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SIB

SIB or sib may refer to:

Sib (anthropology)

Sib is a technical term in the discipline of anthropology which originally denoted a kinship group among Anglo-Saxon and other Germanic peoples. In an extended sense, it then became the standard term for a variety of other kinds of lineal ( matrilineal or patrilineal) or cognatic (i.e.,descended through links of both sexes) kinship groups. The word may also denote a member of such a group.

American anthropologists often used the term 'sib' as the generic term for a category that breaks down into the sub-classifications of patri-sib, referring to patrilineal clan descent, and matri-sib, to refer to matrilineal clan descent.

Wiktionary

sib

Etymology 1

  1. Having kinship or relationship; related by same-bloodedness; having affinity; being akin; kindred. Etymology 2

    n. 1 kindred; kin; kinsmen; a body of persons related by blood in any degree. 2 A kinsman; a blood relation; a relative, near or remote; one closely allied to another; an intimate companion. 3 A sibling, brother or sister (irrespective of gender) 4 (context biology English) Any group of animals or plants sharing a corresponding genetic relation 5 A group of individuals unilaterally descended from a single (real or postulated) common ancestor Etymology 3

    v

  2. (context transitive English) To bring into relation; establish a relationship between; make friendly; reconcile.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Sib

Sib \Sib\ (s[i^]b), n. [AS. sibb alliance, gesib a relative.

  1. A blood relation. [Obs.]
    --Nash.

  2. a sibling.

Sib

Sib \Sib\, a. Related by blood; akin. [Obs. or Prov. Eng. & Scot.]
--Sir W. Scott.

Your kindred is but . . . little sib to you.
--Chaucer.

[He] is no fairy birn, ne sib at all To elfs, but sprung of seed terrestrial.
--Spenser.

WordNet

sib

  1. n. a person's brother or sister [syn: sibling]

  2. one related by blood or origin; especially on sharing an ancestor with another [syn: blood relation, blood relative, cognate]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

sib

short for sibling, attested from 1957.

Usage examples of "sib".

And I feel like hiding under a rock for a thousand years, and the last heet in the universe that I want to see is Uncle Sib.

And although I was an only child, I have a semblance of family life, through my cousin Eddie, the oldest son of my Aunt Hen and Uncle Moosh, who has always treated me as an honorary sib.

Only the smallest children got it wrong, and even they learned quickly because their friends and older sibs made fun of them when they made mistakes.

Flet has been assigned to play Union of Opposites with Cather, because they are sibs and Cather is Different.

You Sibs have always been good at getting the most out of those beasts.

The government decided that it would be unfair to keep sibs and survivors in the dark any longer.

Any developments, any insights, on the part of one of the sibs could be shared with the others through downloads.

Old Davout whose image was projected into the gothic-revival armchair, the original, womb-born Davout of whom the two sibs were copies.

Accepting the name, he remarked that the reason he spoke little when the others were around was that his older sibs had already said everything that needed saying before he got to it.

You have all these farm-boys and merchant sons, minor nobles and conscripts swept up off the streetsall of them burdened with parents and sibs, friends and lovers.

Dowd sibs hire their cousin as a minimum-wage janitor and givehim a former laundry room to live in.

Loosed at the end of the day, we five and the three of my sibs who were big enough ran up to our secret fortress on the mountain.

I regret hearing, let alone not rebutting, and I am sure my sibs do not wish their childhood folly laid out in ink.

As I danced on the mountain with my sibs, rancor and jealousy were as distant from me as death.

His electronic inbox contained downloads from his sibs and more personal messages than he could cope with-he would have to construct an electronic personality to answer most of them.