Find the word definition

Crossword clues for soak

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
soak
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be drenched/soaked with sweat (=be covered in a lot of sweat)
▪ His shirt was drenched with sweat.
soaking/sopping/wringing wet (=very wet)
▪ His suit was soaking wet.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
in
▪ Why it should have taken more than a year for this to soak in is unclear.
▪ The men who went out to the barn came in soaked to the skin.
▪ Pour in plenty of water to flood it and then replace the soil when the water has soaked in.
▪ We just sat there letting it all soak in.
▪ Zyglo® Penetrant is sprayed on the surface until completely wet, and allowed to soak in for at least 10 minutes.
▪ This was an evening to simply soak in and the experience.
▪ Wherever possible, keep the water that the mushrooms are soaked in for use in the recipe.
▪ It soaks in completely leaving a dry feel to the surface.
through
▪ One side of his immaculate jacket was soaked through and spiked with broken glass.
▪ The sweater and heavy shirt he wore were already soaked through with sweat.
▪ I was soaked through by the time I got back to the compound.
▪ My shirt is soaked through, my head is spinning.
▪ Her headscarf was already soaked through.
▪ Ross, the steward, appeared, commiserated that they were all soaked through and took them into the lounge.
▪ She wore no coat and was soaked through.
up
▪ A stable soil soaks up water, and allows acid to break up bedrock and create more soil.
▪ The next thing I realized was just how much fat an eggplant can soak up.
▪ He learned quickly, soaking up both knowledge and art as a cloth soaks up clear water.
▪ Let stand for 5 minutes to soak up liquid.
▪ The more we soak up their way of looking at things, their method of understanding, the more we shall get.
▪ The blanched pith soaked up the sugar syrup during the candying process and turned out to be spectacular.
▪ But many will probably come just to gawp at the locals and soak up the legend.
▪ Those conglomerates are soaking up all the business the country.
■ NOUN
atmosphere
▪ So we ordered another Guinness and soaked up the atmosphere some more.
▪ He was here to soak in the atmosphere of the place.
▪ When the sound of high-flying aircraft began to soak into the atmosphere people stopped talking but looked more interested than afraid.
▪ I was just soaking up the atmosphere.
▪ In spite of his expressed desire to soak up atmosphere, he did not feel at home there.
blood
▪ The royal tabard was soaked in blood.
▪ It was the wickedness that soaks into your blood and slowly heats up and begins to boil.
▪ The man, who was soaked in blood, was stretchered to a waiting ambulance and taken to Darlington Memorial Hospital.
▪ Did I need a towel to soak up blood?
▪ He held a cloth to the wound that soaked his shirt with blood.
rain
▪ The rain poured down, soaking their hair, seeping into their collars, dripping off their chins as they kissed.
▪ The rain had soaked into his cloak as he slept, and it hung in heavy damp folds on his shoulders.
▪ Forecasters say, however, that all indications are that heavy rains will soak the region this winter.
▪ Above this floor, rain soaks down to recharge an aquifer.
▪ Drizzling rain soaked Hodgesaargh as he trudged back to the castle.
▪ The spring rain soaked him but it was warm and he licked it as it trickled down his lip.
skin
▪ I was soaked to the skin, my hands so cold I could hardly keep hold of the tiller.
▪ They were soaked to the skin.
▪ He got up, soaked to the skin but warm and happy.
▪ When he was finally delivered to the rectory nearly soaked to the skin, Puny was getting ready to leave.
▪ Her dress was torn, she was soaked to the skin and ... and she felt afraid.
▪ The men who went out to the barn came in soaked to the skin.
▪ By the time he had reached the shelter of the station he was soaked to the skin.
sun
▪ Others will take it easier, relax in the garden and soak up the sun.
▪ Elena Fonti lay on the beach soaking up the sun.
▪ But everyone enjoyed the opportunity to relax, socialise and soak up the sun.
▪ As well as soaking up the sun, Emma says she's particularly looking forward to scuba diving and swimming in Stingray City.
▪ And former Boddington's beauty Mel Sykes looks about as satisfying as you can get as she soaks up the Majorca sun.
▪ Where fishermen once set out to sea, now travellers stop to soak up the sun which bakes the sandy shores.
▪ The perfect setting for relaxing and soaking up the sun.
sweat
▪ The morning after the trial he woke up soaked with sweat.
▪ Their clothes were soaked with sweat, their lives sustained by the thought of California.
▪ Schramm felt limp from the heat, and Hoffmann's shirt was soaked in sweat to a deep chestnut brown.
▪ Their heavy woolen pants and jackets, hideously ill-fitted, were soaked with sweat.
▪ He was soaked in sweat and shivering.
▪ The sweater and heavy shirt he wore were already soaked through with sweat.
water
▪ Pour in plenty of water to flood it and then replace the soil when the water has soaked in.
▪ She was running water to soak the pudding pan.
▪ Other methods include permeable car parks, where water can soak through the surface and be collected.
▪ The motionless sails stiffened and grew dark with the water soaking into the cloth.
▪ Soon the floor of the trench was covered in water - soaking into everything.
▪ I snagged the plastic bag, water got in, soaked my socks and the outside froze.
▪ Place the mushrooms in a bowl and cover with the boiling water then leave to soak for at least 20min. 2.
▪ Cover with plenty of cold water and leave to soak overnight in a cool place.
■ VERB
get
▪ Tam resigned himself to getting soaked today, but retrieved the sack all the same.
▪ It was nothing more than getting soaking wet.
▪ Unfortunately the fireworks must have seeded the thick clouds overhead because it absolutely poured with rain, and we got soaked.
▪ No one wanted to get soaked this early.
▪ He got up, soaked to the skin but warm and happy.
▪ She shouts that if I get soaked I needn't expect sympathy, and I call for her to join me.
▪ But he got soaked every day from the rain because he could not afford to buy an umbrella.
leave
▪ Place the mushrooms in a bowl and cover with the boiling water then leave to soak for at least 20min. 2.
▪ Cover with plenty of cold water and leave to soak overnight in a cool place.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be soaked in/with sth
▪ Vardell's shirt was soaked in sweat.
▪ Here at the Qutb apartment, dates are soaked in milk.
▪ His head is soaked with rain.
▪ I was soaked in perspiration and the muscles running the length of my spine were in spasm.
▪ If the flavour of this solution is too strong, they may be soaked in milk before use.
▪ The royal tabard was soaked in blood.
▪ Their clothes were soaked with sweat, their lives sustained by the thought of California.
▪ Their heavy woolen pants and jackets, hideously ill-fitted, were soaked with sweat.
▪ When barley is harvested it is taken to a maltings where the grains are soaked in water to encourage germination.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Soak a piece of cotton in water and use it to clean the wound.
Soak the beans overnight before cooking.
▪ a tax designed to soak the rich
▪ If you don't take your umbrella, you're going to get soaked.
▪ Let the pan soak a while before you scrub it.
▪ The rain had come in through the bottom of our tent and completely soaked our clothes.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Her dress soaked up the water from his body.
▪ In a cabin soaked in pure oxygen at greater than atmospheric pressure for five hours, almost anything bums.
▪ One side of his immaculate jacket was soaked through and spiked with broken glass.
▪ Other ethnic groups also seem to have trooped to Azusa Street to soak up the new shower of blessing.
▪ Others will take it easier, relax in the garden and soak up the sun.
▪ Tough stains should be soaked before washing.
▪ We lay on the glossy sand as the waves rustled up, soaked us and retreated.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
long
▪ She puts them in the washing machine, on long soak, and removes every trace.
▪ This is noticeable after a long soak in the bath; the pads of your fingertips will take on a wrinkled appearance.
▪ A long, hot soak in the bath-tub with lashings of her favourite bath oil had helped, too.
▪ Even so, I was looking forward to nothing so much as a long hot soak in the bath.
old
▪ The father's nice enough, but a bit of an old soak and the grandmother was a dragon.
▪ Not the opinionated old soak he's become.
▪ She doesn ` t want to end up an old soak.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ She puts them in the washing machine, on long soak, and removes every trace.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Soak

Soak \Soak\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Soaked; p. pr. & vb. n. Soaking.] [OE. soken, AS. socian to sioak, steep, fr. s?can, s?gan, to suck. See Suck.]

  1. To cause or suffer to lie in a fluid till the substance has imbibed what it can contain; to macerate in water or other liquid; to steep, as for the purpose of softening or freshening; as, to soak cloth; to soak bread; to soak salt meat, salt fish, or the like.

  2. To drench; to wet thoroughly.

    Their land shall be soaked with blood.
    --Isa. xxiv. 7.

  3. To draw in by the pores, or through small passages; as, a sponge soaks up water; the skin soaks in moisture.

  4. To make (its way) by entering pores or interstices; -- often with through.

    The rivulet beneath soaked its way obscurely through wreaths of snow.
    --Sir W. Scott.

  5. Fig.: To absorb; to drain. [Obs.]
    --Sir H. Wotton.

Soak

Soak \Soak\, v. i.

  1. To lie steeping in water or other liquid; to become sturated; as, let the cloth lie and soak.

  2. To enter (into something) by pores or interstices; as, water soaks into the earth or other porous matter.

  3. To drink intemperately or gluttonously. [Slang]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
soak

Old English socian (intransitive) "to soak, to lie in liquid," from Proto-Germanic *sukon (cognates: West Flemish soken), possibly from PIE *sug-, from root *seue- (2) "to take liquid" (see sup (v.2)). Transitive sense "drench, permeate thoroughly" is from mid-14c.; that of "cause to lie in liquid" is from early 15c. Meaning "take up by absorption" is from 1550s. Slang meaning "to overcharge" first recorded 1895. Related: Soaked; soaking. As a noun, mid-15c., from the verb.

Wiktionary
soak

n. 1 An immersion in water etc. 2 (context slang British English) A drunkard. 3 (context Australia English) A low-lying depression that fills with water after rain. vb. 1 (label en intransitive) To be saturated with liquid by being immersed in it. 2 (label en transitive) To immerse in liquid to the point of saturation or thorough permeation. 3 (label en intransitive) To penetrate or permeate by saturation. 4 (label en transitive) To allow (especially a liquid) to be absorbed; to take in, receive. (''usually + '''up''''')

WordNet
soak
  1. v. submerge in a liquid; "I soaked in the hot tub for an hour"

  2. rip off; ask an unreasonable price [syn: overcharge, surcharge, gazump, fleece, plume, pluck, rob, hook] [ant: undercharge]

  3. cover with liquid; pour liquid onto; "souse water on his hot face" [syn: drench, douse, dowse, sop, souse]

  4. leave as a guarantee in return for money; "pawn your grandfather's gold watch" [syn: pawn, hock]

  5. beat severely; slang

  6. make drunk (with alcoholic drinks) [syn: intoxicate, inebriate]

  7. become drunk or drink excessively [syn: souse, inebriate, hit it up]

  8. fill, soak, or imbue totally; "saturate the bandage with disinfectant" [syn: imbue]

  9. heat a metal prior to working it

soak
  1. n. the process of becoming softened and saturated as a consequence of being immersed in water (or other liquid); "a good soak put life back in the wagon" [syn: soakage, soaking]

  2. washing something by allowing it to soak [syn: soaking]

Wikipedia
SOAK

Bridie Monds-Watson, better known by her stage name SOAK, is an Irish singer-songwriter born in Derry, Northern Ireland, in 1996. SOAK's music has been described as 'a vivid portrait of teenage deep-thinking' by The Guardian. She released her debut studio album Before We Forgot How to Dream in May 2015.

Soak (Foetus album)

Soak is the tenth studio album by Foetus, released on October 15, 2013 by Ectopic Ents. It acts as the satellite album for the 2010 album Hide.

Usage examples of "soak".

He soaked the compress with bright yellow acriflavine solution, and bandaged it firmly into place.

I soaked it up like a sponge, listening eagerly to the advice of adoptive parents, their grown children, clinical psychologists, advocates, social workers, and adoption resource professionals.

Murphy ordered the engineer from aft, and in a few moments Jackson Vaughn appeared, hair soaked with sweat, coveralls stained with dirt, a Beretta 9-mm automatic stuffed into his belt.

Five of the Alaunt hounds were stretched out in front of Azhure, soaking up the warmth of the fire.

The garment was filthy and soaked with blood at the neck, but Alec obeyed quickly, pulling it on with a shudder of revulsion.

Angry curses competed with the siren as the pursuing security guards, already rattled by the amuck scooter, slid and slipped on the suddenly soaking floor tiles.

And in the afternoon we went for a row on the river, pulling easily up the anabranch and floating down with the stream under the shade of the river timber--instead of going to sleep and waking up helpless and soaked in perspiration, to find the women with headaches, as many do on Christmas Day in Australia.

Add 1 large can of tomatoes, 2 more ancho chilies that have been soaked in warm water, and enough chicken stock to make the whole mixture very wet.

On each cane shaft, tied behind the iron arrowhead, was a tuft of unravelled hemp rope that had been soaked in pitch, which spluttered and then burned fiercely when touched with the slow-match, The archers loosed their arrows, which sailed up in a high, flaming parabola and dropped down to peg into the timbers of an anchored vessel.

At least some of that many normal arquebus would have had their priming soaked during the crossing, but all of these weapons fired successfully into the mass of pirates hammering at the shield wall.

In the hall were two stretchers, on each a soldier, both feverish, both bandaged, one partially, the other, Hiraga, completely--head, feet, and hands--outside his soaking uniform.

You must dress in short skins like the Baptist to keep from getting your clothes soaked when wading across them.

A heavy rain during the hours before dawn had soaked Batman to the skin.

By the time Batman could clearly see his surroundings it was raining, a misty, intermittent drizzle that turned the ground to soup and soaked the Americans through to the skin in minutes.

You must make a vast variety of invertebrates, to start with -- belemnites, trilobites, Jebusites, Amalekites, and that sort of fry, and put them to soak in a primary sea, and wait and see what will happen.