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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

sue

verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
sued for slander
▪ He is being sued for slander.
sued...for libel
▪ Holt sued the newspaper for libel.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
successfully
▪ Two of his victims successfully sued him and the plaintiff then tried to recover the damages from the defendant.
▪ He was vindicated when he successfully sued the tabloid that broke the story for libel.
▪ Yet this greedy pair have successfully sued a fertility clinic for giving them three healthy babies instead of two.
▪ The City was sued successfully by the Youth Law Center in 1990 over conditions there and has been searching for alternatives since.
■ NOUN
agency
▪ The dealer contemplated suing the recruitment agency until he found a better job.
authority
▪ If a local authority was unable to sue in libel it would not, however, be without recourse to the courts.
▪ If a corporate public authority is unable to sue for libel it is, however, by no means without remedy.
breach
▪ Any well-drafted transfer will therefore provide for the transfer of the right to sue for such breaches.
▪ The owners of the property on which the sign sat sued Bressler for breach of contract.
▪ His remedy was to sue for breach of contract.
▪ Before then, unions could not be sued for breach of these agreements.
▪ She and the company's chairman, Weng You-ming, were being sued for breach of trust in the sale.
▪ He sued for breach of contract.
▪ Fiona is advised by fellow students that she can sue Uncle Tom for breach of contract.
▪ He can not sue the manufacturer for breach of the latter's contract of sale.
city
▪ The posters were withdrawn after the tobacco industry sued the city council.
▪ Levada threatened to sue the city to get his way.
▪ The developer, in turn, sued the city and Pilachowski, setting off a lengthy legal battle.
company
▪ My own company sued me, didn't you know?
▪ They are the company we are suing.
▪ The company always sues those who mimic them, and almost always wins.
Companies A company may sue for defamation, but only in respect of statements which damage its business reputation.
▪ Nevertheless each member of the court held that the company could sue to protect its trading reputation.
▪ The Sheila na gigh bus company was suing for the loss of its only bus and Mr Patel for his Woodbine machine.
▪ Another company, Tatung has sued, too.
contract
▪ His remedy was to sue for breach of contract.
▪ The agency has sued to nullify the contract, claiming it was illegal.
▪ He can of course sue upon his own contract of sale, i.e. sue the retailer.
▪ He sued for breach of contract.
corporation
▪ The Paradise Corporation was suing three of the city's leading newspapers.
▪ A corporation may sue for a libel affecting property, not for one merely affecting personal reputation.
court
▪ I may not for instance sue somebody in a court of law.
▪ He later admitted to having stage-managed the attack and was sued for contempt of court.
▪ It would seem to follow from that that the unsuccessful plaintiff can sue again in the court of the defendant's domicile.
▪ He believed his boss had violated the age-discrimination law, and he sued in federal court.
▪ Simpson was acquitted in 1995 and is now being sued in civil court by the victims' families.
▪ It said federal banking law does not let one bank sue another in federal court over hot-check disputes.
damages
▪ The Department of Trade opposed his application to sue for damages.
▪ A person who is libeled can sue for damages.
▪ Read in studio Traders who've gone out of business in a showpiece shopping complex are suing the developers for damages.
▪ Ten plaintiffs are suing the companies for damages from the blast.
▪ The purchaser may wish to accept repudiation and sue for damages.
▪ We are taking details, legal advice and our rights to sue for damages are fully reserved.
▪ In this case, the contract may be set aside and the buyer will be able to sue for damages.
▪ But an employee not giving proper notice of termination of employment may be sued for damages by the employer.
defamation
▪ Primafacie that right will be interfered with by a public authority if the maker of the statement is sued for defamation.
▪ Companies A company may sue for defamation, but only in respect of statements which damage its business reputation.
defendant
▪ He sued the defendants on the grounds of their vicarious liability for his brother's negligence and breach of statutory duty.
▪ His widow sued the defendants for negligence.
▪ The plaintiff sued the defendants for breach of contract to exercise due care in giving him financial advice.
divorce
▪ These pictures were the most sensational evidence when her second husband, the Duke of Argyll, sued for divorce.
▪ Her granddaughter the Countess Olenska wishes to sue her husband for divorce.
employer
▪ For example, how will suing your former employer affect your chances of finding another job?
▪ A stone fell and injured the plaintiff and he sued his employers for negligence.
firm
▪ The bill would allow smokers and their surviving families to sue the tobacco firms.
government
▪ Now the Government is trying to sue me, and that is persecution.
▪ An affronted Legislature has changed the law so that Texas governments can no longer sue those seeking records.
industry
▪ But 14 more states and several localities have sued the industry since then.
▪ Eight states have sued the industry, seeking to recover the Medicaid insurance costs of treating poor people with tobacco-related diseases.
▪ Others divest Action by state pension funds on tobacco-related holdings is not limited to the states that have sued the industry.
injury
▪ They passed legislation that often made it impossible for ordinary citizens to sue for their injuries.
▪ So in practice no-fault laws have allowed people to sue if their injuries are serious enough.
lawyer
▪ Hearst says she has consulted a lawyer and is considering suing Bailey.
libel
▪ It seems never to have been doubted that a corporation created by Royal Charter can sue for libel.
▪ Trade unions Trade unions, and most other unincorporated associations can not sue for libel.
▪ If a corporate public authority is unable to sue for libel it is, however, by no means without remedy.
▪ Moreover, none of the allegedly violent police interrogators named in both books have sued for libel.
▪ She had sued him for libel.
▪ A corporation may sue for a libel affecting property, not for one merely affecting personal reputation.
loss
▪ In that case the contractor sought to sue the engineer for losses arising from alleged under-certification of the amounts due to the contractor.
▪ The Sheila na gigh bus company was suing for the loss of its only bus and Mr Patel for his Woodbine machine.
▪ He is one of 35 local people who is considering suing the authority for loss of business because of the algae.
▪ It sued to recover its loss.
manufacturer
▪ So suppose an adult sniffs glue making himself very ill and subsequently sues the glue manufacturer.
▪ Medtronic Inc. v. Lohr: Federal law does not prevent patients from suing manufacturers of defective medical devices in state courts.
▪ This relieves the employee of the need to identify and sue the manufacturer of the defective equipment.
▪ He can not sue the manufacturer for breach of the latter's contract of sale.
negligence
▪ His widow sued the defendants for negligence.
▪ He could also sue Alan for negligence.
▪ They decided to sue the farm for negligence and today they won an historic test case at the County Court in Swindon.
▪ The plaintiff was injured and sued in negligence.
▪ A stone fell and injured the plaintiff and he sued his employers for negligence.
▪ Mr Bird issued a writ three years ago. he plans to sue for professional negligence.
▪ If Brian sued John for negligence he could be met with the defences of volenti non fit injuria and contributory negligence.
newspaper
▪ Read in studio A former maid of the Princess Royal has won the right to sue a national newspaper.
▪ Pitka claimed that these words were false and defamatory and sued the newspaper for libel.
owner
▪ It then sued the former owners to force them to pay for the cleanup.&038;.
▪ After Pinocchio eats his way through a local bakery, Gepetto is sued by the owners for full restitution.
parent
▪ A spokesman for Tewkesbury Council said he couldn't comment on the parents plans to sue.
▪ Crushed to death: boy's parents say they may sue for damages.
▪ Stephen Lawrence's parents are suing 42 officers involved in the failed investigation of his murder, including Sir Paul.
partner
▪ A creditor of the partnership may therefore sue any partner for the full amount of the debt.
▪ Barneys said it will sue partner Isetan to recoup more than $ 50 million.
▪ The closely held retailer said it would sue its partner to recoup more than $ 50 million it claims was unfairly withdrawn.
party
▪ For example, if the cost of injuries exceeds $ 5, 000, the other party may be sued.
▪ The jury, then as now, was never permitted to know there was an insurance company behind the party being sued.
▪ If that does not work, the party will sue the state.
peace
▪ But Richard was in no mood to sue for peace.
▪ She was compelled to sue for peace and under the terms of the Treaty of Paris was disarmed on the Black Sea.
▪ They are prepared to sue for peace.
person
▪ There had been conflicting opinions by individual judges on whether injuries must be sustained by a living person before next-of-kin could sue.
▪ That person may sue for any trespass committed since the accrual of the right of entry.
▪ Thus, execution in rem can have been available only where the person sued was actually in possession of the object.
plaintiff
▪ Under the Act the plaintiff can sue either.
▪ Ten plaintiffs are suing the companies for damages from the blast.
▪ Had the plaintiff sued his brother then the action would have failed on the grounds of volenti.
▪ Some furs were stolen from the room while the plaintiffs were out, and the plaintiffs sued the hotel.
▪ It was not worth the plaintiff suing the driver as he was uninsured and had no money.
▪ The plaintiff was injured and sued in negligence.
▪ Only in these five cases may the plaintiff sue for slander without having to prove financial loss.
▪ The plaintiff had sued one member, Hunter, of a committee of the management of a hospital which had engaged him.
school
▪ This point was illustrated by a New York case in which a student, Bruce Gross, sued a parachute training school.
▪ He then sued school officials, claiming that his work was of passing quality and that he should not have been dismissed.
▪ The alternative is to sue the school, which parents regularly do over matters of questionable significance.
slander
▪ Dramatists or actors whose work is maliciously booed or hissed off the stage would sue their tormentors for slander rather than libel.
▪ Can a teacher sue a principal for slander for making critical remarks about his or her teaching techniques?
▪ Of course he'd sue me for slander if l made the accusation publicly.
▪ Only in these five cases may the plaintiff sue for slander without having to prove financial loss.
state
▪ Eight states have sued the industry, seeking to recover the Medicaid insurance costs of treating poor people with tobacco-related diseases.
▪ Others divest Action by state pension funds on tobacco-related holdings is not limited to the states that have sued the industry.
student
▪ Fiona is advised by fellow students that she can sue Uncle Tom for breach of contract.
▪ Can students sue teachers for giving them low grades?
▪ Can students sue teachers for negative statements made in letters of recommendation?
tobacco
▪ The bill would allow smokers and their surviving families to sue the tobacco firms.
■ VERB
allow
▪ Had it gone ahead, companies would have been allowed to sue countries for the removal of the laws restraining them.
▪ Despite this release, the court allowed Gross to sue.
▪ So in practice no-fault laws have allowed people to sue if their injuries are serious enough.
▪ Both countries already have adopted laws that allow their nationals to sue the United States if affected by Helms-Burton.
▪ The suit was filed under a provision of the False Claims Act that allows individuals to sue companies defrauding the government.
decide
▪ Other investors have hired attorneys and are deciding whom to sue.
▪ They decided to sue the farm for negligence and today they won an historic test case at the County Court in Swindon.
▪ Cameron decide whether to sue in state or federal court?
▪ Following a judge's refusal to prevent the Gagosian show taking place, Sonnabend have decided to sue.
▪ Once fund managers see the sequence of events leading to the share price collapse, they will decide whether to sue.
entitle
▪ An author who has not approved the apology is entitled to sue the person who has issued it.
threaten
▪ Levada threatened to sue the city to get his way.
▪ The Guildford Four threatened to sue him.
▪ And on March 20, a man argued with and threatened to sue two intake clerks who refused to record his documents.
▪ McAvennie threatened to sue Kamara but dropped the idea when it was established that the injury would not end his career.
▪ Two black men who had been jurors in the Bristol riots trial in 1981 threatened to sue Lord Denning for libel.
▪ They also threatened to sue First Alert.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ If that does not work, the party will sue the state.
▪ It seems never to have been doubted that a corporation created by Royal Charter can sue for libel.
▪ There is nothing in the contract that would prevent Jody from suing.
Wikipedia

Sué

Sué, Xué, Sua, Zuhe or Suhé was the god of the Sun in the religion of the Muisca. He was married to Moon goddess Chía. The Muisca and their confederation were one of the four advanced civilizations of the Americas and developed their own religion on the Altiplano Cundiboyacense in the Andes. Both the Sun and rain, impersonated by Chibchacum, were very important for their agriculture. __NOTOC__

Sue (name)

Sue is a common short form of the following female given names:

  • Susan
  • Susanna / Susannah / Suzanna
  • Susanne
  • Suzanne

It is rarely used as a man's name, a notable example being Sue K. Hicks (1895-1980), American jurist, who may have inspired the song A Boy Named Sue.

Sue (album)

Sue is the debut album by Frazier Chorus and was released in 1989.

The CD version of the album included an extra track "Little Chef". The album was reissued in 2008 on the Cherry Red Records label.

Sue (dinosaur)

"Sue" is the nickname given to FMNH PR 2081, which is the largest, most extensive and best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex specimen ever found at over 90% recovered by bulk. It has a length of , stands tall at the hips, and was estimated to have weighed around 6.4 to 10.2 metric tons when alive. It was discovered in the summer of 1990, by Sue Hendrickson, a paleontologist, and was named after her. After ownership disputes were settled, the fossil was auctioned in October 1997, for US $7.6 million, the highest amount ever paid for a dinosaur fossil, and is now a permanent feature at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Illinois.

Sue (Or in a Season of Crime)

"Sue (Or in a Season of Crime)" is a song by English rock musician David Bowie. It was released as the lead single from his compilation album Nothing Has Changed (2014). The track was premiered on 12 October 2014, by BBC Radio 6 Music presenter Guy Garvey and features the Maria Schneider Orchestra. Re-recorded versions of both the song and its B-side, " 'Tis a Pity She Was a Whore", appear on Bowie's twenty-fifth studio album, Blackstar.

At the 58th Annual Grammy Awards, "Sue (Or in a Season of Crime)" won the Grammy Award for Best Arrangement, Instrumental and Vocals for bandleader Maria Schneider.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Sue

Sue \Sue\, v. i.

  1. To seek by request; to make application; to petition; to entreat; to plead.

    By adverse destiny constrained to sue For counsel and redress, he sues to you.
    --Pope.

    C[ae]sar came to Rome to sue for the double honor of a triumph and the consulship.
    --C. Middleton.

    The Indians were defeated and sued for peace.
    --Jefferson.

  2. (Law) To prosecute; to make legal claim; to seek (for something) in law; as, to sue for damages.

  3. To woo; to pay addresses as a lover.
    --Massinger.

  4. (Naut.) To be left high and dry on the shore, as a ship.
    --R. H. Dana, Jr.

Sue

Sue \Sue\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sued; p. pr. & vb. n. Suing.] [OE. suen, sewen, siwen, OF. sivre (pres.ind. 3d sing. il siut, suit, he follows, nous sevons we follow), LL. sequere, for L. sequi, secutus; akin to Gr. ?, Skr. sac to accompany, and probably to E. see, v.t. See See, v. t., and cf. Consequence, Ensue, Execute, Obsequious, Pursue, Second, Sect in religion, Sequence, Suit.]

  1. To follow up; to chase; to seek after; to endeavor to win; to woo.

    For yet there was no man that haddle him sued.
    --Chaucer.

    I was beloved of many a gentle knight, And sued and sought with all the service due.
    --Spenser.

    Sue me, and woo me, and flatter me.
    --Tennyson.

  2. (Law)

    1. To seek justice or right from, by legal process; to institute process in law against; to bring an action against; to prosecute judicially.

    2. To proceed with, as an action, and follow it up to its proper termination; to gain by legal process.

  3. (Falconry) To clean, as the beak; -- said of a hawk.

  4. (Naut.) To leave high and dry on shore; as, to sue a ship.
    --R. H. Dana, Jr.

    To sue out (Law), to petition for and take out, or to apply for and obtain; as, to sue out a writ in chancery; to sue out a pardon for a criminal.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

Sue

fem. proper name, a shortened or familiar form of Susan.

sue

c.1200, "continue, persevere," from Anglo-French suer "follow after, continue," Old French suir, sivre "pursue, follow after, sue in court" (Modern French suivre), from Vulgar Latin *sequere "follow," from Latin sequi "follow" (see sequel). Sense of "start a lawsuit against" first recorded c.1300, on notion of "following up" a matter in court. Sometimes short for ensue or pursue. Meaning "make entreaty, petition, plead" (usually with for) is from late 14c. Related: Sued; suing.

Wiktionary

sue

vb. 1 (label en obsolete transitive) To follow. 2 (label en transitive) To file a legal action against someone, generally a non-criminal action. 3 (label en transitive) To seek by request; to make application; to petition; to entreat; to plead. 4 (label en falconry of a hawk) To clean (the beak, etc.). 5 (label en nautical) To leave high and dry on shore. 6 (label en obsolete transitive) To court.

WordNet

sue

v. institute legal proceedings against; file a suit against; "He was warned that the district attorney would process him"; "She actioned the company for discrimination" [syn: action, litigate, process]

Usage examples of "sue".

Here, Georgia sued certain asphalt companies for treble damages under the Sherman Act arising allegedly out of a conspiracy to control the prices of asphalt of which Georgia was a large purchaser.

Should Italy feel unable to endure the continued attacks which will be made upon her from the air, and presently, I trust, by amphibious operations, the Italian people will have to choose between, on the one hand, setting up a Government under someone like Grandi to sue for a separate peace, or, on the other, submitting to a German occupation, which would merely aggravate the severity of the war.

Mr Arbutus to answer in kind and reversing the natural order of things to tell Mr Gibling and Mr Gibling to sue and be damned.

As early as 1818 the Supreme Court ruled that the United States could sue in its own name in all cases of contract without Congressional authorization of such suits.

He was 28 years old, left-handed, bilingual, Catholic, twice married but never in the Church, and was currently being sued for bigamy by one Juanita Torres Fuentes in San Diego.

Sue was wearing an off-the-bosom chlamys with what seemed to be nothing more than a spray-on on the revealed side.

As I saw him, I thought I had found the ideal majesty which I had been so surprised not to find in the king of Sardinia, and I could not entertain a doubt of Madame de Pompadour having been in love with the king when she sued for his royal attention.

Quirinale e delle sue prigioni e direttori, custodi, ufficiali di guardia, dragoni, birri, tutto quanto si trovava nel palazzo era posto in arresto per ordine perentorio dello sdegnato ministro.

It was either send him to Jackson, or have Gillespie sue us, because he knowed some way that Darl set fire to it.

I wonder if we could sue him for defamation, just for mentioning our name.

Before his departure for Lombardy, Chaucer -- still holding his post in the Customs -- selected two representatives or trustees, to protect his estate against legal proceedings in his absence, or to sue in his name defaulters and offenders against the imposts which he was charged to enforce.

The holding does not necessarily disturb one made thirty years earlier in which the Court ruled that a statute which closed the courts of the enacting State to any action on any contract in the State by a foreign corporation unless it had previously appointed a resident agent to accept process, could not be constitutionally applied to the right of a foreign corporation to sue on an interstate transaction.

I need names -- all those who defaulted on loans from Mistress Fitt and were about to be sued, and all those from whom she cozened larger penalties than she ought to have been due.

If Mistress Fitt had sued, Master Gamage would have learned what his wife had been up to.

I twirled Toni and I sucked Sue and the visions of the gray gomere twats and the diseased white and black and native American and under- and overprivileged twats were replaced by fuzzy blond Danish twats and a neat little clit writhing in those spangled gluteal folds.