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Crossword clues for talk

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
talk
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fine one to talk (=you are criticizing someone for something you do yourself)
▪ You’re a fine one to talk.
a round of talks/negotiations/meetings
▪ A second round of talks got under way this week.
baby talk
Careless talk
Careless talk can be disastrous for a business.
crisis talks (=discussions about a crisis)
▪ The Prime Minister went back to London for crisis talks.
disarmament negotiations/talks
▪ United Nations disarmament negotiations started today.
discuss/talk about a subject
▪ Have you discussed the subject with your husband?
gave...pep talk
▪ Alam gave the Pakistani team a pep talk.
give a talk/speech/lecture
▪ He’s giving a talk on early Roman pottery.
have a look/walk/sleep/talk/think etc
▪ We were just having a look around.
▪ Are you going to have a swim?
held talks with
▪ In April, the President held talks with Chinese leaders.
high-level meetings/talks/negotiations etc
▪ a high-level conference on arms control
idle chatter/talk/gossip etc
know what...are talking about
▪ The staff are dedicated people who clearly know what they are talking about.
loose talk
▪ There’s been a bit of loose talk about it.
making small talk
▪ We stood around making small talk.
peace talks/negotiations
▪ A fourth round of peace talks will begin on Monday.
pep talk
▪ Alam gave the Pakistani team a pep talk.
round-table discussion/meeting/talks
shop talk
small talk
▪ We stood around making small talk.
speak/talk in whispers
▪ They spoke in quick, urgent whispers.
straight talk
▪ I think it’s time for some straight talk now.
talk nonsense
▪ That's not true - he's talking nonsense!
talk on the telephone
▪ He was talking on the telephone when the doorbell rang.
talk radio
talk rubbish
▪ You do talk rubbish sometimes.
talk show
▪ a talk show host
talk time
▪ The battery allows approximately 135 minutes of talk time.
talk to/consult an expert (=ask an expert for information or advice)
▪ If cracks appear in your house, you should consult an expert to find out what is causing the problem.
talk to/speak to a lawyer (=for advice)
▪ Have you spoken to a lawyer?
talked openly
▪ Sarah talked openly about her problems.
talking book
talking gibberish
▪ You’re talking gibberish!
talking head
talking point
talking shop
talk/speak (to sb) on the phone
▪ We talk on the phone every day.
▪ We spoke earlier on the phone, if you remember.
talk/speak to the press
▪ He is reluctant to talk to the press.
talk/speak/write etc freely
▪ In France he could write freely, without fear of arrest.
▪ We went outside so that we could talk freely without being overheard.
trade talks/negotiations
▪ A further round of trade talks begins this week in Geneva.
trash talking
▪ Coaches say they want to take trash talking out of high school football.
tripartite agreement/talks etc
▪ a tripartite agreement between France, Britain, and Germany
urgent talks
▪ The union is seeking urgent talks with management on this matter.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
about
▪ X-rays aren't something you can talk about, they're visual things.
▪ How about talking to a computer that will talk back?
▪ They all provide different experiences that children can be encouraged to talk about.
▪ Some people get nervous when you talk about individual flexibility.
▪ We're talking about famous people.
▪ It made everyone feel and do just what the president had just been talking about.
▪ And I don't want to talk about yesterday either.
▪ They want you to talk about how you design a communication program right from ground zero.
to
▪ The person you should talk to about this is your tutor at college and to a counsellor.
▪ And Briony was too daft to talk to, and Uncle Dan wouldn't be here till tomorrow.
▪ Research has shown that having some one to talk to and confide in is an important factor in preventing depression.
▪ Just remember who you are and who you are talking to.
▪ So whom had he been talking to?
▪ The one you're talking to is all tolerance and forbearance.
▪ She's some one I can talk to.
▪ A psychiatric nurse I talked to in Sheffield works twenty-eight hours and takes home £51 to keep herself and two children.
■ NOUN
peace
▪ There is little sign of peace talks in a country already shattered by two decades of war.
▪ Secretary of State Christopher is to join IsraelSyria peace talks today in Maryland in an intensified bid for progress in the negotiations.
▪ Hence his offer this week of a new cease-fire and new peace talks with the rebels.
▪ Naturally, Hanoi heralded the bombing halt and the peace talks in Paris as great victories.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(it's been) nice meeting/talking to you
argue/talk etc till you're blue in the face
crying/shopping/talking etc jag
▪ I had an incredible crying jag.
fence-mending measures/talks/trips etc
money talks
Money talks, and poor working people are ignored.
now you're talking
pillow talk
▪ It was spying, giving away secrets, pillow talk ... Luke knew how desperate she was.
▪ Maybe later he'd get the information he was after during pillow talk.
sales pitch/talk
▪ Don't give them a sales pitch because there is nothing more irritating.
▪ He is running out of possible patrons, sales talk, flirtatiousness, hair, steam.
▪ None of this is likely to stop a flurry of sales pitches from mutual-fund salespeople.
▪ Personally I think this is another of his sales pitches.
▪ The sales pitch can be so slick that many consumers don't even realize they have bought magazines until the bill arrives.
▪ The sales pitch is a wonderful movie moment.
▪ The analogy of the sales pitch is revealing, for advertisers do not promote their product merely by providing information about it.
▪ There was nothing spectacular about my sales pitch except the language in which it was couched.
speak/talk out of turn
▪ I hope I'm not speaking out of turn, but I don't think this is the best way to proceed.
▪ Also this week: Ben and Mandy talk out of turn while Luke is listening.
▪ Captain Steve Waugh had sharp words with Buchanan, telling him he had spoken out of turn.
▪ He enjoys talking out of turn.
talk a blue streak
▪ He had a wicked tongue when roused and could talk a blue streak.
▪ I was talking a blue streak.
talk dirty
▪ She said Smith paid her to pose naked and talk dirty to him.
talk posh
talk sense
▪ I just want our politicians to talk sense for a change.
▪ Someone who could talk sense would get my vote, but most politicians don't.
▪ A man talking sense to himself is no madder than a man talking nonsense not to himself.
▪ He had already tried to talk sense into Jotan, and had got nowhere.
talk shop
▪ Are you two going to talk shop all night?
▪ I don't want to go out to dinner with him and his lawyer friends - all they ever do is talk shop.
▪ And remember that everyone of it is of your own kind, some one with whom you can talk shop.
▪ Andy the Mouse got pretty manic and spent half an hour talking shop with a Mickey.
▪ At the moment the annual summit is little more than an expensive talking shop.
▪ The Commonwealth is simply a talking shop.
▪ This would enable a tough general manager to ensure that medical audit did not become simply a talk shop or token activity.
talk turkey
▪ OK, enough joking around - let's talk turkey.
▪ They said they would be willing to talk turkey at $125 per shipment.
▪ First, let's talk turkey.
talk/buy etc your way into/past etc sth/sb
▪ Each receives some kind of government stipend, and Harry talks his way into a computer job while Kate does laundry.
▪ Forbes' rivals have accused him of buying his way into the race.
▪ Now nationalised and backed by government money, the firm may buy its way into video technology and markets.
▪ The adventurers could fight, but it would be safer to try and talk their way past.
▪ The family - without plane tickets and passports - had to talk their way past airport officials on their homeward journey.
▪ They bought their way into the landed aristocracy.
▪ You should be able to buy your way into any Mystery you choose with that.
talk/speak in riddles
▪ She is described by the Argive elders as speaking in riddles because they fail to understand her predictions.
▪ She talked in comparisons, she spoke in riddles.
▪ She wished people wouldn't talk in riddles.
▪ When Tweedledum and Tweedledee talk to Alice they are almost talking in riddles.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Danny was talking to a girl he'd just met at the bar.
▪ Even after three days of interrogation, Maskell refused to talk.
▪ Gerry wants to talk to his girlfriend before he makes a decision.
▪ He said he'd come back and kill me if I talked.
▪ I left Mario talking with my mother.
▪ I think we need to talk.
▪ If you're having trouble at school, let's sit down and talk about it.
▪ If you have a problem at school, sit down and talk about it with your parents.
▪ If you need more money you should talk with Richard.
▪ In high school, we often got in trouble for talking in class.
▪ Is this one of those birds that can talk?
▪ It's been nice talking to you.
▪ It's important to talk with your kids about drugs, alcohol, and sex.
▪ Jerrod's only one year old and he's already starting to talk.
▪ Please don't all talk at the same time.
▪ Powell talked to a group of industry leaders in Atlanta on Tuesday.
▪ The suspect was questioned for two hours, but refused to talk.
▪ They talked about their favourite pop stars.
▪ This evening Professor Welch will be talking about Shakespeare's historical plays.
▪ two friends talking on the phone
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He walked along talking to himself.
▪ It's as if I was talking to somebody.
▪ Today they talk of doing so but they have yet to act.
▪ Usually the people who want to talk to you are the people who have contributed to you.
▪ Violence is avoided and talked down whenever possible.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
peace
▪ One hopeful sign for the success of the peace talks is the military deadlock.
▪ And it made us realize how important these peace talks that are happening in Northern Ireland right now are.
▪ The gimmick's failure underlined the difficulties the peace talks are causing for the right.
▪ Sinn Fein is excluded from peace talks that are now at a virtual standstill.
▪ A later communiqué from the guerrillas called for immediate peace talks and for their representation in the Constituent Assembly.
▪ The secretary of state is to fly to Damascus today to press IsraelSyria peace talks.
▪ Despite the peace talks, Farc's commanders have said that they will continue to kidnap civilians to pay for their campaigns.
▪ History will not judge us by whether we get these old enemies to peace talks.
pep
▪ I wondered what they said in there, what pep talks were handed out.
▪ A pep talk was all it took.
▪ Rubin himself appeared on stage for a pep talk, a short and stocky 40ish fellow in business blues.
▪ Since I am not a person whose anxiety diminishes at the prospect of certain failure, I gave myself a pep talk.
▪ In Harrogate I was to meet my editor for a pep talk.
▪ This is not just a smarmy pep talk but an unflinching discussion of real angst and a real adjustment process.
▪ If ever there was a time for a spirited pep talk, this is it.
▪ His pep talk had obviously worked the night before.
show
▪ I also discovered that being a guest on a talk show is pretty nerve-racking.
▪ For a while he even hosted his own talk show.
▪ But Costas doesn't have the on-screen presence to hold his own as a talk show host.
▪ When talk show host Denise Richardson asks if he killed the guard, Nathan answers yes.
▪ A big-deal syndicated talk show like us?
▪ That was followed by a series of appearances on talk shows by doctors who extolled Retin-A as a wrinkle treatment.
trade
▪ To seize it he must not let Mr Kaifu get all the credit if the trade talks succeed.
▪ Royals outfielder Les Norman has been mentioned in trade talks.
▪ Tim Brown sifted through the trade talk, clearly and succinctly.
▪ Jamal Crawford, who was virtually untouchable in trade talks, has shown little but long-range potential.
■ VERB
begin
▪ Tyll, a broadcaster for 20 years, began as a talk host in 1982.
▪ The country is poised to begin talks with officials at the International Monetary Fund next week on a $ 3 billion loan.
give
▪ I tell stories, give talks, run writing workshops - for children and adults all over the country.
▪ My brother was now traveling to several towns in Galicia, where he gave talks and readings from his work.
▪ Perhaps you can offer to give talks, show slides, put on an exhibition, start a local interest group.
▪ I gave a talk at Harvard Divinity School in the fall.
▪ You came to the school and gave a talk.
Giving a Talk During your course you will be asked to give at least one talk.
▪ James Griffith will give a free talk about arts of the community at 12: 15 p. m. Wednesday, December 4.
hold
▪ Clinton will hold separate talks with Yeltsin on Sunday.
▪ School governors will hold talks before the next meeting of the Education Committee when a final decision is expected.
▪ Following the meeting Mann said that Shekhar had agreed to hold direct talks with militant leaders.
▪ He held talks with both Johnson and Taylor, which led to the declaration of a truce on Sept. 22.
▪ He then went on to London, to hold talks with Beaverbrook and other Air Ministry officials.
resume
▪ Towards the end of September, western governments finally resumed their tough talk.
▪ Yesterday's meeting resumed talks broken off after eight hours in Dublin last month.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(it's been) nice meeting/talking to you
argue/talk etc till you're blue in the face
fence-mending measures/talks/trips etc
fighting words/talk
▪ And we need to warn them that the words they are using can very easily become fighting words.
▪ It sounds like good fighting talk but, beyond the active birth arena, I wonder how accurate a picture it represents.
▪ Today in the 1980s many Christians don't like this fighting talk.
▪ Where I come from that's fighting talk.
money talks
Money talks, and poor working people are ignored.
now you're talking
pillow talk
▪ It was spying, giving away secrets, pillow talk ... Luke knew how desperate she was.
▪ Maybe later he'd get the information he was after during pillow talk.
sales pitch/talk
▪ Don't give them a sales pitch because there is nothing more irritating.
▪ He is running out of possible patrons, sales talk, flirtatiousness, hair, steam.
▪ None of this is likely to stop a flurry of sales pitches from mutual-fund salespeople.
▪ Personally I think this is another of his sales pitches.
▪ The sales pitch can be so slick that many consumers don't even realize they have bought magazines until the bill arrives.
▪ The sales pitch is a wonderful movie moment.
▪ The analogy of the sales pitch is revealing, for advertisers do not promote their product merely by providing information about it.
▪ There was nothing spectacular about my sales pitch except the language in which it was couched.
speak/talk out of turn
▪ I hope I'm not speaking out of turn, but I don't think this is the best way to proceed.
▪ Also this week: Ben and Mandy talk out of turn while Luke is listening.
▪ Captain Steve Waugh had sharp words with Buchanan, telling him he had spoken out of turn.
▪ He enjoys talking out of turn.
talk a blue streak
▪ He had a wicked tongue when roused and could talk a blue streak.
▪ I was talking a blue streak.
talk dirty
▪ She said Smith paid her to pose naked and talk dirty to him.
talk posh
talk sense
▪ I just want our politicians to talk sense for a change.
▪ Someone who could talk sense would get my vote, but most politicians don't.
▪ A man talking sense to himself is no madder than a man talking nonsense not to himself.
▪ He had already tried to talk sense into Jotan, and had got nowhere.
talk shop
▪ Are you two going to talk shop all night?
▪ I don't want to go out to dinner with him and his lawyer friends - all they ever do is talk shop.
▪ And remember that everyone of it is of your own kind, some one with whom you can talk shop.
▪ Andy the Mouse got pretty manic and spent half an hour talking shop with a Mickey.
▪ At the moment the annual summit is little more than an expensive talking shop.
▪ The Commonwealth is simply a talking shop.
▪ This would enable a tough general manager to ensure that medical audit did not become simply a talk shop or token activity.
talk turkey
▪ OK, enough joking around - let's talk turkey.
▪ They said they would be willing to talk turkey at $125 per shipment.
▪ First, let's talk turkey.
talk/buy etc your way into/past etc sth/sb
▪ Each receives some kind of government stipend, and Harry talks his way into a computer job while Kate does laundry.
▪ Forbes' rivals have accused him of buying his way into the race.
▪ Now nationalised and backed by government money, the firm may buy its way into video technology and markets.
▪ The adventurers could fight, but it would be safer to try and talk their way past.
▪ The family - without plane tickets and passports - had to talk their way past airport officials on their homeward journey.
▪ They bought their way into the landed aristocracy.
▪ You should be able to buy your way into any Mystery you choose with that.
talk/speak in riddles
▪ She is described by the Argive elders as speaking in riddles because they fail to understand her predictions.
▪ She talked in comparisons, she spoke in riddles.
▪ She wished people wouldn't talk in riddles.
▪ When Tweedledum and Tweedledee talk to Alice they are almost talking in riddles.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "They say he's having an affair with a colleague at work." "That's just talk."
▪ A researcher from our division gave a talk today about recent advances in cancer treatment.
▪ Alice Walker has been invited to give a talk to the literary group this evening.
▪ In those days there was always talk if two people lived together without being married.
▪ There's an interesting series of talks by well-known writers on the radio this week.
▪ You should have heard Dr. Cooper's talk on his trip to India - it was fascinating.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Talk

Talk \Talk\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Talked; p. pr. & vb. n. Talking.] [Cf. LG. talk talk, gabble, Prov. G. talken to speak indistinctly; or OD. tolken to interpret, MHG. tolkan to interpret, to tell, to speak indistinctly, Dan. tolke to interpret, Sw. tolka, Icel. t?lka to interpret, t?lkr an interpreter, Lith. tulkas an interpreter, tulkanti, tulk[=o]ti, to interpret, Russ. tolkovate to interpret, to talk about; or perhaps fr. OE. talien to speak (see Tale, v. i. & n.).]

  1. To utter words; esp., to converse familiarly; to speak, as in familiar discourse, when two or more persons interchange thoughts.

    I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following, but I will not eat with you.
    --Shak.

  2. To confer; to reason; to consult.

    Let me talk with thee of thy judgments.
    --Jer. xii. 1.

  3. To prate; to speak impertinently. [Colloq.]

    To talk of, to relate; to tell; to give an account of; as, authors talk of the wonderful remains of Palmyra. ``The natural histories of Switzerland talk much of the fall of these rocks, and the great damage done.''
    --Addison.

    To talk to, to advise or exhort, or to reprove gently; as, I will talk to my son respecting his conduct. [Colloq.]

Talk

Talk \Talk\, n.

  1. The act of talking; especially, familiar converse; mutual discourse; that which is uttered, especially in familiar conversation, or the mutual converse of two or more.

    In various talk the instructive hours they passed.
    --Pope.

    Their talk, when it was not made up of nautical phrases, was too commonly made up of oaths and curses.
    --Macaulay.

  2. Report; rumor; as, to hear talk of war.

    I hear a talk up and down of raising our money.
    --Locke.

  3. Subject of discourse; as, his achievment is the talk of the town.

    Syn: Conversation; colloquy; discourse; chat; dialogue; conference; communication. See Conversation.

Talk

Talk \Talk\, v. t.

  1. To speak freely; to use for conversing or communicating; as, to talk French.

  2. To deliver in talking; to speak; to utter; to make a subject of conversation; as, to talk nonsense; to talk politics.

  3. To consume or spend in talking; -- often followed by away; as, to talk away an evening.

  4. To cause to be or become by talking. ``They would talk themselves mad.'' --Shak. To talk over.

    1. To talk about; to have conference respecting; to deliberate upon; to discuss; as, to talk over a matter or plan.

    2. To change the mind or opinion of by talking; to convince; as, to talk over an opponent.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
talk

c.1200, talken, probably a diminutive or frequentative form related to Middle English tale "story," and ultimately from the same source as tale, with rare English formative -k (compare hark from hear, stalk from steal, smirk from smile) and replacing that word as a verb. East Frisian has talken "to talk, chatter, whisper." Related: Talked; talking.\n

\nTo talk (something) up "discuss in order to promote" is from 1722. To talk shop is from 1854. To talk turkey is from 1824, supposedly from an elaborate joke about a swindled Indian. To talk back "answer impudently or rudely" is from 1869. Phrase talking head is by 1966 in the jargon of television production, "an in-tight closeup of a human head talking on television." In reference to a person who habitually appears on television in talking-head shots (usually a news anchor), by 1970. The phrase is used earlier, in reference to the well-known magic trick (such as Señor Wences's talking head-in-the-box "Pedro" on the "Ed Sullivan Show"), and to actual talking heads in mythology around the world (Orpheus, Bran).

talk

late 15c., "speech, discourse, conversation," from talk (v.). Meaning "informal lecture or address" is from 1859. Meaning "a subject of gossip" is from 1620s (in talk of the town). Talk show first recorded 1965; talk radio is from 1985.

Wiktionary
talk

n. A conversation or discussion. vb. (context transitive English) To communicate, usually by means of speech.

WordNet
talk
  1. n. an exchange of ideas via conversation; "let's have more work and less talk around here" [syn: talking]

  2. (`talk about' is a less formal alternative for `discussion of') discussion; "his poetry contains much talk about love and anger"

  3. the act of giving a talk to an audience; "I attended an interesting talk on local history"

  4. a speech that is open to the public; "he attended a lecture on telecommunications" [syn: lecture, public lecture]

  5. idle gossip or rumor; "there has been talk about you lately" [syn: talk of the town]

talk
  1. v. exchange thoughts; talk with; "We often talk business"; "Actions talk louder than words" [syn: speak]

  2. express in speech; "She talks a lot of nonsense"; "This depressed patient does not verbalize" [syn: speak, utter, mouth, verbalize, verbalise]

  3. use language; "the baby talks already"; "the prisoner won't speak"; "they speak a strange dialect" [syn: speak]

  4. reveal information; "If you don't oblige me, I'll talk!"; "The former employee spilled all the details" [syn: spill]

  5. divulge confidential information or secrets; "Be careful--his secretary talks" [syn: spill the beans, let the cat out of the bag, tattle, blab, peach, babble, sing, babble out, blab out] [ant: keep quiet]

  6. deliver a lecture or talk; "She will talk at Rutgers next week"; "Did you ever lecture at Harvard?" [syn: lecture]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Talk (software)

talk is a Unix text chat program, originally allowing messaging only between the users logged on to one multi-user computer—but later extended to allow chat to users on other systems.

Although largely superseded by IRC and other modern systems, it is still included with most Unix-like systems today, including Linux, BSD systems and OS X.

Talk (magazine)

Talk was an American magazine published from 1999 to 2002.

Talk (film)

Talk is a 1994 Australian film directed by Susan Lambert and starring Victoria Longley and Angie Milliken.

Talk

Talk may refer to:

  • Conversation, interactive communication between two or more people
  • Speech, the production of a spoken language
  • Interaction, face to face conversations
  • Compulsive talking, beyond the bounds of what is considered to be a socially acceptable amount of talking
Talk (DJ Snake song)

"Talk" is a 2016 single by French producer DJ Snake featuring Australian vocalist George Maple. It was released on 2 June 2016 as the second single from DJ Snake's debut album Encore. DJ Snake had hinted at the possibility of releasing new music via Twitter a few days before the single's release. It features vocals from George Maple's song "Talk Talk" that was released in December 2014. The track, which infuses tropical house sounds, was released by Interscope Records and made available for purchase on iTunes on 10 June 2016.

Talk (song)

"Talk" is a song by British alternative rock band Coldplay. Built around a motif from Kraftwerk's 1981 song " Computer Love", it was written by all members of the band and appeared on their third album, X&Y. In the United States, the song entered at number 86 on the Billboard Hot 100 and elsewhere in the world its success varied. It peaked at number one in the Netherlands' Dutch Top 40, becoming the band's first number one single there.

The song received positive reviews, with critics noting the music's sound and memorable lyrics. Both the song and its " Thin White Duke" remix were nominated for the 2007 Grammy Awards, the latter of which won in the category of Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical.

Talk (Yes album)

Talk is the fourteenth studio album by the English progressive rock band Yes, released on 21 March 1994 by Victory Music, an independent label founded by former Atlantic Records vice president Phil Carson. Recording began in late 1992 with the line-up of Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin, Chris Squire, Alan White, and Tony Kaye. Initially, Rick Wakeman was involved in the project before contractual problems led to his departure. The album was recorded on hard disk at Rabin's home studio using an early version of the digital audio workstation software Digital Performer.

Talk was a mild commercial success upon its release, reaching No. 20 in the UK and No. 33 in the U.S, and received a poor reception from music critics. " The Calling" and " Walls" were released as singles that charted at No. 3 and 24 on the U.S. Hot Mainstream Rock chart, respectively. The album was supported by a 1994 tour that covered North and South America and Japan. At its conclusion, Rabin and Kaye left the band in 1995. Carson has high praise for the album but thought it was made "at the wrong time".

Talk (Paul Kelly album)

Talk is the debut album by Australian rock group Paul Kelly and the Dots and was originally released on 30 March 1981 by Mushroom Records and re-released in 1990. Jo Jo Zep & The Falcons leader Joe Camilleri produced seven of the eleven tracks with three tracks produced by Martin Armiger ( The Sports) and one by Trevor Lucas (ex- Fairport Convention, Fotheringay). The album spawned the singles, "Recognition", " Billy Baxter" and "Lowdown". Only "Billy Baxter" appeared on the Kent Music Report Singles Chart it peaked at No. 38. The album peaked at No. 44 on the related Albums Chart. All tracks were written by Kelly, including two co-written with guitarist Chris Langman.

Talk (play)

Talk is an Obie award winning play written by Carl Hancock Rux, first produced at the Joseph Papp Public Theater New York Shakespeare Festival in 2002.The play was initially workshopped at the Sundance Institute in Utah and premiered at the Joseph Papp Public Theater (co-produced by the Foundry Theater, Melanie Joseph, producing, artistic director) directed by Marion McClinton; set by James Noone; costumes by Toni-Leslie James; lighting by James L. Vermeulen; video, Marilys Ernst; sound by Tim Schellenbaum; dramaturgy and music supervisor, Jocelyn Clarke; production stage manager, Scott Pegg; production manager, Jody Kuh; assistant stage manager, Neelam Vaswani.

Usage examples of "talk".

I have heard thy windy talk, and this is the answer: we will neither depart, nor come down to you, but will abide our death by your hands here on this hill-side.

Everett were just stepping out of the stables when they spied Abigail and Moira strolling toward them, talking and laughing.

All the talk aboard was of booty and a run ashore with some money to spend.

So they abode a little, and the more part of what talk there was came from the Lady, and she was chiefly asking Ralph of his home in Upmeads, and his brethren and kindred, and he told her all openly, and hid naught, while her voice ravished his very soul from him, and it seemed strange to him, that such an one should hold him in talk concerning these simple matters and familiar haps, and look on him so kindly and simply.

Martin Cash was a fellow countryman, born at Enniscorthy in County Wexford, and when he had been sent to Norfolk Island, he had talked freely of his exploits as absconder and bushranger, taking great pride in both.

The entire county could be listening in, but too much time had passed and Banish needed to talk to Abies now.

Talking of Serviliuses and getting back to the grain shortage, Servilius the Augur continues to do abysmally in Sicily.

A woman raised in an environment so full of honor and respect, and someone who, according to the academician, led her whole family around by their noses, had thought it worthwhile to talk to him, and in a way that came rather close to friendliness.

But if the governmental systems are providing justice and protecting equity, revolutions can be achieved through talk, not violence.

At that moment I saw Petronio going by, and availing myself of a moment when the officer was talking to someone, I told him not to appear to be acquainted with me, but to tell me where he lived.

I left the coffee-room with the young Frenchman, who, being well acquainted with the place, took me to the most favourable spot, and we waited there for the two other champions, who were walking slowly and talking together.

He had talked to Scott before about using his acreage to build low-cost homes for people in need.

He tried again and again to get Scott to talk about his idea for utilizing some of the Overhulse acreage to build clean but cheap housing.

One could not have a pretty actress to supper without causing a scandal, but such an invitation to a castrato makes nobody talk.

It helped that I knew where Jam was and that I had actu ally talked to her.