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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

so

I.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
A dozen or so (=about 12)
A dozen or so cars were parked near the entrance.
a mile or so (=about a mile or possibly a little more)
▪ There’s a motel a mile or so down the road .
believe so (=think that something is true)
▪ ‘Have they arrived yet?’ ‘Yes, I believe so.’
especially so
▪ A depreciation of the dollar would make US exports cheaper and especially so in Japan.
ever so slightly
▪ He leaned forward ever so slightly.
feel so inclined
▪ You can visit our chat rooms, if you feel so inclined.
felt so alone
▪ I cried like a child because I felt so alone.
for so long
▪ I haven’t seen her for so long that I’ve forgotten what she looks like.
I fear so/I fear not
▪ ‘Were they satisfied?’ ‘I fear not.’
I presume so
▪ ‘Are his parents still alive?’ 'I presume so.’
I suppose so
▪ ‘Can we come with you?’ ‘Oh, I suppose so.’
I suppose so
▪ ‘Aren’t you pleased?’ ‘Yes, I suppose so.’
if so,
▪ Is the book available, and if so, where?
It...happened so fast
It all happened so fast I didn’t even notice I was bleeding.
I’m afraid so (=yes)
▪ ‘Is she very ill?’ ‘I’m afraid so.’
not so hot/not very hotinformal (= not very good)
▪ Some of the tracks on the record are great, but others are not so hot.
resemble nothing so much as sth (=look or seem rather like something)
▪ The building resembled nothing so much as giant beehive.
say so
▪ If you don’t know the answer, don’t be afraid to say so.
so I hear/so I’ve heardspoken (= used to say that you have been told something or know it already)
▪ There’s a nasty infection going round, so I hear.
so I hear/so I’ve heardspoken (= used to say that you have been told something or know it already)
▪ There’s a nasty infection going round, so I hear.
So it seems (=that seems to be true)
▪ ‘So Bill’s leaving her?’ ‘So it seems.’
so it would appear (=used to say that something seems likely to be true, although you are not completely sure)
so many
▪ There are so many things we disagree about.
so much
▪ It was such a small thing to have caused so much trouble.
so much
▪ We’re looking forward to your visit so much.
so tired (that)
▪ I’m so tired I could sleep for a week.
Without so much as (=he did not even say thank you as he should have done)
Without so much as a word of thanks, Ben turned and went back into the office .
‘What’s so funny?’
▪ His laughter stopped her mid-sentence. ‘What’s so funny?’ she demanded.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bad
▪ And the weather outside sounded so bad that it seemed wise to stay as she was a little longer.
▪ I iced him so bad when he bossed me, he might never be back.
▪ Not so bad really, eh?
▪ My handwriting is so bad now that a computer is absolutely necessary for me.
▪ As for United, 1-0 doesn't sound so bad, but the players know its nowhere near good enough.
▪ Get the moment he first heard the news or observed the thing which made him feel so bad.
▪ Ben's injuries were so bad he needed regular check-ups for six months.
▪ They pretended things were not so bad.
far
▪ The Schlieffen Plan as implemented in 1914 had been the most grandiose product so far of this cast of thought.
▪ Consider each one separately and try to apply the guidelines and hints that have been offered so far.
▪ Blackburn Rovers have spent £10 million so far and seem willing to lash out even more on overpriced players.
▪ Stuart must have rung my boudoir and learned how the telephone is answered in about fifteen languages so far.
▪ Operation Desert Storm, by contrast, seems so far to have been supplied without a hitch - thanks to computers.
▪ Documentary proof of 147 deaths had been found so far.
▪ I think they've had it easy so far.
good
▪ I am thinking particularly of one of the Bushmen you knew who was so good at imitating a professor.
▪ Johnny and Carmen are sweethearts, but Carmen loves Zander, because he looks so good in uniform.
▪ She's now so good at them, that the Magic Circle's just made her its youngest member.
▪ The Super Bowl should be so good.
▪ But Tommy was so good natured about everything and he would sally forth and start asking people where his strays might be.
▪ Everything is so good for me now.
▪ I don't think the interview would have been so good with a younger man.
▪ The first time I got outside I almost cried because it felt so good.
great
▪ The migration is so great that the countryside looks almost emptied.
▪ Their bomb load was so great and dangerous that the slightest error would have been suicidal.
▪ Never before has the attraction of a career in golf been so great.
▪ Her Wells routine is so great.
▪ The rights assigned to the empire by these jurists were so great that many cities refused to acknowledge them.
▪ The differences between the East and West are not so great now.
▪ The problem was so great, it dragged him asleep.
▪ But Janice's fear was so great she struggled through two more migraines before screwing up enough courage to try the injection.
hard
▪ If only the bar wasn't brought down quite so hard on everyone's head.
▪ In patients who have fought so hard and been through so much, I sometimes say they just lost their reserve.
▪ He struck me hard, very hard, so hard that I still feel it, across the face.
▪ There are six other members of the team who have worked so hard to get to this moment.
▪ He hauled the front door open so hard that when it hit the stop the stained-glass panel shattered.
▪ I almost lost it-I almost lost control of the business I had worked so hard to build.
▪ If your voice wasn't so hard and loud and ugly.
▪ They could have been even shorter, except encouraging signs have been so hard to come by for the Warriors this preseason.
long
▪ But he took so long to make his point, the Speaker intervened.
▪ The punditocracy in our country has been so one-sided for so long that we hardly notice the routine tilt anymore.
▪ Chapman had at last got the player he had wanted for so long.
▪ No country should be so long without one.
▪ As far as she knew, Griselda had never been away so long before.
▪ The subject never developed much traction so long as it was a rhetorical rather than legislative goal.
▪ Why has it taken so long to find a buyer?
▪ Inexperience with people was probably the reason it took Jennifer so long to catch on.
low
▪ Probably because even she had not expected him to sink so low.
▪ Or did the threshold of success have to be put so low that it represented something self-defeating?
▪ Her blouse was scooped so low at the front that it left her shoulders and upper arms bare.
▪ His chin was down so low it seemed about to touch it.
▪ Since they were erupted so low down, it was not long before the rivers of lava were flowing through inhabited areas.
▪ His voice was so low that it tickled my tailbone.
▪ But that's all changed now, the credibility of dotcoms is so low among investors that companies are shedding the suffix.
▪ The savings rate is so low and the money available to create jobs is not there.
small
▪ Dances were absolute torture, because I was so small and because my hands sweated a lot.
▪ The railing is wobbly, the space is so small that it is suitable only for one person.
▪ It is so small and mobile that it could easily be hidden, and it can carry nuclear or conventional warheads.
▪ Mrs Stowe was a woman so small that her growth seemed to have been arrested in childhood.
▪ We concluded that as Molly was so small, nobody had noticed her.
▪ Billie was so small in his arms, his heart broke for her smallness.
▪ Everything looked so small, almost mean, in the tiny front living room.
▪ And all the Fisherexaggerated traits remain in lekking species as well because the cost of choosing is so small.
■ VERB
become
▪ Perhaps he didn't understand why I'd become so angry and distant.
▪ In 1955 it became so dangerous it had to be dynamited.
▪ He could not think what had happened for things to have become so out of hand.
▪ The cold in the building became so intense that he awoke one morning with feet and hands that were purplish and numb.
▪ I was becoming so tense that my head, neck and even my eyes were always so painful.
▪ If you are not Webwise, we suggest you take active steps to become so.
▪ The assault on the bus is all the more terrifying, because it has become so commonplace.
do
▪ He only do so much amount of work and that was it.
▪ Others noted the armed forces could have said publicly they were backing the elected president but declined to do so.
▪ As they do so, be sure they notice the weights on the crane which balance the heavy loads.
▪ Established wings struggled to do so, and failures were not uncommon.
▪ To do so is very costly.
▪ He had earlier pledged he would not do so.
▪ To do so, however, we had to be examined by the board of deacons.
▪ This is not to say that our soldiers, sailors and airmen have not comported themselves bravely when asked to do so.
feel
▪ And he had felt so light, so sure-footed, so approved, so anchored.
▪ The first time I got outside I almost cried because it felt so good.
▪ I felt so nearly in complete control.
▪ It felt so ... Something for you?
▪ So long, too, since Masakayan was made to feel so out of shape.
▪ Can't you see how I'd feel so degraded?
▪ I had not felt so nice since I was twelve.
happen
▪ Your mind and body feel great sensations and it happens so quickly.
▪ The president has rightly said that the bill will likely die if delayed, as has happened so often in the past.
▪ Perhaps if it hadn't happened so handily by chance, he would have engineered a meeting.
▪ But so happen, one little boy not so good.
▪ So much had happened so fast, and the man she loved was so far away.
▪ But it just so happened that Trondur said no.
▪ She heard Ana scream her name but it had all happened so fast that she was stunned.
▪ It so happens that I have all those breeds.
hope
▪ I've heard they are quite beautiful, and I hope so.
▪ Well, I hope so, and not just because my own wardrobe is decidedly denim dominated.
▪ I hope so, because residential homes are places where people become cut off from family life and the outside world.
▪ I hope so, but...
▪ It was what they had expected of University, but had not hoped so soon to find.
▪ He did so hope I was not bored with country life.
▪ I hope so, and if I can contribute something to that culture change I shall be glad to do so.
▪ Perhaps he'd even hoped so, poor chap.
look
▪ We must have looked so gormless; we certainly looked it in our passport photos.
▪ It makes her look so pitiful.
▪ She uses lightener to keep her hair looking so fabulous and natural looking.
▪ Never had the old pigman looked so fancy.
▪ Never had any man so looked down his nose at her.
▪ So many of the men looked so young to be traveling that road to perdition.
▪ Potter is staring because Keith looks so dishevelled, as if he hadn't slept or even combed his hair.
▪ But don't look so worried, lass.
seem
▪ It seems so right somehow, as if it's my duty.
▪ She was so far from home, and she seemed so isolated.
▪ He seemed so attentive, so clued in to my every word, that I suddenly found the confidence to go on.
▪ It was a genuinely selfless act, which I recount only because at the time it seemed so incredible.
▪ Carolyn was picking up on the movements of the three women, which had seemed so mysteriously random at first.
▪ It is the inexorable quality of differentness which seems so evil here.
▪ Ten years ago now yet seeming so much more.
▪ It seemed so unlike his own withdrawn, tentative inclusion in the life around him.
think
▪ For my part I very much think so.
▪ Do you all think so much of that?
▪ No, well, I don't think so.
▪ Female speaker Maybe somebody might spot me, but I don't think so.
▪ Female speaker I don't think so.
▪ The citizens of some post-communist countries have reason to think so.
▪ Startling the commuter is a game in which it is best to think so.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(and) deservedly so
▪ It received universally ecstatic reviews, and deservedly so.
▪ Nandina is long favored, and deservedly so.
▪ The move up to verse can be ineffective, deservedly so.
▪ The next day, the press criticism was withering, deservedly so.
I don't feel too hot/so hot/very hot
I guess so/not
▪ "She wasn't happy?" "I guess not."
▪ Dope, is it? I guess so.
I hope so
▪ "So you're going to the Amazon?" "I hope so."
▪ I thought so. I hoped so.
▪ Right. I hope so, yeah.
▪ Was it worth it? I hope so.
▪ Will he get the chance to step up? I hope so.
I should hope so (too)
I told you so
▪ I could never work with a man like that and I told him so.
▪ I didn't like his mood. I told her so, but she just laughed.
▪ I was not disappointed. I told myself so, firmly, several times.
▪ I wouldn't have blamed him if he'd walked away and I told him so.
▪ There; I told you so.
▪ To sum up: I told you so.
▪ True it is that Ewan Beg thought he had killed his dallta - for I told him so.
▪ What matters is that we lived like writers, and that I told them so.
I/you should be so lucky!
▪ Sleep past 6 a.m.? I should be so lucky!
and rightly so
▪ We were blamed, and rightly so, for this mess.
▪ For the most part, criteria of critical reasoning are internal to disciplines or professional fields, and rightly so.
▪ It will undoubtedly be one for public debate, and rightly so.
▪ Many organizations see this as a blind leap of faith, and rightly so.
▪ Such an arrangement would probably be considered out of the question today, and rightly so.
▪ Symphony No. 88 has always been a favourite and rightly so, as well as the Oxford, helped by its nickname.
▪ The Bolshevik reputation stood high, and rightly so, for at least they acknowledged the question and officially embraced national independence.
▪ The reaction to arguments from silence is usually noisy vituperation, and rightly so.
▪ The White House would not put the president in that position again and rightly so.
and so forth
▪ The study included women of different ages, races and so forth.
▪ And she thought, oh, maybe she was just overtired, and so forth.
▪ By uh by listing factors and so forth.
▪ He must choose a diet, exercise, relaxation, and so forth.
▪ Motion precedes quiescence, which in turn precedes motion, which in turn precedes quiescence, and so forth.
▪ Please would we list our safety equipment, the radio, the distress beacon, and so forth?
▪ Satan has sovereignties and powers and so forth working for him as well.
▪ Try Yahoo listings of organizations and so forth, and Google for mentions on Web pages.
▪ You browse the Web daily for ideas and download interesting articles from newspapers, magazines and so forth.
as it happens/it just so happens
as/so far as I know/I can remember/I can tell/I can see etc
as/so far as I'm concerned
as/so far as sth is concerned
as/so long as
▪ As long as you're just sitting there, come help me with the groceries.
▪ Pam stayed awake as long as she could.
▪ You can go as long as you're home for dinner.
▪ At the least, officials said, the move will postpone implementation of the program for as long as six months.
▪ Fortunately Scott was reasonably obedient as long as some one kept a close watch over him.
▪ His fame will remain undiminished as long as the game of cricket is played.
▪ It's quite possible you won't even realise this, so long as you each mirror the same changes.
▪ It is not a wasted experience as long as it can be purged of negative overtones.
▪ This is three times as long as the Canon's heads, so I haven't included replacements in the page costs.
▪ Wet wood can recover as long as it dries out relatively quickly.
▪ Why did they not know that as long as they did not speak, he was all right?
even so
▪ She had only seen Matthew Godden once before, but even so she recognized him instantly.
▪ The fines for speeding are large, but even so, they are not always a deterrent.
▪ Try to run on a soft surface, such as grass. Even so, you may start having knee problems.
▪ And yet even so, holy and awesome though they were, they kept the mark of what they had sprung from.
▪ But even so, the original pledge was to get 24 countries into the programme, not 20.
▪ Some people may remain well but even so they are able to infect others.
▪ The lesson: it is, even so, never too late to act.
▪ The people could not have been more charming but even so I sensed an undercurrent of suspicion.
▪ The trumpets shall sound and the Lord shall descend even so it is.
▪ This he freely admitted, although, even so, neither he nor Mama would ever reveal what his real name was.
▪ Yet even so, the United States still leads most industrialized countries in teenage pregnancies, abortions and childbearing.
ever so cold/wet/nice etc
every so often
▪ Every so often we go down to the beach.
▪ Every so often, Frank looked up at me and smiled.
▪ The silence was broken every so often by the sound of guns in the distance.
▪ And every so often a transvestite would swagger past, some more obvious than others.
▪ I come and visit him every so often.
▪ I followed Mundin into the shed, turning every so often and glowering at Fifi, who trailed behind us.
▪ It looked as though it weighed a ton and seemed to quiver every so often.
▪ It will do that every so often on your birthday.
▪ The every so often it was mopped, the every so often sprayed.
▪ They talked in a close huddle and every so often would both turn round and look at me.
go so far/as far as to do sth
how so?
▪ "The scriptures make it perfectly clear." "Oh, how so?"
▪ Have you noticed how so many adverts for chocolate are aimed at girls?
▪ He does not entirely explain how so many people could lift off so quickly into the deal-making stratosphere.
▪ I do not understand how so many Black men stay sane, look after their children and strive to walk beside them.
▪ I repeated the details of how so many of Green's family had been murdered at Auschwitz.
if I may be so bold
▪ And what, if I may be so bold, is the meaning of this note?
if I may say so
▪ And his manner was, if I may say so, more relaxed, almost like an aristocrat.
▪ And if I may say so, they seem more useful than yours.
▪ For my interior vision, if I may say so, it still works.
▪ Now, you're a plants-woman of no small renown, if I may say so, your ladyship.
▪ Suicidal, if I may say so.
▪ Unlike, if I may say so, the dabblings of your brother in the theology of physics.
▪ Very sexist of you to assume otherwise, if I may say so.
if you don't mind my saying so/if you don't mind me asking
in so far as/insofar as/in as far as
in so many words
▪ "Did he say we got the contract?" "Not in so many words."
▪ In so many words, she told me that I don't have any talent.
▪ Although it has not said so in so many words, it is also for the supranational space.
▪ And, if taxed by such as Sylvester, he probably would not now admit it in so many words.
▪ But I also knew that if I admitted to that in so many words, Janir would start fussing.
▪ It hurts to write that out in so many words, but how could it be otherwise.
▪ Oh, not in so many words, of course.
▪ There is, in fact, considerable nervousness about saying these things in so many words.
▪ To be fair, the majority report does not in so many words advance the argument.
▪ Zuwaya had a deterrent theory of peace, and stated it in so many words.
just so
▪ Her house always has to be just so.
▪ Because is just so expensive and you know, food attracts residents.
▪ Did you write to me just so I could agree with you?
▪ He presses just so hard, no harder.
▪ It just so happens that this region includes the heartland of Charles the Bald's kingdom.
▪ Life can last just so long, you understand.
▪ Tamayo swears he comes in at 8 a. m. every day just so he can work out.
▪ There were just so many animals around.
like this/that/so
▪ Aye, some boys will be like that.
▪ But it was not always like this.
▪ Geniculate, at first glimpse, is something like that.
▪ He was an associate of Neuhaus, and like that legendary figure imparted the richest sense of cultural and human ideals.
▪ How typical of Iris to think of such a detail at a time like this.
▪ It goes like this: 1.
▪ Nothing even remotely like this had ever happened to her before, and she didn't like it.
make/be so bold (as to do sth)
never so much as
▪ I do everything for him, and he's never so much as made me a cup of coffee.
▪ Clarisa had never so much as dusted his butt with baby powder.
▪ He never so much as twitched.
▪ Naturally he had never so much as whispered this phrase to a living soul.
▪ Tesla was told firmly that he must never so much as mention the subject of alternating current.
▪ They passed a hundred yards away and never so much as changed course to take a closer look.
not half as/so good/interesting etc (as sb/sth)
not so fast
▪ Not so fast! You'll scrape the paint!
▪ Not so fast, guys. One win doesn't make a championship season.
▪ Both were expanding their departments as well, though not so fast as Ranieri.
▪ But not so fast, or so the town of Oro Valley decided August 30.
▪ It's also big, but not so fast or user-friendly despite its curious system of organizing bits into folders.
not so much ... as ...
not too/so bad
▪ The roads weren't too bad.
▪ At first, things were not so bad.
▪ Compared to how I feel, how I look is not so bad.
▪ She began to think that perhaps village life was not so bad.
▪ The Ky is not too bad.
▪ The policing here is not so bad.
▪ The Vatican, I must say, is not too bad when it is full and the resonance is reduced.
▪ The weather was not too bad.
▪ We played really well and while the other contenders still had to play each other, our run-in was not too bad.
not/without so much as sth
▪ I never received so much as a reply.
▪ The car survived the accident without so much as a dent.
▪ He had never had a day of sickness, not so much as a cold.
▪ How could we have put their bag into ours without so much as a single check?
▪ I, who had traveled all that long day on that train without so much as a cheese in my pocket?
▪ It is a matter of tone, not so much as content.
▪ So far in Rajasthan, I had not so much as nodded to another female.
▪ That he had dumped her without a word, without so much as a goodbye.
▪ We got our six appearances, and not so much as one drop-by or mix-and-mingle extra.
▪ When they go straight to bed without so much as ordering a toasted sandwich or spending money at the bar.
quite/quite so
▪ At Carville, things were not quite so stark.
▪ In fact, my recent diet hadn't been quite so reckless.
▪ It's not quite so good the second time around, never mind the fourth or fifth.
▪ It was all right walking in the mountains but not quite so safe-looking to drive.
▪ Mental programming, of course, does not have to be quite so extreme.
▪ No hotel service could be quite so crass.
▪ The people might be made to kneel, but the elements were not quite so easy to muzzle.
▪ The voices of the neighborhood teenagers are not quite so shrill.
sb is (so) up himself/herself etc
sink so low
▪ How could he have sunk so low?
▪ Because she had never sunk so low, and never would.
▪ Don't let yourself sink so low again - come and talk to me or to the doctor.
▪ Few bands sink so low, few soar this high.
▪ Probably because even she had not expected him to sink so low.
▪ She had not sunk so low as to join the ranks of that sisterhood!
so far
▪ I think he's done a great job so far.
▪ There haven't been any problems so far.
▪ This is the hottest day we've had so far this summer.
▪ We've raised twelve thousand dollars so far, and we expect to reach our goal by the end of next week.
▪ And so far Conservative strategy has been anything but effective.
▪ Because he was so far ahead in his first year, he spent his time on other things.
▪ However, the military were not having much success so far.
▪ On the other hand, the technology plainly is not ready; so far, the tests have been embarrassing.
▪ Our final rehearsal before Farnham, however, delivered the cruellest blow so far.
▪ Selman has sold off two-thirds of his herd so far.
▪ The treatment so far had been innocuous: quinine pills and injections of alum water.
▪ There were times that Iverson was so far down the court that Mutombo didn't make it to halfcourt.
so far so good
▪ "How's your new job?" "So far so good."
so help me (God)
▪ A police station, so help me, is a piece of the action.
▪ But, so help me ... I have done nothing!
so long
▪ "So long,'' he said. "Don't forget to write.''
▪ She grabbed Nick by the shoulders and hugged him affectionately. "So long, Nick.''
▪ All those words he had hoarded for so long and released so grudgingly.
▪ As we look at this reply, it is clear why psychotherapy often takes so long.
▪ Dunn's mouth was open so long that it dried inside and he could not swallow or salivate.
▪ Just so long as there are decent shows either side of it.
▪ The reality was long ago - oh so long ago!
▪ They also maintained that it would be impossible to hold fair trials so long after the alleged crimes had been committed.
▪ Things were going on for so long that I thought he would stay here and things would be settled.
▪ To wait so long for a clean cup of water was beyond me.
so much for sth
▪ So much for 3.75% Profit Share figures and so much for staff motivation.
▪ Thank you so much for coming.
▪ Thank you so much for your encouragement in the past.
▪ That diagnosis is not so much for therapeutic reasons as for administrative and management purposes.
▪ The boys have been lovely and Kenneth has done so much for me.
▪ The method she resorted to was novel, not so much for the times but for her.
▪ Together with the right kind of support we could have fun together and achieve so much for ourselves and our diocese.
▪ We take the railways so much for granted.
so much the better
▪ If it makes illegal drug use even more difficult, so much the better.
▪ You can use dried parsley, but if you have fresh, so much the better.
▪ And if I am Peter, so much the better.
▪ And if that can change things, so much the better Female speaker He's the little man having a kick.
▪ But if I can manage with fewer trips to the store, so much the better.
▪ If love eventually grows, so much the better.
▪ If they are alive so much the better, but they can be persuaded to take dead ones.
▪ If they can fit in with the room's general style, so much the better.
▪ If we can improve the team another way, so much the better.
▪ So a single fluorescent tube will be adequate, and if you have used floating plants, so much the better.
so near and yet so far
so there!
so to speak
▪ We have to pull down the barriers, so to speak, of poverty.
▪ Being in charge of a lethal weapon, so to speak.
▪ Denver had come around, so to speak.
▪ He could get caught up in the story, so to speak, and little by little begin to forget himself.
▪ Other than that, the world was my artistic oyster, so to speak.
▪ The babies, so to speak, are helplessly powerful.
▪ The whole of life, so to speak, is involved in the pursuit of the good life.
▪ These constitute, so to speak, the raw materials for effective education perse.
▪ To get back to business, so to speak.
so what?
▪ "Don't go in there, he's sleeping." "So what?"
▪ After all, Twickenham only holds 65,000 people, so what about the other fans throughout the country?
▪ And so what, she thought, so what?
▪ And the special language of the specialist is a substitute for thought. So what are we to do?
▪ Part of the fun includes a trip to make-up. So what does the future hold for Fiona and David?
▪ She might think he was a little coarse doing that after saying he despised her, but so what?
▪ We are behind in the opinion polls. So what?
▪ You climbed Mount Everest? So what?
so/as far as I am aware
very much so
▪ It was like Hi De Hi backstage, very much so.
without so much as a by your leave
would you be kind enough to do sth/be so kind as to do sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
So this one's the original, and this one's the copy, right?
So, Lisa, how's the new job going?
▪ Dave felt comfortable at Mandy's, even more so than in his own home.
▪ I felt so sick yesterday.
▪ I never knew Rob could sing so well.
▪ If you have not sent in your payment yet, please do so immediately.
▪ It's too bad that so many kids come from broken homes these days.
▪ It all happened so fast.
▪ Oh, he must be about so tall.
▪ Orange is just so not the right color for Kari.
▪ Thank you so much!
▪ That puppy is so cute!
▪ The dresses were lovely, and the colours were so pretty.
▪ What's so bad about getting a B in math?
▪ You've been so kind. I hope I can repay you some day.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But you were not always so committed to this constitutional process.
▪ Finally, there is the secrecy and confidentiality which is so typical of public bureaucracies.
▪ How had it gotten so black out?
▪ I start out slowly so I can take everything in.
▪ Not so, it was suggested.
▪ Something about his smarmy attitude makes me want to shake him so hard his collarbone breaks.
▪ The drizzle was so fine that it amounted to fog and he had to drive slowly.
▪ With so many organizational changes, it is understandable that they are having problems.
II.conjunction
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
So anyway, we decided to go to the mall.
▪ I got hungry, so I made a sandwich.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

So

So \So\, adv. [OE. so, sa, swa, AS. sw[=a]; akin to OFries, s[=a], s?, D. zoo, OS. & OHG. s?, G. so, Icel. sv[=a], sv?, svo, so, Sw. s?, Dan. saa, Goth. swa so, sw? as; cf. L. suus one's own, Skr. sva one's own, one's self. [root]192. Cf. As, Custom, Ethic, Idiom, Such.]

  1. In that manner or degree; as, indicated (in any way), or as implied, or as supposed to be known.

    Why is his chariot so long in coming?
    --Judges v. 28.

  2. In like manner or degree; in the same way; thus; for like reason; whith equal reason; -- used correlatively, following as, to denote comparison or resemblance; sometimes, also, following inasmuch as.

    As a war should be undertaken upon a just motive, so a prince ought to consider the condition he is in.
    --Swift.

  3. In such manner; to such degree; -- used correlatively with as or that following; as, he was so fortunate as to escape.

    I viewed in may mind, so far as I was able, the beginning and progress of a rising world.
    --T. Burnet.

    He is very much in Sir Roger's esteem, so that he lives in the family rather as a relation than dependent.
    --Addison.

  4. Very; in a high degree; that is, in such a degree as can not well be expressed; as, he is so good; he planned so wisely.

  5. In the same manner; as has been stated or suggested; in this or that condition or state; under these circumstances; in this way; -- with reflex reference to something just asserted or implied; used also with the verb to be, as a predicate.

    Use him [your tutor] with great respect yourself, and cause all your family to do so too.
    --Locke.

    It concerns every man, with the greatest seriousness, to inquire into those matters, whether they be so or not.
    --Tillotson.

    He is Sir Robert's son, and so art thou.
    --Shak.

  6. The case being such; therefore; on this account; for this reason; on these terms; -- used both as an adverb and a conjuction.

    God makes him in his own image an intellectual creature, and so capable of dominion.
    --Locke.

    Here, then, exchange we mutually forgiveness; So may the guilt of all my broken vows, My perjuries to thee, be all forgotten.
    --Rowe.

  7. It is well; let it be as it is, or let it come to pass; -- used to express assent.

    And when 't is writ, for my sake read it over, And if it please you, so; if not, why, so.
    --Shak.

    There is Percy; if your father will do me any honor, so; if not, let him kill the next Percy himself.
    --Shak.

  8. Well; the fact being as stated; -- used as an expletive; as, so the work is done, is it?

  9. Is it thus? do you mean what you say? -- with an upward tone; as, do you say he refuses? So? [Colloq.]

  10. About the number, time, or quantity specified; thereabouts; more or less; as, I will spend a week or so in the country; I have read only a page or so.

    A week or so will probably reconcile us.
    --Gay.

    Note: See the Note under Ill, adv.

    So . . . as. So is now commonly used as a demonstrative correlative of as when it is the puprpose to emphasize the equality or comparison suggested, esp. in negative assertions, and questions implying a negative answer. By Shakespeare and others so . . . as was much used where as . . . as is now common. See the Note under As, 1.

    So do, as thou hast said.
    --Gen. xviii. 5.

    As a flower of the field, so he flourisheth.
    --Ps. ciii. 15.

    Had woman been so strong as men.
    --Shak.

    No country suffered so much as England.
    --Macaulay.

    So far, to that point or extent; in that particular. ``The song was moral, and so far was right.''
    --Cowper.

    So far forth, as far; to such a degree.
    --Shak.
    --Bacon.

    So forth, further in the same or similar manner; more of the same or a similar kind. See And so forth, under And.

    So, so, well, well. ``So, so, it works; now, mistress, sit you fast.''
    --Dryden. Also, moderately or tolerably well; passably; as, he succeeded but so so. ``His leg is but so so.''
    --Shak.

    So that, to the end that; in order that; with the effect or result that.

    So then, thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is.

So

So \So\, interj. Be as you are; stand still; stop; that will do; right as you are; -- a word used esp. to cows; also used by sailors.

So

So \So\, conj. Provided that; on condition that; in case that; if.

Though all the winds of doctrine were let loose play upon the earth, so truth be in the field, we do injuriously, by licensing and prohibiting, to misdoubt her strength.
--Milton.

So

So \So\, adv. [OE. so, sa, swa, AS. sw[=a]; akin to OFries, s[=a], s?, D. zoo, OS. & OHG. s?, G. so, Icel. sv[=a], sv?, svo, so, Sw. s?, Dan. saa, Goth. swa so, sw? as; cf. L. suus one's own, Skr. sva one's own, one's self. [root]192. Cf. As, Custom, Ethic, Idiom, Such.]

  1. In that manner or degree; as, indicated (in any way), or as implied, or as supposed to be known.

    Why is his chariot so long in coming?
    --Judges v. 28.

  2. In like manner or degree; in the same way; thus; for like reason; whith equal reason; -- used correlatively, following as, to denote comparison or resemblance; sometimes, also, following inasmuch as.

    As a war should be undertaken upon a just motive, so a prince ought to consider the condition he is in.
    --Swift.

  3. In such manner; to such degree; -- used correlatively with as or that following; as, he was so fortunate as to escape.

    I viewed in may mind, so far as I was able, the beginning and progress of a rising world.
    --T. Burnet.

    He is very much in Sir Roger's esteem, so that he lives in the family rather as a relation than dependent.
    --Addison.

  4. Very; in a high degree; that is, in such a degree as can not well be expressed; as, he is so good; he planned so wisely.

  5. In the same manner; as has been stated or suggested; in this or that condition or state; under these circumstances; in this way; -- with reflex reference to something just asserted or implied; used also with the verb to be, as a predicate.

    Use him [your tutor] with great respect yourself, and cause all your family to do so too.
    --Locke.

    It concerns every man, with the greatest seriousness, to inquire into those matters, whether they be so or not.
    --Tillotson.

    He is Sir Robert's son, and so art thou.
    --Shak.

  6. The case being such; therefore; on this account; for this reason; on these terms; -- used both as an adverb and a conjuction.

    God makes him in his own image an intellectual creature, and so capable of dominion.
    --Locke.

    Here, then, exchange we mutually forgiveness; So may the guilt of all my broken vows, My perjuries to thee, be all forgotten.
    --Rowe.

  7. It is well; let it be as it is, or let it come to pass; -- used to express assent.

    And when 't is writ, for my sake read it over, And if it please you, so; if not, why, so.
    --Shak.

    There is Percy; if your father will do me any honor, so; if not, let him kill the next Percy himself.
    --Shak.

  8. Well; the fact being as stated; -- used as an expletive; as, so the work is done, is it?

  9. Is it thus? do you mean what you say? -- with an upward tone; as, do you say he refuses? So? [Colloq.]

  10. About the number, time, or quantity specified; thereabouts; more or less; as, I will spend a week or so in the country; I have read only a page or so.

    A week or so will probably reconcile us.
    --Gay.

    Note: See the Note under Ill, adv.

    So . . . as. So is now commonly used as a demonstrative correlative of as when it is the puprpose to emphasize the equality or comparison suggested, esp. in negative assertions, and questions implying a negative answer. By Shakespeare and others so . . . as was much used where as . . . as is now common. See the Note under As, 1.

    So do, as thou hast said.
    --Gen. xviii. 5.

    As a flower of the field, so he flourisheth.
    --Ps. ciii. 15.

    Had woman been so strong as men.
    --Shak.

    No country suffered so much as England.
    --Macaulay.

    So far, to that point or extent; in that particular. ``The song was moral, and so far was right.''
    --Cowper.

    So far forth, as far; to such a degree.
    --Shak.
    --Bacon.

    So forth, further in the same or similar manner; more of the same or a similar kind. See And so forth, under And.

    So, so, well, well. ``So, so, it works; now, mistress, sit you fast.''
    --Dryden. Also, moderately or tolerably well; passably; as, he succeeded but so so. ``His leg is but so so.''
    --Shak.

    So that, to the end that; in order that; with the effect or result that.

    So then, thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is.

Wikipedia

SO(8)

In mathematics, SO(8) is the special orthogonal group acting on eight-dimensional Euclidean space. It could be either a real or complex simple Lie group of rank 4 and dimension 28.

, So or Sou (written: or ) is a Japanese surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • (1715–1786), Japanese painter

  • (1568–1615), Japanese daimyō

  • (1818-1890), Japanese daimyō

SO(5)

In mathematics, SO(5), also denoted SO(R) or SO(5,R), is the special orthogonal group of degree 5 over the field R of real numbers, i.e. ( isomorphic to) the group of orthogonal 5×5 matrices of determinant 1.

Só (poem collection)

("Alone"), published in Paris in 1892, is a collection of poems by the Portuguese poet António Nobre. It is the only work of his that appeared in his lifetime, and a classic of Portuguese literature.

Category:Portuguese literature Category:1892 books

So (Static-X song)

"So" is a song by industrial metal band Static-X. It is the eleventh track and second single from their album Shadow Zone. It is also the last release with then guitarist Tripp Eisen. The music video features the band performing in Studio 202 and various cut scenes to Wayne Static playing individually. It also features cut scenes of Wayne Static driving his truck. The video was directed by Darren Lynn Bousman.

Sō (New Love New World)

is the twenty-third single by Japanese artist Masaharu Fukuyama. It was released on 22 October 2008.

So (Korean name)

So, also spelled Soh, is a Korean family name and an element in Korean given names. Its meaning depends on the hanja used to write it.

So (sentence opener)

So is a word that, apart from its other uses, has become increasing popular in recent years as a coordinating conjunctive opening word in a sentence. This device is particularly used when answering questions although the questioner may also use the device.

So (album)

So is the fifth studio album by English rock musician Peter Gabriel, released on 19 May 1986 by Charisma Records. After working on the soundtrack to the film Birdy (1984), producer Daniel Lanois was invited to remain at Gabriel's home during 1985 to work on his next singing project. Initial sessions for So consisted of Gabriel, Lanois and guitarist David Rhodes, although these grew to include a number of percussionists.

Although Gabriel continued to use the pioneering Fairlight CMI synthesizer, songs from these sessions were notably less experimental than his previous material, and fused pop and art rock with elements of traditional world music, particularly African and Brazilian styles. It is Gabriel's first non-eponymous album, So representing an "anti-title" that resulted from label pressure to properly market his music. Widely regarded as his best album, as well as his most accessible, it transformed Gabriel from a cult artist into a mainstream star. It received positive reviews from critics, who praised its melodicism and fusion of genres, and was nominated for the Grammy Award for Album of the Year. Gabriel toured So on the This Way Up tour (1986–1987), with some songs performed at human rights and charity concerts during this period.

So is Gabriel's best-selling solo release, and has been certified fivefold platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America and triple platinum by the British Phonographic Industry. It spawned five singles, " Sledgehammer", " Don't Give Up", " Big Time", " In Your Eyes" and " Red Rain". "Sledgehammer" achieved particular success, reaching number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and winning a record of ten MTV Video Music Awards. So was remastered in 2002, partially re-recorded for Gabriel's 2012 orchestral project New Blood and issued as a box set the same year. It has been deemed one of the best albums of the 1980s and is listed at number 187 in Rolling Stones 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

So (sentence closer)

So is a word that may be used to end sentences. When ending a sentence, it may be:

  • a coordinating conjunctive to refer backwards to something previously mentioned
  • a coordinating conjunctive dangling "so" (sometimes called trailing "so") to refer forwards to something that may be said
  • an intensifying adverb.

SO(10) (physics)

In particle physics, one of the grand unified theories (GUT) is based on the SO(10) Lie group. (The Lie group involved is not really the special orthogonal group SO(10), but rather its double cover Spin(10); but calling it SO(10) is the standard convention.)

Before the SU(5) theory behind the Georgi–Glashow model, Harald Fritzsch and Peter Minkowski and independently Howard Georgi found that all the matter contents are incorporated into a single representation, spinorial 16 of SO(10). (Historical note: the before in the previous sentence is misleading: Georgi found the SO(10) theory a few hours before finding SU(5) at the end of 1973.)

So (kana)

, in hiragana, or , in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora. Both represent . The version of this character used by computer fonts does not match the way most native Japanese people write it with their hands. The native way is shown here as the alternative form.

Form

Rōmaji

Hiragana

Katakana

Normal s-
(さ行 sa-gyō)

so

sou
soo
, soh

そう, そぅ
そお, そぉ
そー

ソウ, ソゥ
ソオ, ソォ
ソー

Addition dakutenz-
(ざ行 za-gyō)

zo

zou
zoo
, zoh

ぞう, ぞぅ
ぞお, ぞぉ
ぞー

ゾウ, ゾゥ
ゾオ, ゾォ
ゾー

So (band)

So are an English duo from London active in the late 1980s, that featured Marcus Bell and Mark Long, who were previously members of a band called The Opposition. The duo were managed by Steve Weltman of Esta Management, and were contemporaries of acts such as Climie Fisher and Waterfront. Signing to Parlophone, they released singles such as "Are You Sure?" ( UK #62, US #41) and "Would You Die For Me", as well as the accompanying album Horseshoe in the Glove, produced by Walter Turbitt.

They are not to be confused with the similarly named electronic act, featuring Markus Popp (also of Oval and Microstoria) and the Japanese vocalist Eriko Toyoda.

Marcus Bell died in December 2014.

SO (complexity)

Second-order logic is an extension of first-order with second order quantifiers, hence the reader should first read FO (complexity) to be able to understand this article. In descriptive complexity we can see that the languages recognised by SO formulae are exactly equal to the languages decided by Turing machines in the polynomial hierarchy. Extensions of SO with some operators also give us the same expressivity given by some well known complexity class, so it is a way to do proofs about the complexity of some problems without having to go to the algorithmic level.

So (dairy product)

So was a type of dairy product made in Japan between the seventh and 10th centuries. The method of creation is noted in Engishiki as so acted as a gift in kind to the emperors. Daigo was produced by further processing so.

The first record of so was made during the era of Emperor Mommu (697-707 AD). Tennyakuryo, then a part of the Ministry of Imperial Household, was responsible for the production of so. It was used as a medicine and as an offering to gods.

The production sites known to date include Ajifu in Settsu (current Higashiyodogawa-ku in Osaka). So is made by solidifying layers of milk skin. The flavor is light, similar to that of cottage cheese.

WordNet

so

  1. adj. conforming to truth; "I wouldn't have told you this if it weren't so"; "a truthful statement" [syn: so(p), truthful]

  2. marked by system; in good order; "everything is in order"; "his books are always just so"; "things must be exactly so" [syn: in order(p), so(p)]

so

n. the syllable naming the fifth (dominant) note of any musical scale in solmization [syn: sol, soh]

so

  1. adv. to a very great extent or degree; "the idea is so obvious"; "never been so happy"; "I love you so"; "my head aches so!"

  2. in order that; "he stooped down so he could pick up his hat"

  3. in such a condition or manner, especially as expressed or implied; "They're happy and I hope they will remain so"; "so live your life that old age will bring no regrets"

  4. to a certain unspecified extent or degree; "I can only go so far with this student"; "can do only so much in a day"

  5. in the same way; also; "I was offended and so was he"; "worked hard and so did she"

  6. in the way indicated; "hold the brush so"; "set up the pieces thus"; (`thusly' is a nonstandard variant) [syn: thus, thusly]

  7. (usually followed by `that') to an extent or degree as expressed; "he was so tired he could hardly stand"; "so dirty that it smells"

  8. subsequently or soon afterward (often used as sentence connectors); "then he left"; "go left first, then right"; "first came lightning, then thunder"; "we watched the late movie and then went to bed"; "and so home and to bed" [syn: then, and so, and then]

  9. in truth (often tends to intensify); "they said the car would break down and indeed it did"; "it is very cold indeed"; "was indeed grateful"; "indeed, the rain may still come"; "he did so do it!" [syn: indeed]

Wiktionary

so

abbr. someone a. 1 true, accurate. 2 In that state or manner; with that attribute. ((non-gloss definition: replaces the aforementioned adjective phrase)) 3 (lb en dated UK slang) homosexual. adv. To the (explicitly stated) extent that. conj. 1 In order that. 2 With the result that; for that reason; therefore. interj. Used after a pause for thought to introduce a new topic, question or story. n. (label en music) A syllable used in solfège to represent the fifth note of a major scale.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

so

Old English swa, swæ (adv., conj., pron.) "in this way," also "to that extent; so as, consequently, therefore," and purely intensive; from Proto-Germanic *swa (cognates: Old Saxon, Middle Dutch, Old High German so, Old Norse sva, Danish saa, Swedish , Old Frisian sa, Dutch zo, German so "so," Gothic swa "as"), from PIE reflexive pronomial stem *swo- "so" (cognates: Greek hos "as," Old Latin suad "so," Latin se "himself"), derivative of *s(w)e-, pronoun of the third person and reflexive (see idiom).\n

\nOld English swa frequently was strengthened by eall, and so also is contained in compounds as, also, such. The -w- was eliminated by contraction from 12c.; compare two, which underwent the same process but retained its spelling. As an "introductory particle" [OED] from 1590s. Used to add emphasis or contradict a negative from 1913. So in mid-20c. British slang could mean "homosexual" (adj.). So? as a term of dismissal is attested from 1886 (short for is that so?, etc.). So what as an exclamation of indifference dates from 1934. So-and-so is from 1596 meaning "something unspecified;" first recorded 1897 as a euphemistic term of abuse. Abbreviating phrase and so on is attested from 1724. So far so good is from 1721.

Usage examples of "so".

I been content to abide till eld came upon me, but my lord would not have it so, but longed for greater things for me.

The monstrosities abiding within the smaller man could not molest him or they would certainly already have done so.

As it was, the spray drenched everyone aboard, causing them to bend their backs that much harder, long before Dunlop screamed at them to do so.

Out of the rubble of this body, I created Abraxas anew, Abraxas the perfect god, the giver of life, the force of good and evil, because it was my destiny to do so.

As there is Good, the Absolute, as well as Good, the quality, so, together with the derived evil entering into something not itself, there must be the Absolute Evil.

So, though Rosemary West may have physically abused him, neither she nor her husband were anxious to relinquish Steven McAvoy once he was in her hands.

Then Fagin pushed hard for some sort of gas attack, which Banish rejected as well, saying that the Abies family might have gas masks themselves and, if so, the agents and marshals going in would be facing a slaughter.

To begin with, the four different classes were not hereditary but in time they became so, probably led by the Brahmans, whose task of memorising the Vedas was more easily achieved if fathers could begin teaching their sons early on.

She promised to do so, but she wished to be acquainted with the young girl.

He had often done so, in days past, when he considered the soul of Acton van Reuter and where it might currently reside.

I know Tosevites are addled, but the notion strikes me as improbable even so.

Thus we are told that earth cannot have concrete existence without the help of some moist element--the moisture in water being the necessary adhesive--but admitting that we so find it, there is still a contradiction in pretending that any one element has a being of its own and in the same breath denying its self-coherence, making its subsistence depend upon others, and so, in reality, reducing the specific element to nothing.

So, aside from the elements that make up an advertisement, the underlying theme, philoSophy and methods of doing business are critical.

Notably so, when in a neck-to-neck dash with an express train, the aeroplane won out in a race to file the location papers of the mine at Monument Rocks.

I do not wish to have to fill up an affiche unless I am compelled to do so.