liabilities, taxes, repairs, sweepings, decorations for the Fete-Dieu, waste-pipes, lighting, projections over the public way, and the neighborhood of unhealthy buildings.

Sword has exempted the transaction from taxes in order to accelerate the buy-out.

Carthage was condemned to pay within the term of fifty years, were a slight acknowledgment of the superiority of Rome, and cannot bear the least proportion with the taxes afterwards raised both on the lands and on the persons of the inhabitants, when the fertile coast of Africa was reduced into a province.

Over a century after coca was taxed by the clergy, we still find reports of its satanic influences, and it is just such reports that, blindly cited by later commentators, would help to propagate the myth of coca chewing as a dangerous, addictive habit - a myth that survives to this day.

State of Texas filed an original petition in the Supreme Court, in which it asserted that its claim, together with those of three other States, exceeded the value of the estate, that the portion of the estate within Texas alone would not suffice to discharge its own tax, and that its efforts to collect its tax might be defeated by adjudications of domicile by the other States.

I happen to remember because it was just two year before that a strain of human aftosa developed in a Bolivian lavatory got loose through the medium of a Chinchilla coat fixed an income tax case in Kansas City.

The most wealthy families ruined by partial fines and confiscations, and the great body of his subjects oppressed by ingenious and aggravated taxes.

The victorious tribunes, in order that the people might reap an immediate benefit from the trial, publish a form of an agrarian law, and prevent the tax from being contributed, since there was need of pay for so great a number of troops, and the enterprises of the service were conducted with success in such a manner, that in none of the wars did they reach the consummation of their hope.

But they paid their taxes to us, albeit with complaining, and we had to discipline them only occasionally, so we managed.

The shares represent an aliquot portion of the whole corporate assets, and the property right so represented arises where the corporation has its home, and is therefore within the taxing jurisdiction of the State, notwithstanding that ownership of the stock may also be a taxable subject in another State.

The soldier who had ended her game with the armadillo was Jimmy Williams, a tax lawyer with a firm in Jackson.

But the girl had indulged in so much, well, mischief and mayhem, since coming to Ashling, that even Mother Teresa would have felt taxed.

Sweat and tax and graft the last dollar out of the damned asterites, and take it back to buy a penthouse and a mistress and the gout in Panama City.