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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

slight

I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a brief/short/slight pause
▪ "Well, that was a surprise," he said after a brief pause.
a high/low/slight fever
▪ The usual symptoms are a pink rash with a slight fever.
a light/slight/faint breeze
▪ The curtains lifted in the light breeze.
a little/faint/slight smile
▪ She gave him an apologetic little smile.
a minor/slight modification (=a small modification)
▪ The document needed a few slight modifications.
a slight advantage (=a small one)
▪ Karpov enjoyed a slight advantage over his opponent.
a slight cold
▪ It’s only a slight cold – I’ll be fine tomorrow.
a slight cough (=one that is not very serious)
▪ He has a slight cough but I don’t think he’s really ill.
a slight edge (also a bit of an edge) (= a small advantage)
▪ Running on the inside lane will give him a slight edge.
a slight exaggeration (=small)
▪ I think that saying the animals are almost extinct is a slight exaggeration.
a slight headache (also a bit of a headachespoken) (= one that is not very serious )
▪ I’d rather stay at home – I’ve got a bit of a headache.
a slight improvement
▪ Sales figures have shown a slight improvement this month.
a slight limp
▪ Young walked with a slight limp.
a slight movement (=small)
▪ His eye caught a slight movement behind the bushes.
a slight pain (=not severe)
▪ I’ve got a slight pain in my side.
a slight/brief/momentary etc hesitation
▪ There was a slight hesitation in Jamie’s voice.
a slight/faint accent
▪ He has a very slight accent.
a slight/faint resemblance (=not strong)
▪ Don't you think she has a slight resemblance to that blonde singer in Abba?
a slight/gentle/wide bend (=that changes direction slightly or gradually)
▪ Ahead of us there was a wide bend in the river.
a slight/mild reaction
▪ A spider’s venom usually causes only a slight reaction.
a slight/minor defect
▪ There are one or two minor defects on the car’s paintwork.
a slight/minor disadvantage
▪ Children who are young in their school year sometimes have a slight disadvantage.
a slight/short delay
▪ There was a slight delay in the departure of the plane.
a slight/small/minor difference
▪ There’s only a slight difference between the male and the female bird.
a small/slight shift
▪ There has been only a slight shift in income distribution.
a small/slight/slim chance
▪ He only has a very small chance of being elected.
▪ There’s a slight chance of some sunshine in the west.
a vague/slight sense of sth (=not very strong)
▪ There was a slight sense of embarrassment.
at a slight/steep angle
▪ The sign leaned over at a slight angle.
at the slightest excuse (=for any reason, however unimportant)
▪ She comes to our house at the slightest excuse.
at the slightest provocation
▪ Julie has a tendency to burst into tears at the slightest provocation.
large/thin/slight etc frame
minor/slight adjustment
▪ It just needs a few minor adjustments.
not the slightest doubt (=no doubt)
▪ There’s not the slightest doubt in my mind about it.
slight build (=fairly thin)
▪ Simpson was of slight build and shy in character.
slight mishap
▪ I had a slight mishap with one of the glasses.
slight/minor (=not serious)
▪ She’s suffering from a slight infection.
slight/small
▪ Doctors have reported a slight increase in the number of deaths caused by the disease.
▪ The temperature increase was quite small.
slight/small/minor
▪ The proposed changes were relatively minor.
small/slight
▪ It’s only a small cut.
technical/slight/last-minute hitch
▪ In spite of some technical hitches, the first program was a success.
the slightest suspicion
▪ Daniel never had the slightest suspicion of how she really felt.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
however
▪ Our dignity requires that we struggle in the net, however slight the hope of escape.
▪ Any movement, however slight, could crack the Chevy wide open like an uncooked eggshell.
▪ There are however slight variations, the first being where the independent belongs to a retail buying association.
only
▪ She awoke with her body lazily relaxed, only slight soreness to remind her of what had happened the previous night.
▪ It is only slight hyperbole to say that Roy Disney averted a cultural tragedy.
▪ Since the modifications were only slight, data from the piloting stage were included in the final analysis.
▪ Yet you may have a list chock full of interesting points with only slight degrees of greater importance.
▪ Most tour packages and many resorts are reporting they are either holding the line or having only slight increases in price.
so
▪ I notice you have been fighting, so maybe your errand was not so slight.
▪ At first his weight was so slight that he had almost to force himself downward by holding on to the handrail.
▪ The differences are therefore in the expected direction but so slight as to be unremarkable.
▪ The whole connection is so slight that the legend only appears in tourist-orientated guide books of the twentieth century.
▪ He was fortunate the punishment was so slight.
▪ He pulled her to her feet, marvelling that so slight a creature could have put up such a fight.
▪ The overhead wires are so slight that you have to look hard to see them.
very
▪ Though both had appeared in the press and are very slight pamphlets, they rank as first editions in book form.
▪ Thus, red maple seeds can fly in a very slight breeze, but silver maples need wind.
▪ Often their connection with the place is very slight or even non-existent.
▪ The oral shield is rounded triangular, often with a very slight distal lobe.
▪ There was only a very slight frown on her brow when Fernando went inside to bring out the paella.
▪ The flattening f of Mercury is very slight.
▪ It's like a combination, although it's very slight on the wrist.
▪ Sometimes the difference caused by assimilation is very noticeable, and sometimes it is very slight.
■ NOUN
angle
▪ His wig was now at a slight angle.
▪ Christabel's tombstone leaned over at a slight angle.
▪ Both chairs are placed securely, with the free chair at a slight angle to where the patient is sitting.
▪ She went about with her head at a slight angle and her eyes permanently narrowed, to avoid the smoke.
bit
▪ But to all outward appearance she was, let it be said, the slightest bit slatternly.
▪ I say, without feeling the slightest bit cowardly.
▪ Are we in the slightest bit surprised by this hypocrisy from a member of the government?
▪ Whenever there was the slightest bit of gossip in the office, Wilkinson was bound to hear about it.
▪ Not that it would have done the slightest bit of good.
▪ He is, he will tell you without the slightest bit of embarrassment, in love.
▪ Was he just the slightest bit jealous?
▪ In fact, no one will admit to being the slightest bit nervous about the lift.
bow
▪ He came to his front door to say goodbye, which he did with a handshake and a slight bow.
▪ She made a slight bow and wheeled to the next desk.
▪ They were just three wires joined at the ends, with only the slightest bow to them.
breeze
▪ The curtains were long and gauzy, fluttering in a slight breeze.
▪ A slight breeze rose to cool his scalp, which had been sun-baked, then doused with water until it tingled.
▪ The slightest breeze to carry her love away.
▪ A slight breeze picks up and you see only occasional flashes of distant lightning that still illuminate the whole sky.
▪ It was cool, a slight breeze drifting over her face, calming the heat of her skin.
▪ Thus, red maple seeds can fly in a very slight breeze, but silver maples need wind.
▪ There was a slight breeze that riffled her hair.
▪ All that was left of the original roof was tar-paper strips that lifted in the slightest breeze.
chance
▪ Thers's a a slight chance of some sunshine in the west, but nothing spectacular.
▪ No eighteenth-century peace plan had the slightest chance of being put into practice.
▪ You aren't going anywhere where there's the slightest chance that you could cause more trouble.
▪ Only the first would Niki have the slightest chance of repaying.
▪ I can not ignore even the slightest chance that she may have survived.
change
▪ A slight change of angle and a full wing shape becomes distorted into a thin one.
▪ The manipulated atoms also could be used to detect extremely slight changes in motion.
▪ Embankments can vary considerably in size; many cater for just a slight change in the level of the ground.
▪ Flight control warned air traffic of a slight change.
▪ Sometimes this happens with a fishing style, small improvements, slight changes. but no real leaps forward.
▪ Had not a slight change of wind taken place, the result might have been fatal to most of us.
▪ For me, it was the most teasing of all things, variations on a theme, slight changes.
▪ Although the forms remained basically the same, his past underwent slight changes.
decrease
▪ Even a slight decrease, a sensible diet, will get you the results you want.
degree
▪ I frequently give into their hands my best guns and never found them in the slightest degree disposed to take advantage.
▪ Yet you may have a list chock full of interesting points with only slight degrees of greater importance.
delay
▪ In the meantime, the slight delay would allow him to run down his quarry.
▪ The good news is that both are worth the slight delay.
▪ Despite the slight delay the audience gave the band a rousing welcome and were rewarded with two superb sets.
▪ There was a slight delay in the departure of her scheduled plane out of Dulles International.
▪ A slight delay as you skirt round it.
▪ Sometimes it is necessary to wait for an incoming aircraft which might cause a slight delay before you proceed to the resort.
difference
▪ Nothing he could say now would make the slightest difference.
▪ Just like your language instructor, they can detect the slight differences between certain speech sounds that adults will insist are identical.
▪ I tried closing my eyes; it made not the slightest difference.
▪ Now those slight differences of electrical potential had disappeared, like the chalk dust at the end of the lesson.
▪ Only the music created slight differences and this not markedly because the composers used the best of commonly recognised traditional musical idioms.
▪ They are all slightly different and all the slight differences cancel each other out.
▪ Not that this would have made the slightest difference to the outcome.
▪ All I could do was repeat the injections, but was it going to make the slightest difference?
doubt
▪ There was now not the slightest doubt that Hsu was decaying and losing her structural integrity.
▪ He began to have slight doubts about going back with Eleanor.
▪ Without the slightest doubt this is a remarkable, compelling exhibition.
▪ Without the slightest doubt, there are far fewer gestures in the world than there are individuals.
▪ But after the triumph, I don't have the slightest doubt that women will ensure that their true rights are respected.
▪ Let me assure you, I never had the slightest doubt we would stay in Division Three.
edge
▪ Now the dim light gave Manville a very slight edge, for he was in cover and his adversaries were not.
▪ Budweiser gets the slight edge here over Pepsi for entertainment value.
▪ The slightest edge of concern had entered her voice now.
▪ Men gave a slight edge to Dole, 44 percent to 43 percent.
▪ Psychologically, in fact, they have a slight edge over their indomitable opponents.
▪ Lose both, and they retain a slight edge.
▪ White's quiet opening may still lead to a slight edge for him if Black permits e4.
exaggeration
▪ One might with only slight exaggeration claim that firelight illuminates virtually every positive page in Victorian novels.
figure
▪ On one of the horses was a slight figure, bound and blindfolded.
▪ In a corner of the room was the slight figure of Jay Gould.
▪ Letty knocked and glancing up Emily saw a slight figure with a mass of dark hair following the maid into the room.
▪ Esther's slight figure could be seen coming furtively through the door and into the recess.
▪ A man from a cell ahead of mine, a slight figure, was knocked aside by two more powerful men working together.
▪ The forward screen zoomed in on the slight figure of the target.
hesitation
▪ As an Eric Clapton fan, I recommend this double album without the slightest hesitation.
▪ He succeeded and was left with just a slight hesitation in speech.
▪ With only a very slight hesitation she launched into her part.
▪ He had noticed the slight hesitation over the gender of the letter writer.
hint
▪ The slightest hint of trouble over the weekend brought a massive response from fleets of police cars.
▪ Crisp, without the slightest hint of being greasy, it both crunches and melts in your mouth.
▪ At the slightest hint of sloth, cross them off your list.
▪ The slightest hint of militancy was enough to bar a group from being funded.
▪ She searched his face for just the slightest hint that there might be the chance of some give in his rigidity.
▪ But Gordon answered that one, too, betraying only the slightest hint of impatience.
▪ But that does not breed the slightest hint of complacency as the 31-year-old Ballinascreen clubman prepares for the All Ireland final.
▪ It tasted yeasty, with a slight hint of effervescence, and began almost instantly to produce a slow easing of inhibitions.
idea
▪ I still haven't the slightest idea.
▪ Without such game rules no society would exist; nor would any individual have the slightest idea how to act.
▪ What we went out there for I haven t the slightest idea.
▪ The auditor now has some slight idea of who the allies may be.
▪ An honest answer seems to be that no one has the slightest idea.
▪ No one in the States has the slightest idea how beautiful it is.
▪ You're the first woman I've ever met who had the slightest idea what travelling light means.
▪ I never have the slightest idea what she's thinking.
improvement
▪ The slight improvements in the eighteenth century are important because they mark the beginning of the downward trend.
▪ It attributed the slight improvement in load factor to recent schedule changes and fare sales.
▪ She remained sedated and in a critical condition throughout Tuesday 7 July although she showed some slight improvement.
▪ The record does, however, show a slight improvement over its predecessor.
▪ Once again sales have moved well and terminations actually showing a slight improvement over last year!
▪ Two other patients reported a slight improvement, and one reported no improvement at all.
▪ The only consolation was that this was a slight improvement on 1987 when Dagenham fell 14 percent short of target.
increase
▪ There have, for example, been slight increases in average family size and in the average age at marriage.
▪ Most tour packages and many resorts are reporting they are either holding the line or having only slight increases in price.
▪ Textiles accounted for just over a third, after a slight increase that got through to profit.
▪ Thiazides may cause a slight increase in magnesium excretion.
▪ This is unlikely to produce anything more than a slight increase in vaginal discharge which has no particular distinguishing features.
▪ Here the increment in individual risk from a slight increase in contact rate is negligible, assuming the individual acts alone.
▪ Both figures constitute a slight increase over the previous year.
▪ Transfection with TAP2 a resulted in a slight increase of HLA-A2 and HLA-B5 expression, which we are investigating at present.
interest
▪ The person I had seen could have not the slightest interest in a beat-up old poet like me.
▪ It was the first time he had ever shown the slightest interest in any type of work.
▪ He'd never shown the slightest interest in any other woman - any decent woman.
▪ You've never displayed the slightest interest in what I do.
▪ I looked round thinking everyone would stare at me, but to my relief no one showed the slightest interest.
▪ She hasn't the slightest interest in Monpazier.
▪ He seemed to have not the slightest interest in what she was saying.
▪ If I were a woman I wouldn't have the slightest interest in it either.
limp
▪ I noticed he had a slight limp.
▪ Noonan walked with a slight limp.
▪ Unfortunately he suffered damage to a knee which left him with a permanent slight limp.
▪ His mind concentrated itself on Tolby's footsteps which were slightly uneven, as if the solicitor had a slight limp.
▪ The only sign of his accident is that he walks with a slight limp.
▪ She noticed for the first time that he had a slight limp.
modification
▪ I do however have orders for two more with slight modifications.
▪ A slight modification of the above example will give us an instance of a deduction that is not valid.
▪ A slight modification of the procedure will enable us to add equality constraints.
▪ This constitution survived with only slight modifications until the Municipal Reform Act of 1835.
▪ The geographical distribution of both doctors and hospitals has remained in favour of the upper socio-economic groups with only very slight modifications.
movement
▪ The slightest movement caused them to twang and reverberate through the silent apartment.
▪ Joe says bravely and makes a slight movement towards the door.
▪ It is sensitive to slight movements of the camera, subject or reference strip and will sometimes trigger spurious diagnostics.
▪ Your nerve endings bristle at the slightest movement.
▪ His eyes were glued to the hands of Young Jack, awaiting the slightest movement amongst the dark captain's metaphysical digits.
▪ When ripe these pear-shaped fungi are filled with dust-like spores which pour out of the small central opening at the slightest movement.
▪ Trent met it with a slight movement of the tiller bar, and the big catamaran lifted smoothly.
▪ She kept as still as possible; every slight movement made her whimper.
pause
▪ Then the slight pause, the half-second of calm and false progress.
problem
▪ There would be some slight problem in distinguishing Jalame glass from that imported to the site.
▪ She had a slight problem, no doctor to conduct the test..
▪ It's only a slight problem I have with names.
▪ He saw that one fire engine got through okay but the second a slight problem in two places.
▪ Speed I've been using RapidCad for a month or so and It's not given me the slightest problem.
▪ One slight problem was that soil built up between the outside tines and the subsoiler legs.
▪ He was already used to being called out by the Sheikhs for the slightest problem.
▪ Hired plant invoices may create a slight problem where the hire period extends across two accounting periods.
rise
▪ In third field go forward to waymarked stile at far end, keeping just right of slight rise.
▪ Would a slight rise in the rate of inflation from the current 2. 5 percent really hurt?
▪ In the lowest-lying places, which are flooded at any slight rise in the water level, no trees grow.
▪ It was huge, red-roofed and white-walled, the main house on a slight rise inside the high-walled perimeter.
▪ This means a slight rise in the wages account which is no different than working overtime for cleaning and maintenance of machinery.
▪ Speciality Chemicals division saw a slight rise in operating profit from £223m in 1990 to £225m.
▪ Despite a slight rise in his approval rating during the campaign, he remains a liability.
sign
▪ Perhaps it was to exploit this slight sign of thaw that Eisenhower immediately afterwards invited Khrushchev to the United States.
▪ I looked around for the slightest sign of life.
▪ They had always found buccaneering terribly alarming, and felt seasick at the slightest sign of bad weather.
▪ And investors who pumped up software stocks in 1995 are now running from the slightest sign of risk.
▪ There was not the slightest sign in his behaviour of any strict Methodist upbringing.
▪ They show not the slightest sign of that one essential attribute we think animal life should have: movement.
▪ Indeed, if we leave only the slightest sign of our passing we should be satisfied.
smile
▪ He leaned back in the chair, a slight smile playing on his lips.
▪ A slight smile curved her mouth, relaxing the rigidity of her body.
▪ She looks at him with a slight smile.
▪ He gives her an angry look, shakes his head, then lets his mouth loosen into a slight smile.
▪ A slight smile now, and a walk that was both casual and wary; cat-like.
▪ Usually his parishioners listened to his lectures with a slight smile, an engaged expression.
▪ Miss Jarman stood back, a slight smile on her raddled face.
▪ Gomez's slight smile was that of a man who believed that politeness demanded he act a little embarrassed at doing his job.
variation
▪ These variations may be a result of slight variations in the amount of template cDNA.
▪ There was never the slightest variation.
▪ It is employed by a wide range of species, with slight variations.
▪ They show slight variations, for example in the woodcut decorations.
▪ A slight variation in this household was that one social worker stayed behind.
▪ Special Scheme Home policies may have slight variations in cover and should be handled accordingly.
▪ There are however slight variations, the first being where the independent belongs to a retail buying association.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a slight headache
▪ a small, slight child with delicate-looking features
▪ He was slight and frail, even as a young man.
▪ He was a good friend - always available to help at the slightest sign of need.
▪ Officials reported a slight increase in inflation.
▪ The doctor says there has been a slight improvement in her condition.
▪ There has been a slight change of plan.
▪ Tom? I haven't the slightest idea where he is.
▪ US foreign policy at the time hadn't made the slightest difference in the situation.
▪ Yoshida is a slight, quiet man with a grey beard.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But there was only a slight, impatient nodding.
▪ Do not spend your life taking over-the-counter medication for the slightest ache or pain.
▪ Dove stood by, ready to bolt for the lifeboat at the slightest glance from Jenkins.
▪ He felt a slight tickling as his old skin blistered.
▪ In those turbulent times that produce skips, however, a slight degradation will be close to unnoticeable.
▪ The only slight justification for Batty going I can see, I realised last night.
▪ Throat and neck sensitive to the slightest touch.
▪ To dread the slightest sneeze or cough that might herald the onset of polio or tuberculosis.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
feel
▪ This disillusion causes one to feel neglected, slighted, rejected, etc.
▪ We feel we are being slighted, or overlooked, or not given our due, etc.
▪ Polly didn't know whether to feel relieved or slighted.
▪ By singling out the black population for a special history month makes all other races feel slighted.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ It was never our intention to slight minority communities.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But does the academic agenda of the classroom get slighted in all this?
▪ He had left things to others too long, and his sovereignty was in danger of being slighted.
▪ I am used to being ignored and slighted, but mark this well!
▪ I have never slighted techniques in my teaching, writing, and consulting.
▪ Polly didn't know whether to feel relieved or slighted.
▪ This disillusion causes one to feel neglected, slighted, rejected, etc.
▪ Through metaphor Thoreau renders the self and nature in total interrelationship without slighting either half of the duality.
▪ We feel we are being slighted, or overlooked, or not given our due, etc.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Slight

Slight \Slight\, n. The act of slighting; the manifestation of a moderate degree of contempt, as by neglect or oversight; neglect; indignity.

Syn: Neglect; disregard; inattention; contempt; disdain; scorn; disgrace; indignity; disparagement.

Slight

Slight \Slight\, adv. Slightly. [Obs. or Poetic]

Think not so slight of glory.
--Milton.

Slight

Slight \Slight\, n. Sleight.
--Spenser.

Slight

Slight \Slight\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Slighted; p. pr. & vb. n. Slighting.] To disregard, as of little value and unworthy of notice; to make light of; as, to slight the divine commands.
--Milton.

The wretch who slights the bounty of the skies.
--Cowper.

To slight off, to treat slightingly; to drive off; to remove. [R.] -- To slight over, to run over in haste; to perform superficially; to treat carelessly; as, to slight over a theme. ``They will but slight it over.''
--Bacon.

Syn: To neglect; disregard; disdain; scorn.

Usage: Slight, Neglect. To slight is stronger than to neglect. We may neglect a duty or person from inconsiderateness, or from being over-occupied in other concerns. To slight is always a positive and intentional act, resulting from feelings of dislike or contempt. We ought to put a kind construction on what appears neglect on the part of a friend; but when he slights us, it is obvious that he is our friend no longer.

Beware . . . lest the like befall . . . If they transgress and slight that sole command.
--Milton.

This my long-sufferance, and my day of grace, Those who neglect and scorn shall never taste.
--Milton.

Slight

Slight \Slight\, v. t. [Cf. D. slechten to level, to demolish.]

  1. To overthrow; to demolish. [Obs.]
    --Clarendon.

  2. To make even or level. [Obs.]
    --Hexham.

  3. To throw heedlessly. [Obs.]

    The rogue slighted me into the river.
    --Shak.

Slight

Slight \Slight\, a. [Compar. Slighter; superl. Slightest.] [OE. sli?t, sleght, probably from OD. slicht, slecht, simple, plain, D. slecht; akin to OFries. sliucht, G. schlecht, schlicht, OHG. sleht smooth, simple, Icel. sl?ttr smooth, Sw. sl["a]t, Goth. sla['i]hts; or uncertain origin.]

  1. Not decidedly marked; not forcible; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe; weak; gentle; -- applied in a great variety of circumstances; as, a slight (i. e., feeble) effort; a slight (i. e., perishable) structure; a slight (i. e., not deep) impression; a slight (i. e., not convincing) argument; a slight (i. e., not thorough) examination; slight (i. e., not severe) pain, and the like. ``At one slight bound.''
    --Milton.

    Slight is the subject, but not so the praise.
    --Pope.

    Some firmly embrace doctrines upon slight grounds.
    --Locke.

  2. Not stout or heavy; slender.

    His own figure, which was formerly so slight.
    --Sir W. Scott.

  3. Foolish; silly; weak in intellect.
    --Hudibras.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

slight

early 14c., "flat, smooth; hairless," probably from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse slettr "smooth, sleek," from Proto-Germanic *slikhtaz (cognates: Old Saxon slicht; Low German slicht "smooth, plain common;" Old English -sliht "level," attested in eorðslihtes "level with the ground;" Old Frisian sliucht "smooth, slight," Middle Dutch sleht "even, plain," Old High German sleht, Gothic slaihts "smooth"), probably from a collateral form of PIE *sleig- "to smooth, glide, be muddy," from root *(s)lei- "slimy" (see slime (n.)).\n

\nSense evolution probably is from "smooth" (c.1300), to "slim, slender; of light texture," hence "not good or strong; insubstantial, trifling, inferior, insignificant" (early 14c.). Meaning "small in amount" is from 1520s. Sense of German cognate schlecht developed from "smooth, plain, simple" to "bad, mean, base," and as it did it was replaced in the original senses by schlicht, a back-formation from schlichten "to smooth, to plane," a derivative of schlecht in the old sense [Klein].

slight

c.1300, "make plain or smooth," from slight (adj.) Meaning "treat with indifference" (1590s) is from the adjective in sense of "having little worth." Related: Slighted; slighting.

slight

1550s, "small amount or weight," from slight (v.). Meaning "act of intentional neglect or ignoring out of displeasure or contempt" is from 1701, probably via 17c. phrase make a slight of (1610s).

WordNet

slight

  1. adj. having little substance or significance; "a flimsy excuse"; "slight evidence"; "a tenuous argument"; "a thin plot" [syn: flimsy, tenuous, thin]

  2. almost no or (with `a') at least some; very little; "there's slight chance that it will work"; "there's a slight chance it will work"

  3. being of delicate or slender build; "she was slender as a willow shoot is slender"- Frank Norris; "a slim girl with straight blonde hair"; "watched her slight figure cross the street" [syn: slender, slim]

slight

n. a deliberate discourteous act (usually as an expression of anger or disapproval) [syn: rebuff]

slight

v. pay no attention to, disrespect; "She cold-shouldered her ex-fiance" [syn: cold-shoulder]

Wiktionary

slight

  1. small, weak(,) or gentle; not decidedly marked; not forcible; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe. n. 1 The act of slighting; a deliberate act of neglect or discourtesy. 2 sleight. v

  2. 1 To treat as slight or not worthy of attention, to make light of. 2 To treat with disdain or neglect. 3 To act negligently or carelessly. 4 (context military of a fortification English) To render no longer defensible by full or partial demolition. 5 To make even or level. 6 To throw heedlessly.

Wikipedia

Slight

A Slight is an Insult

Slight may also refer to:

Usage examples of "slight".

And although, as has been said, a person who is found to be suspected in this way is not to be branded as a heretic, yet he must undergo a canonical purgation, or he must be caused to pronounce a solemn abjuration as in the case of one convicted of a slight heresy.

A mosquito bite, a cut, or the slightest abrasion, serves for lodgment of the poison with which the air seems to be filled.

The abutments also must be strong enough to take safely the thrust of the weighted arch, as the slightest movement in these supports will cause deflection and failure.

He still kept his army in Spain, and this proceeding determined Portugal to accede to some slight alterations in the first treaty.

Slight imperfections in the match were negotiated by a jostling crowd of donor or acceptor molecules.

To separate these, ammonia is added till the solution is alkaline, and then acetic acid in slight excess.

He had been with Mwynwen frequently, either in his own chambers or her house, resting and leaching out of his body the subliminal aches and slight sickness that extended exposure to iron caused .

Carthage was condemned to pay within the term of fifty years, were a slight acknowledgment of the superiority of Rome, and cannot bear the least proportion with the taxes afterwards raised both on the lands and on the persons of the inhabitants, when the fertile coast of Africa was reduced into a province.

Othman emperor still accepts from Egypt a slight acknowledgment of tribute and subjection.

It is not easy, however, to induce a child to use an Acousticon at all times, whereas an adult will take the time and trouble necessary to become accustomed to the instrument, and will put up with the slight inconveniences inseparable from its use.

Sauveur, without the slightest opposition from the venerable priest, who, far from sharing the anti-christain intolerancy of the clergy in general, said that her profession as an actress had not hindered her from being a good Christian, and that the earth was the common mother of all human beings, as Jesus Christ had been the Saviour of all mankind.

The hair was so acutely sensitive that the slightest touch occasioned severe pain at the roots.

It was estimated that before the adjournment of Congress more than a thousand negroes and many white Unionists had been murdered in the South, without even the slightest attempt at prosecuting the murderers.

He amused me with the enumeration of all her adorable qualities, and of all the cruelties she was practising upon him, for, although she received him at all hours, she repulsed him harshly whenever he tried to steal the slightest favour.

I must even confess that I adore women, and that I have not the slightest idea of depriving myself of the most delightful of all pleasures.