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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

string

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a string of failures (=a series of failures)
▪ The team has had a string of failures in recent games.
a string of victories (=a series of victories)
▪ The team won a string of victories.
a string/series/set of coincidences
▪ The accident happened because of a string of unfortunate coincidences.
a string/stringed instrument
▪ He spent many hours playing string instruments of all kinds.
cut the apron strings
▪ You’re 25 years old, and you still haven’t cut the apron strings.
hold/control the purse strings
▪ It all comes down to who holds the purse strings.
instrumental/string/brass etc ensemble
loop of wire/rope/string etc
▪ A loop of wire held the gate shut.
string bean
string of pearls (=a necklace made of pearls)
▪ a string of pearls
string quartet (=four people playing musical instruments with strings, such as violins)
▪ a string quartet
string tie
tied to...apron strings
▪ Jeff is still tied to his mother’s apron strings.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
long
▪ Death of his father. Long string of jokes about the funeral, as though to show how well he was taking it.
▪ Two divorces, a long string of live-in boyfriends.
▪ Our Social Security system has already attached a very long string to generations of children for support of their parents' generation.
▪ TIMES$ A 24 character long string pseudo-variable which reads and sets the system clock.
▪ I thought of the long string of bedtimes that had joined our lives.
▪ Beads can choke babies if swallowed, and long strings of beads can also half-strangle older children.
▪ We picked up to a hover, moved out, and parked in a long string down the middle of row three.
■ NOUN
character
▪ A character string consists of words separated by commas or spaces.
▪ It is to such character string formats that we now turn.
▪ This chapter mentioned several ways in which the end of a character string may be indicated.
▪ A 36-bit word holds six 6-bit characters, and a character string consists of a number of consecutive words.
▪ We therefore consider building an architecture round character string manipulation, rather than round word manipulation.
letter
▪ Sayre used di-gram and tri-gram statistics to rule out implausible letter string combinations.
▪ Use of n-grams requires little storage or processing but is less efficient at discriminating between acceptable and unacceptable letter strings.
▪ Statistical information about n-grams has been applied to the output to select a single most likely letter string result.
▪ Lexical lookup is more demanding of storage and processing but is better at rejecting unacceptable letter strings.
▪ This involved presenting a priming word just prior to a target letter string.
▪ In these cases, letter string combinations are only ruled out if they do not occur in the sample source.
▪ Taken together, these character candidates produce a number of letter string candidates for any one word.
▪ Sayre states that in most cases, there are less than four resulting alternative letter strings, and usually one.
purse
▪ The other half of him is Yorkshire, giving us yet again a man strangled by his own purse strings.
▪ The business leaders wanted the state to loosen its purse strings and give the schools' budgets a healthy boost.
▪ The same hopes as any other pensioner, unless of course that pensioner happens to hold the purse strings.
▪ Why, for instance, does Dahlia continue to control the purse strings after Ella is revealed as the rightful heir?
▪ After closing the caecum with a purse string ligature, the loops of intestine were restored to the abdominal cavity.
▪ All these issues add up to political fire works on Capitol Hill before Congress loosens its purse strings.
▪ Nevertheless, the purse strings have been loosened sufficiently to provide a palatable enough feast.
▪ This means restraint in public spending and holding back the natural enthusiasm of a clutch of new ministers to open the purse strings.
quartet
▪ There was a party in the ballroom: sparkling chandeliers, string quartet.
▪ Remember those glittering parties, the lanterns lining the drive, the string quartet playing Viennese waltzes?
▪ Jacqui watched from a distance as they drank iced coffee and danced to the string quartet.
▪ Mind has waited for 3 billion years on this planet before composing its first string quartet.
▪ Howarth has got a string quartet going at the Lab and they gave a concert there.
▪ The string quartet within the orchestra resembles Faure.
▪ If he wanted to hear a string quartet there was no question of going out in the evening to a concert.
▪ Stravinsky was never at home with the warm homogeneity of the string quartet.
section
▪ The string section repeatedly cut through his fraught baritone with great sheets of emotional counterpoint.
▪ He balanced the string sections between themselves.
▪ Mark Wigglesworth has a smile which would beam the most recalcitrant string section into bowing with bravura.
word
▪ A string such as can be parsed into six different word strings even when the word boundary is known.
▪ A probability was assigned to any word string that could be formed from the spoken input.
▪ In the following chapters we discuss possible ways of reducing the number of word strings.
▪ However, we found indications in the last chapter that this could lead to a very large number of possible word strings.
▪ The syntactic analyser identifies the most syntactically acceptable word strings, whilst the semantic analyser identifies the most semantically plausible.
▪ However, a knowledge of pair-wise transitional probability is often insufficient to select the target word string.
▪ However, if this is not the case we may find a combinatorial explosion of word strings.
■ VERB
attach
▪ However, if they were not attached to a string when new and soft they will have to be drilled.
▪ Our Social Security system has already attached a very long string to generations of children for support of their parents' generation.
▪ Jones attached a piece of string to the bomb's detonator pin and a breeze block.
▪ If attaching strings to future generations without their consent is wrong, the Social Security system is indefensible.
▪ A day after the successful flight, a stronger line was attached to the kite string.
▪ But they attached strings to the aid.
control
▪ It is almost as if the muscles controlled the fingers as marionettes are controlled by their strings.
▪ Why, for instance, does Dahlia continue to control the purse strings after Ella is revealed as the rightful heir?
pull
▪ But if he was the puppet, who was pulling the strings and to what dance?
▪ He pulled strings to get the two of them into a university.
▪ An exhibit where you pull a string and hear Wolfman Jack howl?
▪ Mrs Naulls was in Sunningdale because her son Stanley was a Hilderbridge councillor and had pulled strings.
▪ The scientists pulling his strings are erratic.
▪ She, who had always pulled the strings, to have found herself in this position.
▪ This, of course, leaves Karadzic amply able to pull strings from backstage.
tie
▪ Inside the box was a small flat package wrapped in muslin and tied tightly with string.
▪ A parental dividend would simply tie the string in a more direct and arguably fairer way.
▪ The bundle was tied together with string and had been left there and forgotten one morning when Lavinia was in a hurry.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
apron strings
brass/rhythm/woodwind/string etc section
▪ A brass section blares on trumpet, tenor saxophone and bass sax.
▪ It was in Vegas that Sinatra decided to book Norvo as his opening act and as his regular rhythm section.
▪ Now, drummers like Roy Haynes or Elvin Jones could be heard and studied, not buried in big-band rhythm sections.
▪ The rhythm Section became the stars.
▪ The rhythm section provided a perfect cushion for the soloists, springy and supportive but never obtrusive.
▪ The string section repeatedly cut through his fraught baritone with great sheets of emotional counterpoint.
▪ Try I fall in love too easily for the young Marsalis's strong sound gelling with the experience of the rhythm section.
highly strung
▪ Because of his fine pedigree he was a little bit more highly strung than the others and would set off rather sharply.
▪ Being nervous, highly strung or liable to sudden anger and 2.
▪ But she had to leave because she was a bit highly strung; and of course you know Virginia herself was.
▪ For one thing, Nijinsky started life so excitable and highly strung that O'Brien warned his owner he might not be trainable.
▪ I think he is just an ill and shocked young man with the highly strung temperament of so many artistic people.
▪ Paul was highly strung, working too hard.
▪ Sandra was a dealer lacking in professional experience, who had a highly strung temperament.
▪ They were all very highly strung and eventually, they did break up.
how long is a piece of string?
pull strings
▪ Samuels pulled strings to get her daughter a job in Mitchell's office.
▪ Elfed could and did pull strings on the local Co-operative committee.
▪ Gooch has developed as a captain, too, pulling strings whereas before he might have retreated.
▪ He pulled strings to get the two of them into a university.
▪ Mrs Naulls was in Sunningdale because her son Stanley was a Hilderbridge councillor and had pulled strings.
▪ This, of course, leaves Karadzic amply able to pull strings from backstage.
pull the/sb's strings
▪ Who is really pulling the strings at the White House?
▪ But if he was the puppet, who was pulling the strings and to what dance?
▪ However, I was going to try to pull the right strings.
▪ In his own way, he knew how to pull her strings.
▪ She, who had always pulled the strings, to have found herself in this position.
▪ So, when he died, the puppets had no-one to pull their strings anymore.
▪ Swindon's John Reynolds the man who pulled the strings for Andre Agassi.
▪ The scientists pulling his strings are erratic.
the purse strings
▪ Nevertheless, the purse strings have been loosened sufficiently to provide a palatable enough feast.
▪ Now local transportation agencies decide where the purse strings.
▪ One of Syl's ways of expressing displeasure was by tightening the purse strings.
▪ The Government have no intention of giving power to anyone except those who hold the purse strings.
▪ The same hopes as any other pensioner, unless of course that pensioner happens to hold the purse strings.
▪ This means restraint in public spending and holding back the natural enthusiasm of a clutch of new ministers to open the purse strings.
▪ Why, for instance, does Dahlia continue to control the purse strings after Ella is revealed as the rightful heir?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I need a piece of string to tie this package.
▪ The pen was hanging from a string on the wall.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Almost every trainer with a string of 20 horses shares the same ultimate ambition - to win the Cheltenham Gold Cup.
▪ Is this a string of isolated anecdotes or a pattern of substandard care?
▪ It will give that tight West Coast strum with the bass strings becoming almost percussive.
▪ She pulled the string tight, strangling him.
▪ The strings vibrate again, underscoring my panic.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
highly
▪ Breeds differ in how highly strung they are, how much they snap at children and in their fondness for barking.
■ NOUN
sentence
▪ Never mind he can't string two sentences together - he'd never admit that.
▪ Look for where the names pop out, or where they are strung together into sentences.
▪ Many are by journalists, who ought to know how to string a few sentences together.
▪ Female speaker I can say the odd word, but I can't string a sentence together yet.
word
▪ I never could string two words together, even at school.
▪ The writers could string words together like beads on a necklace.
▪ I can't string two words together, not really.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
apron strings
brass/rhythm/woodwind/string etc section
▪ A brass section blares on trumpet, tenor saxophone and bass sax.
▪ It was in Vegas that Sinatra decided to book Norvo as his opening act and as his regular rhythm section.
▪ Now, drummers like Roy Haynes or Elvin Jones could be heard and studied, not buried in big-band rhythm sections.
▪ The rhythm Section became the stars.
▪ The rhythm section provided a perfect cushion for the soloists, springy and supportive but never obtrusive.
▪ The string section repeatedly cut through his fraught baritone with great sheets of emotional counterpoint.
▪ Try I fall in love too easily for the young Marsalis's strong sound gelling with the experience of the rhythm section.
highly strung
▪ Because of his fine pedigree he was a little bit more highly strung than the others and would set off rather sharply.
▪ Being nervous, highly strung or liable to sudden anger and 2.
▪ But she had to leave because she was a bit highly strung; and of course you know Virginia herself was.
▪ For one thing, Nijinsky started life so excitable and highly strung that O'Brien warned his owner he might not be trainable.
▪ I think he is just an ill and shocked young man with the highly strung temperament of so many artistic people.
▪ Paul was highly strung, working too hard.
▪ Sandra was a dealer lacking in professional experience, who had a highly strung temperament.
▪ They were all very highly strung and eventually, they did break up.
how long is a piece of string?
the purse strings
▪ Nevertheless, the purse strings have been loosened sufficiently to provide a palatable enough feast.
▪ Now local transportation agencies decide where the purse strings.
▪ One of Syl's ways of expressing displeasure was by tightening the purse strings.
▪ The Government have no intention of giving power to anyone except those who hold the purse strings.
▪ The same hopes as any other pensioner, unless of course that pensioner happens to hold the purse strings.
▪ This means restraint in public spending and holding back the natural enthusiasm of a clutch of new ministers to open the purse strings.
▪ Why, for instance, does Dahlia continue to control the purse strings after Ella is revealed as the rightful heir?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Help me string the popcorn to hang on the Christmas tree.
▪ The 200 houses are strung along a narrow 5-mile road.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Alma made them string clothesline around so she could stretch blanketing over him and down to the floor without its touching him.
▪ Awake all night, Jimmy was bleary-eyed but too strung up on his nerves to notice he was tired.
▪ He strung a rope from the roof of the family barn to the ground and practiced aerial feats.
▪ If there was ever a task that wanted teamwork, it was stringing tree lights.
▪ She distrusted the offer of talks which had no other purpose than to string out negotiation.
▪ You're not just stringing me along?
The Collaborative International Dictionary

String

String \String\ (str[i^]ng), n. [OE. string, streng, AS. streng; akin to D. streng, G. strang, Icel. strengr, Sw. str["a]ng, Dan. str[ae]ng; probably from the adj., E. strong (see Strong); or perhaps originally meaning, twisted, and akin to E. strangle.]

  1. A small cord, a line, a twine, or a slender strip of leather, or other substance, used for binding together, fastening, or tying things; a cord, larger than a thread and smaller than a rope; as, a shoe string; a bonnet string; a silken string.
    --Shak.

    Round Ormond's knee thou tiest the mystic string.
    --Prior.

  2. A thread or cord on which a number of objects or parts are strung or arranged in close and orderly succession; hence, a line or series of things arranged on a thread, or as if so arranged; a succession; a concatenation; a chain; as, a string of shells or beads; a string of dried apples; a string of houses; a string of arguments. ``A string of islands.''
    --Gibbon.

  3. A strip, as of leather, by which the covers of a book are held together.
    --Milton.

  4. The cord of a musical instrument, as of a piano, harp, or violin; specifically (pl.), the stringed instruments of an orchestra, in distinction from the wind instruments; as, the strings took up the theme. ``An instrument of ten strings.''
    --Ps. xxx. iii. 2.

    Me softer airs befit, and softer strings Of lute, or viol still.
    --Milton.

  5. The line or cord of a bow.
    --Ps. xi. 2.

    He twangs the grieving string.
    --Pope.

  6. A fiber, as of a plant; a little, fibrous root.

    Duckweed putteth forth a little string into the water, from the bottom.
    --Bacon.

  7. A nerve or tendon of an animal body.

    The string of his tongue was loosed.
    --Mark vii. 35.

  8. (Shipbuilding) An inside range of ceiling planks, corresponding to the sheer strake on the outside and bolted to it.

  9. (Bot.) The tough fibrous substance that unites the valves of the pericap of leguminous plants, and which is readily pulled off; as, the strings of beans.

  10. (Mining) A small, filamentous ramification of a metallic vein.
    --Ure.

  11. (Arch.) Same as Stringcourse.

  12. (Billiards) The points made in a game.

    1. In various indoor games, a score or tally, sometimes, as in American billiard games, marked by buttons threaded on a string or wire.

    2. In various games, competitions, etc., a certain number of turns at play, of rounds, etc.

  13. (Billiards & Pool)

    1. The line from behind and over which the cue ball must be played after being out of play as by being pocketed or knocked off the table; -- called also string line.

    2. Act of stringing for break.

  14. A hoax; a trumped-up or ``fake'' story. [Slang]

  15. a sequence of similar objects or events sufficiently close in time or space to be perceived as a group; a string of accidents; a string of restaurants on a highway.

  16. (Physics) A one-dimensional string-like mathematical object used as a means of representing the properties of fundamental particles in string theory, one theory of particle physics; such hypothetical objects are one-dimensional and very small (10^ -33 cm) but exist in more than four spatial dimensions, and have various modes of vibration. Considering particles as strings avoids some of the problems of treating particles as points, and allows a unified treatment of gravity along with the other three forces (electromagnetism, the weak force, and the strong force) in a manner consistent with quantum mechanics. See also string theory. String band (Mus.), a band of musicians using only, or chiefly, stringed instruments. String beans.

    1. A dish prepared from the unripe pods of several kinds of beans; -- so called because the strings are stripped off.

    2. Any kind of beans in which the pods are used for cooking before the seeds are ripe; usually, the low bush bean.

      To have two strings to one's bow, to have a means or expedient in reserve in case the one employed fails.

String

String \String\, v. i. To form into a string or strings, as a substance which is stretched, or people who are moving along, etc.

String

String \String\ (str[i^]ng), v. t. [imp. Strung (str[u^]ng); p. p. Strung (R. Stringed (str[i^]ngd)); p. pr. & vb. n. Stringing.]

  1. To furnish with strings; as, to string a violin.

    Has not wise nature strung the legs and feet With firmest nerves, designed to walk the street?
    --Gay.

  2. To put in tune the strings of, as a stringed instrument, in order to play upon it.

    For here the Muse so oft her harp has strung, That not a mountain rears its head unsung.
    --Addison.

  3. To put on a string; to file; as, to string beads.

  4. To make tense; to strengthen.

    Toil strung the nerves, and purified the blood.
    --Dryden.

  5. To deprive of strings; to strip the strings from; as, to string beans. See String, n., 9.

  6. To hoax; josh; jolly; often used with along; as, we strung him along all day until he realized we were kidding.

Wikipedia

String (computer science)

In computer programming, a string is traditionally a sequence of characters, either as a literal constant or as some kind of variable. The latter may allow its elements to be mutated and the length changed, or it may be fixed (after creation). A string is generally understood as a data type and is often implemented as an array of bytes (or words) that stores a sequence of elements, typically characters, using some character encoding. A string may also denote more general arrays or other sequence (or list) data types and structures.

Depending on programming language and precise data type used, a variable declared to be a string may either cause storage in memory to be statically allocated for a predetermined maximum length or employ dynamic allocation to allow it to hold variable number of elements.

When a string appears literally in source code, it is known as a string literal or an anonymous string.

In formal languages, which are used in mathematical logic and theoretical computer science, a string is a finite sequence of symbols that are chosen from a set called an alphabet.

STRING

In molecular biology, STRING (Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins) is a biological database and web resource of known and predicted protein–protein interactions.

The STRING database contains information from numerous sources, including experimental data, computational prediction methods and public text collections. It is freely accessible and it is regularly updated. The resource also serves to highlight functional enrichments in user-provided lists of proteins, using a number of functional classification systems such as GO, Pfam and KEGG. The latest version 10.0 contains information on about 9.6 millions proteins from more than 2000 organisms. STRING has been developed by a consortium of academic institutions including CPR, EMBL, KU, SIB, TUD and UZH.

String (music)

A string is the vibrating element that produces sound in string instruments such as the guitar, harp, piano ( piano wire), and members of the violin family. Strings are lengths of a flexible material that a musical instrument holds under tension so that they can vibrate freely, but controllably. Strings may be "plain" (consisting only of a single material, like steel, nylon, or gut). "Wound" strings have a "core" of one material, with an overwinding of other materials. This is to make the string vibrate at the desired pitch, while maintaining a low profile and sufficient flexibility for playability.

String (physics)

In physics, a string is a physical phenomenon that appears in string theory and related subjects. Unlike elementary particles, which are zero-dimensional or point-like by definition, strings are one-dimensional extended objects. Theories in which the fundamental objects are strings rather than point particles automatically have many properties that some physicists expect to hold in a fundamental theory of physics. Most notably, a theory of strings that evolve and interact according to the rules of quantum mechanics will automatically describe quantum gravity.

In string theory, the strings may be open (forming a segment with two endpoints) or closed (forming a loop like a circle) and may have other special properties. Prior to 1995, there were five known versions of string theory incorporating the idea of supersymmetry, which differed in the type of strings and in other aspects. Today these different string theories are thought to arise as different limiting cases of a single theory called M-theory.

In theories of particle physics based on string theory, the characteristic length scale of strings is typically on the order of the Planck length, the scale at which the effects of quantum gravity are believed to become significant. On much larger length scales, such as the scales visible in physics laboratories, such objects would be indistinguishable from zero-dimensional point particles, and the vibrational state of the string would determine the type of particle. Strings are also sometimes studied in nuclear physics where they are used to model flux tubes.

As it propagates through spacetime, a string sweeps out a two-dimensional surface called its worldsheet. This is analogous to the one-dimensional worldline traced out by a point particle. The physics of a string is described by means of a two-dimensional conformal field theory associated with the worldsheet. The formalism of two dimensional conformal field theory also has many applications outside of string theory, for example in condensed matter physics and parts of pure mathematics.

Wiktionary

string

n. 1 (context countable English) A long, thin and flexible structure made from threads twisted together. 2 (context uncountable English) Such a structure considered as a substance. 3 (context countable English) Any similar long, thin and flexible object. 4 A thread or cord on which a number of objects or parts are strung or arranged in close and orderly succession; hence, a line or series of things arranged on a thread, or as if so arranged. 5 (context countable English) A cohesive substance taking the form of a string. 6 (context countable English) A series of items or events. 7 (context countable English) In various games and competitions, a certain number of turns at play, of rounds, etc. 8 (context countable computing English) An ordered sequence of text characters stored consecutively in memory and capable of being processed as a single entity. 9 (context music countable English) A stringed instrument. 10 (context music usually in plural English) The stringed instruments as a section of an orchestra, especially those played by a bow, or the persons playing those instruments. 11 (context in the plural English) The conditions and limitations in a contract collecively. (compare no strings attached) 12 (context countable physics English) the main object of study in string theory, a branch of theoretical physics 13 (context slang English) cannabis or marijuana 14 Part of the game of billiards, where the order of the play is determined by testing who can get a ball closest to the bottom rail by shooting it onto the end rail. 15 The points made in a game of billiards. 16 (cx billiards pool English) The line from behind and over which the cue ball must be played after being out of play, as by being pocketed or knocked off the table; also called the ''string line''. 17 A strip, as of leather, by which the covers of a book are held together. 18 A fibre, as of a plant; a little fibrous root. 19 A nerve or tendon of an animal body. 20 (context shipbuilding English) An inside range of ceiling planks, corresponding to the sheer strake on the outside and bolted to it. 21 (context botany English) The tough fibrous substance that unites the valves of the pericarp of leguminous plants. 22 (context mining English) A small, filamentous ramification of a metallic vein. 23 (context architecture English) A stringcourse. 24 (cx dated slang English) A hoax; a fake story. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To put (items) on a string. 2 (context transitive English) To put strings on (something). 3 (cx intransitive English) To form into a string or strings, as a substance which is stretched, or people who are moving along, etc.

WordNet

string

  1. v. thread on or as if on a string; "string pearls on a string"; "the child drew glass beads on a string"; "thread dried cranberries" [syn: thread, draw]

  2. add as if on a string; "string these ideas together"; "string up these songs and you'll have a musical" [syn: string up]

  3. move or come along [syn: string along]

  4. stretch out or arrange like a string

  5. string together; tie or fasten with a string; "string the package"

  6. remove the stringy parts of; "string beans"

  7. provide with strings; "string my guitar" [ant: unstring]

  8. [also: strung]

string

  1. n. a lightweight cord [syn: twine]

  2. stringed instruments that are played with a bow; "the strings played superlatively well" [syn: bowed stringed instrument]

  3. a tightly stretched cord of wire or gut, which makes sound when plucked, struck, or bowed

  4. a sequentially ordered set of things or events or ideas in which each successive member is related to the preceding; "a string of islands"; "train of mourners"; "a train of thought" [syn: train]

  5. a linear sequence of symbols (characters or words or phrases)

  6. a tie consisting of a cord that goes through a seam around an opening; "he pulled the drawstring and closed the bag" [syn: drawstring, drawing string]

  7. a collection of objects threaded on a single strand

  8. a necklace made by a stringing objects together; "a string of beads"; "a strand of pearls"; [syn: chain, strand]

  9. [also: strung]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

string

c.1400, "to fit a bow with a string," from string (n.). Meaning "to thread (beads, etc.) on a string" is from 1610s. Of musical instruments from 1520s (stringed instrument is from c.1600). To string (someone) along is slang from 1902; string (v.) in the sense "deceive" is attested in British dialect from c.1812; perhaps ultimately from the musical instrument sense and with a notion of "to 'tune' someone (for some purpose)." Related: Stringed (later strung); stringing.

string

Old English streng "line, cord, thread, string of a bow or harp," in plural "tackle, rigging; lineage, race," from Proto-Germanic *strangiz (cognates: Old Norse strengr, Danish streng, Middle Dutch strenge, Dutch streng, Old High German strang, German Strang "rope, cord"), from *strang- "taut, stiff," from PIE root *strenk- "tight, narrow." Gradually restricted by early Middle English to lines that are smaller than a rope. Sense of "a number of objects arranged in a line" first recorded late 15c.\n

\nOld English meaning "ligaments, tendons" is preserved in hamstring, heartstrings. Meaning "limitations, stipulations" (1888) is American English, probably from the common April Fool's joke of leaving a purse that appears to be full of money on the sidewalk, then tugging it away with an attached string when someone stoops to pick it up.\n

\nTo pull strings "control the course of affairs" (1860) is from the notion of puppet theater. First string, second string, etc. in athletics (1863) is from archers' custom of carrying spare bowstrings in the event that one breaks. Strings "stringed instruments" is attested from mid-14c. String bean is from 1759; string bikini is from 1974.

Usage examples of "string".

Malink was hurling a string of native curses at Abo, who looked as if he would burst into tears any second.

We would need an accelerator to slam matter together with energies some million billion times more powerful than any previously constructed in order to reveal directly that a string is not a point-particle.

As our most powerful particle accelerators can reach energies only on the order of a thousand times the proton mass, less than a millionth of a billionth of the Planck energy, we are very far from being able to search in the laboratory for any of these new particles predicted by string theory.

And in the Fifth Symphony, one of those in which he called for no vocal performers, he nevertheless managed to vary and expand the conventional suite by preceding the first allegro with a march, and separating and relieving the gargantuan scherzo and rondo with an adagietto for strings alone.

There was a small amount of sulphurous light from the street lights strung along the se afront path, and I saw Danny climbing the metal steps over the sea wall.

Beany crep out esy and hunted round til we found the string and we tide it agen as tite as we cood and then we crep back into the porch and peeked through the window.

In the alameda a few small tin foldingtables had been set out and young girls were stringing paper ribbon overhead.

Water dripped from the trees in the alameda and the crepe hung in soggy strings.

Pausing to tune the harp, he snapped the string and, after a tense, whispered exchange with Alec, rose and bowed to the mayor.

Stepping away as far as he could, Alec pulled the harp string from his tunic and waved it like a pass.

But it was Alec, another arrow ready on the string, who stepped from tyim Flewelling the trees.

He handed Alec the silver ring, and strung the seal around his own neck on a bit of string.

Boca experience, and many restaurants in town offered alfresco seating beneath palm trees whose trunks and fronds were studded with strings of tiny white lights.

They were roped together with a string, they had mimic alpenstocks and ice-axes, and were climbing a meek and lowly manure-pile with a most blood-curdling amount of care and caution.

The article practically accused the Grand Dame Alpha of violating clan trust to pull strings for her granddaughter.