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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

sin

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
as miserable as sinBritish English (= very miserable)
as ugly as sin (=very ugly)
▪ Nick’s dog is as ugly as sin.
cardinal sin
▪ politicians who commit the cardinal sin of ignoring public opinion
commit a sin (=do something that is wrong according to your religion)
▪ He confessed to having committed the sin of adultery.
confessed...sin
▪ He knelt and confessed his sin.
mortal sin
original sin
sin bin
unforgivable sin
▪ the unforgivable sin of informing on your friends
venial sin
▪ a venial sin
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
cardinal
▪ It's fairly entertaining to watch but commits the cardinal sin of not identifying individual players.
▪ I made the cardinal sin in tennis.
▪ In Gandhi's view, its cardinal sin is the way it tolerates untouchability.
▪ All things were possible; anyone could get rich; the cardinal sin was doubt.
▪ We list the ten cardinal sins to be avoided by anyone hoping to handle their finances better in the future.
▪ Also, eating is not likely to be viewed as a cardinal sin.
▪ Monotony was a cardinal sin for Victorian architects, just as it is the predominant defining characteristic of modern architecture.
deadly
▪ He felt as if he had been led through the seven deadly sins one by one, with lust leading the way.
▪ I noticed with amusement that the tapestries hanging there illustrated the seven deadly sins.
▪ Anger, he saw, had not been lightly numbered among the deadly sins.
▪ Thinking about deadly sin led her to think again of Satan.
great
▪ The greater the sin, the more glorious the struggle would be his attitude.
▪ That is the greatest sin of all.
▪ When I look back over the years I see impatience as the great sin of life.
▪ Then they will learn, there is no greater booj sin than to love us only like a father.
▪ A baby born out of wedlock was a great sin, then, and a huge embarrassment to the family.
mortal
▪ Martinho would have accounted his act a mortal sin.
▪ Making fun of the Corps is a mortal sin.
▪ Suppose, suppose, she were in a state of mortal sin?
▪ Committing suicide was a mortal sin.
▪ As I have said, we are not dealing with a demon but something worse, a soul steeped in mortal sin.
▪ He had compounded a number of venial failings with the mortal sin of adultery.
▪ And is hers strong enough to marry a man who regards unpunctuality almost as a mortal sin?
▪ She regarded gossip as a mortal sin, and encouraging it almost as bad.
original
▪ Lewis was inclined to ground his grudging acceptance of democracy on the doctrine of original sin.
▪ This comes too close to something like a pedagogic version of original sin.
▪ Another incident followed Richard Baxter's preaching of a sermon on original sin.
▪ According to Elvis Costello, there are no original sins.
▪ However, original or commercial sin keeps breaking in and there is undoubtedly a great deal of badly seasoned wood on the market.
▪ I was told in the third grade that I had an overabundance of original sin.
▪ Howard by his belief in original sin, guilt and the possibility of awakening man's consciousness of sin.
▪ Like a piece of apple, some kid said; the chunk of apple that Adam ate and got original sin.
unforgivable
▪ Luke O'Malley had committed the unforgivable sin - he had informed on his friends.
▪ I put down the pen, because this would be the great, unforgivable Miltonian sin.
▪ Marriage in his eyes is sacred; adultery the unforgivable sin.
▪ They suffer, in short, from that most unforgivable of political sins, unworldliness.
▪ Death is the unforgivable sin of modernity, and the modern world will have nothing to do with her.
■ NOUN
bin
▪ Leonard was sent to the sin bin.
■ VERB
commit
▪ Luke O'Malley had committed the unforgivable sin - he had informed on his friends.
▪ I, too, must have lived several lives through the ages and committed enormous sins.
▪ The possibility that he had committed a sin but no murder.
▪ Father Maier, he continued, was committing that sin.
▪ It's fairly entertaining to watch but commits the cardinal sin of not identifying individual players.
▪ Gough has not committed a heinous sin in Kurunegala.
▪ She has committed several sins, greed and gluttony being high on the list.
▪ Or the image of the Fallen, those who have committed the sin of idolatry?
confess
▪ I don't if you have heard but there is now a new way of confessing your sins?
▪ One friend suggested that he could return to the Church simply by confessing his sins.
▪ Then, naked and holding three scourges in his hands, he confessed his sins.
▪ Immediately following mass, she confessed her sins and was baptized by the bishop.
▪ I am a sinner, Lord, and confess my sin.
▪ I wanted to confess my sin.
▪ He can be redeemed, he can confess his sins, he can expiate his guilt.
▪ Why is this young man confessing to the sins of a man twice his age?
cover
▪ It was called UDAG-a sincere-sounding acronym that covered a multitude of sins.
forgive
▪ He healed the sick, raised the dead, exercised authority over the evil spirits and forgave sins.
▪ Costly grace is the only pure grace, which really forgives sins and gives freedom to the sinner.
▪ You have forgiven your people's sins and pardoned all their wrongs.
hide
▪ Jay was a solid woman, dressed in dark loose comfortable clothes that hid a multitude of sins.
▪ Other nations try to hide their sins.
▪ Curtains around a bed can also hide a multitude of sins in patient care.
▪ It hides a multitude of sins.
live
▪ We were, after all, living in sin, and she was a devoted Catholic.
repent
▪ Before Nina dies she and Gael again make peace, she repents her sins, and Gael vows to rewrite his novel.
▪ The Church would accept her because it had to accept anyone who had repented her sins and embraced its teachings.
▪ He said something about repenting for your sin.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
besetting sin
cover/hide a multitude of sins
▪ Patterned carpet can hide a multitude of sins.
▪ Curtains around a bed can also hide a multitude of sins in patient care.
▪ It hides a multitude of sins.
▪ It was called UDAG-a sincere-sounding acronym that covered a multitude of sins.
▪ Jay was a solid woman, dressed in dark loose comfortable clothes that hid a multitude of sins.
live in sin
▪ We were, after all, living in sin, and she was a devoted Catholic.
the remission of sins
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ No one is completely without sin.
▪ the sin of greed
▪ The Bible says adultery is a sin.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All the same, as Father Peter said, even the neediest people must not have their sins condoned.
▪ All things were possible; anyone could get rich; the cardinal sin was doubt.
▪ Death and darkness can be experienced as guilt because of sin or depression and paralysing imprisonment of spirit.
▪ I wanted to confess my sin.
▪ Like conscientious believers everywhere they confess a wide range of sins of omission and commission.
▪ Self-interest was the worst sin and slaveholding was the worst form of self-interest.
▪ These sins may be seen to menace lineage identity and solidarity - the paramount Nuer virtues.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
cover/hide a multitude of sins
▪ Patterned carpet can hide a multitude of sins.
▪ Curtains around a bed can also hide a multitude of sins in patient care.
▪ It hides a multitude of sins.
▪ It was called UDAG-a sincere-sounding acronym that covered a multitude of sins.
▪ Jay was a solid woman, dressed in dark loose comfortable clothes that hid a multitude of sins.
the remission of sins
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ I sinned and brought shame down on all of us.
▪ Paul is saying to an engaged couple that neither the man nor the woman sins if they marry.
▪ She had sinned so much, could she ever find salvation?
▪ You have sinned, Jimbo, I told myself out loud, but it is never too late to repent.
Wikipedia

Şin

Şin (also, Shin) is a village and municipality in the Shaki Rayon of Azerbaijan. It has a population of 1,432.

Sin (mythology)

Sin ( Akkadian: ) or Nanna ( Sumerian: ) was the god of the moon in the Mesopotamian mythology of Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia. Nanna is a Sumerian deity, the son of Enlil and Ninlil, and became identified with Semitic Sin. The two chief seats of Nanna's/Sin's worship were Ur in the south of Mesopotamia and Harran in the north.

Sin (disambiguation)

A sin is a morally wrong act.

Sin may also refer to:

Sin (song)

"Sin" is the third single by American artist Nine Inch Nails from the album Pretty Hate Machine. Released in October 1990, the song peaked at #35 in the UK Singles Chart.

"Sin" has been commonly a staple of Nine Inch Nails live performances for many years; setlist.fm lists it as the artist's eighth most played live song. Its versions on the single differentiate heavily from the album cut, with more an EBM sound with distorted vocals and alternate instrumentation that became the foundation for its many live renditions, as opposed to the Synthpop style featured on Pretty Hate Machine.

(It's No) Sin

"(It’s No) Sin" is a 1951 popular song with music by George Hoven and lyrics by Chester R. Shull. Popular recordings of the song were made by The Four Aces and Eddy Howard.

The recording by Eddy Howard was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 5711. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on September 14, 1951, and lasted 23 weeks on the chart, peaking at #1.

The recording by The Four Aces was released by Victoria Records as catalog number 101. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on September 7, 1951, and lasted 22 weeks on the chart, peaking at #4. This was The Four Aces' first charting record and led to their receiving a contract with a major company, Decca.

This song should not be confused with "It's a Sin", another popular song of the same era.

Knud Pfeiffer wrote the Danish lyrics. The Danish title is "Er det synd". Raquel Rastenni with Radiodansekorkesteret recorded it in Copenhagen in 1952. The song was released on the 78 rpm record His Master's Voice X 8043.

The song was revived in 1964 by The Duprees, a group that made a number of recordings of 1950s hits.

Sin (Marvel Comics)

Sin (Sinthea Schmidt) is a fictional supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character is usually depicted as the daughter of the Red Skull.

Sin (comics)

Sin, in comics, may refer to:

  • Sin (Marvel Comics), the daughter of the Red Skull.
  • Sin (DC Comics), an adopted daughter of Black Canary.

Sin (DC Comics)

Sin is a fictional comic book character appearing in books published by DC Comics. She first appeared in Birds of Prey #92 (May, 2006). She was created by Gail Simone (writer) and Paulo Siqueira (artist).

Sin (album)

Sin is the fifth studio recording from Mother Superior and the first of two to be produced by MC5 legend Wayne Kramer.

Sin (1915 film)

Sin was a 1915 American silent drama film written and directed by Herbert Brenon and starring Theda Bara. It was produced by Fox Film Corporation and shot at the Fox Studio in Fort Lee, New Jersey. The film is now considered to be lost.

SIN (manga)

SIN is an original English-language manga authored by Drake Tsui, published in 2012 by MangaMagazine.net.

Sin (Prilepin novel)

Sin is a 2007 novel in stories by the Russian writer Zakhar Prilepin.

This novel was published in 2007 in Vargius (Russia).

Sin (novel)

Sin: A Novel, also known as Sins, is a 1973 politico- historical novel written by Filipino National Artist F. Sionil José. This particular work of literature features the History of the Philippines, for the most part spanning the twentieth century, through the eyes of the “ amoral” Don Carlos Corbello, a wealthy patriarch also known by the moniker “C.C.”.

Being a part of that era, Corbello reaps most of what he sowed when he was already on his “deathbed”. During this time, Corbello recalled the loves of his life, those that he had lost and longed for. A literary account of the “steady degradation” of the Philippines, Sin was described by Pico Iyer of The New York Times Book Review as a book " ... set in the Philippines, this amorality tale shadows a rake's impenitent progress ..."

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Sin

Sin \Sin\, adv., prep., & conj. Old form of Since. [Obs. or Prov. Eng. & Scot.]

Sin that his lord was twenty year of age.
--Chaucer.

Sin

Sin \Sin\, n. [OE. sinne, AS. synn, syn; akin to D. zonde, OS. sundia, OHG. sunta, G. s["u]nde, Icel., Dan. & Sw. synd, L. sons, sontis, guilty, perhaps originally from the p. pr. of the verb signifying, to be, and meaning, the one who it is. Cf. Authentic, Sooth.]

  1. Transgression of the law of God; disobedience of the divine command; any violation of God's will, either in purpose or conduct; moral deficiency in the character; iniquity; as, sins of omission and sins of commission.

    Whosoever committeth sin is the servant of sin.
    --John viii. 34.

    Sin is the transgression of the law.
    --1 John iii. 4.

    I think 't no sin. To cozen him that would unjustly win.
    --Shak.

    Enthralled By sin to foul, exorbitant desires.
    --Milton.

  2. An offense, in general; a violation of propriety; a misdemeanor; as, a sin against good manners.

    I grant that poetry's a crying sin.
    --Pope.

  3. A sin offering; a sacrifice for sin.

    He hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin.
    --2 Cor. v. 21.

  4. An embodiment of sin; a very wicked person. [R.]

    Thy ambition, Thou scarlet sin, robbed this bewailing land Of noble Buckingham.
    --Shak.

    Note: Sin is used in the formation of some compound words of obvious signification; as, sin-born; sin-bred, sin-oppressed, sin-polluted, and the like.

    Actual sin, Canonical sins, Original sin, Venial sin. See under Actual, Canonical, etc.

    Deadly sins, or Mortal sins (R. C. Ch.), willful and deliberate transgressions, which take away divine grace; -- in distinction from vental sins. The seven deadly sins are pride, covetousness, lust, wrath, gluttony, envy, and sloth.

    Sin eater, a man who (according to a former practice in England) for a small gratuity ate a piece of bread laid on the chest of a dead person, whereby he was supposed to have taken the sins of the dead person upon himself.

    Sin offering, a sacrifice for sin; something offered as an expiation for sin.

    Syn: Iniquity; wickedness; wrong. See Crime.

Sin

Sin \Sin\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sinned; p. pr. & vb. n. Sinning.] [OE. sinnen, singen, sinegen, AS. syngian. See Sin, n.]

  1. To depart voluntarily from the path of duty prescribed by God to man; to violate the divine law in any particular, by actual transgression or by the neglect or nonobservance of its injunctions; to violate any known rule of duty; -- often followed by against.

    Against thee, thee only, have I sinned.
    --Ps. li. 4.

    All have sinned, and come short of the glory of God.
    --Rom. iii. 23.

  2. To violate human rights, law, or propriety; to commit an offense; to trespass; to transgress.

    I am a man More sinned against than sinning.
    --Shak.

    Who but wishes to invert the laws Of order, sins against the eternal cause.
    --Pope.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

sin

Old English synn "moral wrongdoing, injury, mischief, enmity, feud, guilt, crime, offense against God, misdeed," from Proto-Germanic *sun(d)jo- "sin" (cognates: Old Saxon sundia, Old Frisian sende, Middle Dutch sonde, Dutch zonde, German Sünde "sin, transgression, trespass, offense," extended forms), probably ultimately "it is true," i.e. "the sin is real" (compare Gothic sonjis, Old Norse sannr "true"), from PIE *snt-ya-, a collective form from *es-ont- "becoming," present participle of root *es- "to be" (see is).\n

\nThe semantic development is via notion of "to be truly the one (who is guilty)," as in Old Norse phrase verð sannr at "be found guilty of," and the use of the phrase "it is being" in Hittite confessional formula. The same process probably yielded the Latin word sons (genitive sontis) "guilty, criminal" from present participle of sum, esse "to be, that which is." Some etymologists believe the Germanic word was an early borrowing directly from the Latin genitive. Also see sooth.\n

\nSin-eater is attested from 1680s. To live in sin "cohabit without marriage" is from 1838; used earlier in a more general sense. Ice hockey slang sin bin "penalty box" is attested from 1950.

sin

Old English syngian "to commit sin, transgress, err," from synn (see sin (n.)); the form influenced by the noun. Compare Old Saxon sundion, Old Frisian sendigia, Middle Dutch sondighen, Dutch zondigen, Old High German sunteon, German sündigen "to sin." Form altered from Middle English sunigen by influence of the noun.

WordNet

sin

  1. n. estrangement from god [syn: sinfulness, wickedness]

  2. an act that is regarded by theologians as a transgression of God's will [syn: sinning]

  3. ratio of the opposite side to the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle [syn: sine]

  4. (Akkadian) god of the moon; counterpart of Sumerian Nanna

  5. the 21st letter of the Hebrew alphabet

  6. violent and excited activity; "they began to fight like sin" [syn: hell]

  7. [also: sinning, sinned]

sin

  1. v. commit a sin; violate a law of God or a moral law [syn: transgress, trespass]

  2. commit a faux pas or a fault or make a serious mistake; "I blundered during the job interview" [syn: blunder, boob, goof]

  3. [also: sinning, sinned]

Wiktionary

sin

Etymology 1 alt. 1 (context theology English) A violation of God's will or religious law. 2 A misdeed. n. 1 (context theology English) A violation of God's will or religious law. 2 A misdeed. vb. (context intransitive theology English) To commit a sin. Etymology 2

alt. 1 A letter of the Hebrew alphabet; (lang und sc=Hebr ש שׂ) 2 A letter of the Arabic alphabet; (lang und sc=Arab س) n. 1 A letter of the Hebrew alphabet; (lang und sc=Hebr ש שׂ) 2 A letter of the Arabic alphabet; (lang und sc=Arab س)

Usage examples of "sin".

She repented of her abjuration, as of the greatest sin she had ever committed.

For we receive absolution of our sins in proportion to our forgiving our brother.

Now it is evident that in Penance something is done so that something holy is signified both on the part of the penitent sinner, and on the part of the priest absolving, because the penitent sinner, by deed and word, shows his heart to have renounced sin, and in like manner the priest, by his deed and word with regard to the penitent, signifies the work of God Who forgives his sins.

The English, despite the fact that they are in the doctrine of faith alone, nevertheless in the exhortation to the Holy Communion openly teach self-examination, acknowledgment, confession of sins, penitence and renewal of life, and warn those who do not do these things with the words that otherwise the devil will enter into them as he did into Judas, fill them with all iniquity, and destroy both body and soul.

That there can be no forgiveness of sins, thus no salvation but only eternal damnation, apart from self-examination, the knowledge and acknowledgment, confession and breaking off of sins, that is, apart from repentance?

And yet none of these things purifies man at all unless he examines himself, sees his sins, acknowledges them, condemns himself on account of them, and repents by desisting from them, and does all this as of himself, yet with the acknowledgment in heart that he does so from the Lord.

The door is opened by man through shunning evils as sins as if of himself with the acknowledgment that he does so from the Lord.

A great many expressions of kindred tenor might easily be adduced, leaving it hardly possible to doubt as indeed we are not aware that any one does doubt that many of the Jews literally held that sin was the sole cause of bodily dissolution.

Consequently, if the sinner sins by receiving the sacrament, it seems that he would sin by beholding it, which is manifestly untrue, since the Church exposes this sacrament to be seen and adored by all.

Tell me whether you are a man or an angel, for I fear lest I sin in adoring you.

It is the same with all other sins, with adultery and whoredom, revenge and hatred, blasphemy and lying.

Thus if one acknowledges that revenge and hatred, adultery and fornication, fraud and deceit, blasphemy and lying are sins against God and yet commits them, he is therefore in the more grievous of this kind of profanation.

The Word and, in particular, the precepts of the Decalog are the means with those who acknowledge all kinds of murder, adultery, theft and false witness to be sins.

They know and perceive, therefore, that murder, adultery, theft and false witness are sins and accordingly shun them on that account.

I kent her father afore her day, and I hae kent her sin ever she had a day.