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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Tamed

Tame \Tame\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Tamed; p. pr. & vb. n. Taming.] [AS. tamian, temian, akin to D. tammen, temmen, G. z["a]hmen, OHG. zemmen, Icel. temja, Goth. gatamjan. See Tame, a.]

  1. To reduce from a wild to a domestic state; to make gentle and familiar; to reclaim; to domesticate; as, to tame a wild beast.

    They had not been tamed into submission, but baited into savegeness and stubbornness.
    --Macaulay.

  2. To subdue; to conquer; to repress; as, to tame the pride or passions of youth.

WordNet

tamed

  1. adj. brought from wildness into a domesticated state; "tame animals"; "fields of tame blueberries" [syn: tame] [ant: wild]

  2. brought from wildness; "the once inhospitable landscape is now tamed"

Wiktionary

tamed

  1. 1 domesticated 2 tame v

  2. (en-past of: tame)

Usage examples of "tamed".

Hannibal enlisted tamed African elephants in his unsuccessful war against Rome, and ancient Egyptians may have tamed giraffes and other species.

Paintings made by ancient Egyptians show that they further tamed (not surprisingly) hoofed mammals such as gazelles and hartebeests, birds such as cranes, more surprisingly giraffes (which can be dangerous), and most astonishingly hyenas.

I swore that the fae would be tamed, according to the Prophet’s guidelines.

It was as if all the tamed earth-fae that had been in the shop had been boiled down and concentrated into one hot spot of chaotic power.

The latter was a monument to the Forest’s earth-fae, which, once tamed, intensified each Working a thousandfold.

Here’s a woman who tamed the earth itself so that she could drink in its power in safety.

Their temperaments were likewise mismatched but surprisingly compatible, resulting in a tense but efficient partnership that had successfully tamed Erna's most dangerous waters.

Then he felt the fire that was pressed against his cheek, the glowing ring that was pouring out tamed earth-fae to fuel the Prince's Binding.

Even the fae had been tamed there, in accordance with the Prophet's writings, and I was filled with joy and new hope as I saw with my own eyes what miracles a unified faith might reap.

On the wall I saw the whip with which I had been disciplined, after some strokes of which I had begged, tamed, sobbing, to wear a collar.

I had been tamed since the first Gorean male had touched me, long ago, when I had worn a chain and collar in a Gorean field.

The variety of wild animals thus tamed is far greater than the variety eventually domesticated, and includes some species that we would scarcely have imagined as pets.

Ancient Egyptians and Assyrians, and modern Indians, tamed cheetahs for use in hunting.

African elephants were tamed in Roman times despite the obvious danger, and Asian elephants are still being tamed today.

Perhaps the most unlikely pet is the European brown bear (the same species as the American grizzly bear), which the Ainu people of Japan regularly captured as young animals, tamed, and reared to kill and eat in a ritual ceremony.